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RIP Pentium II, 1997 - 2006

CmdrTaco posted more than 9 years ago | from the still-waiting-on-my-sexium dept.

Intel 418

zorn writes "The Register has the scoop that 'this week Intel told its customers that it is to formally discontinue production of the Pentium II at 266, 333, 366 and 466MHz. Documentation seen by The Register reveals that you'll be able to continue ordering the part for a year, with the last trays leaving the chip giant's Pentium II warehouse on 1 June 2006.'"

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418 comments

Pentium II was still available for purchase? (0, Troll)

Omniscientist (806841) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019110)

Not that I'd know, being loyal to AMD and all.

Re:Pentium II was still available for purchase? (5, Informative)

klui (457783) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019136)

Article states that many embedded systems still prefer to use it because of heat/power requirements.

Re:Pentium II was still available for purchase? (4, Informative)

bonzoesc (155812) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019139)

Old CPUs popular for embedded systems and the like are always made forever - their application might not need something fast and hot, the hardware might not support something new and fancy, and there might be certification issues when making a major part change.

Re:Pentium II was still available for purchase? (2, Funny)

wayward_son (146338) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019477)

But if the application needs something slow and hot, what better choice than the Pentium II?

Re:Pentium II was still available for purchase? (1)

chris_eineke (634570) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019510)

I thought they used low-power, embedded ARM chips for these kind of applications?

Re:Pentium II was still available for purchase? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019257)

Not that I'd know, being loyal to AMD and all.

Not that you'd know, being a fanboy and all.

Price of P-IIs Soar? (2, Insightful)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019469)

That's a very good point: People pick up some "loyalty" for some reason, often not based on any particular reason, and ignorantly discount everything else as being inferior. Can we think of any other products, either hardware or software, that this applies to?

Anyway, I wonder if manufactures that have products that are designed around the P-II will start buying them up, creating a shortage. Will we see the price of unused and "reconditioned" P-IIs on Ebay soar?

Re:Pentium II was still available for purchase? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019309)

The Register confirms Pentium II is dying.

Re:Pentium II was still available for purchase? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019320)

That's what I thought. Who would by a low-speed processor that nevertheless requires a fan in this day-and-age? If you want the computing power of one of these old processors, go with an early PPC-type chip so as to save on electricity and cooling-requirements. I guess original equipment manufacturers even fall for "brand"-names when making their purchasing decisions.

Re:Pentium II was still available for purchase? (5, Informative)

arivanov (12034) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019390)

The difference between Intel and AMD is that Intel has been successfull (or unfortunate depending on the point of view) to secure military and government contracts for its CPUs. Some of these contracts require at least 7 years worth of part availability for any component (some even more).

In the past Intel has been successful in moving the technology for its old CPUs to licensees and relieving itself from the burden of maintaining manufacturing facilities. For example the 80286 lifetime during the last years of the contracts was fulfilled by Harris which managed to convince the military that their parts are acceptable replacement despite them using a different semiconductor technology.

There are no full licensees for anything after i486 this is no longer the case and Intel has to ship all of the CPUs themselves. And methinks that with all the developments in CPUS even the circa 2K$ which people like US Gov pay for a Pentium 2 keeping the facilities makes it not worthwhile.

Re:Pentium II was still available for purchase? (1)

SenatorOrrinHatch (741838) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019457)

Yeah I use AMD now too, but I had a PII and I suspect a lot of folks on this board did.

But for a lot of people, the pentium 2 was the real start of PC's for EVERY person in America, not just the nerds and rich kids. It was the Model-T behind the IT boom.

Requiescat in pace

lol (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019112)

lol i did fp i'm member of gnaa LOL YOU ALL LIEK FAGS
babypenis did it

lol (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019116)

lol jews did wtc

Huh? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019118)

What? I thought they weren't even making pentium 3 chips any longer. O_o

Oh yeah, frosty piss all around *wizzzz*

In related news... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019120)

In related news, global warming started to
decline, as temperatures in Oregon
returned to normal.

Pentium II lives on as a military processor. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019227)

The civilian version of Pentium II has been discontinued, but the military version lives on. Remember the 486? Supposedly, it is not being sold as a commercial processor, but the military version is alive and well. Gao Zhan was caught in trying to buy and to transfer several radiation-hardened 486 chips to Beijing [phrusa.org] . By the way, Gao Zhan is a permanent resident (i.e. green card holder) of the USA.

Re:Pentium II lives on as a military processor. (2, Interesting)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019298)

It's still being sold as an Intel Embedded Legacy processor, along with the 186 (which was really only used in embedded environments) and the 386. In fact, you can buy a whole wafer of any of their embedded legacy chips if you want to do your own packaging.

Ninnle will still work, though (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019123)

Ninnle works great on anything >= 286!

What? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019125)

They were still being produced?

What for?

Does that mean (4, Funny)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019126)

they are going to be cheaper or more expensive?

Re:Does that mean (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019413)

they are going to be cheaper or more expensive?

Yes. Yes, they are.

All good things end soon (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019127)

"Rest In Pentium"

is it bad... (1, Funny)

feldkamp (146657) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019128)

That this made me a little sad?

Re:is it bad... (1)

bonzoesc (155812) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019194)

Does it make you sad when McDonalds stops making a particular sandwich, too?

Re:is it bad... (1)

acvh (120205) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019265)

well, when KrustyBurger stopped making the Ribwich my buzz was definitely harshed....

Re:is it bad... (4, Insightful)

Masami Eiri (617825) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019396)

I, for one, was saddened when the Arch Deluxe was discontinued.

Re:is it bad... (1)

databyss (586137) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019458)

here here to the Arch Deluxe comrade.

Was a tasty sandwich indeed!

Re:is it bad... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019499)

Good stuff, but nothing will ever top the McDLT! The two-sided hot/cold styrofoam container was clutch!

Re:is it bad... (1)

wo1verin3 (473094) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019399)

Actually I was quite saddened when the McRib went away... still hasn't come back here yet although certain parts of the US have it :(

Re:is it bad... (1)

numbware (691928) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019289)

No its not. I feel sad too. But that's why I curl up with my 200mhz Pentium Pro (which has been in my closet for ages) and a hot cup of cocoa and try to calm myself... AH salty tears on the pins! NOOOOOOO!

Re:is it bad... (1)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019409)

But that's why I curl up with my 200mhz Pentium Pro (which has been in my closet for ages) and a hot cup of cocoa and try to calm myself...

And I thought that I was the only one that did that ;-)

Re:is it bad... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019321)

> That this made me a little sad?

No, it makes you extremely sad.

And my Netserver? (4, Funny)

mazevedo (117804) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019129)

That means I can't buy parts for my old HP Netserver??

Really warranted? (2, Insightful)

REBloomfield (550182) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019130)

Does this really warrant a death knell? A processor that has been considered slow for the last few years is still going to be around for another two?

I was really impressed when we first got our first 450Mhz, but god, does it seem like a dog now... I do remember thinking at the time, 1998 iirc, who the hell needs that much?!?

Re:Really warranted? (1)

Nohea (142708) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019179)

Hm, my home PC is a 400Mhz Celeron. Maybe i should make that AMD64 purchase, so i can play DOOM3 at more than 0.2 fps.

Re:Really warranted? (1)

REBloomfield (550182) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019243)

i did notice up top that 450Mhz wasn't listed. That wasn't a PIII per chance was it?

Re:Really warranted? (1)

Orgazmus (761208) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019348)

My dads old PII is a 450MHz chip, but they also made 450MHz PIII's

Re:Really warranted? (1)

REBloomfield (550182) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019383)

now i'm curious what it was then..... i thought it was a II...

Re:Really warranted? (5, Insightful)

DaHat (247651) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019226)

For desktop use, yes, they are horribly slow by today's standards. But for simple embedded solutions, they can at times be considered overkill. Ex: When I get around to putting a mediapc under my drivers seat... I have no need or desire for a chip whose clock is measured in Ghz, simply because it's far more power (heat and draw) than I need to play mp3's and basic custom software.

Re:Really warranted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019248)

Sure it is. Not everyone is building Wintel boxes with interchangable parts. Everybody who has been shipping custom designed embedded hardware using these processors is now has three choices:
1 - discontinue the product
2 - re-design the product with a more powerful processor that is overkill
3 - Send Intel a butload of money so that they can buy enough processors to keep them in production for years to come.

Re:Really warranted? (1)

DavidTC (10147) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019317)

Well, the question is: Is the PIII really that much different from the PII? Don't they have basically identical everything?

Sure, they probably run hotter, but you could always underclock them.

Re:Really warranted? (4, Informative)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019470)

A P3 KATMAI is basically a process shrink of the P2, with SSE (and that damn Processor Serial Number) added. However, Coppermine and Tualatin ARE different.

That said, there's not much difference between the Pentium Pro, the P2, and ANY of the P3 cores. The P-M is the first P6 (read: Pentium Pro-based) chip to have a design that's got more than small tweaks here and there.

Re:Really warranted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019513)

I don't know, let's put you on a life support machine designed around the PII but with a PIII kludged in and find out.

Re:Really warranted? (1)

swordboy (472941) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019286)

I was really impressed when we first got our first 450Mhz, but god, does it seem like a dog now...

Actually, a 450Mhz box is quite fast if you provide the ram and hard drive to make it competitive. I threw a 7200rpm hard drive and 512 megs of ram into a 350mhz box and it is quite usable with Windows XP (especially if I turn off the swap file).

Re:Really warranted? (1)

gid (5195) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019415)

How may I ask did you turn off the swap file? I've tried doing this and XP was nice enough to turn it back on, informing me it has done it for performance reason or some other such bs. I even tried to make it a small fixed size, and XP resized it for me [gifpaste.net] .

Re:Really warranted? (3, Insightful)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019479)

I agree... You can even do with less if you're just surfing. I'm posting this from a P-II 400Mhz that is used as a dial-up test machine at work. It has only 128Meg RAM and runs Firefox just fine on WinXP Pro (all visual effects disabled). The Task Manager indicates 170MB used, which means that it would run waaaay better with much more RAM, but it's good enough to do the testing of our webapp (and gives us some humility towards our customers with less snappy machines)

Re:Really warranted? (1)

sporty (27564) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019339)

Depends on what you are doing it. As my web/mail/database/servlet server. Mine works fast enough.


As my simulation server, it's crap. I run things on my 900mhz mac.

Re:Really warranted? (2, Insightful)

eno2001 (527078) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019366)

It's funny about that. Depending on your application and OS, it seems that there are different experiences of "slow". When I used to run Windows and I made the jump from a 486 DX2 66 to a Pentium 100, I thought the 486 was slow as hell. At work (where we use Windows as well) I've also seen the performance degradation in Windows boxes as the registry gets junked over time. So, a PC that started out "fast" eventually seems "slow" artificially unless you do a re-install. The other factor also is additional applications that you didn't originally run before. We had a batch of P3s here that were running Windows 2000 sufficiently fast. Eventually we had to break down and add a few very important and required utilities (DeepFreeze and Norton AV for example). Just the addition of Norton dragged those system's down to really horrible performance.

Now, with my experience at home (where I run Linux pretty exclusively), my main X "application server" is a dual Pentium II with each proc running at 233. This thing is just about as fast as my P4 with hyperthreading running Windows XP Pro (for audio apps). It's been running for two years now and has had no performance degradation. At all. Period. The system is about 7 years old and it competes very nicely with a system that is only just barely a year old.

I'd say that before anyone knocks a processor as being "slow" take a look at what your OS and applications are doing. If they've changed over time, theneither your OS is the issue or your application has changed dramatically in some way.

Re:Really warranted? (4, Insightful)

Tux2000 (523259) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019447)

Do you remember the story of NASA searching i8086 CPUs [geek.com] for their space shuttles just two years ago? There are other stories, I remember some companies paying a lot of money for ancient Toshiba 386 laptops that was the only computer certified to "remote control" a certian pacemaker. A re-certification of a new system would have cost much more than buying a few 386 laptops at pentium-class prices.

Some systems (not only NASA shuttles) are designed around a randomly selected CPU, and they run with software that needs the exact behaviour and timing of that special CPU. Say hello to the world of embedded systems.

This message from intel is just a warning for designers of embedded systems that there will be a day when there is no spare P-II left.

Tux2000

Re:Really warranted? (1)

neko9 (743554) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019487)

my 350mhz p2 box is very quite usable in XP and even Mandrake. plays dvds, xvids, divxs, nicely runs playstation emus... long live p2! :-)

Re:Really warranted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019490)

On my PII it takes only ~20 hours to compile OOo on it, but it's still one of my best computers;)

Re:Really warranted? (1)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019495)

``I was really impressed when we first got our first 450Mhz, but god, does it seem like a dog now... I do remember thinking at the time, 1998 iirc, who the hell needs that much?!?''

I still think that. I just got myself a VIA EPIA with a 533 MHz Samuel (which is probably slower than your 450 MHz PII), and I am very satisfied with the performance. It would even run KDE happily; not the lighteset software by any measure. And all of this silently and without consuming nearly as much power as todays GHz monsters.

"RIP Pentium II" (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019137)

In Soviet Russia, Pentium II rips you.

Cute, but... (5, Informative)

syrinx (106469) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019141)

from the still-waiting-on-my-sexium dept.

"Pent" is based on the Greek prefix, which include "tetra", "penta", "hexa", and "hepta". "Sex" is from Latin, which include "quad(ri)" "quint" (or "quinque"), "sexa" and "septa".

So, the logical next step after Pentium would be Hexium, not Sexium.

Re:Cute, but... (5, Funny)

nomadic (141991) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019164)

Come on, they're slashdot editors, they have trouble enough with English. Don't torment them with Latin or Greek...

Re:Cute, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019202)

But Hexium, isn't nearly as funny SEXium! (in a very immature sort of way)

Re:Cute, but... (1)

virid (34014) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019465)

Why is that the "next logical step"? Even with a Hexium, he would "still [be] waiting on [his] sexium".

Perhaps in this case the next logical step to having read that statement was to LAUGH.

Nevertheless, I'm busting your chops. Your post was quite informational.

PII (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019142)

That's news to me. I thought the PII could still be purchased because retailers still had some floating around in their warehouses. I didn't realize the PII was still profitable for Intell. Are they still making it on 180nm? 130nm?

Re:PII (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019381)

> I didn't realize the PII was still profitable for Intell.

It's not, thats the point of this article! dumbass.

Re:PII (1)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019496)

250 or 350nm, I'm sure (depends on the core). They have to do some redesigning (not much, though, but it does cost money) to do a process shrink, so I don't think they'd bother.

In Corea... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019147)

...only old people still own Pentium II's!!!

Re:In Korea... (-1, Flamebait)

alienspanke (828386) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019349)

"In Corea..." In Korea they know how to spell. It's with a K you F'n ID10T.

Does anyone know... (-1, Flamebait)

elid (672471) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019151)

...who's still buying these things?

Re:Does anyone know... (1)

syrinx (106469) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019180)

The author of TFA knows:

That the part has held on for so long, past the introduction of the Pentium III and the P4, is a sign of its appeal to manufacturers of embedded systems for which high clock speeds and commensurately high power consumption and heat dissipation figures are a problem.

Re:Does anyone know... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019198)

It's still used in embedded applications and where specified in Military/Government contracts.

Re:Does anyone know... (1)

noprunesmoothie (713211) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019213)

I imagine large institutes with many of the same old p2 pc's that have older mobo's that can't support faster processors.

Re:Does anyone know... (4, Informative)

pavon (30274) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019240)

People still by 486 processors and higher for (relatively) heavy-weight embedded systems. Old design processors are far more forgiving of nasty environments (heat, cold, humidity, dust, vibration) than new top-of-the-line ones.

In other news.... (2, Insightful)

Geek_3.3 (768699) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019162)

naah, too easy.

On a real note, how many PII's *DID* Intel produce in the past couple of years?

Gah, this was about as surprising to me as when that /. article on Sony phasing out Betamax...

You mean people still buy Pentium 2s? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019173)

Computer prices don't follow rational pricing. You would think if you could buy a P4 2GHz for 75 bucks that a P2 333MHz would be like, 5 bucks, if that. But chances are it's probably $35, if not more.

Why in the Lord's name would you buy such outdated crap at such a high price? Reminds me of my first PC when the HDD drive died. It was 1 gig back in the days when BIOS limitations on the board would allow about 1.8 gigs, I believe. At the time, I couldn't even FIND a 1 gig HDD in retailers. I looked online, and the 1 gig HDDs were about 20% more expensive than the 6 gigs they had out.

We bought a new PC shortly there after.

Let's weed out the technological throwbacks, alright?

Re:You mean people still buy Pentium 2s? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019272)

that high price CRAP is 9000 times more stable than your P-4 6.8ghz with 22 terabytes of cache.

P-II's go into space on sattelites, rovers, probes..

you know things that actually do work and matter unlike the piece of shit computer you have. (that's if you own a alienware eliete series that cost you $5K or more, that is shit... anything less is uinbelieveably low grade crap.)

get a clue that there are those of us out here that still design things to use a 386 processor because we are doing real work with thme instead of playing around making believe we do something like you.

Re:You mean people still buy Pentium 2s? (1)

DavidLeblond (267211) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019425)

If I had to compile this program using a 386 I'd shoot myself. It takes 10 minutes to compile on a 2 GHz machine as it is.

"Hello world" != real work :P

Re:You mean people still buy Pentium 2s? (2, Interesting)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019402)

How 'bout http://www.dumpinggoods.com/dumpinggoods/itemdesc. asp?CartId=8-ACCWARE-321007DVDKM267&ic=CP-INT-0004 &cc=&tpc= [dumpinggoods.com] ?

It's $3.99, and as far as I can tell, it's new (with heatsink, even ;-))

If you just want a 233MHz chip (to help your collection, maybe? Anand found that in low resolutions, in many games (back in the day), the 233MHz PMMX beat the 266MHz P2), that's free+S&H.

one down! (1)

koi88 (640490) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019186)


Does that mean AMD has won?

Re:one down! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019476)

No it means you are a moron.

change back to 80686 then? (2, Interesting)

peter303 (12292) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019233)

Marketers find that more than five generations in series can make your product seem stale (especially if it is really getting stale). So there is often a name/numbering change.

I considered the original Pentium to be like a x576, the PII a x686, PIV a x886, then lost count.

Re:change back to 80686 then? (1)

JollyFinn (267972) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019340)

So why not rename it 80666 ;)

Re:change back to 80686 then? (2, Informative)

Gorath99 (746654) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019518)

So why not rename it 80666 ;)

I know it's a joke, but there's a reason why they won't go back to numbers (with or without biblical connotations). IIRC Intel tried to sue AMD for producing a chip they called a 486, but they were told by the judge that they couldn't trademark a number. That's why they called their next chip a Pentium instead of a 80586.

But 300 MHz survives! (1, Insightful)

AvantLegion (595806) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019244)

300 MHz, you are the survivor! Fear is obviously not a factor for you. You're hired!

Seriously though, what about the 300 MHz P2? Or 400 for that matter? Were they both canned earlier? Intel hatin' on 100 MHz FSB P2s?

I Fought Moore's Law And The Law Won (5, Funny)

tiktok (147569) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019247)

The Pentium 2 chip's light may be waning, but I still have two fileservers that will continue to defy Moore's Law.

I guess now could be the time to publish that book "101 Uses For An Obsolete Pentium 2 Chip". Bathroom tiles? Floor mosaic? Xmas ornaments?

Re:I Fought Moore's Law And The Law Won (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019445)

My PII 350mHz runs my Smoothwall firewall without a hitch, Also running Squid & Dansguardian too. Oh, one more thing, it's also Folding 24/7. Even though this style CPU looks like a game cartridge for an Atari 2600 it seems to get it's job done. Rather useful for me.

They still make these things? (0, Redundant)

MonkeyCookie (657433) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019251)

I'm hardly going to miss the Pentium II. I didn't even know that Intel was still producing the things!

They're so old technology-wise that I just figured they had stopped making the Pentium II a long time ago.

I'm sure there will still be plenty to be found in the used chip market and in older computers that nobody wants.

Re:They still make these things? (1)

DogDude (805747) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019521)

I'm sure there will still be plenty to be found in the used chip market and in older computers that nobody wants.

Speak for yourself. I just bought 2 for home computers. They work fine. Saved a lot of money, and got some serious Geek Karma (as opposed to going to Best Buy which costs serious Geek Karma).

350 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019278)

I still use a 350 P II machine to build and test the windows versions of my free software!

Original Press Release (3, Informative)

JaF893 (745419) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019330)

The original Press Release [intel.com] is still on the Intel website. Its hard to believe that this was cutting edge back in 1997.

FORMALLY???? (3, Funny)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019343)

They're formally not making any more PII's???

Are they still informally making PII's and I just missed it?

Or is this just like saying the 90's are officially over?

I'm confused.

Damn! (1)

RikRat (834490) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019345)

Dammit, I was just going to buy a new Pentium II 266! Now I need to hurry.

No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019346)

Darnit! First they kill the 8088 and now THIS! I am I ever going to keep living in the past?

Wild speculation (1)

gr8_phk (621180) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019350)

Since those chips are made on an old process, is Intel going to upgrade the fab, close it, or manufacture something that can still make use of it. Licensing DMD from TI would be a nice replacement for the failed LCOS initiative and it doesn't require state of the art chip geometry. Not that I've ever heard of TI licensing that stuff.

1997 - 2006 (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019370)

It's not even 2005 yet!

I'm not dead yet!! Quit writing my obituary!

-Pentium II

One may ask, why? (4, Insightful)

Staplerh (806722) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019374)

This trend to move away from old technology such as the Pentium II that still serves a valid purpose is silly, part of a push to always be bigger and better.

Now I'm not saying that the Pentium II is viable for any new programmes, heck, I find my Pentium 4 a little slow at times. I first started questioning this push over the summer, when I worked at a Canadian government office. The workers there ALL had brand-new Pentium 4 Dells (and it wasn't just our office, the entire facility had been upgraded), with full sound cards, video, you name it. Of course, sound was all deactivated as it was a cubicle farm.

Needless to say, what did the people use these Pentium 4's for? Word Processing. Perhaps a bit of Excel, and some random surfing of the web. I wasn't complaining, because I was underworked and could take advantage of the Pentium 4's spectacular Solitaire and Minesweeper processing, but it wasn't necessary.

The Pentium II can run Office applications fine, and heck, that's waht the majority of work force productivity is? Now you'll have to buy a better model to use Word.. wow.

I don't know the cost difference in terms of productivity between the P2 and the P4, and I'm sure they can concentrate on just producting the P4 even more on masse, but this is simply going to give procurement departments an excuse to connive themselves better equipment.

Well, that devolved into a rant, but hopefully my point can still come across clear! Cheers.

Better Spyware Performance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11019512)

was One may ask, why? (Score:3, Insightful) [slashdot.org]

Needless to say, what did the people use these Pentium 4's for? Word Processing. Perhaps a bit of Excel, and some random surfing of the web. I wasn't complaining, because I was underworked and could take advantage of the Pentium 4's spectacular Solitaire and Minesweeper processing, but it wasn't necessary.


The Pentium II can run Office applications fine, and heck, that's waht the majority of work force productivity is? Now you'll have to buy a better model to use Word.. wow.


The newer CPUs are necessary to run the latest spyware and exploits, which could really slow down an older PC.

Pentium II? Heh, try the 8088 (1)

shoppa (464619) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019395)

The 8088 (the processor used in the original IBM PC) is still current production. (Not made by IBM but by others, remember second-sourcing? Seems like a quant concept today.)

Production of reduction? (1)

Zemplar (764598) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019403)

My only experience with the PII in the last few years have been carting them off as waste!

I'm sure I could have had this market cornered if only I had saved them. And yes they worked, but typically the machines were economically totaled and did not warrant any use of funds for refurbishing.

Certainly not a bad product....back in it's day.

They're STILL being made? (1)

imstanny (722685) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019412)

and people STILL buy them?

Doh! (1)

kyoko21 (198413) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019426)

Doh! I still need to get a PII 450 to install into my dual 440GX board. I hope I will get one in time!

Has Netcraft Confirmed it? (0, Flamebait)

Discotechnica (699121) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019438)

I won't beleive it untill netcraft has confirmed it.

Might not run HL2, but... (1)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019453)

When paired properly with "obsolete" software, "obsolete" hardware works beautifully.

A Great Processor (1)

Creamsickle (792801) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019461)

This was a great processor that still keeps ticking. I've got a PII 266Mhz machine running Slackware that I'm still using as a firewall, proxy server, file server, and game server. I'll take one of these solid well designed CPUs from back when they really knew how to make them anyday over stuff on the market now. RIP Pentium II, you will be missed.

What's next after Pentium? (1)

yorkpaddy (830859) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019481)

I remember it was a big deal when intel went from the 486 to Pentium. well they keep on milking the Pentium name 2,3,4. Why not the Octium or Nonium?

Stock up! (1)

derxob (835539) | more than 9 years ago | (#11019484)

Looks like I'll be stocking up on the last ever Pentium II's! These babys will be hotter than an autograph of Jesus.
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