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892 comments

New Section Please (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033865)

"China Bans X" or something similar.

Thanks.

Re:New Section Please (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033897)

In Soviet China, old X bans YOU!

hmm (3, Insightful)

DaFallus (805248) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033866)

"People's" Republic indeed...

Re:hmm (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033912)

All your soccer games r belong to us!
How appropriate...

Re:hmm (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034061)

That's exactly what it is; all rights belong only to the people as a whole, not to the individual person.

Re:hmm (5, Funny)

XanC (644172) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034062)

The difference between a republic and a people's republic is the difference between a jacket and a straight jacket.

Re:hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034126)

All right, who's the commie sympathizer who modded the parent as flaimbait?

The makers should code in a new soccer team... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033874)

The Falun Gong Tigers...

Re:The makers should code in a new soccer team... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034017)


The parent is not off topic. Idiots.

Would their slogan be "Falun Gong, we prance but we're not gay!"?

FP? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033876)

Anyone? Anyone?

Last post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033877)

Yes, in reverse.

FRIST POST! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033878)

oooooh fristy fristy frist.

Fuck China (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033882)

Ban them from the World!

Huh? (2, Interesting)

Luigi30 (656867) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033883)

What's the harm in a game that has Taiwan listed as a country? Nobody's going to say "hey, Taiwan's independent! Kill China!" because it's listed in one lousy game.

Re:Huh? (2, Insightful)

Omniscientist (806841) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033932)

The game, "Soccer Manager 2005", contained content that harmed China's sovereignty and territorial integrity and violated Chinese law, the Xinhua news agency reported on Tuesday

The article answered that quite nicely. China's government is very sensitive about territorial issues.

Re:Huh? (5, Interesting)

WARM3CH (662028) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033996)

Well, some countries are very sensitive about such issues. Even people can be very sensitive about it. Take this recent example: You know that some Arab countries insist on using the name "Arabian Gulf" to call whan we know as "Persian Gulf". Recently, after mentioning this second name in some national geography publications, a large group of Persian weblogs and sites helped making a google bomb. Try searching for "Arabian Gulf" in google and select the first results and see it for yourself.

Re:Huh? (1)

Alkaiser (114022) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034011)

The whole Taiwan/China thing is an ego trip. So any news related to it is part of the ego tip.

What's retarded is that FIFA 2000 had Taiwan in it, too...I took them to the World Cup.

Re:Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034034)

They don't want the camel to get his nose under the tent.

Ignorance Rears it's Ugly Head (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034071)

What's the harm in a game that has Taiwan listed as a country? Nobody's going to say "hey, Taiwan's independent! Kill China!" because it's listed in one lousy game.

You twit. This is about national pride. Learn some contemporary chinese history.

Taiwan was occupied by fleeing KMT [wikipedia.org] (Kuomintang in 1949, when the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) drove them from their last coastal refuges in the mainland. Lacking any kind of navy the CCP couldn't hope to pursue and fight any kind of battle to complete the toppling of the former republican goverment, which had been largely run by the Green Gang (to whom Chiang Kai-shek was merely a puppet and a poor military commander.) Even after generations the CCP still view the revolution as incomplete, willing to overlook most of the people running the island republic and living there are descendents and have less to do with the original KMT.

In a nutshell, it's a matter of pride, stupid certainly, but memories are often long in the east and far east.

All I Can Say: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033888)

Viva La Revolucion!!

This is the China (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033890)

This is the China that everyone here on Slashdot loves so much. You don't hear about this kinda stuff happening in the US.

I'm going to blow those fuckers up at some command and conquer now.

We Fight From High Place!

In Korea... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033892)

In Korea only old people play Soccer Manager 2005

This just in.... (5, Funny)

lottameez (816335) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033893)

Great Britain has banned all references to the "United States" and insists that any software produced in "the colonies" or elsewhere reflect this view.

Re:This just in.... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033943)

I wish, even better would be: /callvote kick "The U.S."

wait, let me rephrase; /callvote kick "George W. Bush" /vote yes /vote yes /vote yes

Re:This just in.... (0, Offtopic)

fani (176635) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034056)

are you an idiot, Anonymous coward ?
The elections are over. The people did thankfully vote yes to GWB. crawl out of your rat hole and get over it.
People voted kick kerry.

China & Taiwan: Not so Funny Stuff (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034063)

Beijing need not have fear of Taipei leaving the Chinese orbit [phrusa.org]. The Taiwanese support all the geopolitical objectives of Beijing [geocities.com]: the sole exception is rule by Beijing.

Taipei has told both Japan and the Philippines to back off from the Senkaku Islands and the Spratly Islands because these Islands are supposedly "Chinese territory". Taiwanese high schools teach that Tibet is rightfully part of China, and the Taiwanese constitution insists that Tibet should be integrated into "One China".

The West is the most popular destination of Taiwanese emigration. The second most popular destination is mainland China. (reference: "Los Angeles Times")

It would be more acurate to say.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034114)

Canada has banned all reference to Quebec and insists that any software produced in the "province"
or elsewhere reflect this view.

Taiwan is part of china, US of A got it independence long ago and it reconised world wide. witch is not the case for Taiwan or Quebec.

Re:This just in.... (1)

interiot (50685) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034143)

For what it's worth, the United States (via Powell's statements in October 2004) (wikipedia [wikipedia.org], google news [google.com]) believes that Taiwan should remain part of China rather than becoming independent. So while I appreciate the parent post's humor, it's not historically accurate... It's not as simple as China being long in a state of delusion.

Apt error message ... (1)

YetAnotherName (168064) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033895)

Nothing for you to see here. Please move along.

Yes, I can imagine that's what proprietors of Chinese franchises of EB Games [ebgames.com] will be saying when customers come inquiring for Soccer Manager 2005.

China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033901)

China, Taiwan, what's the difference? Half the God damn world is made in Asia anyway.

So many peanuts, so little gallery. (1, Flamebait)

conner_bw (120497) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033902)

Why is there so much news about China in slashdot, followed by so many ignorant comments by people from outside of China or tourists?

I'd like the Chinese opinion please. I have been to taiwan as a tourist and have felt the hostility, but would like a real perspective from real people born there.

Thank you.

Re:So many peanuts, so little gallery. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033940)

> I'd like the Chinese opinion please.

Me no rikey.

Sincerely,
A Chinaman

Re:So many peanuts, so little gallery. (4, Interesting)

The Cisco Kid (31490) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033948)

You are assuming that the Chinese government allows its citizens to access this site.

I would think that if they had any power to do so, slashdot would *definately* be one of the sites they would block. Way too many opinions that conflict with the official CN views.

Re:So many peanuts, so little gallery. (1)

FRiC (416091) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034095)

I've had no problems accessing /. from our offices in Shanghai...

Re:So many peanuts, so little gallery. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034097)

And you're assuming that anyone in China, in the government or otherwise, has even heard of slashdot.

Re:So many peanuts, so little gallery. (1)

cooley (261024) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033959)

I doubt you'll get the Chinese opinion. The government has probably banned citizens from looking at Slashdot.

If you can't beat 'em in the real world... (2, Funny)

Cranial Dome (28458) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033904)

...you can make some pathetic attempt to hold 'em back in the virtual world.

And in related news... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11033914)

...UK doesn't ban a soccer game that shows England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland as separate entities...

Re:And in related news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034138)

How does something like the parent post get modded insightful?

Last I checked, Scotland and Wales weren't considered by the British government to be in open rebellion. Nor Northern Ireland, though I can see how the British might be mightily displeased if some game company put out "Ireland for the Irish Sinn Fein Soccer 2005".

but great employees (3, Insightful)

ch-chuck (9622) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033923)

is it any wonder every factory owner want to built there - no pesky problems with free thinking laborers, just govt controlled menial units toiling away for emporer and Wal Mart.

Re:but great employees (1)

cooley (261024) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034020)

"emporer"? You mean that Chinese laborers are toiling away in order to support the leader of feudal Japan?

I get your point, and don't entirely disagree, but you China is not ruled by an Emporer; it's a communist country.

Re:but great employees (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034054)

Actually IIRC, the Wal-Mart employees in China are unionized but the ones in the US are not allowed to join a union. I hate unions (especially the teacher's union) but that is kind of ridiculous.

It's the insect colony like culture. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034107)

Those people put ants to shame. Hardworking do such a good job of doing whatever the overmind wants.

Re:but great employees (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034110)

It's "emperor", you fscking illiterate.

Sheesh... (1)

Adouma (826526) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033925)

Let her go China, you're too good for Taiwan. Things have been really rocky lately, just cut her out of your life with a pair of oversized novelty scissors. You might be hurting, but don't rebound on Tibet, either.

This is a surprise? (4, Insightful)

nebaz (453974) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033935)

This is still a country with a Communist government (modified, granted, but still not democratic) who has never recognized the independence of Taiwan, who
blocks its citizens from portions of the internet at the national level, and brutally rolled over demonstrators in Tienaman (sp) square. What do you think they would go?

The worst part of the whole thing is that China is a capitalist's dream, cheap labor, who have no chance to redress grievances. No wonder we can't compete.

To those who say that economic capitalism leads to democracy, we'll just have to wait and see. I'm not holding my breath.

Just like the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034045)

has never recognized the independence of Taiwan

Who's the Ambassador to Taiwan? Trick question, nobody. The US doesn't recognize Taiwan as independant. What do you think "One China Policy" means?

who blocks its citizens from portions of the internet at the national level

Are you talking about what's happened with indymedia.org and the Patriot Act?

Re:This is a surprise? (1)

Wordsmith (183749) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034068)

That's a mischaracterizatoin of capitalism. A Capatalism is a free-market type. We'd like cheap labor, with unions and market forces addressing grievences. For instance, we're perfectly content with EA employees crying to the media and game purchasers boycotting EA in response.

Re:This is a surprise? (3, Interesting)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034125)

> This is still a country with a Communist government (modified, granted, but still not democratic) who has never recognized the independence of Taiwan, who blocks its citizens from portions of the internet at the national level, and brutally rolled over demonstrators in Tienaman (sp) square. What do you think they would go?

This is a country with a modernizing government who has never recognized the breakaway rebellion in the Taiwanese province, who protects its citizens from superstition on the Internet at the national level, and who defended the people against an uprising in Tienanmen square.

It's all in how you look at it. Mao was only half-right. Political power not only flows from the barrel of a gun. Reality itself flows from the barrel of a gun.

> To those who say that economic capitalism leads to democracy, we'll just have to wait and see. I'm not holding my breath.

When the Russian socioeconomic system collapsed, Russia tried freedom - and descended into anarchy before reverting to "managed democracy".

When the Chinese socioeconomic system was on the verge of collapse, China adopted policies which placed them on firm ground as the world's first stable fascist state. As a result of this decision ("It is glorious to be rich!"), its leaders remained in power, the Chinese middle class continues to grow, and standards of living continue to rise.

As for America, slouching towards its own socioeconomic collapse (largely brought on by unsustainable entitlement spending and a colossal trade deficit), China is merely the beta test site, from which we can learn what works and what doesn't, as we modernize our political system.

And speaking as someone who lives in America, I'll take the Chinese solution over the Russian solution any day.

Re:This is a surprise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034145)

Communist government (modified, granted, but still not democratic Communism is not the opposite of democracy, seeing as one is an economic ideology and one is political, and they are not mutually exclusive.

It's Just A Game (1)

teiresias (101481) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033939)

China: Giving new meaning to the phrase 'It's just a game.'

This isn't really suprising considering China's (belligerent) stance on anything and all things Taiwainese. Last weeks West Wing had a good example of these types of 'affronts' (although on a bigger scale) towards China regarding Taiwan.

Only in the US... (2, Insightful)

gosand (234100) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034047)

China: Giving new meaning to the phrase 'It's just a game.' This isn't really suprising considering China's (belligerent) stance on anything and all things Taiwainese. Last weeks West Wing had a good example of these types of 'affronts' (although on a bigger scale) towards China regarding Taiwan.

Sigh. Only in America would someone reference a fictional TV show as a source of information on something like this.

Thought for a mo that Slashdot was banned here (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033954)

Kept getting that Nothing to see here, move along message.

It's utterly silly that PRC continues with this stand, which by my reckoning pushes Taiwan further away. While China's economy was ~ 40th in the world this year, it's still growing, while much of the world stagnates and it seems there will be economic extortion when an economy can dictate recognition of a state or entity by the strength of the yuan.

Meanwhile, off the coast of Brazil is a sunken ship with amphorae from the the eastern mediterranean, which conflicts with the beliefs of the Brazilian government, so they've buried until dredgings to bury the truth.

I wonder if I wrote a video game, Archeological Diving of South America, which featured this ship, would it be banned in Brazil?

In other news... (1)

bizmark22 (823743) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033956)

South central Los Angeles has banned copies of "Grand Theft Auto San Andreas" as depicting their ganstas as "more hardcore" than theirs...

Ambiguous Headlines (1)

echocharlie (715022) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033963)

I thought the headline meant that China recognized Taiwanese Independence by banning a game. That headline could have been phrased a bit better.

China also jailing journalists. NYT (4, Insightful)

glrotate (300695) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033972)

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/12/01/opinion/01kristo f.html?hp=&pagewanted=print&position=

China's Donkey Droppings
By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF

For the last century, the title of "most important place in the world" has belonged to the United States, but that role seems likely to shift in this century to China.

So what are China's new leaders, Hu Jintao and Wen Jiabao, really like? Are they visionaries who are presiding over the greatest explosion of wealth the world has ever known? Or are they ruthless thugs who persecute Christians, Falun Gong adherents, labor leaders and journalists in a desperate attempt to maintain their dictatorship?

There's some evidence for both propositions, and they are probably both true to some degree.

When Mr. Hu and Mr. Wen rose to the helm of the Communist Party two years ago, many Chinese hoped they would bring a new openness to a nation that is dynamic economically but stagnant intellectually. Instead, China has become more repressive.

The repression has now engulfed a member of The New York Times's family. Zhao Yan, a researcher for the Beijing bureau of The Times, has been detained by the authorities since September and is not allowed to communicate with his family or lawyers.

Mr. Zhao is accused of leaking state secrets, a very serious charge that could lead to a decade in prison. China's government may believe that he was behind the September scoop by The Times's Beijing bureau chief, Joseph Kahn, that China's former leader, Jiang Zemin, was about to retire from his last formal position.

While The Times's policy is, wisely, never to comment on the sources of articles, my own private digging indicates that Mr. Zhao was not the source for that scoop. He is innocent of everything except being a fine journalist who, before joining The Times, wrote important articles in the Chinese press about corruption.

(In fairness, sending journalists to prison for doing their job is not an exclusively Chinese phenomenon. Several American journalists - Jim Taricani of NBC, Judith Miller of this newspaper and Matthew Cooper of Time - may be sent to U.S. prisons in the next month or two for refusing to reveal their sources.)

Mr. Zhao's case is depressingly similar to that of another Chinese journalist, Jiang Weiping. He is serving a six-year sentence for "revealing state secrets," even though his real crime was exposing corruption.

"China has changed so much economically, but not politically," Jiang Weiping's wife, Li Yanling, told me. "It's a puzzle to me."

The authorities ordered Ms. Li to keep quiet about her husband's arrest, and detained her when she didn't. The couple's daughter, now 15, was traumatized at losing first her father and then her mother to the Chinese prison system. When Ms. Li was finally released, the daughter called her constantly from school to make sure that she had not been arrested again.

Mr. Zhao's arrest is just the latest in a broad crackdown in China. The Committee to Protect Journalists reports that 42 journalists are now in prison in China, more than in any other country.

"There was a period of openness, a period of hope, when the new leaders first came to power," said Jiao Guobiao, a journalism professor at Beijing University. "But now they've consolidated power, and everything has closed up again."

Mr. Jiao should know. He wrote an essay this year denouncing censorship, and it was immediately censored. Now the government has banned Mr. Jiao from teaching.

I've felt this cooling as well. I was planning to visit China this month, but the government has declined to give me a visa. It's the first time I've been refused, and the State Security Ministry may have worried that I would write a column about its unjust imprisonment of Mr. Zhao.

I love China, and I share its officials' distaste for those who harm it. That's why I'm angry that hard-liners in Beijing are presenting China to the world as repressive, fragile, tyrannical and backward. They are also undermining China's long-term prospects by gagging its people.

China now dazzles visitors with luxury skyscrapers, five-star hotels and modern freeways. This boom is real and spectacular, but for China to be an advanced nation it needs not only spaceships, but also freedom.

Otherwise, all that dazzle is just a mirage. The Chinese leaders might recall an old peasant expression, "Lu fen dan'r, biaomian'r guang." It means, "On the outside, even donkey droppings gleam."

This is actually quite common (5, Interesting)

kusanagi374 (776658) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033974)

This is not an isolated case. Back when Windows 95 was released, Microsoft had problems in India because the timezone worldmap (when setting date & time) wouldn't highlight Kashmir as part of India. To deal with that problem, they just removed country highlighting for good.

They'll probably just release an updated version of the game without Taiwan and move along.

Re:This is actually quite common (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034086)

There's a huge difference. Everyone not living under a rock should know about the China-Taiwon issue. The India-Pakistan issue over Kashmir didn't really become a news item in the US till IIRC the late 90s.

In other news... (3, Funny)

TooMuchEspressoGuy (763203) | more than 9 years ago | (#11033988)

Today the United States announced that they, too, are banning "Soccer Management 2005" on the grounds that it recognizes Canada as a separate country, when it is *obviously* just part of the United States.

War on China (5, Insightful)

oexeo (816786) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034001)

(Disclaimer: This is not a troll, I really think it's on-topic, and worth discussion)

Please remind why America is not at war with China? My knowledge on this subject is limited, but my checklist (based on the precedent set by the "justifications" for the war on Iraq) suggests that they should be:

(X) Totalitarian government
(X) Autocracy government
(X) Possesses Weapons of Mass Destruction
(X) No human rights
(X) Unstable, Irresponsible leadership
(X) Inhumane treatment of its people
(X) Government oppression and censorship

If these are the valid reasons, could someone please explain why America is not at war with China?

Re:War on China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034030)

They make the most of the shit we buy

Re:War on China (1)

grape jelly (193168) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034075)

Umm. Is money an adequate explanation? There's a reason China continues to be declared "Most Favored Nation" with regard to trade.

Re:War on China (1)

fieldcomm (685891) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034077)

I don't know what sand dune you've had your head in, but, contrary to what the government says, the US does not go to war for freedom and democracy.

They go to war for money, plain and simple, and currently China isn't giving them any shit, so there is no reason to go to war.

Re:War on China (2, Insightful)

DoctorPepper (92269) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034082)

Please remind why America is not at war with China?

Because they:

(X) Possess Nuclear Weapons
(X) Possess Largest Army on the Earth

Come on, even Dubya isn't that stupid!

Re:War on China (1)

nebaz (453974) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034094)

This is simple. China has the capacity to do some real damage to us, they have a space program, probably have some ICBMs, definitely have nuclear weapsons. War with China would have terrible ramifications on US soil. Other smaller countries that we preemtively invade will only kill our troops, and we don't show coffins on tv anymore, so that's just a blurb on the news.

Re:War on China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034101)

China does not intend to use WMDs because they believe in Mutually Assured Destruction?

Re:War on China (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034131)

You forgot the counter-points:

(X) Makes huge number of manufactured goods that we rely on and for which we've shuttered/decommissioned our factories here.

(X) Can actually fight back (i.e. has nuclear ICBMs)

Basically:
Remember the old theory that democracies don't start wars? Well, it was predicated on the idea that "the people" won't generally invite the necessary hardship and risk to do it. This is pretty much accurate, it just breaks down when the scales of power are so disbalanced that there's no effect on the homeland (as per Iraq: we're not exactly rationing materiel here to keep up that fight). It works just fine when we're faced with an opponent whose defeat would require (gasp!) sacrifice and discomfort.

Re:War on China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034132)

two things: lose lots of money and too many people would die

Re:War on China (2, Interesting)

Tanktalus (794810) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034133)

Pick one:

  • Nuclear weapons
  • Lack of oil
  • Too big to bully around, even if the US did win

On the other hand, Japan would likely be one of the first countries to sign up as a US ally!

modern re/op/pression (1)

10000000000000000000 (809085) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034005)

what is this country's problem?

you know, in the american colnial times it seemed it was much simpler to revolt against an unjust power.

nowadays the advancement in media communication has allowed propaganda to grow to such a sophisticated level that suppression of a populace can nearly be done with a wizard.

look how effective Saddam was ruling his country through mis-information.

of course, this media also allows for the rebels to propogate thier ideas as well, so perhaps it's actually a level playing field after all.

how long will the chinese and tawainese take this for?

If china can do it (3, Funny)

codesurfer (786910) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034007)

then can we lobby to ban anything that depicts Nick Lachey and Jessica Simpson as talented?

Oh well, no big loss (1)

SunofMan (829776) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034012)


At first I thought, this is gonna be hell for all those sports game manufacturers that still have Taiwan listed with its flag before it was seemingly banned from the Olympics. I mean, there's an ENORMOUS customer base for sports games (especially related to soccer) in China. But then I realized, wait...most software in China is pirated anyway! So really, no big loss here folks.

Not quite accurate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034016)

It was one of those new-fangled sexy beach type soccer games and Taiwan was depicted as independent from any clothes.

Sorta a dead horse... (1)

gmknobl (669948) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034028)

I know it's a dead issue since we hear so much about it but why do we business with these people? Big corporations have one moral - make money - and now the U.S. is just a big corporation. At least that's the way it's gone. And we are back in the bad guilded age of "the business of America is business." Too bad. Support repressive regimes? Who cares! It makes us money. YUK!

they're right (1)

atcdevil (700926) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034029)

Because in America we just readily accepted that the southern states could secede from the Union... and moved on with our lives. Why do we have a double standard?

not surprising at all (2, Insightful)

magikweis (123136) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034033)

I work for a publishing house in Germany. Whenever we are going to produce a book with maps, which may include Taiwan, we can not print it in China. The Chinese government insists on Taiwan beeing printed in the same colours and font size as provinces of Mainland China. They take a tough line in order to not erode their position in this conflict.
Now, if one can not produce material like that for export, how can one dare to sell this on the Chinese domestic market?

I wonder what it would take... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034041)

to convince the mainland Chinese govt to recognize Taiwan as an independent country. How many similar places in History are like that? North and South Korea, maybe? North and (former) South Viet Nam? Ireland and Northern Ireland? To what extent can accommodations be made? Probably none so long as powermad mainland Mao-wannabes think they have a right to enslave first everyone who speaks Chinese, and later everyone else. Maybe we should give Taiwan a nice big quantity of intermediate-range nuclear-tipped missles, and then leave them to duke it out. (Could also end up with more jobs returning to US, hmmmm?)

Which China? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034064)

Taiwan has -never- been under the yoke of the communist dictatorship ruling the Chinese, Tibetan, Manchurian and east Turkmen mainland.

In fact, if there is a legitimately elected government of China, it is on Taiwan.

Clever ploy (1)

Stripsurge (162174) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034099)

Quite a move by the video game maker(Sega). Perhaps this actually is their sublte way of pushing for Taiwan's independence. Kids see them separate so when they grow up they see a separation they'll say "Uh... weren't they already?" rather than take up arms. In the end the video game companies profit by Taiwan becoming independent. Thats probably something along the lines of what the government was thinking. Its a win-win situation for the game makers. China does nothing, free propaganda spread. China reacts and they're hated for censorship. Good work Sega.

Meh. Just a thought.

olympics '08 (1)

cliffe (832751) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034103)

china has their population brainwashed so well. i've met a lot of chinese who emphatically state that taiwan is part of china. there's seems to be no dissesion among them. so this is how they accomplish it. starting with the young and their games!

if they won't let this type of stuff slide, i wonder what they'll do to taiwan for olympics '08 in beijing.... maybe just ban the whole contingent haha

From the Article (2, Funny)

Moonchen (452105) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034104)

From The Article:

China, sensitive about issues of national sovereignty, has banned a computer sports game that classifies Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau and Tibet as countries and has threatened to fine Web sites that supply the game and Internet cafes that let patrons download it.


Regardless of the state of Taiwan's independence, it looks like that the game is indeed geographically incorrect. Hong Kong and Macau are both officially part of China. This would be similar to a game depicting Texas as its own country.

Re:From the Article (1)

SunofMan (829776) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034144)

The game isn't geographically incorrect. Hong Kong and Macau have their own football (soccer) teams that compete on the international stage. It's the same deal with Scotland, England, and Wales each having their own 'national' team that plays in international tournaments separately. They are in fact Great Britain, but they play football separately.

Of course they should ban the game! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034105)

And I repeat: Of course they should ban the game. Nothing on this beautiful planet happends by shere chance if it has anything to do with politics. And sneeking into China anything that would hurt chinese national sovereignity should rightly be outright banned.

US of A has spent huge amount of money on overt and covert operations around the world, messing with other nations and provoking wars. Hell, USA is even destroying itself internally, when it comes to democracy and decency..

But why should China allow access to it's lucrative market to some ignorant game producer? Beats me, but I'd definetely throw them out and therefore make an empty space (read: create an opportunity) for a game producer that cares for facts, and even knows how to make a cash out of it..

What do you thing, will this hurt game producer financially? If I'd be chinese official I'd sertainly make sure that it does.

Remember this (1, Interesting)

squarooticus (5092) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034113)

Anytime an American citizen bitches about how America (or should I say Amerikkka) is become a facist dictatorship under the Bush Dynasty, I should refer them to stories like this. Sedition (which is essentially how Chinese authorities see this game) has long been unprosecutable in the United States, whether it is officially restricted by the Constitution or not.

We the People have more power than many of the more hysterical among us admit. The Chinese people have far less than most of us who grew up in the West realize. The prospect of a country with a billion-strong populace subservient to a fascist oligarchy scares the hell out of me. It should scare you too. Do what you can to introduce the Chinese people to the benefits of liberty, or I guarantee you China will be far more formidable and righteous a foe than the Soviet Union ever was.

Chinese people will overthrow communist government (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11034123)

...they will all be killed once and for all!

Thugs have no sense of humor. (1)

RealAlaskan (576404) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034124)

Insecure thugs react violently to anything which might be a threat.

I don't think this tells us anything about China's government that we didn't already know.

Different approach (5, Insightful)

kahei (466208) | more than 9 years ago | (#11034130)


There is a lot of ignorance here about the difference between the Chinese and Western ways of defining, and thus changing, reality.

If a Western government banned a game or a particular statement, it would be a move against that particular game or statement. When the Chinese government does it, it's one tiny part of the general full-time business of defining the version of reality they want to be percieved (and which is percieved) as the canonical Chinese one.

China is a large country, containing large areas which were not China until quite recently and still have major anti-Chinese native populations, and large areas whose interests conflict with each other and with Beijing's interests. The Chinese machine -- 'leadership' is the wrong word because it is a culture-wide effort -- has therefore always worked hard to promote a unified pro-Chinese vision in which the answer to the questions 'Should we not be part of China? Can China do bad?' is an automatic, instinctive 'no', so automatic that the question cannot really be asked at all.

If you want to get a feel for this, try reading XinHua in parallel with your other news sources. At first you will note differences here and there but over time you will come to see two different, parallel world histories going on; the XinHua one and the 'real' one.

But the true effect is only achieved when the whole dialectic of discussion at all levels, not just of government-controlled news sources, assumes the artificial reality, and this effect has been achieved brilliantly -- although lately they have been resorting to extreme nationalism to keep it up. The abuse of foreign soccer teams, the constant rehearsing of Japanese, British and French crimes in schools, the scholarly books on how Tibet and Goguryeo (google it, I don't know the right romanization though) and this and that bit of India have been stolen away by evil foreign interests but have been returned to China by the force of truth and sincerity -- it's all part of one absolutely brilliant concerted effort of which the banning of this game is a tiny, tiny, tiny, part.

I think the creation of not merely a new Chinese history but a whole Chinese reality, basically in 5 short decades, is probably the greatest cultural achievement of the previous century.

Or not.

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