Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Lying Makes The Brain Work Harder

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the what-if-you're-just-thinking-about-lying dept.

Biotech 364

Ant writes "This Wired News article says it seems to take more brain effort to tell a lie than to tell the truth according to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans. Lying caused activity in the frontal part of the brain -- the medial inferior and pre-central areas, as well as the hippocampus and middle temporal regions and the limbic areas. Some of these are involved in emotional responses. During a truthful response, the fMRI showed activation of parts of the brain's frontal lobe, temporal lobe and cingulate gyrus."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

i'm telling the truth (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950650)

second post

No lie (0, Offtopic)

Infinityis (807294) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950651)

This is the first post. I am not lying, I promise. Proof: I've never been known to work that hard. I never RTFA, just the blurb.

Err, of course? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950653)

It seems like it'd require more effort to fabricate something than to recite truthful memories. I wonder if these lies were cooked up ahead of time, and if so, how well learned they were when they were recited?

On the contrary (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950724)



You sez:

"It seems like it'd require more effort to
fabricate something than to recite truthful
memories"

Well ...

It doesn't take a lot to say "I am lying"

Am I fabricating anything ?

Or am I telling the truth ?

Thinking (4, Interesting)

lordkuri (514498) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950654)

The reason they're seeing so much more activity is because a person who's lying is actively thinking, rather than just "regurgitating" information.

Pretty simple concept IMHO.

Re:Thinking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950685)

My life is a lie IMHO

So that's why...... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950691)

GW Bush says it's 'hard work'.

Re:Thinking (1)

malsbert (456063) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950699)

Or to paraphrase:

You allways just regurgitate, telling the truth simply means you need not modify it to much before sending it out.

Re:Thinking (5, Interesting)

SerpentMage (13390) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950703)

BINGO!!!!

And where the problems will arise are with those people who can lie. After all a lie is only a lie if the person telling the lie thinks it is. When the person thinks they are telling the truth then the lie is not a lie anymore. Its all relative!

Where I see serious problems with this is when people use it to test for terrorists. They will only catch those people who cannot lie. Those that can lie will pass through with flying colors and bomb everything. Great, I can see the excuses now, "But he was telling the truth..."

I wish there would be a little less technology and more reliance on common sense!

Then you must... (4, Insightful)

Facekhan (445017) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950771)

The solution is to think of your lies in advance in considerable detail and regurgitate them when needed. Only when a question is unexpected can this method work and if you actually need to lie to a serious question then you probably should have realized it was a likely question like "What were you doing the night of the murder?"

Keep your lies consistent too.

Re:Thinking (4, Insightful)

InternationalCow (681980) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950786)

Well, it's not that simple actually. Thinking "harder" does not necessarily cause more brain activity in any kind of linear relation. Rather, what you see in the case of lying is specific activity in the areas of the brain that are involved in the regulation of the emotional response, including ones (such as the amygdala) involved in fear and planning (prefrontal cortex). Lying lights up these areas because the liar fears being found out, which involves a kind of "planning" and an emotional response following from it. Could be useful for lie detection, if you get the scanner down to a manageable size :)

Re:Thinking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950805)

Exactly. That's why compulsive liars are so unintelligent and vice versa. There's a direct causal relationship between truth and intelligence.

Lying = Thinking (1)

b100dian (771163) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950831)

So lie as much as you can, gives you brains.
Oh, wait..

Re:Thinking (3, Interesting)

Sir Pallas (696783) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950839)

And what we know as "the truth" is already consistent in our heads. It might be unbelieveable, "but it did happen." Mix that with the fact that there is an infinite magnitude more "untruths" than there are "truths" and it becomes a lot harder to pick out something that seems consistent but is also untrue. (For every truth, there are a set of true conditions, concatenated. There are 2^n - 1 untrue things this truth can be turned into.) The bigger the lie, the more bits you flip, and the harder the consistency check becomes. The frontal lobe deals with perception of reality, as far as I understand; thus, it makes sense that this check would happen there.

A person who tells the truth isn't thinking?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950844)

So let me get this straight - recall requires no effort, even if it's the first time you're discussing a truthful event that happened? C'mon man.

Maybe you should consider "thinking" a little more.

PS - I have a 14 inch Cock. (I was testing the frontal lobe activation theory, forgive.)

Pants of fire (5, Funny)

slumpy (304072) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950655)

"No honey I'm not lying to you, just practicing for my MENSA exam tomorrow"

Yes. (5, Funny)

smiley2billion (599641) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950657)

That would be correct, I have done several studies on this, since I am a doctor and all. Definatly more brain activity occurs when you lie. For that groudbreaking information I ask a mere $25 from each and everyone of you via Paypal... since I am a doctor and all...

In Korea (-1, Offtopic)

martyn s (444964) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950659)

In Korea lying is only for old people!

Re:In Korea (-1, Offtopic)

PedanticSpellingTrol (746300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950674)

in korea, soviet russia is only for old people!

Re:In Korea (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950679)

Too bad, 'cause it would help keep these koreans in miniskirts [chosun.com] warm in winter.

Re:In Korea (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950704)

Japanese girls do the same thing. They are really not that different from each other.

Re:In Korea (-1)

themaidtricks (823827) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950707)

In Korea, lying is for the elderly!

I think this sounds better.

Re:In Korea (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950770)

You = gay

Ok, we knew this (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950660)

This is how polygraph interpretation ("lie detectors") works.

Re:Ok, we knew this (3, Informative)

jfengel (409917) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950675)

No it's not, at least not in my experience. Polygraphs that I've seen measure respiration, heartbeat, blood pressure, and sweat. The goal is to measure your physical tension, with the idea that you tense up when you lie. I won't vouch for its accuracy (in my experience, pretty low), but I've never seen one which measures anything about the brain directly.

Laying (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950663)

In other news, 'laying' discovered to have the same effect.

Re:Laying (0, Troll)

eclectro (227083) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950807)

In other news, 'laying' discovered to have the same effect.

Thankfully, slashdotters do not need to worry about getting laid, thus freeing up countless brain cells to develope important open source projects.

In Korea, (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950665)

brain scans are only for old people.

Useless against /. Folk (4, Funny)

Tezkah (771144) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950667)

They can't tell if we're lying, MRIs are notoriously unreliable when faced with tinfoil hats.

Re:Useless against /. Folk (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950690)

MRI's use ridicously strong magnetic fields, enough to do serious damage to anything magnetic. You'd better hope that your tinfoil hat has nothing magnetic in it, otherwise it's going to be ripped right off your head.

I've heard tell of cases where big metal plates were placed in an MRI machine. The field was strong enough to levitate / suspend the plate (say, roughly 10 lbs) inside the machine. The plate was supposedly rigidly held in place and any attempts to move it were extremely difficult.

Ok then (5, Funny)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950669)

Now I know why sometimes I feel like the hardest working man on the planet.

Re:Ok then (1)

rollx (830963) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950701)

Lying caused activity in the frontal part of the brain
that's why people say, that I have a bigger forehead

Re:Ok then (1)

yobbo (324595) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950726)

What, like when you made that post just now?

Of Course (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950670)

When I'm lying, I'm usually trying to think about what I'm lying about and how it should change my story. Essentially, I'm making sure that what I'm lying about is, for the most part, reasonable and I'm not going to get caught.

When telling the truth I don't have to do this, so activity is likely lower.

Using all my brainpower... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950671)

No it doesn't!

Didn't they take the Lying Module? (2, Insightful)

zlel (736107) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950672)

noting that it has been documented that some people can fool a polygraph using various techniques.... Using fMRI as a lie detector is expensive, but it may be worthwhile in some cases -- such as trying to question a terrorism suspect

Yes, terrorists aren't trained at lying, only FBI agents are.

No shit (0, Redundant)

CptChipJew (301983) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950676)

Lies require thought and planning.

The truth requires citing specific knowledge.

Re:No shit (2, Interesting)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950741)

however a Premeditated lie can be stored and recalled just as truth is, and will be even more dangerous with an mri backing it up as truth.

Re:No shit (1)

sik0fewl (561285) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950759)

But what if you plan your lie ahead of time, convincing yourself (somewhat) that it's the truth. You wouldn't have to think too hard if you have the lie memorized.

Re:No shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950808)

Then you spent that time using brainpower which wouldn't have been used otherwise.

AKA, more brain power still used.

Re:No shit (1)

sik0fewl (561285) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950829)

Yes, but if you "plan your lie" before they test you, you don't have to do any thinking during the test.

SCO and Microsoft (1)

p0 (740290) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950680)

... I bet they knew this earlier!

That's why they are working SO HARD ! (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950744)



On the other hand - we must be very lazy bums ! :)

Ah finally an explanation... (4, Funny)

SandmanCL (444428) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950682)

... to why I am to gosh darn smart !

- I run a 40-yard dash in 2 seconds
- I compleded college by the age of 18
- I have climbed the Everest - naked
- I became Mr Universe AND Miss Universe, in the same year

Re:Ah finally an explanation... (4, Funny)

typhoonius (611834) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950803)

I bet you read the article too.

Univerersally applied? (4, Interesting)

Infinityis (807294) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950683)

I wonder if this study can be universally applied of if it only applies to personal experiences.

That is, if someone wants me to recall a fact from highschool biology, I can probably work hard to remember it. However, I could probably work a lot easier and just make something up.

This sort of thing has happened to me before. My parents once gave my sister and I a math problem, some multiplication of two large numbers. Much to my chagrin, my sister came up an answer the fastest, to which my parents replied "Wow! That's right!" I worked so quickly to try to come up with the right answer, and I fumed about her getting it right until I realized that she had just made up a number...my parents really didn't know the answer either, but by acting confidently like they did, I couldn't see the lies until a minute later.

I'm quite certain that my brain was working a lot harder to do the multiplication than my sister's, which had only to pull a reasonable-sounding number from thin air.

Re:Univerersally applied? (1)

malsbert (456063) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950733)

<b>I wonder if this study can be universally applied of if it only applies to personal experiences.<b>

Faro and colleagues tested 10 volunteers. / hardly a scientific study.

Re:Univerersally applied? (1)

YouMakeMeSoANGRY (641079) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950804)

You'd be amazed what counts as a valid sample size in psychophysics experiments.

I recently attended a seminar from such a researcher, and he used samples of 2. One of which was himself and the other was a control (someone who didn't know the goal of the experiment).

On such solid foundations are the groundbreaking theories of modern psychology based.

Beavis... (2, Funny)

nebaz (453974) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950686)

The lie-detector episode that ends with Beavis arrested as the "Hippie Ripper". "When asked how a teenage boy could have committed the brutal murders over twenty years ago, a police spokeswoman said, quote, "He's very clever.""

Working hard (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950687)

Well, the marketting department has to earn its keep one way or the other...

Well, DUH (3, Insightful)

Capt'n Hector (650760) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950688)

I don't need a MRI to tell me that lying is harder than telling the truth. When you lie, you need to invent a story and make it convincing. The fear of getting caught kicks in, as does the guilt of lying: the mind starts racing. Perhaps it would be interesting to see how the MRIs of habitual liars differ from "normal" liars. Does the absence of fear and guilt change the amount of work done by the brain, or do lawyers and such work just as hard as we do?

Re:Well, DUH (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950709)

Does the absence of fear and guilt change the amount of work done by the brain, or do lawyers and such work just as hard as we do?

One time we hooked up a lawyer to a lie detector. The thing started smoking. Then we turned it on. It blew the fuck up. We didn't even ask him a question yet.

Re:Well, DUH (1)

Dr. Spork (142693) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950778)

I wonder whether a well-rehearsed lie would show the same traces as telling the truth. I think the point is, you want to get your story down do much that you tell it automatically, without thinking, which is what the prefrontal cortex does. So to be a good liar you might need to "brainwash" yourself, but nothing in the article makes me think that's impossible.

Speaking of lying... (4, Funny)

doorbot.com (184378) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950694)

Those Microsoft brains must be working really hard... just look at the Slashdot advertisements that are running with this story.

MS's "Get the Facts"
http://m3.doubleclick.net/790463/mrs03111_VeriTest _336x260_25k_v3.gif [doubleclick.net]

Oh the irony!

Maybe that content-based advertising system really does work!

Hmm... (4, Funny)

Infinityis (807294) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950696)

Hmm...my wife is always tired and exhausted from "working so hard". This may explain a few things...

Re:Hmm... (1)

Stevyn (691306) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950784)

trust me, she's doing all the work

Doh (1)

NanoGator (522640) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950697)

"Lying Makes The Brain Work Harder"

I was halfway through writing an email to my boss with the subject "Siesta" before I read the second line and slapped my forehead.

How is this news? (1)

Kiyooka (738862) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950702)

Obviously, when you're telling the truth you're just recalling, but when you're lying you're both recalling the truth and inventing a lie, which involves creativity, logistics, etc. Of course your brain will be used differently.

What's harder to do? Sing a song you already know, or make up a new one?

Re:How is this news? (1)

malsbert (456063) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950751)

as other posters has allready noted, a lie is not necessary more "work" then truth, depends on the circumstance.

You don't say? (2, Insightful)

Tim C (15259) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950708)

You mean that having to create a fiction that's close enough to the truth to be believable and memorable (so you don't forget the lies you tell!), yet far enough off to achieve the desired effect (be it avoiding trouble, personal gain, whatever) is more difficult than simply recounting a fact?

Good to see it confirmed, I guess, and I do believe in pure research for research's sake, but even I am moved to say "well, duh!".

Another polygraph?? (1)

vinukr (796210) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950710)

Is this going to be another polygraph [antipolygraph.org] ??. Cant these activities in the frontal brain happen anytime else, say when u r tensed?? Do these activities suggest a definite lie??

OVERKILL (1)

AnalogDiehard (199128) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950715)

Just get out a yardstick and measure their noses.

There are some brains in US reachin the abs. max (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950716)

According to media reports, brains of
Pastor/Brother George Bush and some of his engineers are reaching the absolute infinity temperature :-)

God bless US of Jesus ( formerly USA )

That's not true (1)

Rii (777315) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950718)

I don't believe them. They're lying.

So that's why... (1)

Spacejock (727523) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950721)

... fiction writers are brainy people. (Ok, biased observation)

Re:So that's why... (1)

DeepHurtn! (773713) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950788)

Lousy Plato, he was right the whole time!

I can see it now... (1)

mstefan (635858) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950728)

No sir, I wasn't lying. I was merely exercising my hippocampus. My progesterone receptors needed the workout, you understand.

Makes Sense (4, Insightful)

dshaw858 (828072) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950729)

This makes a lot of sense. Not only because as the first poster says does the person have to think, but they're not just thinking up information, they also must connect that information with a logical and sensical situation. So, if I were to lie to my teacher about my math homework, the truth would take little to no activity (didn't do it), a nonsensical lie would take a little thinking (the moon is green), but a logical lie requires an entire story to back it up (well, my dog was hungry cause he didn't have dinner so he decided to eat it, and...). Makes sense to me.

- dshaw

Laid (3, Funny)

thedogcow (694111) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950738)

I got laid today...
whew. I'm pooped.

Re:Laid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950781)

I believe it! I mean, you just can't make that stuff up. Why would anyone lie about getting laid? There's no point!

Great! (1)

dan dan the dna man (461768) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950739)

I must be exercising more than I thought!

I'd be interested... (5, Interesting)

TLLOTS (827806) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950743)

I'd be interested to see the results for various situations for lying. For instance, in this situation it was only done with a very specific type of lying where there was no doubt in the subjects mind that they were indeed lying. I'd be interested to see the results for instance however if the subject were given time to manufacture in their own mind a belief or memory almost, so that when asked a question to which they lie, the lie isn't manufactured on the spot, but rather is already in existance in the persons mind, somewhat like a memory. So would that cause the results to be similiar to telling the truth when lying in such a situation, or would they still show the signs that the MRI picked up, indicating that they were lying.

It could be quite pertinent to find out if this were ever to be used seriously as a truth detection mechanism, as it could trip up in some situations, such as for instance a man who's just killed his wife, sitting in his car thinking to himself all the things he did today not killing his wife, essentially fabricating a story or lying to himself. When brought in for a lie detector test you really wouldn't want it showing that a murderer could indeed lie about comitting such an act without any sign showing that he was indeed lying. Of course, this method would be quite useless for questions which the subject hasn't had ample time to manufacture the truth for.

Re:I'd be interested... (4, Interesting)

wrecked (681366) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950852)

Another one would be if the subject believes a story to be true, when in fact (and unknown to the subject) the story is a lie.

When the subject is asked questions about the story, the subject will honestly answer with what s/he believes to be the truth.

"Yes, sir, there were definitely Iraqis among the 9-11 terrorists!"

so...brain go overdrive or shutdown for saying (1)

lingqi (577227) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950745)

This sentence is a lie.

???

Re:so...brain go overdrive or shutdown for saying (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950794)

No it's not.

Girlfriend (1)

ramos289 (234634) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950750)

Lying caused activity in the frontal part of the brain -- the medial inferior and pre-central areas, as well as the hippocampus and middle temporal regions and the limbic areas.

Ah, now I know what my girlfriend has been using her big head for!

No wonder... (1)

Phidoux (705500) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950753)

... my brain is so slow! Signed - Pinocchio

Yay! (1)

bryan986 (833912) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950755)

My brain must be really strong now!!

Aspirin for Mensa members. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950756)

"Lying caused activity in the frontal part of the brain -- the medial inferior and pre-central areas, as well as the hippocampus and middle temporal regions and the limbic areas. Some of these are involved in emotional responses. During a truthful response, the fMRI showed activation of parts of the brain's frontal lobe, temporal lobe and cingulate gyrus."

And in other news. Reading articles with big words that no one knows the definitions to, makes the brain hurt.

I went through the article@wired, and ... (1)

CMCC.PTT (830439) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950763)

...I can't find the accurate definition of Work Harder. 1. Does it means "causes more activity"? or. 2. Does it means "needs more energy"? While I think the 2nd makes sense. Maybe the editor needs us to pay more attention to the title than the experiment itself. PS: Did the editor's brain worked harder? :)

Dub'ya (3, Funny)

TheDarkener (198348) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950765)

Wouldn't it be nice to test this theory on the great W. Bush?

Doctor: Ok, put the probes on the president, Norma.

Norma: They are on, sir.

Doctor: ... Can you make sure they're on tight? I'm not getting a reading here.

Norma: Yes sir, they're on tight.

Doctor: Mr. Bush, can you please tell us why we are at war with Iraq.

Dub'ya: They are a terrorist harboring nation with weapons of mass destruction! Yeehaw!

Doctor: Norma, can you turn down the sensor sensitivity, please? My reader just crashed.

Dub'ya: Yee-haw!!

NewScientist coverage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950767)

This issue was well covered in the NewScientist a while ago.
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns999 91543 [newscientist.com]
Also longer article here (subscription required)
http://archive.newscientist.com/secure/article/art icle.jsp?rp=1&id=mg18324585.500 [newscientist.com]

So this proves that G W Bush is clever ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950769)

because he uses his brain a lot?

Believing the lie (1)

sfled (231432) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950772)

It just takes more energy for me to believe my lies than my truth...

LoL@myself (1)

jim_v2000 (818799) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950775)

In Soviet Russia the truth tells you!

Lie Detectors (1)

tsunamifirestorm (729508) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950777)

Is this or will this become part of lie detector technology?

Venture Brothers (1)

CableModemSniper (556285) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950779)

How does it feel to be a liar with pants constantly on fire?

Skinny girls... don't trust em' (1)

brxndxn (461473) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950791)

They burn most of their calories with common lies like 'maybe', 'I've had 3 previous partners only', and my favorite 'I'm 18!'

You can tell an honest girl by how fat she is.

um DUH? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950795)

yes it takes more effort to lie (ie make something plausible up, than to just regurgitate what is known)

i cant beleieve they tested this. its obvisious

Any else seen Cypher? (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950796)

For some reason I don't think James Bond would get done by this machine. Good spies actually convince themselves of the lie so much so that they don't even think about it when they're questioned about their cover.

Re: WSoP... (1)

Forbman (794277) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950799)

...so has anyone thought to do this with poker players?

So.... (2, Interesting)

dakan (746916) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950816)

So here's what I want to know:
Since it takes more "brain power" to lie then does that mean that smart people are better liars?

Nik

The quote at the bottom of the page: (2, Funny)

Vexinator (253312) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950824)

The quote at the bottom of the page when this article was posted was:

"One man tells a falsehood, a hundred repeat it as true."

It's soo true! I do *ALL* the damn work around here. :P

One reason lying works the brain harder (2, Interesting)

Wansu (846) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950825)


"Liars have alot to remember."
-- an unknown but astute source

Things to ponder (3, Insightful)

FleaPlus (6935) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950832)

I wonder how accurate a "lie detector" made using this would compare to, say, a more standard polygraph test.

Also, I wonder what differences would be observed if you tested somebody who is more used to lying in a convincing manner, such as a a politician or undercover cop.

Yes my son. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10950833)

"A lie must be made with great effort, it's a thing of beauty and precious like a rare diamond. Do not waste lies when truth will do." Anonymous

"Silence is often the best thing to say." Bene Gesserit Axiom

This study is flawed (5, Informative)

dannytaggart (835766) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950834)

Six of them were asked to shoot a toy gun and then lie and say they didn't do it. Three others who watched told the truth about what happened.

This experiment isn't symmetric - the conditions for each group are entirely different. A proper experiment would consist of:
1. a group who committed the act and lies
2. a group who committed the act and tells the truth
3. a group who witnesses and lies
4. a group who witnesses and tells the truth

Also, they should probably have a control group of people who didn't witness anything.

strangely enough though... (1)

calculadoru (760076) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950837)

...Bush sounds just as dumb as he did four years ago. hmmmm...wonder how they'll explain this one...

Compulsive liars? (3, Interesting)

Lord_Dweomer (648696) | more than 9 years ago | (#10950840)

I'd be interested for them to test this with people clinically diagnosed as compulsive liars. Since the extra activity comes from having to formulate a thought as opposed to just spitting back an answer, I wonder if someone who's normal thought patterns did that with lies would show up.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?