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Flexiglow UV Reactive Neon Paint

CmdrTaco posted more than 9 years ago | from the it-ain't-no-picasso dept.

Hardware Hacking 127

VL is running a review of (no I'm not kidding) UV Reflective Paint for whatever sort of artistic case design aspirations you might have. Various colors and some bad photos make me kind of wonder about the whole thing, but perhaps others have more informed thoughts...

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127 comments

Keyboards and goth clubs (3, Interesting)

skinfitz (564041) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880883)

Painting up a keyboard would be great for a (particularly goth) club DJ's PC - both in looks and functionality.

Re:Keyboards and goth clubs (1)

jacksonj04 (800021) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880911)

I'm sure there can be more uses found for this in clubs than just making PCs looks cool. Decks? Colour code your records (on the centre, not the track info) so you can find them in the dark?

Re:Keyboards and goth clubs (1)

alib001 (654044) | more than 9 years ago | (#10882851)

Recently, DJs have harnessed a form of magick known as 'elastic-trickery' and contained it's essence within a small cylinder they call...

a 'torch'.

Re:Keyboards and goth clubs (1)

alib001 (654044) | more than 9 years ago | (#10882775)

Does this [viperlair.com] look gothic to you?

Maybe I misread what you said and you were suggesting they go nuts with this paint stuff to cheer themselves up.

Re:Keyboards and goth clubs (1)

DjReagan (143826) | more than 9 years ago | (#10882930)

I take it you've not come across Cybergoth [gothic.no] before?

Re:Keyboards and goth clubs (1)

alib001 (654044) | more than 9 years ago | (#10883147)

No. Is that what you call them?

Over in the UK, that look was called 'cyber kid' and worn by clubbers who liked Trance and usually attributed to a club called Gatecrasher. I say 'was' because that was about five years ago and, save for a few diehards, not many people dress like that any more.

Thanks for the link - I did have a look - but for me 'goth' doesn't really conjure up images of happy people covered in UV reactive paint boshing to 'ard 'ouse.

How is this different... (3, Interesting)

cbrocious (764766) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880888)

from Clearneon?
Is it just that clearneon sprays on and this has to be applied by the applicator?

Re:How is this different... (1)

mordors9 (665662) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881339)

Since the taggers will love this stuff, better get it now before a permit is needed to buy it.

Benchmarks Please? (5, Funny)

Average_Joe_Sixpack (534373) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880889)

How much of a performance boost will this paint give me? Will it allow me to run Doom 3 in XGA??

Re:Benchmarks Please? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10880909)

forget about performance, would painting pcb stuff not affect the heat transfer of the components?

Re:Benchmarks Please? (4, Funny)

baywulf (214371) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881031)

To get DOOM 3 level of performance you need a bigger chrome exhaust (fan) and a "calvin and hobbes" sticker.

Re:Benchmarks Please? (2, Funny)

Zakabog (603757) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881753)

Hey it can't just be a calvin and hobbes sticker, calvin has to be pissing on the rival CPU maker. It makes your processor feel stronger to see the rival chip maker logo being pissed on, so it runs faster.

Note (5, Interesting)

elid (672471) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880895)

Note that you can see some pretty interesting "pre-painted" gear directly at the company's website [flexiglow.com] .

Re:Note (0)

ObsidianGT (808503) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881068)

Wait a minute now... That Flexiglow [flexiglow.com] site shows the same pic [flexiglow.com] from the article.

Hrrrrmmm, foul play?

My girlfriend really wanted to use this as nail-polish, too. Guess I'll have to break the bad news to her.

Re:Note (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881298)

Yeah, right above the picture on the article, the author said he took the picture from their website.
His camera wasen't good enough in the dark.
He wanted a better illustration of the colors glowing

Re:Note (2, Funny)

sunhou (238795) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881568)

Note that you can see some pretty interesting "pre-painted" gear directly at the company's website.

Thanks! I was going to click on one of the five links [flexiglow.com] to the company's website [flexiglow.com] in the review, but I was afraid maybe the review site was in cahoots with Flexiglow [flexiglow.com] or something, and felt a bit reluctant to click on their whoring links [flexiglow.com] . But here in the pure and innocent environment of Slashdot, I can safely click on the link [flexiglow.com] you provided.

Thanks again ! [flexiglow.com]

Re:Note - biohazard and radioactive warning signs. (1)

mikael (484) | more than 9 years ago | (#10882183)

Undoubtably, the biohazard [flexiglow.com] and radioactive [flexiglow.com] etched warning signs look really cool. But if your house or office were on fire, would the emergency services refuse to continue to work in the building if they saw potential radiation and biological hazards that they didn't have the correct protective gear for?

I have to ask (5, Interesting)

Ryvar (122400) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880902)

I'm not terribly familiar with the latest in case-modding, so I have to ask - are these UV lights entirely safe for longterm exposure? Say, 16 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year?

--Ryv

Re:I have to ask (3, Funny)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880972)

You're right, could be risky. Rather than using this stuff, check around to see if anyone still sells Undark paint [roger-russell.com] --it doesn't need UV at all.

Re:I have to ask (4, Funny)

Vic (6867) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881002)

I'm not terribly familiar with the latest in case-modding, so I have to ask - are these UV lights entirely safe for longterm exposure? Say, 16 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year?

Um, I think you have bigger issues than the choice of paint on your PC. :)

Re:I have to ask (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881117)

Yeah....like the choice of lights.

Re:I have to ask (4, Funny)

Zocalo (252965) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881003)

Well there has already been speculation that some of the plastics used for cable insulation and component construction may not be UV proof. I gather the effect was that long term exposure to UV lighting used in case mods caused the plastic to breakdown leading to the possibility of shorts and component failure, although precise timescales were unclear. If the UV is potent enough to break down plastic over time, then it's got to be having an effect on your skin, right?

Then again, if you are sitting by your PC for 16 hours a day, then that's a lot of UV from sunlight you are missing - it *might* balance out... Just make sure that you move around enough to get an even tan. :)

Re:I have to ask (4, Interesting)

WareW01f (18905) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881040)

Prolly not. Most things I've read indicate that even the tamer wavelengths of UV used in black lights can still cause cataracts [postgradmed.com] I would imagine that the UV LEDs would cause problems too (with enough exposure) although there is not yet an LED out there at the right wavelength to do real damage (and be useful for things like steralizing things, or say, keeping water in water cooled PCs from getting slimy... if I'm wrong about this please post a link here as there are many that would like to know) There are many fun links (like here [nasa.gov] and here [hps.org] ) on the fun effects of the different forms of UV. Most deal with tanning beds and sun, but I'm sure if you spend enough time in blacklight, the same applies.

I'm sure in the end most Slashdotter's will opt for more enertaining ways of going blind. >;^)

Re:I have to ask (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881579)

What the FUCK does "prolly" mean you illiterate fuck? Learn to speak your language properly for fuck's sake!

Re:I have to ask (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10882834)

" What the FUCK does "prolly" mean you illiterate fuck? Learn to speak your language properly for fuck's sake!"

People "type" written words.
They "speak" vocalized ones.

Re:I have to ask (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881622)

You are correct.

Black lights emit all forms of UV (A B and C) but are coated with a material that is supose to prevent B and C from escaping.

The wave lenghts are: UVC (220-290 nm), UVB (290-320), and UVA (320-400 nm)

They're all dangerous to some degree, including UVA: "Overexposure to UVA has been associated with toughening of the skin, suppression of the immune system, and cataract formation"

http://hps.org/hpspublications/articles/uv.html

UVC is what is used in in the manufacture of some products (or really expensive pools)to kill of germs.

Most UV LEDs really aren't... or are only at the very edge of the specuturm generating light in the wavelength of 400-450 nm

LEDs can't

Re:I have to ask (1)

alib001 (654044) | more than 9 years ago | (#10882997)

...there is not yet an LED out there at the right wavelength to do real damage (and be useful for things like steralizing things... if I'm wrong about this please post a link.

I'm not vouching for its ability to do what it says but this [scan.co.uk] fan claims to purify air using an UV LED.

Re:I have to ask (4, Informative)

legirons (809082) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881089)

"are these UV lights entirely safe for longterm exposure?"

They may not know the birthdate of Alexander Hamilton, but Wikipedia does have an article [wikipedia.org] on ultraviolet light and its health effects.

Re:I have to ask (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10882032)

Thanks for the tip. I'm off to vandalize it repeatedly for the next few months.

Re:I have to ask (1)

Teddlet (699012) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881317)

For those who are realy conserned with this I suguest getting a roll of UV Filter. [rosco.com] For those who desire to have their fun and not die.

UV exposure = Risk of cataracts, melanoma (4, Insightful)

sakusha (441986) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881506)

I used to work in a prepress lab where we used UV rigs to expose plates and Matchprints. The units are usually closed boxes so no UV leaks out, but we had a huge freestanding unit that had huge UV-opaque curtains around it. And that's because prolonged UV exposure is a health risk.

The manufacturers of these UV systems made it absolutely clear, prolonged exposure to UV light will dramatically increase your likelyhood of geting cataracts and skin cancer. I don't know anything about the cataracts, but I sure wouldn't do anything to endanger my vision since I depend on being able to read a computer screen.

But I do have personal experience with the effects of UV lights on skin. I worked around UV lights for years, and despite my precautions to minimize exposure, I've already developed a 3 precancerous lesions that had to be removed, one was a basal cell carcinoma in an early stage, the two were neoplastic somethingorother that my dermatologist says would have developed into melanoma (skin cancer) if I hadn't had them removed. Now I have to go to my dermatologist every 6 months for a complete body inspection, and have any lesion that is even the slightest bit suspicious surgically removed. I guarantee that these lesions were solely due to UV exposure in the lab, because I'm a night person and I hate going out in the sun.

DO NOT FUCK WITH MELANOMA. It is one of the deadliest cancers around. Most people are dead within 6 months of discovering they have the disease, it metastasizes rapidly into every organ in your body within weeks, and becomes inoperable. Most people are already fatally afflicted by the time they even discover they melanoma.

So if you want to play around with kewl glowing UV lights, just realize you might be inflicting fatal damage on yourself.

Re:UV exposure = Risk of cataracts, melanoma (0)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881801)

The manufacturers of these UV systems made it absolutely clear, prolonged exposure to UV light will dramatically increase your likelyhood of geting cataracts and skin cancer.

So will prolonged exposure to too much visible light. It is all just radiation, and too much radiation at ANY frequency is harmful. Higher-frequency radiation tends to be worse, but UV and visible light at not that far apart on the frequency scale, at least on the low end where recreational paint targets.

Which, brings up another issue. Commercial UV equipment may be at a higher frequency and intensity than recreational UV equipment. Recreational UV stuff usually targets lower frequencies to reduce risk. Your workplace may use higher UV frequencies for industrial needs, which can be near to X-rays. The range of frequencies from "long-wave" UV to "short-wave" UV is relatively wide.

For recreational stuff, one should have a directional bulb or directional lamp and not face the lamp light toward their body, especially the eyes. In other words, shine it on the case, not your face.

Re:UV exposure = Risk of cataracts, melanoma (3, Informative)

sakusha (441986) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881934)

So will prolonged exposure to too much visible light. It is all just radiation, and too much radiation at ANY frequency is harmful. Higher-frequency radiation tends to be worse, but UV and visible light at not that far apart on the frequency scale, at least on the low end where recreational paint targets.

Which, brings up another issue. Commercial UV equipment may be at a higher frequency and intensity than recreational UV equipment. Recreational UV stuff usually targets lower frequencies to reduce risk. Your workplace may use higher UV frequencies for industrial needs, which can be near to X-rays. The range of frequencies from "long-wave" UV to "short-wave" UV is relatively wide.

You are spreading dangerous misinformation. You say that exposure to "regular light" will give you cataracts and skin cancer too. So what IS "regular light?" Stuff that comes out of incandescent bulbs? Nope. Full spectrum sunlight? Yeah, that will give you problems, because it has UV in it too. It's the UV light, not visible spectrum light, that will give you skin cancer and cataracts.

There is no difference whatsoever between the commercial UV rigs I used and the "recreational" UV lamps, except in intensity. The spectra are almost identical. I use an array of 6 "recreational" UV tubes to expose the same narrow-spectrum UV sensitive plates I used in the pro lab, except it takes 15 minutes to expose the plates instead of 2 minutes. I guarantee you that these "recreational" UV tubes are just as dangerous as the high-intensity rigs, in fact, the "recreational" tubes might be MORE dangerous, because idiots like YOU think they're safe and thus they have more cumulative exposure with no precautions whatsoever.

I realize this is slashdot, and every idiot thinks their opinion is correct, but I remind you, UV systems are an area where I have professional expertise and you don't know jack shit about them compared to me. So just SHUT the FUCK up, and quit telling people these lamps are safe, unless you want to be personally responsible for giving people skin cancer and cataracts. YOU are a health risk, if you spread incorrect information that would encourage people to take stupid, unnecessary risks.

Re:UV exposure = Risk of cataracts, melanoma (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 9 years ago | (#10882420)

You are spreading dangerous misinformation. You say that exposure to "regular light" will give you cataracts and skin cancer too.

Yes, regular (visible) light *can* give you skin cancer, according to some research I looked at. It is one of the reasons why "real" sunblock that lifeguards use can be seen unaided. It is usualy white or pale in color.

As far as cataracts, I don't know.

There is no difference whatsoever between the commercial UV rigs I used and the "recreational" UV lamps, except in intensity.

Okay. It was not clear. I only suggested that is something to check when comparing.

But, "intensity" may be the key. Most people live less than 100 years. It may take 1000 years under low intensity to have noticable side-effects. But, since nobody lives that long, it ain't matter. If your group of lights is 50 times that amount, then a decade or two would put one in the range of danger.

Further, you getting skin leasions is not positive proof that your lab lights are the cause. You may have gotten them anyhow. Until we expirement with a 100 or so of your clones, we have no direct way to tell with reasonable certainty what the cause of the leasions were. One sample size (you) is insufficient to draw conclusions from. Maybe some other gizmo or chemical in your work area caused it or contributed to it.

And, I suggest you add a bit more diplomacy to your wording. It comes across as rude and condescending. If you think I am wrong, simply say so nicely.

Inkjet? (5, Funny)

superswede (729509) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880919)

Can I put it in my inkjet?

Re:Inkjet? (2, Funny)

legirons (809082) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881071)

"Can I put it in my inkjet?"

Ask again in a week. If nobody has sued the manufacturer by that time, then it's probably not compatible with inkjets.

Why yes (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881252)


its not cheap but it can be done [fxsupply.com]

The good old days (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10880939)

I remember painting the inside of my folks microwave when I was younger using a similar green paint.

My non too technical mother freaked when she saw the "radioactive glow".

But this new stuff, can I use it on skin?

I have a lovely sphinx cat [google.com] which would look devastating with a fluorescent glow.

Re:The good old days (2, Funny)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881148)

Starch glows blue under UV light, so you could always try spray-starching the cat. (You'll want to use the iron on the delicate setting.)

Finally! (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10880943)

I can now put flames on the side of my video card, just like my car! Flames make anything go super fast!

making a bitchin hoopty (5, Insightful)

photozz (168291) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880949)

Personally, I think painting my hardware is on the level with doing burnouts in front of the high school with my bitchin Camaro that I will fix up someday. It does nothing for system performance, and can't imagine what it's doing to the thermal properties of the card. It's just tacky. Really tacky. If you have that much energy you should concentrate on Doing something a little harder [thebestcasescenario.com]

Re:making a bitchin hoopty (4, Interesting)

bergeron76 (176351) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881380)

Interestingly, they sell clear versions of this paint for use on license plates. They apparently make your plate illegible to Traffic Camera's.

UV warning system (3, Informative)

r00t (33219) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880951)

If the computer case glows, you have problems.
UV leads to eye damage. (cateracts?)

Plus there's skin cancer, your furniture fading...

Re:UV warning system (1)

Vicsun (812730) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881039)

UV light is outside the visible spectrum, so can someone more versed in Physics than me explain how exctly stuff painted with UV reflective paint glows? I would have thought that UV reflective paint would reflect UV rays which you can't see anyway

Re:UV warning system (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881326)

I believe it is UV reactive paint, not reflective
So the paint has some stuff mixed in that reacts to UV light, and glows becuase of that.

Re:UV warning system (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881464)

And that's the thing...

EVERYthing you see is the consequence of that material ABSORBING, and re-emitting light. That is, the incoming light energy is absorbed by atoms, which bumps their electrons to a higher energy level, and when those electrons fall back to where they were they transmit a new photon. Some of the energy is kept by the atom, and it's kinetic energy is increased (gets hotter). The re-tranmited light HAS to be of a lower energy than the incoming light. Basic thermodynamics.

So, you've got UV light coming into a phosphorescent paint. Pretty high energy, that UV. The cool thing about phosphors is that they absorb that UV, and retransmit it at a lower energy level (wavelength) that we CAN see, and heat is created as a sideeffect... But not much. Most other materials abosrb the UV and retransmit it at an energy not much lower than when it came in, thus we can't see it.

There is no true "reflection". It's all absorbtion and retransmission.

Re:UV warning system (1)

Otter (3800) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881392)

I don't claim to be versed in this, but my understanding is that they absorb UV and re-emit in a visible frequency. So you get a glowing effect because you can't see the initial (or reflected) UV but do see the the visible light coming off the dyes.

Re:UV warning system (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881968)

Most case mods will use a lexan windows which blocks UV.

Photographic Quality Tip (1, Insightful)

binaryspiral (784263) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880953)

I'm not a photographer, but I play one on /.

Use a tripod or other solid mount when making photos in low light conditions... it keeps your photos from bluring.

Re:Photographic Quality Tip (1)

Stevyn (691306) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880970)

Another trick is to set the camera on self timer mode. This will prevent that little shift that happens when you press the shutter release. However, having those shutter release cables will also work, but even the cheapest digital cameras have a self timer mode available.

NOT OFF TOPIC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881586)

RTFA and see that the author (of TFA) doesn't know how to take pictures.

Re:NOT OFF TOPIC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881751)

With our help, maybe w 'll get better photos from the author - you dolt.

Re:Photographic Quality Tip (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881919)

that's not a tip, that's just basic fucken knoledge. ANyone who doesent know that should be decapatated and have thier digital camera rammed up thier stupid ffucken ass sideways

Cool idea (3, Funny)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880954)

Rather than just using that paint for case mods, you could also paint things in your room with it. Like maybe posters and stuff, especially for music groups.

UV Reactive Posters. Right, I'm off to the patent office!

Re:Cool idea (3, Funny)

Skater (41976) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881085)

While you're there, could you ask them to move the office? Their new building is blocking my view of the Washington Monument.

Thanks!

--RJ

Keyboard and monitor? (3, Funny)

E IS mC(Square) (721736) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880956)

Now I dont have to get up and switch on the lights - i can avoid the horrors of typing pubLic with L missing!

But fun would be to set the background of the 'windows' to one such color - if available in future!

Re:Keyboard and monitor? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10882560)

How often do you type public in the dark though? And for what reasons(s)?

the laws (4, Interesting)

myukew (823565) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880967)

did you know that (at least here in germany) it's actually forbidden to use computers which don't have a complete metal cover? it's because of the radio interference, I believe.

Re:the laws (1)

CAlworth1 (518119) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881359)

Wait, so the iMacs, both new and old, are illeagal? And what is done for palms and the like?

Re:the laws (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881486)

Nice try, but iMacs do have an RF shield.

Re:the laws (1)

myukew (823565) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881803)

yes, probably their plastic has some thin aluminium coating or something similar

Re:the laws (1)

binaryspiral (784263) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881827)

no, the actual motherboard is encased in a simple grounded metal shield. The transparent plastic is just transparent plastic... the crt in pre-lcd imacs don't need to be shielded because of the lead lining in the tube.

Re:the laws (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881564)

Not true. It is forbidden to sell computers and parts of computers which do not adhere to certain standards (It must not interfere with other electronics, very much the same thing the FCC does in the USA)

Re:the laws (1)

SagSaw (219314) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881798)

It's very similar in the US: Any electronic product you sell (or build for more than personal use) must be certified to be compliant with (at least) Part 15 of the FCC rules. (Part 15 deals with the amount of RF energy that can be radiated by a device that is not designed to produce RF radiation). You don't necessarily need a complete metal case, a full metal case will generally make it easier to pass the certification testing.

Of course, home-built computers also need to comply with Part 15, but as long as you're not selling them, there is no requirement for certification.

Finally, the technology... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10880968)

...to make my velvet Elvis casemod a reality.

Re:Finally, the technology... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10882540)

Don't be cruel.

What's so amazing about this? (4, Insightful)

KDan (90353) | more than 9 years ago | (#10880982)

I've seen UV-glowy paints around for years. This is nothing new. You still need a blacklight (ie UV light) for it to be visible, it doesn't just glow in the dark magically (that would be more interesting, but still nothing amazing - there are plenty of fluorescent material about). So what's so great about this that it deserves a front-page post on slashdot?

Daniel

Re:What's so amazing about this? (2, Informative)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881016)

It's a new name, you see. Fluorescent, Day-Glo, Neon and now UV Reactive! (I could never understand Neon. Neon is a very specific amber-ish colour that you get from Neon gas in a light tube, not that taser-lime colour.)

Re:What's so amazing about this? (1)

sakusha (441986) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881386)

Yew are correct, this stuff has been around since the 1960s, when Day-Glo paints were first common. Hasn't anyone seen those old dayglo UV posters before?

Re:What's so amazing about this? (0, Offtopic)

Technician (215283) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881120)

Slightly offtopic, but may be of interest to some slashdoters under the personal communications heading...

Free ringtones.

This includes some classic Pink Floyd tunes..

Re:What's so amazing about this? (1)

Stone Rhino (532581) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881456)

Glow in the Dark is phosphorescent. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphorescence UV Reactive is flourescent. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescence Just an FYI

Re:What's so amazing about this? (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881646)

I've seen UV-glowy paints around for years.

Psychodelic UV wall posters were a big fad around 1974. I don't know how common purchasable UV paints were back then, though.

maybe... (1)

Brightest Light (552357) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881011)

Maybe Viperlair should take some of the money they make from using slashdot as their free advertising platform and buy a non-shitty digital camera+tripod, so they don't look like a hardware review site ran out of some teenager's basement...

Re:maybe... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881511)

Maybe they should, but perhaps you should consider that maybe they WANT it to look that way. When I looked at the pictures, I got the distinct impression that the pictures were rendered. That may have been their goal, and they may have paid someone good money to get that effect.

Dayglo, flag people, etc (1)

scythian (46974) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881134)

Dayglo paint, and the flag people running around in a glowing bus.

It's the electric kool aid acid test all over again!

ewww (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10881160)

One Word: FUGLY

Nice but (1)

t_allardyce (48447) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881234)

Im still waiting for a backlit keyboard that looks like something out of a cockpit, that would rock.. or i could save my eyesight, money and timne and just get a life..

How about ... (2, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881314)

A computer system that fits into the surrounding decor, seamlessly, as if it were a well-chosen piece of furniture, efficiently serving its prime function, while maintaining a muted physical presence that does not grandly announce its existence to every pair of eyes in the vicinity, thereby diminishing the worth of whatever is being presented upon the screen? Or shouldn't I say that here?

Interesting... (1)

midifarm (666278) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881462)

But nothing new. This paints have been around for quite awhile, just maybe not for case modding. To clarify, it's NOT UV activated but "black light" activated, which is nothing more than a high frequency violet shade. This is simply visible light and shouldn't affect your components any more than the goofy cold neon tubes that people are putting in their cases. I wonder what the long term effect of painting a video card would be. But this paint has been used for stage and film work. One thing I find really interesting is the lack of pricing mentioned, it's REALLY expensive. Something to the tune of $40/ tiny jar.

Peace

Re:Interesting... (1)

BlacKat (114545) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881718)

Sorry, but a black light most certianly does produce ultraviolet light, along with a tiny bit of visible light from the very end of the spectrum before it shifts into ultra.

If you do a simple google search for "black light" you will find many sites about black light and every single one indicates they are ultraviolet.

There are two types of UV light, UVA and UVB. Black lights give off UVA, while the Sun gives off UVB, which is much more harmful.

Re:Interesting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10882337)

Um, I though there were three types of UV, (A, B, C)

The sun gives off all three (and indeed everything in the spectrum), and it's the B and C that are the most dangerous that we typically encounter (C IIRC is used for killing germs), but UVA around 400nm wavelength is basically harmless, and is what's used for blacklight.

Around 300nm is the type that can tan you, and shorter than that will burn. I'd have to look in my E&M book to find the formula to calculate the energy difference (hey, it's been quite a while), but from 400 to 300 nm it's going to be substantial.

Re:Interesting... (1)

Necronian (602418) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881756)

UV paint for casemodding has been around for a while too. I'm sitting here looking at a can 'Black Light Accent Paint' made by pcToys that I bought almost two years ago. I think it cost about $5 when I bought it.

case mod idea - fog (1)

ch-chuck (9622) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881585)

Something that might work with all those glowing colors and paints would be a fog machine. Maybe I'm just thinking of Deep Thought.

UV Condums (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 9 years ago | (#10881892)

UV condums may turn into a great fad. If you are strait, your GF may get a kick out of Glowing Willy. If you are gay, you can recreate Light-Sabre fight scenes from Star Wars.

Re:UV Condums (1)

Powercntrl (458442) | more than 9 years ago | (#10883016)

If you are gay, you can recreate Light-Sabre fight scenes from Star Wars.

Don't you mean Spaceballs [imdb.com] ?

Dark Helmet: I see your schwartz is as big as mine. Let's see how well you handle it.

I already did this (3, Funny)

DrugCheese (266151) | more than 9 years ago | (#10882086)

Many many moons ago I colored my keyboard and mounted a blacklight underneath my monitor stand so that I could be in a very dark room and still see my keys needed to code n play my video games.

Problem was I used Tide to color the keys, as Tide laundry detergent reflects rather brightly under blacklight. A little too brightly in fact as I soon washed it off becuase it was too bright and distracting.

But let me tell you when I was using that thing ... my hands always smelled clean.

Re:I already did this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10882311)

What kind of coder or gamer actually needs to see the keys to code and/or play games?

Seriously, you need some more practice.

I'm disappointed (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10882166)

When I saw the heading "UV-reflective paint", my first thought was "Oh Wow!!! Paintings for Bees!!"
Bees see into the ultraviolet, and many quite plain looking flowers have quite garish patterns in their UV reflectance so the bees can easily see them and home in on the nectar.

But this is just fluorescent paint. Colour me unimpressed.

Why no monitor mods? (1)

Illserve (56215) | more than 9 years ago | (#10882744)

All this obsession with modding the part of the computer you don't look at.

How about an acrylic case for the monitor?

hell, the back of it glows all by itself.

Highlighters (2, Informative)

kd5ujz (640580) | more than 9 years ago | (#10882757)

I have recieved almost identical results with highlighters and a UV light sorce.
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