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MPAA Sues Movie-Swappers

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the shocked-simply-shocked dept.

The Courts 585

aacool writes "The MPAA has filed a first wave of lawsuits against individuals they say are offering pirated copies of films using Internet-based peer-to-peer file sharing programs." From the article: "The MPAA said it would also make available a computer program that sniffs out movie and music files on a user's computer as well as any installed file sharing programs. The MPAA said the information detected by the free program would not be shared with it or any other body, but could be used to remove any 'infringing movies or music files' and remove file sharing programs."

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Three words... (1, Insightful)

frdmfghtr (603968) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837412)

Firewall,
firewall,
firewall.

I don't do the p2p thing but I'll be damned if I'm going to let somebody sniff around my system without my permission.

Re:Three words... (5, Insightful)

kaustik (574490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837460)

"The MPAA said it would also make available a computer program that sniffs out movie and music files on a user's computer as well as any installed file sharing programs."


I believe this to be an opt-in download and scan. Of course, there is no way in Hell I would run this kind of program willingly. However, as a Systems Admin, it would be nice to have this available to scan my corporate LAN. I am all for file-sharing, but I don't trust users to do so safely and would prefer to protect my servers and avoid lawsuits at work.
Just my opinion.

Re:Three words... (1)

calophi (831610) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837487)

Actually, that's a good point. I know some people who have trouble with their interns downloading illegal files at work.

Re:Three words... (4, Funny)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837515)

Yeah, it was the *cough* interns *cough* who did it.

Damned kids these days. *cough*

Re:Three words... (2, Insightful)

calophi (831610) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837539)

Oi, no need to be rude now. These people have no reason to lie about it. In any case, SOMEONE is doing it, and they shouldn't be allowed to while at work.

Re:Its funny! Laugh! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837585)

I think the previous poster was more concerned with being funny than casting aspersions. Did anyone involved tell you "Shocked! I am shocked to learn there is file-sharing going on in this establishment!"

Re:Three words... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837510)

> However, as a Systems Admin, it would be nice to
> have this available to scan my corporate LAN. I am
> all for file-sharing, but I don't trust users to
> do so safely and would prefer to protect my
> servers and avoid lawsuits at work.

so how long before ISPs are going to be required to have these programs scan packets going across there networks? Once the MPAA/RIAA can show that it is fairly easy to track pirated material, they can use the internet backbone to control content. If this remains an opt-in program, then I suppose this will be one of the biggest failures next to MS Bob.

Re:Three words... (1)

kaustik (574490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837629)

Not sure I agree with you there. Viruses are hated by all, including MS, MPAA, RIAA, government, etc. However, ISPs are not required even to scan email attachments, let alone break down the packets in real time and try to figure out whether or not the data is "acceptable"

Re:Four words...RTFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837537)

The software isn't meant to run remotely. It's for a local user (a teenager's parent for example) to find pirated movies.

So... (4, Insightful)

Martin Blank (154261) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837413)

They will make available a program that guesses which files are bad?

Can I rename my home movies with names like "Terminator.mpg" and then sue them when the file is deleted?

Re:So... (2, Informative)

TheSpoom (715771) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837524)

No, because you'd have to download the program, scan your computer yourself, and probably also choose which files to delete, kinda like a virus scanner.

"The MPAA said it would also make available a computer program that sniffs out movie and music files on a user's computer as well as any installed file sharing programs. The MPAA said the information detected by the free program would not be shared with it or any other body, but could be used to remove any 'infringing movies or music files' and remove file sharing programs."

That said, of course, I wouldn't run a program created by the MPAA on my computer period.

Except... (1)

pseudochaotic (548897) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837532)

Except, they never said it would automatically delete the files, probably for exactly this reason. They're just trying to prevent the defense that you didn't know it was on your computer.

Re:So... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837550)

Can I rename my home movies with names like "Terminator.mpg" and then sue them when the file is deleted?

If you really want them deleted, just rename them to Gigli.mpg.

Besides, there is no jury that would believe you downloaded that movie.

So, does this mean... (1)

rearl (262579) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837416)

...that I need to delete all those...never mind!

fp (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837418)

fp

Good! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837419)

Fucking criminals.

Re:Good! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837500)

I don't understand. What's so good about fucking criminals arbitrarily deleting files on your computer?

Re:Good! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837573)

Fucking criminals.

It's actually not as unpleasant as it sounds.

Hopefully they'll have co-ed correctional institutions by the time the copyright police hunt me down.

Did we slashdot MSNBC? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837422)

Google cache [64.233.167.104]

Re:Did we slashdot MSNBC? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837564)

no, we did not slashdot MSNBC...

Dangit. (0)

slinky259 (827395) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837423)

Will the madness never end?

Snoopery (4, Funny)

mfh (56) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837424)

The MPAA said it would also make available a computer program that sniffs out movie and music files on a user's computer as well as any installed file sharing programs.

I would like to see the source code for this program, please. (Guessing it behaves much like a common virus or spyware.) I hope SpyBot releases some patches against this kind of snoopery.

Re:Snoopery (1)

mordors9 (665662) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837543)

The way I read the actual article was that this program would be available for parents or perhaps employers to run the check on a local machine. That way the person running it would probably have to waive any claims against the MPAA for wrongfully deleting files.

RTFA people! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837581)

The article describes an as yet unnamed program that parents can download from their website to run on their own machine. "Parents want to know what their kids are downloading onto their computers..."

It's not a bot/crawler/whatnot. Hang up your tinfoil hat now.

sniff out files is not 100% accurate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837425)

anybody knows that some legit files will be deleted. Willthe RIAA pay for that?

Who's copyright? (4, Funny)

Japong (793982) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837426)

Har! But I already wrote & patented a program like that, so the MPAA is infringing on my copyright by distributing it for free over the internet!

That's not a bad idea (2, Interesting)

rsilvergun (571051) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837471)

and it's probably already been done. I know there where companies specializing in this crap, and like all businesses they've probably got scads of patents. If not, I smell money...

yeah, right (0)

N3wsByt3 (758224) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837428)

If they invade peoples' computer without permission and remove P2P programs (which aren't illegal on itself) just like that, they'll get sued themselves. Even if they wouldn't be breaking some law, which is probable, with all the cyberlaws flying around.

Re:yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837502)

If you read the article they are making the program freely available so you can check for violations yourself, supposively as a tool, and probably best used by SysAdmins to check the office PCs.

Re:yeah, right (2, Informative)

SoulOfMyShoe (774521) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837559)

Most of the commenters on this article so far seem to think that the MPAA is going to force the program on people. I think it is more that they are making it available as a free download so that people who aren't sure if they are infringing, or parents who don't want to get sued over what their kids download, can find and delete the stuff. The article says that the data uncovered by the program wouldn't be shared with the MPAA or anyone else. It also says that the program will be made available on a website. That is a far cry from virus behavior.

Not that I think it is a particularly useful tactic, but they may get some parents to clean out their kids pirated movies.

Re:yeah, right (2, Insightful)

Crudely_Indecent (739699) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837561)

You lack vision. How many people willingly install "Bonzi Buddy" or "Comet Cursors" without reading the license agreement (answer: all of them). They'll be sly and install it along with some system performance booster and WHAM, all those MP3's you searched so hard to find are gone.

Now, I've got several thousand MP3s (and FLACs and OGGs) that I ripped from my own CD collection (really).....Do I get to sue the RIAA for the time it takes me to re-rip them after their application deletes them for me? At my billing rate, I could expect a fairly sizeable check for the time it would take me to rip and encode all of the music that I legally own.

Not that this would happen....I'm far to paranoid to allow it.

Is this program open source? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837435)

nt

Re:Is this program open source? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837625)

no...

first (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837437)

first

eh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837441)

Now what was the name of that russian proxy server again?

Yet Another Proprietary Application! (1)

Noksagt (69097) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837444)

The trade group said the program would be available for the Windows computer operating system on a special Web site established to educate consumers about copyrights. The name or exact nature of the program was not described Tuesday.
Too bad. I would have liked to try it out. Wagers as to how it will figure out offending content? Just by filename/size?

FP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837445)

From the article: The MPAA said it would also make available a computer program that sniffs out movie and music files on a user's computer as well as any installed file sharing programs.

The big and obvious question here is of course: but does it run on Linux?

Oh No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837446)

I better erase my copy of Fahrenheit 9/11 right now! I would feel bad if Michael Moore ever found out I downloaded it.

Heh... I didn't, btw... I lub Bush! :D

Re:Oh No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837527)

Wow...We don't want morons claiming our party, quit 'lub'ing Bush unless you can come across as halfway intelligent please. (I really wish we didn't have to play down to these fools and rednecks to win...see what we get)

A weakness in their system? (3, Insightful)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837447)

"...program that sniffs out movie and music files on a user's computer as well as any installed file sharing programs..."

This program must have access to a master list of movie names for comparison to your filenames that is either installed locally or accessible online. Couldn't an enterprising individual just "back into" those reference names and rename his files to something that then won't trigger a flag?

Re:A weakness in their system? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837565)

Yeah. Or they could just not download the program, as it's 100% voluntary. Sheesh.

Doom (2, Funny)

Spiffy McPerson (615066) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837448)

It is disturbing that an ad for Doom appeared under this topic...

Re:Doom (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837520)

why coz doom 3 sucks just like the mpaa sucks?

We need a lab rat! (2, Interesting)

numLocked (801188) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837450)

I want to find out exactly how much stuff I have that the MPAA deems 'copy protected'. I would run their crazy program to find out, but I'm scared it's going to make me delete it all if I run it. Someone has to be first! If it will just give you a count, we could have a competition to see who has the most! Awesome.

Job for John Ashcroft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837451)

Ashcroft should go to work for the MPAA, now. They seem to have similar philosophies

#1 (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837452)

Anonymous coward #1 post!!!

Re:#1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837473)

nope

This just in (1)

itistoday (602304) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837453)

Their software doesn't offer support for the Macintosh platform! Oh my! I guess I better install Virtual PC...

Not to worry just yet... (2, Insightful)

onzfonz (741147) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837521)

Judging from what the article says, it seems as if the program would act more like ad aware or spybot, since it would be available for download. My guess is targeted toward the soccer mom's, it's available on some site to download and parents would download it and check to see if they have anything that could be pirated stuff, just as if you were checking for malware or spyware and remove it. IMHO the MPAA is evil, but if they want the common person to adopt this, then they are going to try to make the software as nice as they can, and not make it some type of worm. That would also just give them bad press with the regular joes & janes of america.

Re:This just in (1)

ravenspear (756059) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837528)

Exactly, plus the nice thing is the more popular networks on the Mac like Gnutella and OpenFT don't support this kind of privacy invasion device either.

Yay a free program! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837455)

I've been waiting for a program that deletes files and programs off my computer without my authorization!! Let me load up gnutella and download this program now!

fp! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837459)

On the bright side, the movies Hollywood puts out are for the most part total and utter garbage that they might actually be doing a world a favor by impeeding their distribution...

And just exactly how? (1)

Anti Frozt (655515) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837462)

Are they going to get this program on to the computers of people who are swaping files? And exactly how is this program going to remove other third party software without access to the underlying filesystem? What about non-windows users? (That is unless this program acts as some kind of virus and forcibily removes it against the user's wishes)

I get the feeling that the people that are swaping these files aren't going to be very forthcoming or cooperative with the MPAA's wishes.

Google cache link of article: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837465)

Good News (3, Insightful)

timmyf2371 (586051) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837467)

Glad to see the movie industry finally taking action against those responsible for breaking copyright law, rather than against the tools such as P2P, Bittorrent, and other filesharing programs which all have legal purposes.

Re:Good News (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837613)

Not exactly.. their "sniffer" will also look for installed P2P programs so that you can uninstall them so you can stop being a nasty wasty criminal!

Re:Good News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837621)

Did you even read the article summary? They're releasing a tool that scans your hard drive and offers to delete P2P programs. If this isn't the MPAA going after P2P programs (that have plenty of legal uses), then I don't know what is.

Too bad (5, Insightful)

Woofles (674667) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837474)

It's too bad that they cannot find alternatives to lawsuits, you might find it plausable that they could perhaps offer movie's online at low-prices, and maybe even really early releases for people on the internet, and charge a price? Well I guess the thoughts didn't add up to make enough, although these lawyers aren't very cheap, it's hard to say which would make more profit... Anyway those are just my two cents!

The land of the free... (5, Funny)

NG Resonance (794484) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837476)

...and the home of mega-conglomerates who sue their customers despite record sales!

They can have my BitTorrent (3, Insightful)

nathan s (719490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837479)

when they pry it from the ashes of my cold, dead hard drive.

Seriously, I can understand the movie issue but I think it's a bit idiotic of them to go after filesharing in general. Oh, wait - there are no legitimate uses for filesharing, right? I see where I was wrong. I apologize humbly. I will go immediately and chop up my debian cds.

Re:They can have my BitTorrent (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837626)

it seems they're just going after pirates not the actual services

and to tell the truth, most P2P apps are for piracy.. kazaa's only purpose is piracy.. no one will use it for real legal file sharing.. that is what BitTorrent is for.. the first truly usefull p2p app that has more uses than just piracy

Which makes me think.. can they even go after pirates on BT? I mean sure they can see whos downloading/uploading a file, but they cant see if that person has other movies, or if hes uploading movies just because or if hes just downloading the movie for personal use.. sure its still piracy but the RIAA doesnt go after someone sharing 1 song or downloading 1 song, they went after people who had gigs upon gigs being shared 24x7.. something that, while possible in BT, cant be confirmed.

File Sharing Programs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837484)

So long FTP, watch out rsync...

Nice... (5, Interesting)

The-Bus (138060) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837488)

Somebody at the MPAA must be crazy if this is true.

So this program, presumably similar to what they use to find movies and music, is actually available to everyone? So, for example, I can "check" "my" drive for any "illegal" music or movies? I've ripped most of my CDs onto my hard-drive. Of course the MPAA doesn't know if I own those CDs (they would have to prove I do not), but I will gladly direct them to the boxes downstairs where I keep all the jewel cases (for the record, since file-sharing, my music purchasing has gone from 1-2 CDs per month to 3-4 CDs per week).

Other people might use the program as "insurance" to make sure they are safe from any one tracking them.

As I don't have anything to hide, I would not mind using that program. Rest assured I would do my best to make sure information isn't being sent somewhere (custom host file? firewall? who knows).

So, my guess is I am the anomaly and would actually not mind downloading that software and trying it out.

Re:Nice... (4, Interesting)

Coneasfast (690509) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837560)

I've ripped most of my CDs onto my hard-drive. Of course the MPAA doesn't know if I own those CDs

well maybe this program has an intelligent way of finding out if those files are in a 'p2p-shared' directory or not. (my guess is probably not though)

Re:Nice... (1)

schwep (173358) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837579)

Now if your really up to no good, you can figure out how to cause false positives for which you can counter sue.

The hunter becomes the hunted.

What does this have to do with our rights online? (0, Troll)

zerdood (824300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837489)

Since when do we have the right to swap movies (or music for that matter) online? This does not violate our rights. So why did the editors put it under "your rights online"? Yes, okay, if "you" means the music company owners. But it doesn't. Copyright laws clearly make this sort of thing illegal. However stupid these laws are (Which yes, I agree, they are stupid,) we have no right to violate them. The music companies should be commended for protecting their rights.

Too funny! (5, Funny)

Noksagt (69097) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837503)

One of these ads shows a finger clicking a mouse, alongside a headline emblazoned in red: "Is this you?" That's followed by a long list of user names and IP addresses typical of those found on file-sharing networks such as Kazaa, eDonkey, DirectConnect, Grokster and Lime Wire, which are named specifically. "If you think you can get away with illegally trafficking in movies, think again," the ad warns.
Pr0nKING0049, you're gonna be famous!

Bittorrent block? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837505)

I have been having problems with bittorrent lately. Anyone else seeing trouble? All I use torrent for is Linux and BSD iso. Could the MPAA and RIAA be starting to mess with iso file transfers? I know my server (telus.net) has started to monitor some of the torrent traffic.

Re:Bittorrent block? (1)

zerdood (824300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837538)

How could they do this, noting the fact that BitTorrent is completely decentralized? AFAIK, that is the entire point of a decentralized network. The RIAA can't stop it. Also, why would they do this anyway, because movies are hardly ever shared as ISOs, and music even less so?

Re:Bittorrent block? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837589)

You are right about bittorrent being decentralised, but that is how they detect torrent traffic on the server side. Some of my torrents have started to trigger off a server block.

Re:Bittorrent block? (1)

zerdood (824300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837627)

Oh, I see what you mean.

Not a trojan or worm... (1)

fieldcomm (685891) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837511)

RTFA you asshats. The program is not a worm which searches over the internet but a program for "concerned parents" to scan their own computers to find out what their children have been downloading, and from where.

Re:Not a trojan or worm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837593)

So it is a trojan then.

Re:Not a trojan or worm... (2, Interesting)

Justin205 (662116) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837605)

Maybe these "concerned parents" would be better off monitoring their children's internet use actively, as opposed to after-the-fact.

That's the problem with many of the young people of these days - the parents don't care enough.

Hmmm Lawsuits - I'll Be Back (1)

Hexzero (744801) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837522)

They are just begging for those lawsuits to come rolling in. The only place I can see this type of software being useful would be corporate networks, where the user has no rights to the boxes they work on. Sometimes it is not smart to be the first.....

Check out the scan of the affidavit: (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837530)

there goes everything (1)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837534)

its under YRO because of their new program. Anyone remember the Adminmod fiasco back when lots of admins were using the client exec capability to trash peaples HDD's?

delusional mpaa (1)

bani (467531) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837540)

just goes to show you how powerful a reality-distortion field these mpaa people walk around in, if they think anyone is going to actually download and use their "warez detector" software.

if anyone had any doubts that the mpaa has completely lost touch with reality, this latest move should completely eliminate them.

yay, more freedom (2, Interesting)

TurtlesAllTheWayDown (688108) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837542)

The MPAA said the information detected by the free program would not be shared with it or any other body, but could be used to remove any 'infringing movies or music files' and remove file sharing programs.

Wow. Yet another definition of "freedom" in software.

Free as in [freedom|beer] now:

freedom as in slavery!

Re:yay, more freedom (1)

necro2607 (771790) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837628)

"Don't open your eyes... Take it from me - I have found you can find happiness in slavery"

How do they find them? (1)

vlad_grigorescu (804005) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837544)

This brings up the interesting question: how does the MPAA program find "illegal" movies on your computer? With a little reverse engineering, this shouldn't be all that hard to find out, and probably even easier to fix.

something isn't right here.... (1, Interesting)

to_kallon (778547) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837546)

The trade group said it would also join with the Video Software Dealers Association to place educational materials in more than 10,000 video stores nationwide. The materials will include anti-piracy ads that are also playing in theaters.
would these be the same ads where low-paid lighting technicians and extras complain about piracy because they are losing money(ie. the same ads salaried workers are paid extra to claim their payment from a film has anything to do with the profit of the film itself)? or would these be the same ads where the movie industry parades around its underpaid workers while "forgetting" to mention that, even if [imdb.com] a [imdb.com] movie [imdb.com] is [imdb.com] horrible [imdb.com] the "stars" will still get millions?

Boycott MPAA (1)

StarWreck (695075) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837555)

... I was soooo enjoying buying 50 - 100 DVD's per year ever since 1998. I'm going to miss it. You brought my boycott upon yourself MPAA.

Re:Boycott MPAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837636)

Just buy the high quality knockoffs out of China. Since they're the ones doing all the meaningful pirating anyway you'll be helping the MPAA to focus on the real problem.

Target users of the program.. (5, Interesting)

whoever57 (658626) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837556)

Parents!

There have already been well publicised cases of families having to settle with the RIAA because of a child's filesharing activities.

I expect this will be promoted by the MPAA as a way for parents to ensure that their children don't get the family in trouble.

Re:Target users of the program.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837632)

I expect this will be promoted by the MPAA as a way for parents to ensure that their children don't get the family in trouble.

well thats funny since its the MPAA whos GETTING them in trouble in the first place. Goodold *AA

Sweating over whether you'll be serverd? (4, Informative)

Noksagt (69097) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837557)

This article cites St. Louis as the first city to receive suits, followed by New York and Philadelphia. Examples of movies: "Troy," from Warner Bros., "Spider-Man 2," from Columbia Pictures and "Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen," from The Walt Disney Co.

sniff out... (3, Insightful)

nbert (785663) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837567)

...any installed file sharing program That's a good one - I must admit that a lot of p2p file sharing is about pirating software/music/movies, but why on earth are they trying to find out whether someone is using a file sharing app? Looking for people sharing files called Terminator3.avi on Kazaa (example) is one story, but scanning entire subnets for p2p apps sounds to me like the RIAA is pushing it too far again.

Hmmm (4, Interesting)

Azureflare (645778) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837568)

Will they be suing individuals who are serving up massive amounts of movies (as the RIAA did with mp3 fileswappers) or will they just be going after everybody who's offering anything up? Also will they be suing people who are distributing movies which are not copyrighted by Hollywood? And is this against people who are currently sharing movies, or also those who have shared in the past? And if in the past, how far in the past? I suppose these questions will be revealed when there are more details about this (there seems to be almost nothing right now).

I'm rather interested to see about this. I only use BitTorrent right now; are they tracking bittorrent users as well?

I wouldn't be surprised if they were (BitTorrent is inherently public after all), but I'm wondering what they will do about Japanese anime type of stuff (Since that's the only thing I download these days).

Episodes of TV shows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837569)

i didnt RTFA, but do they consider it illegal to download episodes of a show (like episodes i missed or earlier seasons)? I know its just about the movie industry now, but tv channel companies might pipe in later.

Current Ares user, started kicken it in '98 with Napster.

Please come to Canada, Please come to Canada! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837576)

Please come to Canada and delete my movies. Please! PLEEEEEEEEEEASE! I sue you for violations of my chartered right to privacy :) I'm a broke student and I NEED MONEY! Come to Canada! ...Please?

(with sugar and a cheery on top?)

Corporate computers (1)

crow (16139) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837584)

I could see the corporate I.S. people using this to check on employee's desktop systems.

Is it illegal to... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10837587)

Capture the stream from say HBO from your cable box onto your computer, and have a movie say Terminator.divx?

From the MPAA point of view, it is still a movie on your computer.

Um.. (1)

Malicious (567158) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837592)

So does this program only delete files that ARE copyright violations, or does it delete anything that contains the string "Terminator", or "Xmen" or perhaps "Matrix"?

I've said it before... (1)

Sj0 (472011) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837596)

Well, I guess the MPAA really doesn't like not being boycotted. It's a pity really, because I actually spend money on movies and video games...well, I guess just video games now. Oh well! ^ ^

$30,000 penalty for unintentional piracy? (5, Insightful)

necro2607 (771790) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837597)

From the linked MSN news article: "The copyright law also provides for penalties of up to $30,000 for each motion picture traded over the Internet, and up to $150,000 if such infringement is shown to be willful."

So, if some family member of mine uses my computer, downloads some movie using a P2P program and leaves it there in my "shared files" folder, I can be fined $30,000, or potentially more?

Whatever... hearing about this stuff just makes me want to promote the piracy of movies (and music) because of the way the record/movie industries are handling the situation. They're behaving like little kids who got their candy taken away from them... they'll bitch and whine and scream and do anything to get it back, but never even consider any form of rational reaction.

bring it on (1)

LittleLebowskiUrbanA (619114) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837624)

loads gtk-gnutella on my OpenBSD box If they write something that will run on a *BSD box, they can have the shit!

What's to distinguish... (1)

nebaz (453974) | more than 9 years ago | (#10837635)

Files you captured yourself (which I presume are legal, video tapes are, say off HBO), from those you downloaded. I realize that due to the DMCA you aren't allowed to rip DVDs because of encryption, but what about HBO feeds?
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