Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

NetBSD 2.0 RC5 Tagged

CowboyNeal posted more than 8 years ago | from the bsd-everywhere dept.

BSD 74

ulib writes "NetBSD 2.0_RC5 has now been tagged. Changes since RC4 include fixes to various COMPAT_ emulations, IP Filter backward compatibility fixes, XFree86, pax(1), rsh(1), hp300 boot blocks, pthread fixes for amd64 and i386, documentation updates. Binary snapshots of NetBSD 2.0_RC5 are available in the daily builds directory on the main FTP site."

cancel ×

74 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

bsd is frist (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#10931249)

1. frist bsd is dyng psot!!

2. in soviet russia frist psots are, uh, what the hell do I know.

3. ???

4. Frist Profit!

Well.. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#10931430)

Jerking off while typing is a bit.. tasteless, but ultimately legitimate. But why doing it with the same f*ckin' hand??

And btw, BSD f*ckin' rules. :)

1 comment? (-1, Offtopic)

MrPerfekt (414248) | more than 8 years ago | (#10931381)

Is posting busted or does nobody care about NetBSD?

Re:1 comment? (5, Insightful)

wooby (786765) | more than 8 years ago | (#10931580)

Posting works. It's morning EST; the nerds slumber. I for one am pumped about 2.0. I'm a recent convert from Linux and I like NetBSD's installer as well as its bloat and crap-free default software arsenal.

With Fluxbox [sourceforge.net] , the GNU coreutils, and bash, my P133 makes a reasonable desktop workstation. Though Linux would work, the low hard-drive footprint of a NetBSD install is what makes the installation trouble-free. Comparable modern Linux distros seem to me to take time to whittle down to a sub-300MB install. With NetBSD, the core system with XFree uses only 290.

Re:1 comment? (1)

peripatetic_bum (211859) | more than 8 years ago | (#10932433)

any other reason why I would want to use netbsd instead of freebsd in an x86 machine?

THanks for the tips

Re:1 comment? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#10933099)

Better networking in NetBSD. Basically, it boils down to this:
  • If you need top of the line security, use OpenBSD.
  • If you need a small footprint, use NetBSD.
  • If you need to run on an odd architecture, use NetBSD.
  • If you need a great BSD operating system, and know that everything you'll use is in NetBSD's package system, use NetBSD.
  • If none of the above meet your criteria, use FreeBSD.
Also, FreeBSD has better hardware support than the other BSDs as far as number of supported devices. FreeBSD works well, and ports is pretty good, but the cost of that is bloat (although it pales in comparison to what Linux users regard as bloat. A bloated FreeBSD is comparable to a modestly slimmed down Linux installation, although if you really bite down hard, Linux can be made a little smaller than FreeBSD, while still not being able to compare to NetBSD). Basically, if one of the other BSDs will work for you, use it instead of FreeBSD

Lastly, in time, DragonFlyBSD will edge out FreeBSD. Dfly is going to have far better SMP and clustering, and it's being done so well that performance on a UP machine isn't suffering.

Re:1 comment? (2)

Megaweapon (25185) | more than 8 years ago | (#10933394)

Just curious (as I've never installed or maintained any *BSD system): Suppose you have a FreeBSD and lets say a Mandrake workstation setup, complete with XOrg, GNOME, KDE, OpenOffice, etc. Are we talking a substantial bloat increase with the Mandrake setup just because it's "Linux"? Is it more libraries, bigger binaries, more software package dependancies...? Or are you talking a default install of *BSD versus a typical default install of a modern Linux distro?

Re:1 comment? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#10933623)

Mandrake

I would recommend FreeBSD over Mandrake, if you're just looking for a non-Windows OS. FreeBSD's configuration takes place via direct manipulation of the text files that control the OS. It's generally not hard to find information on what to twiddle and how, and you end up learning more in the process. Mandrake (and Redhat, the last time I used it) uses GUI frontends to change these text files, and often uses its own nonstandard text files, so that anything you learn won't carry over to another Linux distribution. Furthermore, the last time I used Redhat, I had choices of several different GUI frontends to many different text files, some of which were changed in different ways for different purposes. Without X, I couldn't configure my system.

Is it more libraries, bigger binaries, more software package dependancies...? Or are you talking a default install of *BSD versus a typical default install of a modern Linux distro?

It's typical distribution size. Almost every Linux distribution has a large sprawl involved with what it's including these days. A default Linux From Scratch install contains expect and Perl, for example. The BSDs are built with a focus on taking away everything that isn't necessary. Linux distributions for the most part don't even try.

As for the system binaries, it depends on how they're built. You could build in the library routines they use, or compile them so that they need dynamic libraries, or you could use something like busybox to decrease the size dramatically. It's not a cut and dry situation, but most Linux distributions manage to be larger than the BSDs anyway.

As always, it comes down to what you personally need and what matches your skill level. For Linux, you're better off using Slackware or Debian or Gentoo because they're less likely to damage your ability to learn Linux deeply than something like Mandrake. Today, even though I have no trouble managing FreeBSD or Linux From Scratch, I'd probably have trouble managing a Redhat or Mandrake installation, but I could probably pick up Gentoo or Debian's way of doing things in a few days.

Re:1 comment? (1)

Homology (639438) | more than 8 years ago | (#10933822)

One man's bloat is another ones needed features :-)

A commercial Linux distribution tends to install more programs and libraries by default than *BSD. On a *BSD it's more common to actually add the different applications you want from the ports system.

Re:1 comment? (4, Informative)

setagllib (753300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10934700)

It's more than just base software choices actually. The BSDs have huge amounts of useful base system software, and depending on your needs you can get an amazing lot done without touching a single out-of-tree package. This includes relatively comfortable software development thanks to nvi, gcc/g++/etc, gdb, BSD make, and so on.

The difference comes in when you look at how bloated the software itself is. All the BSDs have libcs that are tiny (a couple of minutes to compile on even my slowest machines) and do everything a C library should, including full networking and everything. The GNU libc, which you'll find on every Linux system by default (there's a diet libc out there, but it isn't recognized), is a HUGE package that takes a very long time to compile and results in a hefty binary in the end. What does all this bloat go towards? Most say it's all because of its attempt at being completely internationalized, but this is hardly enough to warrant about a 10x size increase.

The same idea applies to all other software that wasn't imported from GNU. If you can do the same things smaller and more efficiently, do it that way. There's no point in having 90% of your source appeal to minor features few people will ever use. There's also a strict adherence to tradition where possible - nvi is kept instead of some stripped-down vim-alike (which would have more convenient features, for instance) because people coming from a BSD system a decade ago won't get culture shock. But all the same modern software is a 'make install' away on any of the BSDs.

The bloat difference in the Linux kernel and BSD kernels isn't even worth discussing. It's just not funny any more. Linux has inflated a LOT in recent times. I remember back when some 2.4 was about 25 megs tar.bz2, now look at it - 2.6.9 weighs in at 35 meg. Is it really 40% more functional? Nowhere near. If anything it should be getting smaller, since they insist they're refining to simpler algorithms that should work faster and take less code.

The NetBSD 2.0RC5 src/sys source compresses (bzip2 -9) to 20M, smaller than Linux 2.4 was. Compared to 2.6, it includes most of the same drivers, the same functionality (plus good security), the ability to run Linux binaries natively (and FreeBSD, SVR4, and some others I forgot), a network stack known to be better than Linux', and oh so much more. This source INCLUDES the ports of NetBSD for which Linux needs EXTERNAL patch sets to run on, meaning that this source tree is even more portable. We all know it's more stable, too. Where is the gargantuan (~175%) size of Linux going? It's all pure bloat. And I challenge even one person to come up with something Linux does that NetBSD can't do, and that takes up 15 meg when bzip2-9'd.

Re:1 comment? (1)

setagllib (753300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10934744)

Actually, before some clueless newbie posts saying it's all file systems, take a look at this:

thor linux # pwd /usr/src/linux thor linux # tar -c fs | bzip2 -9 > fs.tar.bz2 thor linux # du -h fs.tar.bz2 2.8M fs.tar.bz2

Not to mention NetBSD supports a few file systems Linux doesn't in-tree (LFS, portalfs, nullfs...), and that many (NFSv3, UFS [NetBSD supports more of it anyway], ext2fs, SMBFS, ...) they have in common. Sorry folks, file systems doesn't answer for it.

Re:1 comment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10934958)

OpenBSD 3.6 src is only 15MB:
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 15656593 Sep 20 19:09 sys.tar.gz
And that's just a plain tar.gz, not a bz2...
It has less features than Linux, but it's got all the ones I need. I even run it on my desktop machine. :)

Re:1 comment? (1)

setagllib (753300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10935188)

Exactly, see? Good systems don't need code bloat. OpenBSD is yet another system which does what it does very well and obviously efficiently.

Linux doesn't have security, in 2.6 it doesn't even have stability, and performance seems limited to synthetic cases. Why it gets all the attention is beyond me.

BSD: The cathedral versus the bizarre.

Re:1 comment? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10935738)

You keep telling yourself that, it is a common passtime for BSD'ers. In the meantime, Linux keeps getting further ahead and isn't looking back.

Re:1 comment? (1)

setagllib (753300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10936072)

You're right. I should join in and help make Linux a bigger, more 'forward' project.

cd /usr/src/linux
dd if=/dev/urandom of=l33t-new-functionality.c bs=1k count=10k

...and then email the diff to Linus who'll happilly include it. Seems that's how the coding is done, anyway.

Face it man, getting bigger doesn't mean getting better. It still suffers from very significant issues in stability, networking capability, security, and root@life knows how dirty it is in every way, even dmesg. That's what you get when you hand a tosspot around to thousands of developers.

Re:1 comment? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10936694)

Naturally, you can't back up any of your "significant issues" claims. Face it, the market has chosen the better of the two platforms. You BSD fanatics have the approach of "if it's not done our way it's wrong", which is a load of bullocks. Maybe if you drop your superiority complex and figure out why BSD is failing to gain in the market then you'll get somewhere, but don't counter the success of Linux on non-existant "issues".

Naturally this gets modded down, what cowardice (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10936894)

I'm asking a person to back up their claims, and I get modded as a "troll". Typical slashdot, if you disagree with someone, MOD THEM DOWN!!!! Heaven forbid I want to engage in some dialog with someone making wild claims!

Re:1 comment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10941176)

You're right. I should join in and help make Linux a bigger, more 'forward' project.

cd /usr/src/linux
dd if=/dev/urandom of=l33t-new-functionality.c bs=1k count=10k ...and then email the diff to Linus who'll happilly include it. Seems that's how the coding is done, anyway.


Yeah OK man. As I said, you keep telling yourself that.

Re:1 comment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10935744)

Excuse me? While Linux is probably almost triple the size, it supports more architectures than NetBSD, is more scalable than FreeBSD, supports close to as much hardware out of the box as windows, has numerous journalling filesystems (of which the free BSDs have none).

Re:1 comment? (2)

setagllib (753300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10936094)

It does not support more architectures in-tree. You need external patches for a great many of them. A person with a clue would know this. NetBSD supports them all in-tree and with mutual inclusion.

LFS is a journalling file system, which NetBSD has. A person with a clue would know this. If you looked at my self-reply post, I pointed out that the difference the Linux file systems makes is roughly "jack shit".

There are also few drivers Linux has the BSDs don't. These are mostly only the 'evil' new cards made by NVidia and co, for which you often need external Linux drivers anyway. What's your point? None of them take up 15 meg bzip2'd anyway.

More scalable doesn't require larger code, if done right. If you knew ANYTHING about programming you'd understand this. You're coming off as a clueless troll and I can only conclude this is in fact what you are. Go read a book before you try to write one.

Re:1 comment? (2)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 9 years ago | (#10936433)

I can't really comment on NetBSD (I've only run it on some old SPARC32 boxes being used as dumb X terminals - where it is about 50-100% faster than Linux due to appalling SPARC32 MMU code in the Linux kernel). FreeBSD, however includes soft updates which solve the same problem as journaling but without the performance hit of journaling and with fewer buzzwords. FreeBSD also supports background fsck for all except the root partition (which is usually FreeBSD also supports one particularly useful feature which, I believe, Linux only supports for XFS - filesystem snapshots. You can mount a snapshot of a mounted filesystem, and continue to access it. This allows you to back up the filesystem as it was at a fixed time point, without having to worry about writes during the backup, and without having to unmount the drive.

Oh, and LFS isn't a journalling filesystem. It's a log structured filesystem. The idea of LFS is that nothing is deleted (until you run out of space). When you save a file, it writes the changes at the end of the disk. This means that nothing you do will corrupt the disk in the event of a power failure (as with journalling, the only thing you'll lose is the last update), and that you can easily undo changes to a file (since the original is never overwritten). Additionally, the write performance of LFS is close to the theoretical maximum of the disk (since the head never has to seek for a write). The disadvantages are that it requires a lot more disk space, and disk reads of frequently modified files are slow. Additionally, when the disk becomes nearly full it is necessary to compact the log (i.e. erase bytes that have been overwritten). Log structured filesystems were a hot research area about a decade ago, but the disk space requirements were such that they were not considered feasible for general use. That will probably change in the near future due to larger disk sizes (except for Linux users, who won't be happy unless they have 500 text editors installed...). Tanenbaum proposed an interesting variant of a log structured filesystem that was implemented in Amoeba. In this version, there was no modify operation. Files were created and written to, then became read-only. Modifying a file was a matter of reading the entire file, modifying it in-core, and then writing the new version. This gave similar write-performance to a log structured FS, but also gave very good read performance (since files were always contiguous). While this design is not feasible for everything (very large files, frequently updated files), it would be ideal for many things.

Re:1 comment? (1)

setagllib (753300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10936481)

Well log-structuring is said to be the 'more complete journalling' so I didn't figure the distinction would matter as much. Thanks for the extensive description though, that really depicts the differences. Even the online documentation on NetBSD's site didn't go into that much detail.

We need more people like you and less like great grandparent (fellow talking about Linux being the only one with journalling file systems and hence being so bloated, etc).

Re:1 comment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10941294)

FreeBSD, however includes soft updates which solve the same problem as journaling but without the performance hit of journaling and with fewer buzzwords.

Actually, FreeBSD's softupdates are not nearly so good as journalling. For a couple of simple reasons.

First of all, the concept is basically the same as journalling - write out metadata in the correct order, to give a consistent disk image.

However, with journalling, one can write out large swaths of metadata information in linear writes to the journal, and later lazily write them out in an optimised order to the actual metadata blocks. With softupdates, all the little synchronous metadata writes go to different areas of the disk. Performance often isn't as good as with journalling, despite what zealots will say.

Second, with journalling, a crash just means a journal replay or rollback. Softupdates can still get into an inconsistent state on crash - it is just structured so those states are recoverable, but still take long, performance sapping background fscks, which are often not acceptable in high availability situations.

Third, softupdates has no possibility to give fully ACID semantics at the filesystem level, like journalling theoretically can (see for example, Reiser4).

FreeBSD also supports background fsck for all except the root partition (which is usually

Heh, this isn't a feature. See above: journalling filesystems don't *need* this hack.

FreeBSD also supports one particularly useful feature which, I believe, Linux only supports for XFS - filesystem snapshots. You can mount a snapshot of a mounted filesystem, and continue to access it. This allows you to back up the filesystem as it was at a fixed time point, without having to worry about writes during the backup, and without having to unmount the drive.

Err, cool... so Linux supports snapshots. That's great.

Re:1 comment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10958168)

Ahem, is this thing on? Excuse me, why hasn't anyone replied? Oh it is on... so that means I have TAMED THE RABID BSD ZEALOTS! Bwaahahahaaa!!

Now in all seriousness - I forgot one other thing which makes journalling really nice compared to softupdates.

You can journal to a really fast non volatile ram drive. This can give you huge speed boosts, especially on metadata intensive operations, but still with all the protection of a journalling filesystem.

No way in hell softupdates can do anything of the sort.

Re:1 comment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10941259)

It does not support more architectures in-tree. You need external patches for a great many of them. A person with a clue would know this. NetBSD supports them all in-tree and with mutual inclusion.

Really?

Linux, 19:
alpha, arm, cris, ia64, ppc, sh, sparc64, x86_64, h8300, m32r, mips, ppc64, sh64, i386, m68k, parisc, s390, sparc, v850

NetBSD, 13:
alpha, arm, parisc, i386, m68k, mips, ns32k, ppc, sh, sparc, sparc64, vax, x86-64

What's more, Linux supports more _relevant_ CPUs. For example, all of 3 people care about running NetBSD on VAX, but they don't support ia64 or ppc64, which are the two fastest general purpose processors in existance today. And NetBSD doesn't support systems without MMUs - excluding it from a large and growing class of embedded CPUs.

Newsflash for you: system platforms != CPU architectures. Linux doesn't count the platforms it supports, they are far less interesting than supporting a new CPU - usually consisting of nothing more than some chipset and bus drivers. But if you want to count them up yourself, you'll probably find something comparable to netbsd.

LFS is a journalling file system, which NetBSD has. A person with a clue would know this. If you looked at my self-reply post, I pointed out that the difference the Linux file systems makes is roughly "jack shit".

LFS, isn't a journalling filesystem as someone alraedy pointed out... funny you should mention the phrase "jack shit"...

There are also few drivers Linux has the BSDs don't. These are mostly only the 'evil' new cards made by NVidia and co, for which you often need external Linux drivers anyway. What's your point? None of them take up 15 meg bzip2'd anyway.

Whatever. The core linux kernel code without drivers or architecture specific code, including the ipv4 stack takes up about 5 megs uncompressed. Which would be less than 500K in bzip2 format.

How about we use a more relevant metric. The Linux 2.6 kernel can be configured down to run a busybox in 2MB RAM, and have a few hundred K leftover. With network stack.

More scalable doesn't require larger code, if done right. If you knew ANYTHING about programming you'd understand this. You're coming off as a clueless troll and I can only conclude this is in fact what you are. Go read a book before you try to write one.

It does. It requires more elaborate algorithms. It requires more sophisticated locking, use of per-cpu data and lockfree algorithms.

For example, Linux 2.4's basic scheduler was pretty simple and not very scalable (because it didn't have to be, at the time). It's 33K. Linux 2.6 uses an O(1) algorithm and per-cpu runqueues, and has so far scaled up to 512 CPUs. It is 118K of code. (Although it compiles down to about 35K of object code, 15K when SMP support is not compiled in).

And in case you have any trollish comments about the Linux 2.6 scheduler, FreeBSD reimplemented it for their next gen SCHED_ULE (which they can't get right, but that's another story).

However, Linux actually often has a smaller footprint where it does count in terms of efficiency and scalability, though. For example, on i386, NetBSD requires 64 bytes for every page of physical memory in the system, while Linux requires only 32 bytes. The difference gets much larger on 64-bit architectures.

Re:1 comment? (1)

cmad_x (723313) | more than 9 years ago | (#10936611)

While Linux is probably almost triple the size,
it supports more architectures than NetBSD
Ahem... Are you sure?

Re:1 comment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10941260)

Yep.

Re:1 comment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10975039)

"We all know it's more stable, too."

Really? My Debian and Slackware boxes never, EVER crash. They're rock solid. Perhaps comparing NetBSD to, say, Mandrake -- you might be right. But there's barely any difference in terms of reliability with proper, tested distros.

Oh, and here's one thing Linux can do: be supported for years. Certain distros such as RHEL have a whopping FIVE YEARS of security and bugfixes -- a great help on production servers when you don't want to upgrade every 12 months or so.

Otherwise, I mostly agree with what you say. And I'm certainly looking forward to NetBSD 2.0.

Re:1 comment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10975103)

Oh, and binary updates. I can't stress this enough. OpenBSD could be the most secure system on the planet, but when I have to:

- read advisory and download patch
- apply patch by hand
- have a compiler toolchain installed
- rebuild affected files
- copy them into place in the filesystem

As opposed to:

- apt-get update

It's a royal pain. One command vs serveral steps (and having a compiler and toolchain on a server is unwise anyway). Give the BSDs a clean, fast and simple binary update system and they'll be so much more pleasant to administer.

An RC got tagged (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#10931673)

and this isn't frontpage news for Slashdot???

Re:An RC got tagged (1)

Piranhaa (672441) | more than 9 years ago | (#10934870)

RC's aren't a huge deal (in my opinion anyways), compared to -RELEASES. I'm sure the 2.0-RELEASE will be on the frontpage of slashdot for surely!

Re:An RC got tagged (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10940814)

It was a joke you retard.

Still XFree86 and not X.Org? (2, Interesting)

HighOrbit (631451) | more than 8 years ago | (#10932077)

Does NetBSD have any plans to migrate? Or do they have a good reason for sticking with XFree86?

Re:Still XFree86 and not X.Org? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#10932261)

Moving to X.org because of licensing isn't a good reason.

Licensing aside (2, Insightful)

HighOrbit (631451) | more than 8 years ago | (#10932316)

Licensing aside, most of the development seems to be happening at X.Org and that is a good reason to migrate.

Re:Still XFree86 and not X.Org? (4, Informative)

Homology (639438) | more than 8 years ago | (#10932802)

Moving to X.org because of licensing isn't a good reason.

It's a _very_ good reason if you don't accept the new license. As it is, NetBSD accepted the new XFree86 license. OpenBSD did not, and has recently imported X.org into -current.

Re:Still XFree86 and not X.Org? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10938214)

The only reason you wouldn't accept the license is if you so damn religious about licensing.

Open source has become _WAY_ too political.

Re:Still XFree86 and not X.Org? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10941103)

The only reason you wouldn't accept the license is if you so damn religious about licensing.

When you don't agree to accept a particular licence, then the non-acceptance goes hand in hand with NOT ACCEPTING THE ITEM FOR WHICH THE LICENCE APPLIES!

Open source has become _WAY_ too political.

Are you serious?! Open Source was political from the start!!

Re:Still XFree86 and not X.Org? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10941090)

Moving to X.org because of licensing isn't a good reason.

To YOU maybe. But if someone says that it is a good reason for them, then you might like to take thier word for it.

The "correct" answers to all the Worlds questions, are not in YOUR head. Of that, I am certain.

Re:Still XFree86 and not X.Org? (5, Informative)

Ushakov (57403) | more than 8 years ago | (#10932443)

The work on X.org support is being done in -current on rtr-xorg-branch [netbsd.org] branch.

Re:Still XFree86 and not X.Org? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10937587)

Well, just install NetBSD without XFree86, and install Xorg via the packages system.

How does NetBSD compare to OpenBSD? (1)

ceallaigh (584362) | more than 9 years ago | (#10934639)

I understand the OpenBSD has its origins in NetBSD. I've been using OpenBSD for some time now and was curious if anyone knew any pros/cons of one versus the other. Thanks.

Re:How does NetBSD compare to OpenBSD? (3, Informative)

Piranhaa (672441) | more than 9 years ago | (#10934856)

Well I am a big fan of Open and Free BSD's. As soon as I get my iBook back in from warantee I will be dualbooting OSx with netbsd. I tried Openbsd and it simply never had the support. Understand the BSD goals. Openbsd tries to be the most secure/stable OS. FreeBSD likes to be rich with features. NetBSD tries to get on as many architechtures as possible. It's all about flavors, just like various flavors of linux. There, I hope that helps you :)

Re:How does NetBSD compare to OpenBSD? (1)

Nimrangul (599578) | more than 9 years ago | (#10937500)

You sure about that? Last hackathon there was a metric assload of improvements to the macppc port from what I hear; a fair number of developers use PowerBooks.

I realise that iBooks and PowerBooks use some different hardware, but the support should be there I'd think.

Re:How does NetBSD compare to OpenBSD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10975198)

"Back in from warantee"? And people say Apple stuff is supposed to be well-made.

Presumably the same people who ignored the massive logic board problems, and hinge issues, and the fact that iBooks are made in Taiwan by a third-party ODM...

Re:How does NetBSD compare to OpenBSD? (4, Interesting)

Nimrangul (599578) | more than 9 years ago | (#10934864)

First, here are a few fundamental differences between the two operating systems, all the while I will list perceived pros and cons of NetBSD and OpenBSD in random spots.

OpenBSD broke from the NetBSD base over 9 years ago, that is nine years of code divergence in small ways even in the most similar of parts of the codebases.

NetBSD has a great deal of platforms that are supported, including architectures untouched by most other operating systems. OpenBSD supports only 14 platforms, with several discontinued ones as well. NetBSD's supported platforms however are not up to the same standard as OpenBSD's; OpenBSD requires that the port be compilable on it's given platform and many of NetBSD's cannot. This makes the overall codebase of NetBSD more portable and stable at the price of properly supporting it's platforms.

OpenBSD has in the past audited the codebase for it's entire system in order to remove as many programming errors as possible, this has lead to increased security as well as stability.

OpenBSD has in the past removed system tools and ports that it deems to be too insecure or bug ridden. NetBSD does not have this policy. Such as rlogin.

OpenBSD has in the past fought over licenses which they do not believe in having within their system; trying to relicense or replace code which does not conform with their level liberal code. NetBSD does not find this to be a priority. Such things include SSH/OpenSSH, IPF/PF, XFree86/X.org and GnuTAR/TAR.

OpenBSD integrates security minded protection into it's system whenever possible. NetBSD does not. Stack protection; stackghost on Sparc and propolice on I386 as well as taking them to other platforms in the future.

I honestly see no major pros to using NetBSD over OpenBSD on any of the overlapping platforms, but NetBSD is on more platforms.

Re:How does NetBSD compare to OpenBSD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10935829)

Well, for one thing, NetBSD performs much better than OpenBSD and is at least on par with FreeBSD in that regard.

OpenBSD once tried to import UBC from NetBSD but failed, iirc.

Re:How does NetBSD compare to OpenBSD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10936193)

Indeed, NetBSD is much faster then OpenBSD.
More scalable as well.

OpenBSD is a fine project in its own right, but I much prefer NetBSD.

NetBSD is faster and more scalable then OpenBSD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10936165)

It is worth remembering that recent scalability test shown NetBSD the second most scalable OS.
After Linux kernel 2.6.

Now, notice that NetBSD beat both FreeBSD and OpenBSD.
OpenBSD came last on the test, and did rather poorly.
I like OpenBSD, a nice OS but NetBSD is more polished, faster and more scalabel as an OS.

NetBSD is also very secure.

Furthermore, NetBSD holds the TCP/IP record for amount of data transferred...

AND

it was the fastest in a PPPoE test between
Free/Open/Linux24

MIT uses it and NASA uses it, and VUW in Wellington, New Zealand.

NetBSD is the finest OS I have ever used.

Re:NetBSD is faster and more scalable then OpenBSD (1)

Nimrangul (599578) | more than 9 years ago | (#10938550)

Your post doesn't work very well for supporting NetBSD nor Linux: Which Linux distrobution was used? Which NetBSD release was used? OpenBSD? FreeBSD? What tests were used to determine the scalability? Were the tests made fairly or optimized for one platform or system? Who ran them? Were developers contacted to help optimize the systems or were default installs used? What compilers were used? Which platform? You need to put this information in a post for it to be taken seriously when you talk about a performance test of any kind. NetBSD is not as secure as OpenBSD, there is no way one can prove otherwise, it is the way things are. Just as OpenBSD cannot claim to be on the most processor architectures, it simply isn't. The NetBSD record for TCP/IP packet handling could probably be obtained by any system with a similar stack if the same test is done with them. If you are vaguely referring to the same record I think you are; then only NetBSD was tried for that test. Once again, who did the test? What was used to test it? Etcetera... I could care less what a university uses themselves; they also use Windows and Solaris. Perhaps if you said that MIT and NASA used it for their extremely important sevices and listed them it would matter to people. Sure, NetBSD is a very slim looking operating system, I just happen to be doing her sister.

Re:NetBSD is faster and more scalable then OpenBSD (1)

Nimrangul (599578) | more than 9 years ago | (#10938582)

Sorry about that, forgot to unselect HTML formatting.

Your post doesn't work very well for supporting NetBSD nor Linux:

Which Linux distrobution was used? Which NetBSD release was used? OpenBSD? FreeBSD?

What tests were used to determine the scalability? Were the tests made fairly or optimized for one platform or system? Who ran them? Were developers contacted to help optimize the systems or were default installs used? What compilers were used? Which platform?

You need to put this information in a post for it to be taken seriously when you talk about a performance test of any kind.

NetBSD is not as secure as OpenBSD, there is no way one can prove otherwise, it is the way things are. Just as OpenBSD cannot claim to be on the most processor architectures, it simply isn't.

The NetBSD record for TCP/IP packet handling could probably be obtained by any system with a similar stack if the same test is done with them. If you are vaguely referring to the same record I think you are; then only NetBSD was tried for that test.

Once again, who did the test? What was used to test it? Etcetera...

I could care less what a university uses themselves; they also use Windows and Solaris. Perhaps if you said that MIT and NASA used it for their extremely important sevices and listed them it would matter to people.

Sure, NetBSD is a very slim looking operating system, I just happen to be doing her sister.

Re:NetBSD is faster and more scalable then OpenBSD (1)

setagllib (753300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10941883)

You'd know all of this if you didn't live under a rock. Almost all of Slashdot's OS zealots/trolls know about Felix' (very flawed but still popular, making Felix himself a great candidate for government, ) scalability benchmarks which compare apples and oranges and then slander perfectly good systems.

Nevertheless, NetBSD went from being second worst to second best in two weeks of work, all of which continues to work stably and all. This is a proud achievement that the other BSDs could learn from, and apparently have (but nobody has put new figures up yet so it's not 'public').

NetBSD has three important things going for it: Cleanliness (code and system), stability, and portability. It also has security (but is not as active in this as OpenBSD, yet still very active..) and amazing performance in 2.0 (but most of the time performance is still left up to Linux). It has a very good place in computing, but could be doing much better if NVidia got up off their asses and made drivers for it, at the very least.

And yes, there are newer architectures that it doesn't support, ppc64 and ia64. Strange but true. Nevertheless when they do support it, they'll support it with "solutions, not hacks".

Re:NetBSD is faster and more scalable then OpenBSD (1)

Nimrangul (599578) | more than 9 years ago | (#10942682)

Oh yes, of course, how silly of me. Instead of telling some anonymous poster why their post cannot really be taken seriously I should have just assumed what they were talking about; filling in any blanks and correcting faults myself. Oh and Netcraft has confirmed that BSD is dying, so I better stop using it.

I was not talking smack about NetBSD's architecture numbers, I was more saying they do alot of cross compiling; a bad idea in my eyes as you no longer know for sure that the system can rebuild itself.

Re:NetBSD is faster and more scalable then OpenBSD (1)

setagllib (753300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948495)

That wasn't a flame, just wondering how anyone could ask at this point in time what scalability benches are being discussed. Don't take it so harshly.

The architecture numbers were a tangent mention that just happened to appear in a post otherwise replying to you. These things happen.

Take it easy, it's not worth popping a vein on Slashdot.

Re:NetBSD is faster and more scalable then OpenBSD (1)

Nimrangul (599578) | more than 9 years ago | (#10949061)

I didn't take it as an attack on me or anything, it is simply that one cannot expect other people to know everything that they do. I have read a few trans-operating system scalability tests, none of them really any good; so I cannot just magically know what one AC means in their post.

Re:NetBSD is faster and more scalable then OpenBSD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10941307)

Unfortunately as it stands it really does not matter which version of OpenBSD was used.
It is slow, sorry if it hurts.

Excellent firewall, but people complain that it is slow.
And apart from firewalling, VPN there is not anything else I would use it for.
Security is great, speed stinks...even Linux 2.6 beats it these days.

Re:NetBSD is faster and more scalable then OpenBSD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10941316)

OpenBSD is a lot slower then Linux 2.6, not even in the same leauge.
Same goes the other way around for security, while Linux 2.6 is a lot faster, I/O especially...security is well below OpenBSD out of the box.
Can be secured with SELinux, and time...different goals.

Re:How does NetBSD compare to OpenBSD? (2, Interesting)

tedu (647286) | more than 9 years ago | (#10935759)

as one point of comparison, in the time NetBSD 2.0 has been in beta, OpenBSD has managed to ship two releases out the door.

Re:How does NetBSD compare to OpenBSD? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10936200)

Selling CDs, are we ?
Look at speed, scalability, code..not point releases ;)

Computer Science != hacking.

Re:How does NetBSD compare to OpenBSD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10941111)

Re:How does NetBSD compare to OpenBSD?

Take a ride in to the danger zonnnnneeeeee!

Why I use Linux (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10934922)

_d8b____________________d8b_______d8,
_?88____________________88P______`8P
__88b__________________d88
__888888b__.d888b,_d888888________88b_.d888b,
__88P_`?8b_?8b,___d8P'_?88________88P_?8b,
_d88,__d88___`?8b_88b__,88b______d88____`?8b
d88'`?88P'`?888P'_`?88P'`88b____d88'_`?888P'

______d8b________________________d8b
______88P________________________88P
_____d88________________________d88
_d888888___d8888b_d888b8b___d888888
d8P'_?88__d8b_,dPd8P'_?88__d8P'_?88
88b__,88b_88b____88b__,88b_88b__,88b
`?88P'`88b`?888P'`?88P'`88b`?88P'`88b

*BSD Film Festival (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10934980)

*BSD Film Festival Tonite at the Bijou:

On the marquee:
# Flatliners
# A Kiss Before Dying
# Night of the Living Dead
# Dead Poet's Society
# Faces of Death
# Four Weddings and a *BSD Install

Why use NetBSD? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10934989)

1. You can not play games on it.
2. It cannot be used by my grandma.
3. It lacks a GUI of any note.
4. There is no support available for it.
5. It is an assortment of fragmented OSes.
6. It cannot be run on the x86 platform.
7. You have to compile everything and know C.
8. Support for the latest hardware is always poor.
9. It is incompatiable with GNU/Linux.
10.It is dying.

Re:Why use NetBSD? (1)

setagllib (753300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10936537)

Beautiful. The first 100% troll post I've seen in ages. Usually trolls have had at least one thing that was partially true, but not this one. Pure shit :)

A work of art, even. Thankyou sir, you give us something to mark other stupidities by.

Re:Why use NetBSD? (1)

DashEvil (645963) | more than 9 years ago | (#10936906)

Hey, you. You're a NetBSD advocate.

Make them release 2.0 already. I bought CD-R's specifically for this and I'll be damned if I don't get a chance to use them soon!

Re:Why use NetBSD? (2, Informative)

setagllib (753300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10939871)

I don't have that kind of power, nor would I do it if I could. You can install a 2.0RC5 system with a couple of floppies and FTP, or failing that, an unofficial ISO. You can then track (via cvs) netbsd-2-0 past its release and on to -stable. This will work very well for you and not require an official release, which, at this stage, could mean a flaky system for some other users (since there are still issues holding it back).

A lot happened to make 2.0, and given it's edging NetBSD out of 'old slow deprecated system' into 'holy sh*t-fast modern system', getting the first release Right is well worth the wait. The functional difference is about as much as FreeBSD 4 into FreeBSD 5 (sans some things like Project Evil), but with a performance gain instead of performance loss. You really have to try it to believe it.

Re:Why use NetBSD? (1)

ChristTrekker (91442) | more than 9 years ago | (#10942724)

edging NetBSD out of 'old slow deprecated system' into 'holy sh*t-fast modern system'

I'm a NetBSD user but don't follow all the news about latest developments at this level. In a nutshell, what's responsible for such a large performance boost? The biggest new feature I'm looking forward to in 2.0 is native threading. I'm going to recompile a bunch of my apps to take advantage of it.

Re:Why use NetBSD? (1)

setagllib (753300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948318)

Native threading is one very big thing (surprisingly big thing even), but generally they seem to have optimized everything and it all adds up to blinding performance, especially in how well it uses hardware. You won't see any hardware NOT doing the best it possibly can, is what I mean to say. And the hardware support itself is what I would call "clean like Linux, but with sensible messages". Hotplugging and everything is kernel-level unlike FreeBSD, which I rather like.

More interesting changes will come in AFTER 2.0 is released, since some new stuff is happening in -current that has to wait until after release. On this topic, the 2.0 release HAS BEEN TAGGED, so it's a matter of days before the release is official! The wait is over!

The power to serve - on the platform of your choice.

Net BSD versus Windows XP (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10934997)

Net BSD versus Windows XP

XP: Has the most advanced and easy to use GUI available.
NetBSD: Has no GUI of note.

XP: Supported by the world's largest and most trusted software company.
NetBSD: Supported by some losers who got kicked off of the 386BSD core team

XP: Available for free preinstalled on computers from every major manufacturer.
NetBSD: Available for free as an unstable source release that you have to compile yourself in C and then manually build your own base system.

XP: Stable and reliable, and scalable from the desktop to the datacenter.
NetBSD: Basically unusable due to major bugs. And it doesn't fix FreeBSD's SMP problems, so don't worry about running it on your server.

XP: Everyone else uses it, so it has all the popular software.
NetBSD: It runs...uh...vi...and...uhm...thats it actually...

XP: Microsoft has a licensing agreement with SCO, so all SCO IP is fully licensed when you buy a licensed copy of XP!
NetBSD: You may be liable for the same $699 licensing fee as linux users if you use it, after all, Microsoft is already paying licensing fees for the same code.

XP: Alive
NetBSD: Dead

As you can see, Windows XP is the clear choice!

Case Mod (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10935010)

click here [planetquake.com] [planetquake.com] to see the ideal case mod for a *BSD system!

Theres a new offical NetBSD Song! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10935018)

"Last Disk" [to the tune of Last Kiss by pearl jam]

Oh where, oh where is my BSD?
I just loaded Beta 5.3
It's gone to heaven, so I've got to be good,
So I can see the OS when I leave this world.

I'd started to load it in my roommate's Dell,
the hard drive was taking it pretty well.
During the load, it crashed the heads,
the distro was stalled, *BSD was dead.
I couldn't stop, so I yanked the cord.
I'll never forget, the sound , oh Lord--
the screamin' drives, the speaker's blast,
the painful scream that I-- heard last.

Oh where, oh where is my *BSD?
That load took it away from me.
It's gone to heaven, so I've got to be good,
So I can see *BSD when I leave this world.

When I woke up, the sparks were pourin down.
There were admins standin all around.
Some burned-out chips had fallen on the tiles,
but somehow I found my disc of files.
I lifted the CD, the devil winked and said,
"Load me darlin just a little while."
I held it close, I kissed the label--our last kiss.
I found the love that i knew i had missed
well now it's gone, even though I loaded it right
I lost my *BSD and the Dell-- that night.

Oh where, oh where is my *BSD?
I tried to load it yesterday.
It's gone to heaven so I've got to be good,
So I can see *BSD when I leave this world.

When I next went to Slashdot, where so many had trolled.
Any so many times "BSD's Dead!" was told.
Tears fallin' on the keyboard, I checked "Anonymous"
and I eulogized *BSD, in memory, of us....

When I logged on next, my post was modded down.
In my heartbreak and sorrow, treated like a clown....
No matter what the mods do, it's in my heart and head
We'll always know "*BSD IS DEAD!"

Oh where, oh where is my *BSD?
I tried to load it yesterday.
It's gone to heaven so I've got to be good,
So I can see *BSD when I leave this world.

One of the Devs just emailed me this... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10935033)

It is official; Netcraft now confirms: *BSD is dying

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered *BSD community when IDC confirmed that *BSD market share has dropped yet again, now down to less than a fraction of 1 percent of all servers. Coming on the heels of a recent Netcraft survey which plainly states that *BSD has lost more market share, this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along. *BSD is collapsing in complete disarray, as fittingly exemplified by failing dead last [samag.com] in the recent Sys Admin comprehensive networking test.

You don't need to be a Kreskin [amazingkreskin.com] to predict *BSD's future. The hand writing is on the wall: *BSD faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for *BSD because *BSD is dying. Things are looking very bad for *BSD. As many of us are already aware, *BSD continues to lose market share. Red ink flows like a river of blood.

FreeBSD is the most endangered of them all, having lost 93% of its core developers. The sudden and unpleasant departures of long time FreeBSD developers Jordan Hubbard and Mike Smith only serve to underscore the point more clearly. There can no longer be any doubt: FreeBSD is dying.

Let's keep to the facts and look at the numbers.

OpenBSD leader Theo states that there are 7000 users of OpenBSD. How many users of NetBSD are there? Let's see. The number of OpenBSD versus NetBSD posts on Usenet is roughly in ratio of 5 to 1. Therefore there are about 7000/5 = 1400 NetBSD users. BSD/OS posts on Usenet are about half of the volume of NetBSD posts. Therefore there are about 700 users of BSD/OS. A recent article put FreeBSD at about 80 percent of the *BSD market. Therefore there are (7000+1400+700)*4 = 36400 FreeBSD users. This is consistent with the number of FreeBSD Usenet posts.

Due to the troubles of Walnut Creek, abysmal sales and so on, FreeBSD went out of business and was taken over by BSDI who sell another troubled OS. Now BSDI is also dead, its corpse turned over to yet another charnel house.

All major surveys show that *BSD has steadily declined in market share. *BSD is very sick and its long term survival prospects are very dim. If *BSD is to survive at all it will be among OS dilettante dabblers. *BSD continues to decay. Nothing short of a miracle could save it at this point in time. For all practical purposes, *BSD is dead.

Fact: *BSD is dying

*BSD is dying (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10940959)

It is now official. Netcraft confirms: *BSD is dying

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered *BSD community when IDC confirmed that *BSD market share has dropped yet again, now down to less than a fraction of 1 percent of all servers. Coming on the heels of a recent Netcraft survey which plainly states that *BSD has lost more market share, this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along. *BSD is collapsing in complete disarray, as fittingly exemplified by failing dead last [samag.com] in the recent Sys Admin comprehensive networking test.

You don't need to be the Amazing Kreskin [amazingkreskin.com] to predict *BSD's future. The hand writing is on the wall: *BSD faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for *BSD because *BSD is dying. Things are looking very bad for *BSD. As many of us are already aware, *BSD continues to lose market share. Red ink flows like a river of blood.

FreeBSD is the most endangered of them all, having lost 93% of its core developers. The sudden and unpleasant departures of long time FreeBSD developers Jordan Hubbard and Mike Smith only serve to underscore the point more clearly. There can no longer be any doubt: FreeBSD is dying.

Let's keep to the facts and look at the numbers.

OpenBSD leader Theo states that there are 7000 users of OpenBSD. How many users of NetBSD are there? Let's see. The number of OpenBSD versus NetBSD posts on Usenet is roughly in ratio of 5 to 1. Therefore there are about 7000/5 = 1400 NetBSD users. BSD/OS posts on Usenet are about half of the volume of NetBSD posts. Therefore there are about 700 users of BSD/OS. A recent article put FreeBSD at about 80 percent of the *BSD market. Therefore there are (7000+1400+700)*4 = 36400 FreeBSD users. This is consistent with the number of FreeBSD Usenet posts.

Due to the troubles of Walnut Creek, abysmal sales and so on, FreeBSD went out of business and was taken over by BSDI who sell another troubled OS. Now BSDI is also dead, its corpse turned over to yet another charnel house.

All major surveys show that *BSD has steadily declined in market share. *BSD is very sick and its long term survival prospects are very dim. If *BSD is to survive at all it will be among OS dilettante dabblers. *BSD continues to decay. Nothing short of a miracle could save it at this point in time. For all practical purposes, *BSD is dead.

Fact: *BSD is dead

jeeze (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11001513)

All this attacking linux is probably making you guys thirsty, you don't have an inferiority complex do you?

I wish people would stop whinging and just accept that different things a better for different things.

i.e. there are cases where netbsd, openbsd, freebsd or various versions of linux excel at what they are designed to do.

For example; out of the above, linux is "best" on the desktop. From speed of setup, hardware detection, open and closed drivers etc. If you want to run a desktop with some games, 3D acceleration, flash, realplayer etc. And you don't want to spend an age setting it up. Things like fedora core 3 leave the others in the dust. I can have a fedora core box set up in about 20 minutes with everything working for the above tasks. It simply leaves your command line installs and hardware problem OSs in the dust. That is it's PURPOSE.

BUT, for a networking purpose, security needed, embedded/low disk space etc. it is likely that netbsd will absolutely thrash fedora core.

It's possible that they can do each other's jobs, it's just they have emphases. Which makes me think the guy running fedora on his desktop and running netbsd on his special server is the true techy. And the guy running fedora on both or netbsd on both is the zealot.

I know a number of phds in comp sci who use fedora because they are sick of messing with command line stuff they don't need to (even though that CAN, they dont NEED to). That is a massive feature which cannot be priced in your "eliteness" worlds.

It's gentoo syndrome all over again. 1% speed boost.....AFTER hours and hours of tweaking which cancel out the speed boost by many orders of magnitude. Gentoo is a platform to LEARN on, not to use as a desktop.

Everything has it's place and it's purpose. Anyone who claims they have a one-size-fits-all is peddling snake oil.

So netbsd is very impressive for what it specialises in. But SHUT THE FUCK UP to all these trollish wankers who constantly claim their OSs are appointed by God. It goes for linux zealots to BSD zealots.

The BSD guys always claim to be more mature, but all I see of them is constant jealousy. And the linux tardates are always stirring shit by "bsd is dying" it.

All of you just shut the fuck up you fucking nerds. Wipe the orange cheeto dust off your fingers and just discuss the pros of netbsd and what is good about it.

You are all falling into troll traps.
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>