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228 comments

The answer... (5, Funny)

GameGod0 (680382) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115382)

... is obviously 42.

Re:The answer... (1)

JaffaKREE (766802) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115473)

I wouldn't have the slightest idea how to begin working on a problem like this. Anyone feel like offering an explanation of how to start ?

Re:The answer... (2, Funny)

Fire Dragon (146616) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115514)

I wouldn't have the slightest idea how to begin working on a problem like this. Anyone feel like offering an explanation of how to start ?


All you need to do is to hack into their system and look for the right answer. No need to break the code in contest.

Applied Cryptography (2, Informative)

bsd4me (759597) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115526)

Read Bruce Schneier's Applied Cryptography, and then do all of the sample problems in the book.

Re:The answer... (3, Informative)

nelsonal (549144) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115546)

Depending on how difficult they make it, look for letters that occur often (names usually have a lot of vowels). You could use a letter histogram for that, there should be a very wide distribution of letter frequency. Then it is just a matter of spelling out the words by trial and error, until you recognise a name then plug those letters into other names, and you will eventually see more partial names to complete. Most likely the names are relativly famous, so that should be a clue. As far as relating the names to together, you are on your own.

Re:The answer... (1)

aug24 (38229) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115627)

That rather assums its a simple rotational cypher, and I'm afraid I've already ruled that out (not that I thought it would be). I'm about to do the histogram thing, and I expect it'll be roughly smooth, suggesting a varying rotational cypher., but I could be wrong ;-) J.

The penguins talk to you, they only steal my beer (1)

nelsonal (549144) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115722)

You are correct, I only looked at old solutions noticed that they used simple single letter replacement cyphers in prior puzzles, which was where the idea came from.

Re:The penguins talk to you, they only steal my be (3, Funny)

brsmith4 (567390) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115950)

To both of you: only I and the makers of the Matrix are allowed to misspell 'cipher'... As it was a name of a rather blah character in the movie and has been the domain for my email address for quite some time, I think we have the monopoly on this one, pal(s). Please immediately cease your infringement on our intellectual properties so as to prevent this from becoming a _legal_ matter.

Re:The answer... (1)

JohnFluxx (413620) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115886)

Look at: BZGZD A'GAANZ

There's one famous name that fits that. (hint A=O - not that that gives much away since there's not much that can go before a ')

Re:The answer... (1)

fatdave (122425) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115869)

The frequency histogram is pretty flat, suggesting a rotational cipher. Might try taking each line as an increased increment in the rotation.. ..d

Re:The answer... (2, Informative)

geordie_loz (624942) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115644)

The have an introduction to codes and code-breaking methods on the site. Just click on the link which says "Break Some Codes" or click here [gchq.gov.uk] .

If so, what is the question? (1)

wiredog (43288) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115550)

No Text

I know who they are (1, Funny)

Reignking (832642) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115792)

They are all people who have never been in my kitchen.

Answer: (4, Funny)

k4_pacific (736911) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115392)

Drink your ovaltine?

Re:Answer: (5, Funny)

pete-classic (75983) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115422)

Be sure to drink your Ovaltine. Ovaltine? A crummy commercial? Son of a bitch!

Re:Answer: (1, Interesting)

emmetropia (527623) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115563)

Ovaltine? Why do they call it ovaltine? Shouldn't they call it roundtine? I await the wrath of the mod's.

Re:Answer: (1)

Reignking (832642) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115716)

I hope that they don't -- I doubt that there are any more references to Ovaltine to be made. Thanks, Banyan!

Re:Answer: (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115609)

Make that:

Be sure to drink your Ovaltine

The Magic Words.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115393)

are squeamish ossifrage

Uh... (5, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115411)


that page just looks like a few columns of perl code to me.

Re:Uh... (4, Funny)

iapetus (24050) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115449)

Tsk. It's easy to tell the difference - the GCHQ code challenge is neatly formatted.

the mercury is rising (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115412)

if you're a 6 year old autistic kid, does bruce willis come to save you from the british equivelant of alec baldwin (which would probably be hugh grant by the way)?

Re:the mercury is rising (1)

FinestLittleSpace (719663) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115556)

bloody helll thats a dodgy film. glad im not the only one who was reminded of it.

egassem (3, Funny)

fishdan (569872) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115413)

sdren era syug uoy

erkjay (0)

vp_development (789333) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115487)

Owhay areway ouyay allingcay away erdnay ourfay eyesway?

Re:erkjay (1)

Apiakun (589521) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115620)

tong hong-a tong wong-o u long dong bong-e yong-o u.

Re:erkjay (0, Offtopic)

Democritus2 (553661) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115763)

i top hop-i nop kop i-top i-sop yop-o-u

Re:erkjay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115862)

Hmm.. Definately an Asian guy on pot... definately.

GCHQ (4, Interesting)

Gilesx (525831) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115417)

I live a mile from GCHQ - it looks like a huge donut, and is apparently mostly built underground. The scarey thing is that I recently read that it's the second most desirable terrorist target after the Whitehouse. Nice!

Re:GCHQ (1)

dbleoslow (650429) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115501)

Where did you read this? What publicity value does blowing up GCHQ hold as opposed to say, Big Ben? How many uneducated terrorists even know this place exists?

I recently read somethere that my wang is the most desirable target for the ladies. Doesn't mean it's true though :)

Re:GCHQ (1)

Gilesx (525831) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115553)

Did you even consider that some organsiation has to be recording and intercepting the al queda cell phone calls, and the US is a little bit far away to be doing that?

Re:GCHQ (1)

jester22c (613967) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115884)

FYI the US is not too far away... we intercept everything in space. My father did it in the Air Force for almost 30 years.

Re:GCHQ (2, Interesting)

10Ghz (453478) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115573)

How many uneducated terrorists even know this place exists?


What makes you think that the people who come up with the terrorist-attacks are "uneducated"?

Re:GCHQ (1)

CProgrammer98 (240351) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115538)

I live in Harrogate, 5 miles from RAF Menwith Hill - the UK owned but US run "Communications Relay" station, which GW himself has said is a vital asset to the US. I dunno which they would go for first. GCHQ or the hill.

Re:GCHQ (1)

_the_bascule (740525) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115929)

GW himself has said is a vital asset to the US

Hasn't the whole Island just become an aircraft carrier/first strike base for the US in recent years?

Re:GCHQ (4, Funny)

museumpeace (735109) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115607)

I would have assumed the US has an equivalent of the GCHQ organization. I enquired about it and was told we have No Such Agengcy.

Re:GCHQ (1)

ViolentGreen (704134) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115664)

Wouldn't that fall under the NSA?

Re:GCHQ (2, Funny)

gavin_barr (765622) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115709)

NSA? But there is No Such Agency.

Re:GCHQ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115685)

You're a quick one.

Re:GCHQ (1)

Reignking (832642) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115764)

Sure! I read about it in Dan Brown's Digital Fortress...it was part of the NSA...

errr, (1)

Tangurena (576827) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115994)

You are supposed to Never Say Anything about No Such Agency.

Re:GCHQ (1)

Dutchmaan (442553) | more than 9 years ago | (#11116014)

>

The GCHQ is just a cover organization for the Krispy Kreme world headquarters!

Answer? (3, Funny)

CypherXero (798440) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115419)

We have your IP address. Thanks!

Decrypt Santa's List (1)

codesurfer (786910) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115428)

If you can do it, move me to the top of the 'Nice' list please!

Re:Decrypt Santa's List (1)

yummy1991 (546737) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115564)

Nice - you mean the men's list right?

Great (1, Insightful)

had3l (814482) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115430)

Until someone posts the answer on slashdot.

I see how it works... (5, Funny)

jmcwork (564008) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115431)

You win the contest, they recruit you, then you spend the rest of your life drinking vodka martinis, getting shot at, and having gorgeous women fall at your feet. (Time to start code breaking!)

Re:I see how it works... (0)

CortoMaltese (828267) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115483)

Then they'll make a movie of you. And then they make a sequel. And a sequel. And a sequel...

Re:I see how it works... (1)

pjt33 (739471) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115596)

No, that would be the Secret Intelligence Service.

Re:I see how it works... (1)

loftwyr (36717) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115624)

More like: you win the contest, they recruit you, you spend the rest of your life in a computer lab staring at code segments and being ignored by the guys drinking vodka martinis...

way to easy (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115432)

rot13 + rot13 isn't really encryption

Already Sloved! (0, Offtopic)

Artie_Effim (700781) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115433)

Quite obviously the answer is: . . Cowboy Neil

Young Ones? (1)

Migraineman (632203) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115732)

"Cowboy Neil"

The Young Ones [phill.co.uk] version? I'll use Rick's cricket bat to solve this problem. *whack*

Job Opportunity? (3, Insightful)

mordors9 (665662) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115434)

I know it says you can win a book, but this smells like those Google job application tests that were in the magazines a few months back. Come up with enough correct answers on these tests and who knows....

Re:Job Opportunity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115582)

> Come up with enough correct answers on these tests and who knows....

Someone will kidnap you for lifetime.

Don't enter if you're an American (4, Funny)

russotto (537200) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115459)

They'll know

1) You're too smart for the good of the country and

2) You're disloyal enough to cozy up to a foreign spy agency.

Can you say "do-not-fly list"? Thought so.

Re:Don't enter if you're an American (4, Funny)

david.given (6740) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115536)

Can you say "do-not-fly list"?

Do-not-flih...

Doughnut fly...

Do-nut-fly...

Duh-not-fluh...

Apparently not.

Re:Don't enter if you're an American (2, Insightful)

3terrabyte (693824) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115669)

First thing that went through my mind was that the FBI would watch you for life under the Patriot Act. Or at least until this administration is over.

All members of Moveon.Org please report to Guantanemo Bay!

interesting "puzzle" at most (3, Interesting)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115461)

Modern crypto isn't based on oddly configured puzzles [e.g. once you learn the algo the solution is simple].

While this is a nice puzzle and certainly I couldn't solve it in the 2 mins I was staring at it this has nothing todo with modern crypto. Have an AES breaking contest if you want to promote real research.

Tom

Re:interesting "puzzle" at most (5, Interesting)

wronski (821189) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115545)

This is not about promoting research. Most people think (with some reason that spying agencias like GCHQ are somewhat creepy. So they promote a nice and cuddly puzzle contest as if to say 'Look, we are just regular guys who like to have some fun and read other countries' diplomatic mail every now and then'.

Reminds me a bit of the CIA Homepage for Kids [cia.gov] , but not nearly as weird.

Re:interesting "puzzle" at most (1)

wwest4 (183559) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115847)

At the bottom of the CIA page is says "say no to drugs." If my kid has to say no to drugs, then why have my tax dollars gone to hacking the hell out of the Columbian rain forest? I thought we were going to get CHEAPER blow from that, cheaper opium from Afghanistan, cheaper flying saucers from Mars, and cheaper oil from Iraq? I'm starting to thing the CIA's motives are not as selfish and sinister as we were led to believe, and frankly, that pisses me off. As a great patriot once said: Did we lose a war? That's not America; that's not even Mexico.

Re:interesting "puzzle" at most (1)

garcia (6573) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115549)

What does this have to do w/promoting research? I took this as something to do for fun.

TJPGGNCJJOTJPMZTZJPOFDY (yeah it's encrypted, enjoy the easy answer).

Re:interesting "puzzle" at most (1)

myukew (823565) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115558)

it's not about research, it's about get-people-to-do-something-with-their-freetime-ing

Re:interesting "puzzle" at most (3, Insightful)

wiggys (621350) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115560)

Actually the purpose of this puzzle is to test your problem solving skills.

They want to know that you are capable of thinking for yourself: maybe you know nothing about the differences between Blofish and AES. That doesn't matter. What does matter is you have a problem and can find a way to solve it.

The connection between the two columns... (3, Funny)

Woogiemonger (628172) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115463)

..is that all the people listed have really fucked up names.

It says... (3, Funny)

guitaristx (791223) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115468)

All your codebreak are belong to uk.

Quick Robin! (2, Funny)

WormholeFiend (674934) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115471)

To the BatBeowulf-Cluster!

All winners will be eliminated. (0, Offtopic)

Darth23 (720385) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115475)

If they can't be recruited.

(In Soviet Russia, code breaks YOU!)

All the "winners" will disappear... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115476)

... as they are too clever for the continued security of the state.

Automated entry submission system (5, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115477)

GCHQ has launched a little Christmas crypto challenge for all you budding secret agents. To submit your entry to the challenge, just pick up your phone, call your mother, and tell her your solution!

Winners will be wisked away... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115494)

...on black helicopters to a secret island somewhere off the coast of England where you will enjoy the amenities of the village.

ok learn from history... (4, Informative)

johnjones (14274) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115508)

it would be a good bet in my mind it will be something like what they did before (people tend to repeat themselves)so... previously on gchq

Each of the six extracts is encrypted with a simple substitution cipher. In the first extract, this is a straightforward shift: P=A, Q=B, R=C etc.

In extracts two to six, the ciphertext alphabet is formed by taking a keyword, removing those letters that occur more than once in the keyword, and then adding all remaining letters in alphabetical order. For example, in extract two, the keyword is MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE. By taking out those letters that are repeated in the keyword, we are left with: MURDESINTHOG. We then add all unused letters in alphabetical order to give us: MURDESINTHOGABCFJKLPQVWXYZ.

Finally, the alphabet is shifted to give the keyword PUZZLE as the encryption of A in each alphabet in turn (as read down the left hand side of the grid).

1) And Joshua the son of Nun sent two men secretly from Shittim as spies, saying, "Go, view the land, especially Jericho."

Joshua chapter 2. The Bible, c.550 BC. (An early reference to intelligence gathering.)

2) Many years ago I contracted an intimacy with a Mr. William Legrand. He was of an ancient Huguenot family, and had once been wealthy; but a series of misfortunes had reduced him to want.

Edgar Allan Poe, Tales of Mystery and Imagination: The Gold Bug. The Dollar Newspaper, Philadelphia, 1843. (The first extensive treatment of cryptanalysis in fiction.)
Keyword: MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE (another famous short story by Poe).

3) Holmes had been seated for some hours in silence with his long, thin back curved over a chemical vessel in which he was brewing a particularly malodorous product.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventure of the Dancing Men, The Strand Magazine, 1903. (Another fictional example of a substitution cipher.)
Keyword: MYCROFT HOLMES (Sherlock Holmes's brother).

4) The American handed Leamas another cup of coffee and said, "Why don't you go back and sleep? We can ring you if he shows up."

John Le Carre, The Spy Who Came In From The Cold. Victor Gollancz, 1963. (The third in the series of books featuring George Smiley, one of the best known fictional agents.)
Keyword: GEORGE SMILEY (main character in this series of books).

5) An Act to make provision about the Secret Intelligence Service and the Government Communications Headquarters, including provision for the issue of warrants and authorisations

(The Act of Parliament allowing GCHQ to operate, and defining its accountability to Parliament and the public.)
Keyword: ELIZABETH THE SECOND (signatory of the Act), Intelligence Services Act 1994.

6) On the morning of Wednesday, 15 October 1586, Queen Mary entered the crowded courtroom at Fotheringhay Castle. (Some editions of this book list the day as Saturday)

Simon Singh, The Code Book. Fourth Estate, 1999. (Singh's book is a recent tour de force on the subject of cryptography.)
Keyword: FOURTH ESTATE (publisher).

Re:ok learn from history... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115562)

3 cheers for cut and paste karma!

Re:ok learn from history... (1)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115666)

>> Simon Singh, The Code Book. Fourth Estate, 1999.

This is an excellent little book for anyone interested in the subject. It's both entertaining, and completely accessible to the layman.

Re:ok learn from history... (2, Insightful)

AssFace (118098) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115855)

I have written here how they have done it (it is a site I run):
http://www.etraininglog.com/forums/viewtopi c.php?p id=28691#28691

RE:... (1)

youknowmewell (754551) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115933)

Show off.

Part 1 solved (3, Funny)

mpcooke3 (306161) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115532)

What is the connection between the men in the first list and the women in the second list?

They all have very strange sounding names.

Re:Part 1 solved (1)

hsmith (818216) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115559)

well that is what google is for, now isn't it

Re:Part 1 solved (1)

mzwaterski (802371) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115674)

Strange names indeed, I've never heard of KCRVKXHL EUJDXZ and a google search for him revealed nothing...

How to win (1)

ajnsue (773317) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115566)

I learned this watching BBC on PBS. If your around something you think you should know, but dont. Just laugh knowingly and say "how amusing..." This is also my plan faking it on slashdot, only prepending the appropriate acronym "BASH...how amusing"

Tools... (2, Interesting)

perlionex (703104) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115569)

Try using/modifying these tools:

frequency analyzer [thepen.com]

caesar cipher cracker [sentex.net]

some other tools also available here [pintday.org]

What an amazing co-incidence... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115599)

I was at school with KEZHQ WSNIEC.

J.

Huh? (2, Insightful)

HarveyBirdman (627248) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115612)

even if you're not brave enough to actually send in an entry."

What's brave got to do with it? Is this more tinfoilhatism? I think it's a fun idea.

Books? No -- I want a glass cutting laser watch! (4, Funny)

IronChefMorimoto (691038) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115652)

From the challenge page:

"Just to make things a little more interesting, GCHQ will be offering copies of 'Big Bang' the latest book by Simon Singh, the well known mathematician and code expert, to six successful solvers whose names will be drawn from a hat."

Screw that. If a bunch of secret agents are running a contest, I expect to win at least a friggin' mini-missile launching pen or some C4 toothpaste w/ detonator toothbrush.

Wait -- maybe the books are hollowed out and contain flasks that convert into single-shot 9mm pistols!

Too bad I can't even balance my checkbook, let alone compete in this contest. If you win, let us know if the books including an expandable titanium katana sword bookmark.

IronChefMorimoto

Re:Books? No -- I want a glass cutting laser watch (1)

HarveyBirdman (627248) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115915)

Screw that. If a bunch of secret agents are running a contest, I expect to win at least a friggin' mini-missile launching pen or some C4 toothpaste w/ detonator toothbrush.

Pfft! Keep your toys. I want to win the date with a sexy Russian agent.

Hey, I spent my formative years with James Bond films. I know how to show a sexy Russian agents a good time as long as she doesn't mind if the Aston Martin is a rental.

damn, was hoping for a bit more time (1)

AssFace (118098) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115653)

I currently have this nearly solved (should have it by tomorrow barring too much real work).

I was hoping that Slashdot would hold off for a day or two to give me time to blurt out the answer(s).

4 sets of the names are proving to be much harder than the others and I am contemplating how much code I should write, or if I should focus on the next stage instead and then try to back fill.

Re:damn, was hoping for a bit more time (1)

AssFace (118098) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115713)

Incidentally we are talking about it here:
http://www.etraininglog.com/forums/viewtopi c.php?p id=28688

That is a site I run. Once I get the full answers I will post it to one of my blogs.

The general idea is that the male/female pair are movie stars and that the pairs share the same encryption type (meaning key alphabet).
From there you go to the next stage to get the phrase and I have an idea on that, but I can't be positive yet.

British predictability (1)

pa3gvr (548273) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115675)

I'm guessing one of the men is David Beckham and one of the women is Victoria Adams (Posh Spice)

Now where is my tin-foil hat....

I am not a mama's boy! (2, Interesting)

HarveyBirdman (627248) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115691)

But I must give this to me mum. She solves the simple daily cryptogram puzzle in the paper in her head. She startes at it for a minute, and, boom, she just has the decrypted version. I always told her she would have made a good spook.

She did work in the aerospace industry before retiring, though. Hmm...

Another good thing about the article was I didn't know Singh had a new book coming out. Cool. I keep "The Code Book" here at work and it's been beaten up through many borrowings by coworkers.

part three? Easy... (1)

pla (258480) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115707)

Kwhqv ozxrx Nud Lpbjq gkt, kmoaute ly yoc dar Cobc!

Heh... Those wild-n'-crazy guys at the GCHQ. What kidders. What will they come up with next? And an off-color joke in a "family" contest? Tsk.

Got one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115756)

BZGZD A'GAANZ = PETER O'TOOLE

So how are people doing? (1)

salmacis2 (643788) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115823)

Anybody else actually attempting this? I've got about 2/3rds of the names, with most of them matched up. I think I've got the hard 1/3 to do..

This challenge is for poor coders (1)

yogikoudou (806237) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115854)

Guvf pelcgb punyyratr fhpxf. Abobql pna oernx zl pbqr. Zjununununu V bja lbh.

Re:This challenge is for poor coders (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115966)

great, more perl

seek and destroy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11115897)

Can you say "Three Days of the Condor" ??

pffft. I solved the most important number (1)

Prince Vegeta SSJ4 (718736) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115969)

94143243431512659321054872390486828512913474876027
671959234602385829583047250165232525929692572765 53
643634627271840120126431475463294501278472648410 75
622347896267285928582953475027722626464562176139 84
829519475412398501

Solved... (1)

Bazman (4849) | more than 9 years ago | (#11115977)

Ah, they've used an old Persian cypher, I just dug it up out of an original text in arabic, I have the only copy in the west. Very clever. Here's what it says:

BINLA DENIS HIDIN GATSE VENTE EENHI GHSTR EETCL
APHAM

Re:Solved... (1)

The MESMERIC (766636) | more than 9 years ago | (#11116069)

yeah but most of us don't know any Arabic - so could you please translate it to English? thanks :)

a starting point: SPOILER (1, Informative)

Orestesx (629343) | more than 9 years ago | (#11116010)


I picked the name that looked the easiest to solve: the man's name with the apostrophe in the first column. After about 30 seconds of inspection I cam up with "Peter O'Toole." Your welcome.

this is ideal (1)

harryoyster (814652) | more than 9 years ago | (#11116050)

This would be a great way for intelligence to work out who they need to keep an eye on more closely. The guy with the most computer power the home beowulf computer cluster cracking joe-algorithms ;)
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