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Intel's Expensive Disco Ball

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the dance-to-it-baby dept.

Intel 324

Re-Pawn writes "From the NY Times: The Disco Ball of Failed Hopes and Other Tales From Inside Intel (Registration Required.) Seems like Intel is losing market share to other chip makers - this article highlights a few problems that Intel has had including one very expensive disco ball made from a failed attempt to produce projection televisions."

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wINNAR (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947836)

WINNAH

ahh! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947838)

oh my

Fixed broken link (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947846)

thanks to google [google.com]

Better than Google- BugMeNot (0, Offtopic)

fsterman (519061) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948348)

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Karma Whoring OFF!

fdsfdfds (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947848)

FIRST POST jaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

all your chips (5, Funny)

Shinaku (757671) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947849)

are no longer belong to them!

Intel ZIG intiative (5, Funny)

stealth.c (724419) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947950)

Perhaps now would be a good time for Intel to launch its enigmatic ZIG program. Nobody's quite sure what it is but rumor has it that the new initiative could result in great justice.

Registration Not Required (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947853)

over at CNET [com.com] , as I'm sure it is not required at many other sites.

What's with the /. addiction to NYT?

Re:Registration Not Required (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947948)

Have you noticed that all of the NYT article summaries have the same writing style? Have you also noticed that the Slashdot User Info pages of all submitted NYT articles have an odd posting history? My guess is that someone financially interested in NYT's success has been writing and submitting these article summaries for the past few years.

Re:Registration Not Required (1, Offtopic)

itwerx (165526) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948139)

Have you noticed that all of the NYT article summaries have the same writing style? Have you also noticed that the Slashdot User Info pages of all submitted NYT articles have an odd posting history?

Er, no, I haven't noticed that. Care to be more specific? :)

Re:Registration Not Required (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948269)

If you notice the posting history of the article submitters, you will notice some pattern such as:
  • None of the users have their emails shown publically
  • None of the users bothered to fill out their description fields
  • All have similar posting histories, about a message a month, and you may also notice that the message postings for each user have similar dates (i.e. if a message was posted from one account in May of last year but didn't have any other postings for the next month, then the other NYT user accounts will show the same pattern)
  • Many of the accounts have similar creation times (and thus have a similar number of message postings)

Those are just a few of the things I can think off the top of my head that have looked awful suspicious.

Not all postings are made by this finicially interested individual or group. There are some exceptions, such as a professor who once posted a link to an article about his research, and maybe one or two other people who were genuinely bored, found something the liked, wrote a summary, and submitted it to Slashdot. However, I think those submitters are in a minority.

Re:Registration Not Required (3, Interesting)

Suburbanpride (755823) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948217)

I submitted this story too, and I can promise that I don't work for the Times. I do happen to spend at least 30 minutes a day reading it tough. I think it is one of the best sources of news out there

I don't normaly read the times for tech news though (that's what slashdot is for). But it certainly rather see this posted than a nother article about the guy who made a working death star out of old shampoo bottles and ber cans in his parents basement :)

Re:Registration Not Required (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948345)

I don't normaly read the times for tech news though

funny though how it seems the times is such a prevalent source of our tech news then don't it?

Re:Registration Not Required (1)

CmdrStallman (578747) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947980)

What's with the /. addiction to NYT?>

Well, you can start with all the liberal faggotry they have in common and go from there.

Use NYT Generator! (5, Informative)

antdude (79039) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948080)

Clicky [nytimes.com] without logging in! Use NYT Generator [blogspace.com] for these NYT stories.

Re:Registration Not Required (2, Funny)

jd (1658) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948161)

It's part of a secret readership drive, using subliminal suggestions in NYT-based stories to assimilate the entire Slashdot following. It is combined with a secret program to promote the NYT as immune to terrorist attacks. After all, if they can survive a Slashdotting, they can survive anything!

NYTimes :( (-1, Offtopic)

sheaman (826235) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947854)

Can someone that has a NYTimes login paste the text in?

Back on subject...How does this "disco ball" refrence work?

Re:NYTimes :( (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947909)

login: slashdot03 password: slashdot03 ken sent me.

Re:NYTimes :( (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947914)

diy muh man [bugmenot.com]

Re:NYTimes :( (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947938)

Ever heard of www.bugmenot.com ? :)

Check it out, it rules

BTW, we should have a www.spreadbugmenot.com :P

And oh, www.mailinator.com is the perfect companion

Re:NYTimes :( (1)

sheaman (826235) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948127)

bugmenot just became my favorite site of the day

THIS ARTICLE SCARED THE SHIT OUT OF ME (-1, Flamebait)

arothstein (233805) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947860)

LITERALLY. I READ THE ARTICLE, AND THEN TOOK A HUGE DUMP.

*_g_o_a_t_s_e_x_*_g_o_a_t_s_e_x_*_g_o_a_t_s_e_x_*_
g_______________________________________________g_ _
o_/_____\_____________\____________/____\_______o_ _
a|_______|_____________\__________|______|______a_ _
t|_______`._____________|_________|_______:_____t_ _
s`________|_____________|________\|_______|_____s_ _
e_\_______|_/_______/__\\\___--___\\_______:____e_ _
x__\______\/____--~~__________~--__|_\_____|____x_ _
*___\______\_-~____________________~-_\____|____*_ _
g____\______\_________.--------.______\|___|____g_ _
o______\_____\______//_________(_(__>__\___|____o_ _
a_______\___.__C____)_________(_(____>__|__/____a_ _
t_______/\_|___C_____)/INTEL_\_(_____>__|_/_____t_ _
s______/_/\|___C_____)_INSIDE|__(___>___/__\____s_ _
e_____|___(____C_____)\_(TM)_/__//__/_/_____\___e_ _
x_____|____\__|_____\\_________//_(__/_______|__x_ _
*____|_\____\____)___`----___--'_____________|__*_ _
g____|__\______________\_______/____________/_|_g_ _
o___|______________/____|_____|__\____________|_o_ _
a___|_____________|____/_______\__\___________|_a_ _
t___|__________/_/____|_________|__\___________|t_ _
s___|_________/_/______\__/\___/____|__________|s_ _
e__|_________/_/________|____|_______|_________|e_ _
x__|__________|_________|____|_______|_________|x_ _
*_g_o_a_t_s_e_x_*_g_o_a_t_s_e_x_*_g_o_a_t_s_e_x_*_


Important Stuff: Please try to keep posts on topic. Try to reply to other people's comments instead of starting new threads. Read other people's messages before posting your own to avoid simply duplicating what has already been said. Use a clear subject that describes what your message is about. Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated. (You can read everything, even moderated posts, by adjusting your threshold on the User Preferences Page) If you want replies to your comments sent to you, consider logging in or creating an account.

Important Stuff: Please try to keep posts on topic. Try to reply to other people's comments instead of starting new threads. Read other people's messages before posting your own to avoid simply duplicating what has already been said. Use a clear subject that describes what your message is about. Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated. (You can read everything, even moderated posts, by adjusting your threshold on the User Preferences Page) If you want replies to your comments sent to you, consider logging in or creating an account.

Important Stuff: Please try to keep posts on topic. Try to reply to other people's comments instead of starting new threads. Read other people's messages before posting your own to avoid simply duplicating what has already been said. Use a clear subject that describes what your message is about. Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated. (You can read everything, even moderated posts, by adjusting your threshold on the User Preferences Page) If you want replies to your comments sent to you, consider logging in or creating an account.

AMD4EVA (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947863)

down with intel

who's house (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947873)

ravens housE

Article text (4, Informative)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947879)

(Courtesy of bugmenot.com ;-) )

One sign that Intel is having trouble dancing to technology's current beat may be the world's most expensive disco ball.

For a company holiday party next month, a handful of engineers assembled a disco ball - with hundreds of small reflective devices - to hang above the dance floor. The mirrors are leftover projection-television chips from Intel's planned effort to enter the digital television market - an effort the company recently abandoned only 10 months after a splashy introduction at the Consumer Electronics Show last January.

The TV effort became yet another in a series of embarrassing stumbles for Intel. The company has publicly canceled a succession of high-profile projects, has replaced managers in money-losing ventures and has fallen behind its keen competitor Advanced Micro Devices in introducing technologies, like a feature that wards off viruses and worms, in markets that Intel has long dominated.

A.M.D. has been so successful in stealing the spotlight from Intel lately that Kevin B. Rollins, the president of one of Intel's biggest customers, Dell Computer, said at a financial conference call this month that Dell was considering adding computers with A.M.D. chips to its product line.

For two decades, Intel has been the most sure-footed of Silicon Valley companies. But lately, it seems to have lost its way. "They have made many wrong decisions and now it's time for soul-searching and structural, not cosmetic, changes," said Ashok Kumar, a financial analyst at Raymond James & Associates.

This all portends an interesting inauguration for Intel's 50-year-old president, Paul S. Otellini, the longtime Intel marketing executive tapped by the board this month to become only the fourth chief executive in the company's history.

Mr. Otellini does not officially take the job until May. But next week in one of his first official acts as the designated chief executive, he plans to present his strategy to Wall Street analysts. He may have a lot to answer for, including the 25 percent decline in Intel's stock price this year.

Mr. Otellini will tell analysts that he plans to focus on four areas for growth: international markets for desktop personal computers, mobile and wireless applications, the digital home, as well as a new initiative aimed at large corporate computing markets that Intel is calling the Digital Office.

The strategy is a significant shift - a "right-hand turn," as Mr. Otellini likes to say - from Intel's long-term obsession with making ever-faster computer chips. Instead, the company is now concentrating on what he calls platforms: complete systems aimed at both computing and consumer electronics markets.

Mr. Otellini insists that the recent missteps, including the premature introduction he himself made of the digital project, are simply a result of over-optimistic marketing.

"What was wrong was that I made the decision to go public on it at the Consumer Electronics Show," he said in a recent interview in Intel's Santa Clara headquarters. "Error of judgment. Mea culpa. I learned a lesson."

The decision to preannounce an unproven technology was an uncharacteristic one for Intel, said G. Dan Hutcheson, president of VLSI Research Inc., and a longtime observer of the company. However, he said, it has been Mr. Otellini's ascendancy at the company that has changed the way it markets technology.

"As he came into power Intel tried to become a more aggressive marketing company," he said. "They never seemingly made mistakes before and that was simply because they didn't preannounce. This is the classic failure of a company where the marketing guys are pushing the manufacturing guys more than what's there."

Intel is still a technology giant, the global leader in semiconductors, with revenue last year of more than $30 billion. The company retains an unrivaled manufacturing capacity, control of a powerful desktop computing standard, and an enviable international growth rate which shows no sign of slowing anytime soon.

But some of the company's marketing problems may become more acute before they are resolved. Until recently, selling Intel chips was easy: faster was better. Now, Mr. Otellini said, Intel intends to play the same game with the number of processor cores that can be embedded on a chip. The hope is that by breaking problems into parts that can be computed by separate cores simultaneously, chips will continue to offer better performance.

The problem with the strategy is that so far Intel is trailing A.M.D., I.B.M. and Sun Microsystems, who all have their own aggressive multicore chip strategies.

Yet Intel's challenge in entering new markets also runs deeper, according to an engineer who worked on the ill-fated digital television project and insisted on not being identified. The engineer said that the company's failure to perfect the technology, known as liquid crystal on silicon, or LCOS, came from its inability to think beyond its expertise in manufacturing digital circuits. The company's failure was that it did not search for outside expertise soon enough.

The LCOS display technology has proved vexing to many other consumer electronics companies because it is so difficult to manufacture. However, Intel's top executives believed that by applying the same manufacturing process techniques that have gained it dominance in microprocessors, the company would succeed where others have failed. The engineer described sitting in meetings where the company's simulation models showed that 95 percent of the chips from each test wafer would be usable, while the actual yields were closer to 4 percent. High manufacturing yields are the holy grail of the chip-making industry but Intel has been unable to translate its traditional prowess to the new technology. That gap meant that Intel was unable to drive the cost of the chips down in the same way it has traditionally lowered the costs of its microprocessors.

Indeed, LCOS may not be the last of Mr. Otellini's tough decisions.

"He has a tough inheritance," said Richard Doherty, a computer industry consultant who is president of Envisioneering, based in Seaford, N.Y. "He has to take a cold hard look at these new markets, particularly the ones that aren't carrying their own weight."

To combat the inroads in the microprocessor market being made by A.M.D. and other competitors, Intel is moving to add a growing array of functions to its microprocessor chips, a strategy that Mr. Otelleni refers to awkwardly as the "platformization" of Intel. Currently, the company has 10,000 software developers and its new chip sets each ship with over a million lines of software code, largely hidden from the user.

The clearest example of that strategy to date is the Centrino microprocessor for portable computers, which comes bundled with wireless abilities.

"We don't talk about the chip, but the collection of attributes that Intel brings," he said. "That's the footprint in the snow for Intel's future."

The ability to add software functions to its chips is a genuine opportunity for Intel but it also raises the possibility that it will reignite some of the tensions the company has faced in its more than two-decade-old alliance with Microsoft, which has intensely resisted Intel's software efforts in the past. And the two companies are increasingly likely to compete both in Intel's efforts to enter the digital home and its new effort to embed software that provides greater manageability in systems sold to the corporate server market.

The most visible fracture in the Wintel alliance came last year when Microsoft chose I.B.M.'s microprocessors over Intel's x86 chips for the next version of its Xbox game machine. Mr. Otellini said he believed that future consumer versions of Intel's Entertainment PC would gain favor over traditional video game machines.

"Our view is that an evolutionary version of the PC will win that space," he said. "Do you want a rack of single-purpose devices costing from $100 to $250 each or do you want one $400 to $500 device, the PC? The key to the home is networking, and the PC is much better suited to do that."

The challenges in front of Mr. Otellini are balanced by the company's enviable position and the reality that desktop computer markets are just starting to grow in many parts of the world. Intel, he said, now sees China and India as maturing markets while its real potential is in rapidly growing countries like Laos and Vietnam. Not long ago, the company got its first dealers in Nigeria.

Moreover, Mr. Otellini said that despite the defeat in the digital television business, Intel still has some big bets that it hopes will pay off as lucratively as the PC industry once did.

One of those big bets came into sharper focus last month when it announced it was investing in Clearwire, a digital wireless start-up being led by Craig McCaw, a cellular telephone pioneer. Clearwire hopes to capitalize on the unproven long-range version of the WiFi digital wireless standard called Wi-Max and Mr. Otellini clearly hopes the technology will be a disruptive one.

If his vision is correct, the big losers will be today's voice telephone companies.

"Voice is going to be free as a result of all of this, which the carriers don't like to hear, but that's essentially where it's going," he said.

What is in it for Intel? A cellphone-like wireless handset that works seamlessly both inside and outside the home throughout an urban area.

That is a market that could easily mitigate any number of missteps and blunders - potentially a market that would remake the cellular phone world that so far has largely eluded Intel.

"Any market of 600 million small computers is not just important, but it's critical to us," Mr. Otellini said.

Steve Lohr contributed reporting for this article.

Quality not just hurtz (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947962)

For two decades, Intel has been the most sure-footed of Silicon Valley companies. But lately, it seems to have lost its way.

Intel maybe is forgetting quality. My PERL mobo and 2.4 GHz died a few weeks ago just out of warranty. This has a tendancy to drive people to AMD. This is why hurtz and not hertz.

Need a dual proc 2GHz AMD... that takes less than 50 watts.

Re:Article text (4, Interesting)

PhotoGuy (189467) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948027)

"What was wrong was that I made the decision to go public on it at the Consumer Electronics Show," he said in a recent interview in Intel's Santa Clara headquarters. "Error of judgment. Mea culpa. I learned a lesson."

I like this statement. And I think it's consistent with what I've known of Intel first hand. A corporation this large and leading-edge, needs to dabble and branch off in "researchy" ways to test out areas of new market potential.

I was involved in a company whose seed money came from a sizeable (to us) contract from Intel, to license our technology in the digital imaging space. They were a great company to work with, talented people, good executives, and they got their demonstration technology, based upon our code, up and life in a respectable time.

The site was never marketed and never took off, but I believe it served their purposes in exploring this potential area of technology. It's a good thing to see a company like Intel taking part in this type of thing.

The only story here, as in the quote above, is that they made a bit of a visible statement about where they were headed, before knowing for sure. Minor mis-step, if mis-step at all.

-d

Re:Article text (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948253)

"The only story here, as in the quote above, is that they made a bit of a visible statement about where they were headed, before knowing for sure. Minor mis-step, if mis-step at all." It was a mis-step. That said, we have a corp. culture that embraces risk taking. This is epitomized that Paul is now being promoted to CEO, in spite of this. If you are afraid to take risk you will not make it big. We will continue to take (informed) risks, we will continue to make the occasional mis-step, and we will continue to win when our risks pay off (as they often do).

Re:Article text (4, Funny)

itwerx (165526) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948163)

So where the hell is a pic of the damn ball already?!?
Geez... :)

come on (5, Insightful)

lashi (822466) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947896)

oh, come on, what company doesn't burn some R & D money that ends up junked? I am sure all the "good" companies like IBM and so on have failed projects too.

Now if you are doing this as a showcase of bad ideas, let's link a few more interesting samples.

Re:come on (4, Insightful)

Coryoth (254751) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947977)

oh, come on, what company doesn't burn some R & D money that ends up junked? I am sure all the "good" companies like IBM and so on have failed projects too.

Yes, but I think the point is that Intel is somewhat lacking in the "recent successes" department to cover the losses on the failures - For now they're still happily on top of the market, and that is their strength, but they are losing mindshare, which really is crucial. The more that other chips are seen as perfectly viable options the faster Intel could lose market share.

There is, of course, no reason to go counting them out just yet. I'm sure Intel has plenty of fight left, and potentially a few cards still up their sleeve. Compared to their position 3 or 4 years ago however, they are not looking anywhere near so good.

Jedidiah.

Re:come on (1)

Sebastopol (189276) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948023)

Wasn't centrino a success? It's low power and integrated wireless made AMD have to follow suit and revamp its mobile core line. Of course, the anti-intel slant (not you!) on this board tends to not see AMD failures.

Re:come on (5, Insightful)

Coryoth (254751) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948093)

Wasn't centrino a success? It's low power and integrated wireless made AMD have to follow suit and revamp its mobile core line. Of course, the anti-intel slant (not you!) on this board tends to not see AMD failures.

Yes, Centrino was a definite win for Intel. That means they're doing well in the laptop market, but are losing share on the desktop. And yes, AMD is not without its own issues: The Opteron hasn't been doing quite as well as they would like [theregister.co.uk] . That's not exactly fatal, but its not exactly great press either.

So, in summary: laptop: Intel, desktop: AMD, server: still up for grabs. The question is whether the laptop market will supercede the desktop market - certainly the laptop market is growing faster... it may have a lower ceiling though, and there's always Apple and the Power chips to compete with there, and Apple is quite strong in laptops.

Only time will tell.

Jedidiah.

Re:come on (4, Insightful)

Monkelectric (546685) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948165)

There is a Centrino Shortage [theinquirer.net] BTW which is keeping the prices of those popular laptops way too hight IMHO. Not sure If Id call that a "success". They make a product people want, then they dont have it

Re:come on (3, Insightful)

Moofie (22272) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948335)

Any time you're selling more than you can make, that's a "success".

Re:come on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948102)

What you all don't realize, is that Intel is the #1 manufacturer of NOR based flash memory. This is the memory used as a boot device in nearly everything.
Quick lesson: NAND is used in digital cameras and USB memory keys, is fast to write, but slow to read. NOR is very fast to read but slower to write (Intel is working hard to change this). While NAND is the high visibility product, it has much lower margins. NOR is a great moneymaker.

Re:come on (1, Interesting)

itwerx (165526) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948236)

What you all don't realize, is that Intel is the #1 manufacturer of NOR based flash memory.

And the portion of Intel's profits stemming from this doesn't even warrant a line item in their financial breakdown. STFU troll!

Re:come on (4, Insightful)

Total_Wimp (564548) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948050)

"Dell Computer, said at a financial conference call this month that Dell was considering adding computers with A.M.D. chips to its product line."

The words "news of Intel's death were greatly exagerated," come to mind.

It's like Microsoft wringing their hands over Linux; they _should_ be paying attention, but they've got a long way to go before they become number 2.

TW

Re:come on (1)

jonbryce (703250) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948095)

Not that long if they don't come up with an answer to AMD64 soon.

Itanium looks like it is a complete failure.

an interesting example -- ia64 (1)

bani (467531) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948277)

intel seems to be succumbing to stubborn 'face-saving' rather than killing projects which are obviously broken beyond repair.

take ia64 for example. over a decade of development, billions and billions sunk into the project, and they have nothing to show for it. remember that intel intended ia64 to replace ia32. go ahead and point to a couple overpriced ( terrible price/performance) top100 machines as "vindication" of ia64 -- but realize that intel expected ia64 to be on millions of desktops and servers by now -- not a tiny niche of a few custom built supercomputers.

project monterey is dead, core ia64 partners are abandoning ship. microsoft cancelled ia64 clustering in their products, which pretty much kills ia64 for business.

while intel is busy trying to save face by continuing to beat the ia64 dead horse, they are being eaten alive by amd.

the old intel killed off i860 and i432 when they didn't deliver on their promises. the old intel would have killed off ia64 by now.

it remains to be seen if today's intel can regain focus, or if they will continue to stubbornly "save face" instead.

Re:come on (3, Insightful)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948339)

oh, come on, what company doesn't burn some R & D money that ends up junked? I am sure all the "good" companies like IBM and so on have failed projects too.

One big difference is that those "good" companies were also smart: they didn't go to the press and the trade shows and drum up a lot of hype over their R&D projects, saying they'd be releasing products based on them very soon. Yes, IBM did make the Linux wristwatch, but they also made it very clear this was simply a research project, and nothing more, and would not show up in stores any time soon. Intel made all kinds of noise about how they'd revolutionize the big-screen TV market with their LCOS technology, and it didn't work.

This is not a way to inspire confidence in your company. The old story of the boy who cried wolf is very applicable here.

Re:come on (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948362)

all the "good" companies like IBM


Shedfuls. I can say no more.

waar's my first post (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947898)

ek soek first post my fok

Interesting thought for youall: (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947905)

Though the x86 now pretty much owns the consumer pc chip market unchallenged-- it's just that Intel isn't always the person shipping that x86 chip-- Intel's platforms are not doing so well in other areas. IBM's POWER chip, the chip the PowerPC is based on, is very very quickly becoming the new MIPS. All three of the next-generation video game systems-- the PS3, the XBox Next, and the Nintendo Revolution-- are known to use CPUs based off of a POWER core...

Karma Whoring! (-1, Redundant)

aaron_hill2 (772732) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947908)

One sign that Intel is having trouble dancing to technology's current beat may be the world's most expensive disco ball. For a company holiday party next month, a handful of engineers assembled a disco ball - with hundreds of small reflective devices - to hang above the dance floor. The mirrors are leftover projection-television chips from Intel's planned effort to enter the digital television market - an effort the company recently abandoned only 10 months after a splashy introduction at the Consumer Electronics Show last January. The TV effort became yet another in a series of embarrassing stumbles for Intel. The company has publicly canceled a succession of high-profile projects, has replaced managers in money-losing ventures and has fallen behind its keen competitor Advanced Micro Devices in introducing technologies, like a feature that wards off viruses and worms, in markets that Intel has long dominated. A.M.D. has been so successful in stealing the spotlight from Intel lately that Kevin B. Rollins, the president of one of Intel's biggest customers, Dell Computer, said at a financial conference call this month that Dell was considering adding computers with A.M.D. chips to its product line. For two decades, Intel has been the most sure-footed of Silicon Valley companies. But lately, it seems to have lost its way. "They have made many wrong decisions and now it's time for soul-searching and structural, not cosmetic, changes," said Ashok Kumar, a financial analyst at Raymond James & Associates. This all portends an interesting inauguration for Intel's 50-year-old president, Paul S. Otellini, the longtime Intel marketing executive tapped by the board this month to become only the fourth chief executive in the company's history. Mr. Otellini does not officially take the job until May. But next week in one of his first official acts as the designated chief executive, he plans to present his strategy to Wall Street analysts. He may have a lot to answer for, including the 25 percent decline in Intel's stock price this year. Mr. Otellini will tell analysts that he plans to focus on four areas for growth: international markets for desktop personal computers, mobile and wireless applications, the digital home, as well as a new initiative aimed at large corporate computing markets that Intel is calling the Digital Office. The strategy is a significant shift - a "right-hand turn," as Mr. Otellini likes to say - from Intel's long-term obsession with making ever-faster computer chips. Instead, the company is now concentrating on what he calls platforms: complete systems aimed at both computing and consumer electronics markets. Mr. Otellini insists that the recent missteps, including the premature introduction he himself made of the digital project, are simply a result of over-optimistic marketing. "What was wrong was that I made the decision to go public on it at the Consumer Electronics Show," he said in a recent interview in Intel's Santa Clara headquarters. "Error of judgment. Mea culpa. I learned a lesson." The decision to preannounce an unproven technology was an uncharacteristic one for Intel, said G. Dan Hutcheson, president of VLSI Research Inc., and a longtime observer of the company. However, he said, it has been Mr. Otellini's ascendancy at the company that has changed the way it markets technology. "As he came into power Intel tried to become a more aggressive marketing company," he said. "They never seemingly made mistakes before and that was simply because they didn't preannounce. This is the classic failure of a company where the marketing guys are pushing the manufacturing guys more than what's there." Intel is still a technology giant, the global leader in semiconductors, with revenue last year of more than $30 billion. The company retains an unrivaled manufacturing capacity, control of a powerful desktop computing standard, and an enviable international growth rate which shows no sign of slowing anytime soon. But some of the company's marketing problems may become more acute before they are resolved. Until recently, selling Intel chips was easy: faster was better. Now, Mr. Otellini said, Intel intends to play the same game with the number of processor cores that can be embedded on a chip. The hope is that by breaking problems into parts that can be computed by separate cores simultaneously, chips will continue to offer better performance. The problem with the strategy is that so far Intel is trailing A.M.D., I.B.M. and Sun Microsystems, who all have their own aggressive multicore chip strategies. Yet Intel's challenge in entering new markets also runs deeper, according to an engineer who worked on the ill-fated digital television project and insisted on not being identified. The engineer said that the company's failure to perfect the technology, known as liquid crystal on silicon, or LCOS, came from its inability to think beyond its expertise in manufacturing digital circuits. The company's failure was that it did not search for outside expertise soon enough. The LCOS display technology has proved vexing to many other consumer electronics companies because it is so difficult to manufacture. However, Intel's top executives believed that by applying the same manufacturing process techniques that have gained it dominance in microprocessors, the company would succeed where others have failed. The engineer described sitting in meetings where the company's simulation models showed that 95 percent of the chips from each test wafer would be usable, while the actual yields were closer to 4 percent. High manufacturing yields are the holy grail of the chip-making industry but Intel has been unable to translate its traditional prowess to the new technology. That gap meant that Intel was unable to drive the cost of the chips down in the same way it has traditionally lowered the costs of its microprocessors. Indeed, LCOS may not be the last of Mr. Otellini's tough decisions. "He has a tough inheritance," said Richard Doherty, a computer industry consultant who is president of Envisioneering, based in Seaford, N.Y. "He has to take a cold hard look at these new markets, particularly the ones that aren't carrying their own weight." To combat the inroads in the microprocessor market being made by A.M.D. and other competitors, Intel is moving to add a growing array of functions to its microprocessor chips, a strategy that Mr. Otelleni refers to awkwardly as the "platformization" of Intel. Currently, the company has 10,000 software developers and its new chip sets each ship with over a million lines of software code, largely hidden from the user. The clearest example of that strategy to date is the Centrino microprocessor for portable computers, which comes bundled with wireless abilities. "We don't talk about the chip, but the collection of attributes that Intel brings," he said. "That's the footprint in the snow for Intel's future." The ability to add software functions to its chips is a genuine opportunity for Intel but it also raises the possibility that it will reignite some of the tensions the company has faced in its more than two-decade-old alliance with Microsoft, which has intensely resisted Intel's software efforts in the past. And the two companies are increasingly likely to compete both in Intel's efforts to enter the digital home and its new effort to embed software that provides greater manageability in systems sold to the corporate server market. The most visible fracture in the Wintel alliance came last year when Microsoft chose I.B.M.'s microprocessors over Intel's x86 chips for the next version of its Xbox game machine. Mr. Otellini said he believed that future consumer versions of Intel's Entertainment PC would gain favor over traditional video game machines. "Our view is that an evolutionary version of the PC will win that space," he said. "Do you want a rack of single-purpose devices costing from $100 to $250 each or do you want one $400 to $500 device, the PC? The key to the home is networking, and the PC is much better suited to do that." The challenges in front of Mr. Otellini are balanced by the company's enviable position and the reality that desktop computer markets are just starting to grow in many parts of the world. Intel, he said, now sees China and India as maturing markets while its real potential is in rapidly growing countries like Laos and Vietnam. Not long ago, the company got its first dealers in Nigeria. Moreover, Mr. Otellini said that despite the defeat in the digital television business, Intel still has some big bets that it hopes will pay off as lucratively as the PC industry once did. One of those big bets came into sharper focus last month when it announced it was investing in Clearwire, a digital wireless start-up being led by Craig McCaw, a cellular telephone pioneer. Clearwire hopes to capitalize on the unproven long-range version of the WiFi digital wireless standard called Wi-Max and Mr. Otellini clearly hopes the technology will be a disruptive one. If his vision is correct, the big losers will be today's voice telephone companies. "Voice is going to be free as a result of all of this, which the carriers don't like to hear, but that's essentially where it's going," he said. What is in it for Intel? A cellphone-like wireless handset that works seamlessly both inside and outside the home throughout an urban area. That is a market that could easily mitigate any number of missteps and blunders - potentially a market that would remake the cellular phone world that so far has largely eluded Intel. "Any market of 600 million small computers is not just important, but it's critical to us," Mr. Otellini said.

Re:Karma Whoring! (1)

-kertrats- (718219) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947933)

You could at least try and make the effort of including
s.

Re:Karma Whoring! (1)

-kertrats- (718219) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948008)

Yay me, ridiculing someone for their poor post and then forgetting to turn off HTML! That was supposed to say <br>s, instead of a line break there.

Re:Karma Whoring! (1)

Brandybuck (704397) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948150)

Use &lt; and &gt; instead of brackets. Works every time. Now that's karma whoring!

HEY SLASHDOT! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947911)

Why don't you start charging NYT instead of giving them free advertising? Then you wouldn't have to mooch money off of your viewers like you do now.

Is about time! (4, Insightful)

elfarto (650512) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947919)

Well, never been a Intel Fan before, i don't like the bullying tactics applied to OEM distributors ala Micro$oft style, for me lower Intel share translates into higher quality and lower prices for the end user, and most important "freedom of choicee", so the next time joe user goes shopping for a new Worm/Spyware host because the old one is too slow, he will see more AMD and less Intel Inside. By the way, the disco ball may be useful for the next wave of laidoff intella employees who will dance to the rythm of "the pink slip blues", sorry for all of them, really sorry. $hitty corporate america has to keep the skyhigh CEO salaries somehow.!

Just Desserts for Intel (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947926)

Intel has 2 shocking policies: bell-curve grading system and preferential hiring of H-1B workers from China (which includes Taiwan province and Hong Kong) [phrusa.org] and India.

More than 50% of Intel's workforce in the USA (not China) is current or former H-1Bs. Intel claimed that it absolutely needs Chinese workers in order to build a competitive product: e.g. Itanium. Then, IBM proved Intel wrong by producing the Power5, which is mostly built by American engineers.

Further, Intel has a brutal job evaluation policy: strict bell curve. If an employee falls in the bottom 25% more than once, then the manager shows her the door. Exceptions are made when there is a labor shortage, but officially, the 25% rule is strictly enforced.

I, for one, am glad that Intel is losing. I hope that IBM beats the pants off of it.

Re:Just Desserts for Intel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947953)

Further, Intel has a brutal job evaluation policy: strict bell curve. If an employee falls in the bottom 25% more than once, then the manager shows her the door.

Do you want your processor designed by the bottom 25% of the company?

Re:Just Desserts for Intel (2, Insightful)

jabuzz (182671) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948251)

25% of what? You could have a room full of certified genius, but there would still be a bottom 25%.

Imagine a 100m race with four people, the first comes in at say 9.8 seconds and each following one comming in 0.01 seconds later. By Intel's alledged reasoning you dump the fourth guy because he is not up to the grade. Yet 9.83 seconds would probably put you in the top ten 100m times of all time.

Re:Just Desserts for Intel (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948009)

Whatever! The FOCAL process (as it is called) may seem brutal to outsiders, but you have be pretty lazy and completely incompetent to lose your job...and it is more like the bottom 10% that fall into the category that get put on corrective action plans.

Re:Just Desserts for Intel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948143)

What happens after they fire all the 'lazy and competely incompetent' people? Then the 'bottom' 10% is made up of excellent employees who are getting punished. Right, wonderful plan.

Re:Just Desserts for Intel (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948200)

you forgot to note that the 10% is not for a given rnak group. I've seen managers take the hit because they believed no one on their team deserved an IR.
This 10% bell curve is not strictly enforced, but rather a guideline (this from someone who's been near the bad side). In all reality, given a large population this curve fits pretty close, with or without enforcement. I have had bad management, so I moved and now work in an excellent department. I would not leave this corp for any other (except maybe google). One of our key workplace charters is: Be a great place to work. It is.
-an AC INTC employee

Re:Just Desserts for Intel (1)

Amiga Trombone (592952) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948046)

I, for one, am glad that Intel is losing. I hope that IBM beats the pants off of it.

Well, you're already getting your wish in the enterprise space. There are sure a lot more Power servers than Itanium ones out there.

Of course, on the desktop it's another story. Power isn't going anywhere there unless the world changes to Macintosh. Nice as they are, I just don't see that happening. Too much is invested in x86.

But hey, it's nice to dream.

[OT] (2, Insightful)

0racle (667029) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948137)

Gotta love the xenophobia on Slashdot. Your aware that the 'American Dream' was people leaving the low living conditions they grew up in and go to America and live at a much higher standard right?

Huh? Most H-1Bs are Elites from India/China. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948179)

Most H-1B engineers are elites from India and China. The typical route is to enter American graduate school, and the parents pay the bill.

Most of the folks at the bottom in India and China have no chance for an engineering education. The parents cannot afford it. The kids cannot enter the good high schools or good colleges in India or China.

Let's deport the H-1B engineers for various reasons. One is that they are an affront to the words on the statue of libery. Her inscription says, "Send me your poor, downtrodden masses", not "Send me your elite, your well educated, your rich."

Re:Huh? Most H-1Bs are Elites from India/China. (1)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948369)

Actually, I believe a system that utilizes H1-B, heavy outsourcing (laying off 50+% of a department and hiring out-of-country labor) and other nasties can be dealt with easily.

Make all government approved tax abatements paid in full, to current date.... Wow, you had an abatement 3 years ago and hired in 4 H1-B's? PAY UP!

I do not advocate fines, fees, or tarriffs. I encourage that if a company wishes to stay here in the US, they either hire US citizens or have no abatements.

Re:Just Desserts for Intel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948202)

"I, for one, am glad that Intel is losing. I hope that IBM beats the pants off of it."

I have a friend that was working for Intel. Went to Hong Kong on Intel business. Got laid off while IN HK. Didn't get his expenses reimbursed. Came to understand that is the sort of treatment you expect from that company, and not at all unusual.

Re:Just Desserts for Intel (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948221)

The bit about the "Bell Curve" and the bottom 25% at Intel is a myth - at least based on my personal experience. I worked for Intel for 4 years and was given my cards 2 years ago when the project that my group worked on was cancelled and we were ALL let go. Before that, we had heard stories that if you were in the bottom x% (we heard 10%) you were toast, however our group grew (as we were needed for the project) and no-one was axed. As a company, they may have an overall aim each year to get rid of the bottom x%, however I feel that this is a good aim looking at many of the useless workers that some companies accumalate over the years. Also, when we were all axed, Intel were much more generous with their severance package than local laws dictated. Whilst I realise that didn't do this just to be nice (they want to avoid negative PR), it's still the case that we were well treated and not just fired.

Re:Just Desserts for Intel (1)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948337)

---Further, Intel has a brutal job evaluation policy: strict bell curve. If an employee falls in the bottom 25% more than once, then the manager shows her the door. Exceptions are made when there is a labor shortage, but officially, the 25% rule is strictly enforced.

Leave out the emotional buzz words. If you have a bell curve associated with employee efficency (Assuming efficency is mapped), there will always be datapoints mapped in all regions.

This system seems to be the same way nasty ISP's get rid of heavy downloaders: Ax the top 2% of custemers that over-utilize the network connection. Point: There will always be 2%, it'll just shift.

now I get it. (4, Funny)

tloh (451585) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947945)

...including one very expensive disco ball made from a failed attempt to produce projection televisions.

So THAT was the inspiration for those commercials with dancers in clean suits!

Re:now I get it. (2, Funny)

stealth.c (724419) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948004)

with the company's decline, do you suppose that they will soon be dancing in dirty suits?

Genetic sample NOT required. (2, Informative)

kinema (630983) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947960)

If you would like to read the article but don't feel like registering you can as always use Google's NY Times referer [google.com] or checkbugmenot.com [bugmenot.com] for a login and password.

Sounds like one of my estimates (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947974)

The engineer described sitting in meetings where the company's simulation models showed that 95 percent of the chips from each test wafer would be usable, while the actual yields were closer to 4 percent.

Re: disco ball (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10947982)

This thing about the disco ball made out of discontinued microchips makes me think of something I've been wondering. Microchip fabrication involves a LOT of defective chips, right? Like chips that burn but then fail the tests. What happens to all those chips? Are they just melted down for metal? Are they thrown away? Can you buy them?

I would just love to have some earrings made out of broken G5s.

Re: disco ball (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948190)

"Like chips that burn but then fail the tests. What happens to all those chips?"

They get rebranded "Celeron" and sold as a low-cost alternative.

Staying alive... (0, Troll)

DigitalTechnic (822530) | more than 9 years ago | (#10947998)

o/` Ah, ha, ha, ha, stayin' alive, stayin' alive. Ah, ha, ha, ha, stayin' alive. o/`

Intel simulation model way off (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948002)

The engineer described sitting in meetings where the company's simulation models showed that 95 percent of the chips from each test wafer would be usable, while the actual yields were closer to 4 percent.

Unfortunately, the simulations were running on Intel processors and were hit with rampant floating-point errors. They should have gone with AMD like the engineers wanted.

amd is not the competition (-1, Troll)

Sebastopol (189276) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948003)

AMD is struggling hard, as they always have, to hold a modicum of the market. They are still nothing more than a small Intel. Intel has proven again and again that all they can do is make CPUs. The dismisal of the p4 line is a sign they acknowledge the trend in low power computing.

They are both about to get blown out of the water by Apple.

Apple is about to introduce an entertainment server. Everyone knows the future is networked consoles, but Sony et al are still focusing on games only. Apple will introduce a device that will displace the PC in a very short time. Fortunately their suppliers have horrible fab capacity. It wouldn't surprise me if Apple built in x86 if their volumes get high enough.

My bet is on the apple device.

Re:amd is not the competition (5, Insightful)

RzUpAnmsCwrds (262647) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948117)

"AMD is struggling hard, as they always have, to hold a modicum of the market. They are still nothing more than a small Intel. Intel has proven again and again that all they can do is make CPUs. The dismisal of the p4 line is a sign they acknowledge the trend in low power computing.

They are both about to get blown out of the water by Apple.

Apple is about to introduce an entertainment server. Everyone knows the future is networked consoles, but Sony et al are still focusing on games only. Apple will introduce a device that will displace the PC in a very short time. Fortunately their suppliers have horrible fab capacity. It wouldn't surprise me if Apple built in x86 if their volumes get high enough.

My bet is on the apple device."

You are so full of shit that you don't understand up from down.

1: Apple does not, and will not manufacture or design CPUs.

2: AMD *does* design and manufacture CPUs.

Intel and Apple *don't* compete because they don't manufacture the same products. Intel competes with AMD, Transmeta, IBM, VIA, Samsung, and other companies in a variety of fields.

Apple competes with software companies - like Microsoft, PC companies - like Dell, and, more recently, with

"Apple is about to introduce an entertainment server. Everyone knows the future is networked consoles, but Sony et al are still focusing on games only. Apple will introduce a device that will displace the PC in a very short time."

A media server is going to "displace" the PC? What a load of crap. Analysts have been spelling doom for the PC for *years*. Cellphones were going to kill the PC. Or PDAs. Or "smart" TVs.

Guess what? It's never happened. Because the PC is the best tool for communication. You can't displace the PC with a media center because, for most people, the PC isn't a media center. Most people use their PCs to get on the Internet. They surf the web and read email. A media server isn't going to displace that.

"It wouldn't surprise me if Apple built in x86 if their volumes get high enough."

Assuming your crackpot theory is correct, who do you think is going to manufacture those x86 chips?

AMD or Intel. That's who. They are the only companies producing high-performance x86 CPUs. Heck, they are the only companies *capable* of producing a high-performance x86 cpu in the short term.

"Everyone knows the future is networked consoles"

If by "everyone", you mean crackpot analysts, then, yes, "everyone" knows that.

Remember the PS2 hype? With it's FireWire and USB ports, the PS2 was supposed to be the "future networked console". It wasn't. It's just another game system, just like the XBOX. The PS2 hasn't killed the PC.

"Fortunately their suppliers have horrible fab capacity."

IBM can fab a lot more than you think. Not as much as AMD or Intel, but they have the resources to bring Apple as many PPC970 CPUs as they will need.

Re:amd is not the competition (1)

Pope (17780) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948254)

Actually, there's a PPC970 FX shortage at the moment, because IBM is having trouble ramping production up on them, as well as getting them faster, which is why the G5 speed bumps have been few and far between.

Re:amd is not the competition (2, Interesting)

Frogbert (589961) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948350)

My bet is that 95% of consumers will not go with the expensive Apple option while there are much cheaper options that will do almost everything the apple option will do.

Also you can get an Xbox and put XBMC on it right now.

Real Reason for Intel failures (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948028)

Could it be that bringing out a compiler for any OS other than MS has them on the Redmond corporate hit list? The intel 64bit linux compiler works fine with Itanium but sure as hell has big trouble with NT and everything else Microsoft centric!

an article about a silicon disco ball... (2, Insightful)

jbridge21 (90597) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948038)

... and they don't have pictures???!!!

Craig Barrett has been a failure as CEO (2, Insightful)

Ars-Fartsica (166957) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948064)

The Barrett era at Intel has been an unbroken string of failures. I fault the Intel board for not having the guts to purge him. The problem is, at any tech company, it is impossible to make painful (but necessary) cuts when the stock is going up. Everyone's attitude is "hey, we're making money, why rock the boat?"

Even marketshare and technology takes a back seat to obsession over the closing price of the stock...this is what you get for obsessing over the very short term.

Re:Craig Barrett has been a failure as CEO (1)

dokebi (624663) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948284)

After reading the article, it sounds like Otellini isn't any better. He comes from marketing background, and his only success is the Centrino--which is basically a marketing strategy, not a new technology. And now he talks about platforms and mobile devices--Intel's potential new markets. What, are they not interested in CPU's anymore? No wonder they are chasing AMD. Good riddens.

Oh really? (1)

JayJay.br (206867) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948103)

(...)"Seems like Intel is losing market share to other chip makers"(...)

Whoa... that is revealing... anybody else heard of that?

And no, haven't RTFA yet, but c'mon... no need to say it every time we talk about Intel.

Please don't reply. I'm just making a point about recent quality in slashdot blurbs.

Pentium Serial Numbers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948124)

I wonder how much of AMD's current market share, and any problems Intel may be having, are due to Intel's cpu serial number fiasco in the PII or PIII or whatever it was.

I can't even recall the details of the whole thing, but I've steered every processor purchase I could to AMD because of it.

Am I the only one?

Show us the beef! (1)

taniwha (70410) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948130)

we want a picture of the disco ball ... after all if it's covered with MEMs mirror chips maybe it doesn't spin, maybe it's not even a ball ....

Why I've prefered AMD over Intel for years (3, Insightful)

jedaustin (52181) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948162)

One word... VALUE!

AMD makes good products. I've NEVER been burned when buying AMD processors. I've been buying them since the K6 chips.

I once had a machine that would periodically crash (K6/2). I thought it was just windows, since windows crashed a fair amount anyway. One day on a whim I opened up the case and discovered the CPU fan was burned out. I'd been running it that way for over a year. I put a new fan in it and all was well.

I had a P4 cpu fan go bad.. it was toast by the time I knew about it.
I haven't tried that trick with newer AMD chips, but that experience was enough for me to stick with them since. Plus they're still usually cheaper.

Re:Why I've prefered AMD over Intel for years (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948224)

I've NEVER been burned when buying AMD processors.

no but many people have been burned using AMD chips...

Thank you, i'll be here all week!

Re:Why I've prefered AMD over Intel for years (1)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948307)

Heh, same here. Once I tested an older chip (350MHz K2) by.... putting my finger on the metal top of the die, and powered it up.

I had a blister for 3 days.

Re:Why I've prefered AMD over Intel for years (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948315)

P4s have thermal protection built in, if you remove the heatsink (not just the fan), P4s will throttle down their speed immediately in order to cope, and will speed back up again when the heatsink is replaced. Tom's Hardware did an article about this a couple years ago, and even made a video of them removing the heatsinks of various processors. The P4 throttled down, a P3 locked up (but the chip survived), and an AMD Athlon XP and an MP both burnt up (one of them even produced a small fire).

I agree that AMD's chips are a good value: I own a dual AMD box, and it's great. Spreading lies because you are a fanboy won't win AMD any new customers, though. Let the merits of a company's products speak for themselves.

mo3 up (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948168)

mtransfer, Netscape Members' creative Ha5 significantly need to join the Progress. Any go find something they learn from our exemplified by

*Sigh* (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948175)

"We don't talk about the chip, but the collection of attributes that Intel brings," he said. "That's the footprint in the snow for Intel's future."

In other words, it will take me more time to sort through the marketing bullshit to see what's really there.

Unlike the typical luddite (forced to learn the technology), I prefer to know how the parts in my system work.

I could buy a "portable centrino solution" (basically a pentium-m with integrated 802.11b/g) but I could just as easily buy a laptop with an external, better network card for cheaper.

I don't like it when companies generalize for me. I don't like the term "gaming computer" or "workstation computer". What I do like is the performance I see in Athlon 64 4000+ benchmarks. Sorry but for my "gaming computer" a pentium 4 2.8 Ghz with 512 MB RAM doesn't cut it. I so often see this is the case.

What some companies call "gaming computers" I call a mid level workstation.

i.e. A Pentium 4 2.8Ghz with 512 MB of RAM and a Geforce FX 5600 is NOT a "gaming machine". I would call that a satisfactory computer for any use.

Point being, I hate when companies generalize.

Re:*Sigh* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948246)

retarted are you?

a AMD XP2300+ 256 meg of ram and i810 video chipset is a satisfactory computer for most any use.

it run's XP great, Linux great, Office 2003 great, internet, burn CD's music, upload to your ipod, etc...

anyone that thinks they need more than that for general use is a complete and utter moron.

I guess that would be you?

The problem here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948270)

Intel isn't trying to sell microchips, they're trying to sell packages. "Solutions", if you will.

This doesn't work. People don't want solutions from their chipset provider. They want chipsets. The "solutions", they want from their pc company. That's what the OEM is there for; to provide the solution. It seems like Intel is trying to take over the OEM's job from the inside moving out. I can't fathom that being popular with either OEMs or consumers.

Intel's focus areas (3, Interesting)

chiph (523845) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948223)

Mr. Otellini will tell analysts that he plans to focus on four areas for growth: international markets for desktop personal computers, mobile and wireless applications, the digital home, as well as a new initiative aimed at large corporate computing markets that Intel is calling the Digital Office.

International markets are more price-sensitive than the US, so they'll go with the cheapest CPU they can find, which ain't Intel.

If they think that the PC market is fast moving, wait until they see the mobile market. We're talking a 6-9 month obsolesence cycle and incredible price pressures. There's also lots of established players, so Intel had better offer something special that the others don't have (and can't easily duplicate).

So far as a "digital home" -- most people (meaning non-developers and non /. readers) are happy with a single PC to surf, get email, etc. The gamers are a viable market, but the under-24 folks don't have the money for media-center PCs, as they can barely afford to buy new GForce cards and purple case lamps every few months.

The corporate market is the one place that Intel has a chance of succeeding. Most IT departments won't buy anything unless it has "Intel Inside" because they're so conservative. The areas for Intel to focus on there are increasing power density, reducing heat, and improving system managability.

Chip H.

Help me out here... (3, Funny)

synth7 (311220) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948243)

Could someone post the article text, or perhaps another news source with this article, or perhaps post an alternative link that bypasses the NYT registration? I mean, I looked... I really did, but I just couldn't find a way to view that article in all these replies.

Seriously.

AMD stock broke $22 today... (2, Interesting)

Sai Babu (827212) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948263)

Wallmart dragged it down though.

AMD is making that spiffy flash too.

I'm a fan of whoever makes the best stuff the cheapest. Right now I'm a Athlon 64 fan and will be happy if Intel can compete with the Opteron.

re: Dell. They areall over the place on this AMD switch. I rad someplace that Dell is holding off because the design their own boards and adding the AMD will mean adding a new design team. Not familiar enough with Dell costing to knwo it this is a significant problem or if it;s just more smoke and mirrors. Any of youy /. guys know what it costs to bring a server design tem on line? After all, the ultimate goal of any business is to make $ and beating Intel up on price with AMD noise may pay better than actually bringing AMD based Dell product to market.

I can tell Intel there are only two ways to make $ in manufacturing. 1)Be the only guy who CAN make something. 2)Be the guy who can make it the cheapest.
Trying to compete in projection TV which is pretty mature is NOT gonna make you $ unless you've got a spiffy atent likr TI and mirror arrays used for DLP. Of course that patent will expire so if you can beat TI, and everyone else waiting in the wings, handily on the cost/unit front...when that day arrives, you'll clean up.

Manufacturing is all about cost/unit which is all about cycle time, yield, and amortization of the plant. Chip manufacturers would do well to study other USA industries. Excepting the guys who are the only guys who can make the stuff, most stuff that anyone can make is moving offshore. Some exceptions. My brother told me of a 5 pan&pot stamped steel cookware set selling for $4.99 at BrandSmart. Made in USA. It costs less to make here and ship domestic than to ship steel to china and the shp the pots back.

Re:AMD stock broke $22 today... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10948373)

Why not make the steel in China? Or even just ship it in from Japan, which has an extremely sophisticated steel industry? Not all developed countries industries are doomed to obsolesence by upstarts; technological investment means that the Western European and East Asian steel makers are still humming along just fine. Just the U.S. ones. No, the U.S. loss of competitiveness probably has more to do with labor laws and regulation here, the complete rebuilding of the infrastructure overseas after WW2, and plain short-sightedness in not investing sufficiently in upgrades.

Not to troll... (1)

Viceice (462967) | more than 9 years ago | (#10948276)

But how many people here looked at the title and summery went over to NYT, went to the trouble of BugMeNotting the registration, expecting a cool story about the neat things Intel engineers do with leftover parts?

That was disappointing.

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