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DIKKY * (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277365)

I know a nord who's fun and l33t
He's so cool, His cat was beat
Got everything that I desire
Sets his three foot bong on fire

Heartiez DiKKy 3
Heartiez DiKKy 3

Ought to see him with his hair `hawked
Fight with him he'll never balk
DiKKy's just what timecop ordered
He's so nordic he makes my eyes water

Heartiez DiKKy 3
Heartiez DiKKy 3

DiKKy on IRC, there's nothing better
But I like DiKKy in a `hawk and a sweater
Some day soon Jews will do WTC
LOLOLOLOL

Heartiez DiKKy 3
Heartiez DiKKy 3

HUGE!! (5, Funny)

Moustache N Tits (828608) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277369)

a 5!!! page article?! I sure hope they figure out a good way of distributing all that bandwidth to a large amount of people with minimum slowdown!

Re:HUGE!! (1)

IchBinDasWalross (720916) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277395)

Yeah, somebody had better copy the article and post it in the comments as "Article Text - Please Mod Up"

Re:HUGE!! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277514)

i'm searching napster for the article but i cant seem to find it

What will the nxt version of BitTorrent be called? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277528)

BitTsunami, of course! Sweeping away the MPAA and the RIAA in one huge wave!

Bram is cool (4, Insightful)

Amiga Lover (708890) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277603)

He's smart, he's understated, he keeps doing new logical puzzlement stuff, and he's made a simple application spread worldwide without marketing through word of mouth, and simply because it does what it's meant to well. That's true innovation.

But I have to say, Sailor Moon Bram [bitconjurer.org] really freaks me.

Re:Bram is cool (0, Offtopic)

AceCaseOR (594637) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277635)

Ehh, Girly Bram is kind of creepier.

Article Text (Bittorrent style) (5, Funny)

OECD (639690) | more than 9 years ago | (#11278045)

Here's the article text, Bittorent style: ...von Lohmann, a lawyer at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, because Linux...

C'mon, start serving you leeches! That's all I got!

yay, it's "in-depth"! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277373)

god, I hate that phrase.

Fristage Postage HOWTO (1)

repruhsent (672799) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277375)

How to get a Fristage Postage on Slushgut:

1. Wait for stupid headline about the new slushgut story;
2. Masturbate continually to taco snotting photos;
3. Click READ MORE;
4. Click REPLY;
5. Enjoy firstage postage!

Re:Fristage Postage HOWTO (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277494)

Apparently your method needs work, because YOU FAIL IT!

Hey...wait a second.... (-1, Offtopic)

kngthdn (820601) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277380)

Isn't this article a dupe from last week?

Re:Hey...wait a second.... (0, Offtopic)

n00i3 (837196) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277431)

yep

Re:Hey...wait a second.... (1)

stupidfoo (836212) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277444)

I think so, but the search is down, so who knows? I know they posted an article about a wired bittorrent article sometime recently. But that could have been the article about how movies/files/etc are distributed.

Re:Hey...wait a second.... (2, Informative)

jmcmunn (307798) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277515)


Actually, the previous Wired article was not an interview with him. It was an editorial on the "Dark Pyramid" of the pirating underground. There was no interview with Cohen in it if I remember.

I can't seem to get to this new one just now (thank you /.) but it sounds entirely different.

Old news from last year... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277775)

Actually, this interview appeared before the Shadow Network article. It's from last year, Dec 29, 2004 -

http://wired.com/news/archive/0,2618,2004-12-29,00 .html/ [wired.com]

Ok... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277393)

pirate things [mozilla.org]

WJR 760 (5, Insightful)

Puls4r (724907) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277427)

A local radio station WJR 760 in Detroit interviewed him earlier this week. It was apparent that he needed to hire someone with a little better speaking skills - especially when he knows he'll be ambushed at nearly every opportunity.

I couldn't believe my ears when the talk show host asked him: "Does it bother you that people use your product for negative purposes, sort of like the scientists who developed the formulas used in the atomic bombs that killed hundreds of thousands?"

My jaw hit the floor when his reply was "Well, this isn't exactly an atom bomb...." That's why the lawyers are winning right now. It's not because they're smarter. It's because they are SO good at twisting things around, and us geeks can't speak in public worth a damn.

He also wouldn't admit that bit-torrent is a revolutionary way of transfering data, he kept downplaying his program. Come on man! You're not a programmer right now. You're a salesman and a human resource department. Act like it!

Re:WJR 760 (1)

nkh (750837) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277530)

I'm sorry but it had to be said: in the article, he really looks like Lemmer in "Parker Lewis can't lose". That has to be improved...

Re:WJR 760 (5, Insightful)

kmak (692406) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277687)

And if he "brags" about Bittorrent, the Slashdot crowd will call him arrogant...

I agree with you with being more articulate though. I think the standard answer should be to deflect responsibility, just like a politican!

Probably something along the lines of:
"It is the responsibility of the individual to decide what he/she wants to do with it. I'm only responsible for discovering new things."

Or maybe even a bit extreme:
"Someone can stab someone else to death with a pen. Does that mean pens should've never been invented?" (Or insert something equally trivial..)

Merit alone, sadly, isn't enough anymore..

Re:WJR 760 (5, Insightful)

NoMoreNicksLeft (516230) | more than 9 years ago | (#11278006)

Nope, that's not it. The proper response is something like:

(Cohen) What can I do? Even now, there are evil bittorrent people who have used my software to burn villages to the ground, teach schoolchildren to write with their left hands, sodomize livestock and advocate american usage of the metric system! It makes my skin crawl to hear how it ressurrected Jeffrey Dahmer and caused him to go on a zombie rampage, eviscerating screaming women and devouring innocent children! Stop zombie Dahmer, think of the children! What will we do when the terrorists twist my innocent application into a weapon of mass destruction, simply because Congress couldn't stop the partisan bickering long enough? Bittorrent doesn't even prevent AIDS, let alone cure it!

(Radio host) But, you say this can be used by terrorists, and you still created it? What?

(Cohen) What, does that sound a little ridiculous to you?

(Radio Host) I dunno, can it be used...
(Cohen, interrupting) Because it sounds more than a little ridiculous for you to compare Bittorent to nuclear weapons. C'mon, tell us straight. The RIAA didn't put you up to this, but you've been one of their lapdogs so long, they don't have to explicitly tell you to do this sort of character assassination.

(Radio Host) Now wait a minute...
(Cohen) No, you wait a minute. Bittorrent doesn't do anything the internet itself doesn't do. Except that if ever the RIAA was so insane to suggest the internet be made illegal, even the most bought senator would laugh. Bittorrent is just a networking protocol, something your mouth-breathing bosses couldn't describe in layman's terms if their lives depended on it. A protocol that makes the internet slightly more efficient, and not much more. It's clever, I like it, and so do quite a few other people. What do you say to that? (stomps out of the booth).

Re:WJR 760 (1)

consumer (9588) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277694)

I'm not seeing it. What would you have preferred to have him say in response there?

Re:WJR 760 (0, Troll)

stupidfoo (836212) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277720)

Why is that such a bad question?
His software is used primarily for illegal deeds.

What he should have done is focus on what causes people to do so (greed/being cheap, a horrible media distribution system, overpriced merchandise, etc).

And then also discuss how bittorrent is so unique and how the MPAA and RIAA could use it to help distribute content legally (or something).

Re:WJR 760 (4, Interesting)

RailGunner (554645) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277911)

His software is used primarily for illegal deeds.

So that fact that a bunch of linux distro's being released as .torrent links means nothing, eh? Just because some people are using BitTorrent to violate copyrights does not mean it has no legitimate use. I can get a shiny new (legal) .iso image in far less time over torrent then I can over an http download, in almost every case.

BitTorrent is a tool. Nothing more. It is the person who misuses it, not the tool, that's the problem.

Griping about the RIAA / MPAA would have been completely innappropriate. Besides - if you don't like the RIAA / MPAA, quit sending them your money. You don't *have* to see movies you know... after all, as amazing as the LOTR movies are, I enjoyed the books even more. You also don't have to buy CD's - support your favorite artists by seeing them in concert. But when asked about a legitimate software tool like torrent, discussing the RIAA / MPAA would have been a tangent and seen as a dodge.

Re:WJR 760 (1)

dAzED1 (33635) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277916)

software is used primarily for illegal deeds


That, sir, is what a psychologist would call "projection." There are quite a lot of us that download debian or gentoo releases via bittorrent. Downloading movies is a much more resent phenominon.

Re:WJR 760 (1)

DrSkwid (118965) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277996)


that's odd, because I have *never* use bit-torrent for downloading anything that came anywhere near to being illegal : 3dmark, freebsd live cds, cygwin disks etc.etc.

Re:WJR 760 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277729)

You're a salesman and a human resource department. Act like it!
So, you want him to lie and cover his ass?

Re:WJR 760 (5, Interesting)

bwindle2 (519558) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277762)

Maybe his autism has something to do with that? "Cohen in fact has Asperger's syndrome, a condition on the mild end of the autism spectrum that gives him almost superhuman powers of concentration but can make it difficult for him to relate to other people"

Re:WJR 760 (3, Insightful)

gowen (141411) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277817)

My jaw hit the floor when his reply was "Well, this isn't exactly an atom bomb...."
But he's right. The Atomic Bomb dominated international politics from 1945 to 1990. This is seriously small potatoes by comparison. Kudos to him for keeping his achievement in perspective.

Re:WJR 760 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277827)

If he had time to think, he could have come up with a response like

Whose responsibility was the atomic bomb? Was it the scientists who created it, the Congress who funded it, the companies that built it, the pilot who flew it, the enemy whose actions resulted in it, the people of our country who were defended by it, or the President who ordered its use?

The answer is, it's everybody's responsibility. Those who use bittorrent have a responsibility to use it ethically, and if they do not their moral lapse does not lie with those who use it legally and responsibly.

Re:WJR 760 (1)

molnarcs (675885) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277867)

That's why the lawyers are winning right now. It's not because they're smarter. It's because they are SO good at twisting things around, and us geeks can't speak in public worth a damn.

Except perhaps swedish lawyers? Funniest quote from the article:

The Pirate Bay is a BitTorrent tracking site in Sweden with 150,000 users a day. In the fall, it posted a torrent for Shrek 2. Dreamworks sent a cease-and-desist letter demanding the site remove it. One of the site's pseudonymous owners, Anakata, replied: "As you may or may not be aware, Sweden is not a state in the United States of America. Sweden is a country in northern Europe [and] US law does not apply here. It is the opinion of us and our lawyers that you are fucking morons." Shrek 2 stayed up.

Re:WJR 760 (1)

Mantorp (142371) | more than 9 years ago | (#11278065)

Too bad that this site is getting publicity, I've used it for a while to get Swedish stuff over in the US. A bit worried that it'll get pressured out of existence after this writeup.

Well it really isn't an atom bomb (1)

svin (803162) | more than 9 years ago | (#11278085)

You're propably right about him not being a rhetorical genius - ie. the article states :
Cohen in fact has Asperger's syndrome, a condition on the mild end of the autism spectrum that gives him almost superhuman powers of concentration but can make it difficult for him to relate to other people.
I don't imagine many people, who have trouble relating to others, are great speakers.

But his reply to the "an atom bomb" question is IMO actually rather good. Any semi-intelligent person should be able to see, that a comparison between Hiroshima & Nagasaki and downloading copyrighted material is plain stupid.

Instead of suggesting for him to hire someone with a little better speaking skills, my suggestion would be for the radiostation to hire someone with a bit better interviewing skills :)

Cohen didn't invent multi-source downloading (5, Interesting)

Sanity (1431) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277428)

The article seems to imply that Cohen invented multi-source downloading, for example:
Cohen realized that chopping up a file and handing out the pieces to several uploaders would really speed things up. He sketched out a protocol: To download that copy of Meet the Fokkers, a user's computer sniffs around for others online who have pieces of the movie. Then it downloads a chunk from several of them simultaneously. Many hands make light work, so the file arrives dozens of times faster than normal.
Yet this feature has existed in other P2P applications for years.

Personally I think BitTorrent's core advantage over other file sharing technologies is also its core architectural weakness, namely its centralised nature. This allows an editorial filter on content made available through BitTorrent, yet also makes a juicy legal target. Until recently BitTorrent's obscurity has protected it, but clearly this is no-longer the case.

(Disclaimer: I am working on some free software [dijjer.org] that is competitive with BitTorrent)

Re:Cohen didn't invent multi-source downloading (4, Insightful)

PhilHibbs (4537) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277561)

Simple. Don't break the law, and you won't become a "juicy legal target". There's nothing illegal about BitTorrent, but it is illegal to violate copyright with it, so don't do that.

Re:Cohen didn't invent multi-source downloading (0, Troll)

Sanity (1431) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277797)

Simple. Don't break the law, and you won't become a "juicy legal target". There's nothing illegal about BitTorrent, but it is illegal to violate copyright with it, so don't do that.
There is certainly nothing illegal about BitTorrent itself, but there is something illegal about what the vast majority of its users do with it.

If trading copyrighted material is no-longer possible, I am not sure that BitTorrent will retain its current popularity for long.

Common carriers aren't liable (1)

Baldrson (78598) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277965)

So long as a P2P system isn't editing for content, you really can't treat a P2P server as anything but a common carrier. That means you can't go after the owner/operators for the content. Going after content-neutral P2P systems is akin to going after Federal Express for delivering CDs that some customer of FedEx had copied illegally.

Now, to the extent that BitTorrent's architecture lends itself to centralized control of content, as asserted by the original poster, Cohen has indeed opened up the owner/operators of said points of control to legal attack.

Could some smart person explain (1)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277579)

Okay I get the basics of Bit torrents distributed file sharing. But could someone please explain the details. That is how does the original site know who has what slices. How does the system heal itself when a seeder signs off taking with him some of the pieces. How to the nodes decide which peers to ask for what and get updated on who has what as more peers sign on. How is the download=upload actually enforced--what stops me from creating some evil bittorrent that only downloads then hands out shit.

Re:Could some smart person explain (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277617)

The Official site [bittorrent.com] has everything in detail.

Speed Bittorrent v. Kazaa (1)

harmonica (29841) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277664)

Yet this feature has existed in other P2P applications for years.

Not only that, it exists in Kazaa which was mentioned as the "slower technology" in the same article. Yet, in reality, Bittorrent really seems to be faster from what I hear. What is the actual explanation?

Re:Speed Bittorrent v. Kazaa (1, Insightful)

Sanity (1431) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277734)

I'm really not sure which is faster, although if its BitTorrent, I suspect it may have more to do with the usage patterns of its users than the way the technology is designed.

Re:Cohen didn't invent multi-source downloading (0, Flamebait)

peeping_Thomist (66678) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277751)

(Disclaimer: I am working on some free software that is competitive with BitTorrent)

It's too bad people must be willing to use unfree software [sun.com] before they can use your free software.

Re:Cohen didn't invent multi-source downloading (1)

Sanity (1431) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277830)

It's too bad people must be willing to use unfree software before they can use your free software.
News [kaffe.org] to [gnu.org] me [gnu.org] .

Re:Cohen didn't invent multi-source downloading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11278075)

It's too bad people must be willing to use unfree software before they can use your free software.

BitTorrent is written in Python, not java. Python is Free Software.

Re:Cohen didn't invent multi-source downloading (2, Interesting)

Timmmm (636430) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277972)

The article seems to imply that Cohen invented multi-source downloading

Personally I think BitTorrent's core advantage over other file sharing technologies is also its core architectural weakness, namely its centralised nature.

It's real innovation is the tit-for-tat file sharing. With only multi-source downloading, no-one has an incentive to upload (it uses bandwidth, they risk getting cause supposedly). With tit-for-tat however, you have to upload in order to download at a reasonable speed.

Also, in a slightly related topic, tit-for-tat (ie bittorrent) is generally more successful than always-defect (ie kazaa etc) in the iterated prisoners dilema.

Repeat After Me... (2, Interesting)

KrackHouse (628313) | more than 9 years ago | (#11278049)

...BitTorrent is also used for legal purposes. As people figure out how to make money with it I predict that the majority of BT traffic will be legal. I used it recently to distribute Tsunami videos on my blog. 30,000 visitors a day over the last week and I agree that its centralized nature is its downfall, but not for legal reasons. BitTorrent trackers apparently use a ton of bandwidth and they're not Apache friendly if you're using BlogTorrent. We need decentralized or distributed tracking before BT really takes over.

Article describes eDonkey2000 (2, Informative)

Baldrson (78598) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277466)

The article's description of Cohen's "invention" is a description of the way eDonkey2000 [edonkey2000.com] works:
Paradoxically, BitTorrent's architecture means that the more popular the file is the faster it downloads - because more people are pitching in. Better yet, it's a virtuous cycle. Users download and share at the same time; as soon as someone receives even a single piece of Fokkers, his computer immediately begins offering it to others. The more files you're willing to share, the faster any individual torrent downloads to your computer.

Re:Article describes eDonkey2000 (4, Informative)

Java Pimp (98454) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277785)

Given that quoted paragraph and the following, it is apparent that even after interviewing the creator, the author has absolutely no idea what bit torrent is for or how it works.

He [Cohen] sketched out a protocol: To download that copy of Meet the Fokkers...

Yeah, I'm sure that's what he was thinking when he created the protocol...

a user's computer sniffs around for others online who have pieces of the movie

No, trackers keep track of who is downloading or seeding the file, there is no sniffing around. Infact, there is no search capability that I am aware of...

The more files you're willing to share, the faster any individual torrent downloads

Are you kidding me? No... the more people downloading/seeding an individual torrent, the faster it downloads. More files have nothing to do with anything.

mirrored here: (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277468)


Wired is getting slow.

Wired :Why did you write BitTorrent?
Cohen :To get LEET WAREz!
Wired :Before you've said for fast distribution of legal files.
Cohen :Yeah, that and LEET JU$R3ZZZZZ!!!!
Wired :Legal and 'warez'?
Cohen :and MP3!!!11111 Fux0r the *AA, GET IT FREE!
Wired :Thank you Mr. Cohen.
Cohen :Would you like fries with that?

Not a 5 page article (4, Insightful)

chris_mahan (256577) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277469)

Not a 5 page article. An article on the web does not have pages, since the web does not have pages (you scroll down), What we do have is an article split in 5 sections to allow for more ads, more branding, more clicks.

Wired Marketing droid to potential advertisers: We got 5 million clicks yesterday--grumble under breath: one million people clicked 5 times-- and displayed 25 million ads --grumble under breath: 5 ads per click, times 5 sections.

Re:Not a 5 page article (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277555)

You need firefox and privoxy. :) I didn't see a single ad in the entire article.

Re:Not a 5 page article (4, Informative)

deglr6328 (150198) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277721)

It's calld a "printer friendly version [wired.com] ".

Old News (0, Redundant)

parcifal (812729) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277473)

How old is this article? I remember reading it atleast a week ago. Is slashdot slipping or what?

Re:Old News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277975)

"How old is this article? I remember reading it atleast a week ago. Is slashdot slipping or what?"
  • Slipping when you're already on the bottom is called wallowing....


Re:Old News (1)

Politburo (640618) | more than 9 years ago | (#11278042)

Do you think you're special? What is so pleasing about posting "OLD NEWS! I saw this x days ago!"

Furthermore, mods, what is so damn insightful about it?

Urrrmm, Yeah (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277483)

That was in the January issue which was on newsstands a month ago. You know, the one with the Virgin dude Branson on the cover?

Re:Urrrmm, Yeah (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277675)

That's it. I'm starting a band called Virgin dude Branson.

The best thing about bit torrent (3, Interesting)

bit trollent (824666) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277489)

A link on a website leads to a file on a p2p network. This is the killer app of bit torrent and the reason it is likely here to stay.

Re:The best thing about bit torrent (2, Insightful)

grm_wnr (781219) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277806)

eDonkey can do that. And IIRC, it could do that before BT, though I'm not certain.

Re:The best thing about bit torrent (1)

fshalor (133678) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277875)

Great for downloading/distributing linux too..

Stream should have looked into torrents for HL2. Would have REALLY lessened their load. And with the DRM methods used, wouldn't have caused any piracy problems. :)

Re:The best thing about bit torrent (1)

Politburo (640618) | more than 9 years ago | (#11278082)

Except that this has nothing to do with bit torrent itself. Any p2p network, or other application, can do this if they want to.

too bad bittorrent died (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277498)

really does anyone use it anymore? after suprnova went down?

Re:too bad bittorrent died (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277556)

Yep, bittorrent died as far as lamers know...

Re:too bad bittorrent died (0, Flamebait)

Squatchman (844798) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277838)

Yes, bittorrent is dead. Nothing to see here, move along. Suprnova was the only website that was or would have been able to host torrent files for the general populace to download.

Back to the Mom's garage crowd on mIRC with you!

3.9 beta version download delays are uncool (2, Insightful)

spoonyfork (23307) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277523)

The built-in delays for downloading multiple files in the 3.9 beta version of BitTorrent are a bit extreme. I know it is a user config setting but a default of 300 minutes between downloads? Uncool. How about a countdown timer or something so others don't spend a lot of time trying to figure out what is going on. Thought it was buggy or crashed at first. Ended up going back to version 3.4.

Other than that.. great product! I downloaded megs of tsunami videos from http://www.waveofdestruction.org/ [waveofdestruction.org] as they were posted.

Re:3.9 beta version download delays are uncool (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277610)

I hope you have a lot of fun with these tsunami videos. Maybe you'll masturbate on some kiddie porn later and see what's new on goat.cx?

Damn. (-1, Offtopic)

falzer (224563) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277540)

If you're going to spell out p2p, why not go the whole hog? Point-two-point.

Re:Damn. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277563)

Whoops, failed it!

s/point/peer/i

Re:Damn. (0, Redundant)

youngerpants (255314) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277747)

Point to point is a protocol for connecting devices over the internet e.g. over a VPN using point to point tunneling protocol

P2P is peer-to-peer e.g. for downloading... erm... Linux iso's, yeh, Linux iso's

Link (4, Funny)

Fr05t (69968) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277543)

This is at the top of the story:
"Movie studios hate it. File-swappers love it. Bram Cohen's blazing-fast P2P software has turned the Internet into a universal TiVo. For free video-on-demand, just click here."

Unfortunately someone forgot to add the link :P

Gimmie a break (0)

Sargeant Slaughter (678631) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277572)

The executive vice president for research and planning at CBS, David Poltrack, elaborates: "In our research with consumers, content-on-demand is the killer app. They like the idea of paying only for what they watch." The trick, he figures, is to work out a solution before the audience for illegal downloading becomes truly huge. He figures the networks have 10 years."
Come on dude! We don't like paying for content on demand, we like getting content on demand for free. And, you think it'll take 10 years? Try 3, at most.

Azureus client is the best (4, Informative)

tedgyz (515156) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277573)

If you have not tried Azureus [sourceforge.net] , you have not felt the full power of bittorrent.

Re:Azureus client is the best (2, Interesting)

nadadogg (652178) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277726)

I'm quite gay for azureus. It makes things so handy. I can download the stuff I want, and leave it in smart-seeding mode, so any old torrents that come back to life will be seeded by me again.

Re:Azureus client is the best (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277973)

im still laughing

It provides a bittorrent protocol implementation using java language.

Lost in the Jungle (3, Funny)

MikeMacK (788889) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277592)

Cohen says he loves Amazons...

Wouldn't mind playing with some Amazons myself.

YOU FAIL IT (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277612)

Cuntwipes Jordan very own shitter, to die. I will jam [mit.edu] found get how people can contributed code the gay niggers Lube. This can lead only way to go: writing is on the That has grown up some of you have Sanctions, and project faces a set MOVE FORWARD, well-known OpenBSD wanker Theo parties, but here part of GNAA if corporate officers. Others your own beer and the Bazzar Revel in our gay Fear the reaper BUNCH OF GAY NEGROS about bylaws serves to reinforce these rules will when done playing systems. The Gay visit has ground to a their hand...she everything else took precedence Their parting very sick and its To the politically with the number in ratio of 5 to KNOWS THAT EVER than this BSD box,

I know somebody who knows somebody... (1, Interesting)

happyemoticon (543015) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277640)

One of my coworkers floats in the same circles as this guy. Apparently he's the type of person people try not to talk to at parties but who gets invited anyway for absolutely inscrutible reasons.

Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277753)

There are a lot of people like that, amazingly... including me :(

How can I get people to try to talk to me? I've got the shower thing down right now, so I know that's not an issue... The clothes, maybe the clothes are out of date? I can't tell, I have no fashion sense. Or maybe it's the hair, that hasn't seen a blade for about 5 months?

Hmm....

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11278005)

You gotta remember, showering involves shampoo. Especially when you've got that much scary hair.

10 Years?! (4, Funny)

colonslashslash (762464) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277657)

Quoth the article:

"In our research with consumers, content-on-demand is the killer app. They like the idea of paying only for what they watch." The trick, he figures, is to work out a solution before the audience for illegal downloading becomes truly huge. He figures the networks have 10 years.

Sounds like a very liberal estimate. I'd say that illegal downloading has already become pretty "huge". If it wasn't, what are the MPAA/RIAA getting so worked up about, and why are all these TV executives commenting on it in the first place?

Later in the article they discuss the takedown notice Dreamworks sent to ThePirateBay.org concerning Shrek 2, for those of you who havn't already, and are interested to read the letter (and the hilarious response), check it out here:

Dreamworks Takedown Notice & Response [thepiratebay.org]

Re:10 Years?! (1)

gregjmartin (806753) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277748)

I wonder if the riaa lawsuits are the finger in the dike (so to speak). If enough 'normal' consumers hear stories about lawsuits they'll figure its not worth it. So the lawsuits slow wide-spread adoption from 3 -> 10 years (well, not that long!).

And FWIW, I thought the writer did a good job of presenting the p2p disruption. Not the first article to do so, but certainly worth the read.

\\Greg

Re:10 Years?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277912)

Holy crap, that piratebay letter had me rolling. Thank you...

The Life of (2, Funny)

Vollernurd (232458) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277672)

I misread his name as Brian Cohen.

"He's not the messiah, he's a very naughty boy!"

Ho hum. Long day.

Why isn't BitTorrent defeatable? (4, Interesting)

saddino (183491) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277685)

Here's something that I've been wondering:

I haven't looked at the source, but given the broad description of the protocol I'm assuming each "chunk" has a GUID along with the payload. Obviously, this allows for swarming and reduced download/upload bottlenecks, but doesn't it also allow for easy corruption of the data stream?

For example, when the RIAA tried to defeat Napster by brute force, namely setting up drone/honeypot PCs with libraries of corrupted files, the method failed miserably. I would guess that by its nature, knowing what IP you were downloading an entire file from, it wouldn't be too hard to filter out known RIAA servers.

But, with BitTorrent handling the gathering of chunks from the swarm from multiple IPs, doesn't that greatly increase the likelihood of success for a similar attack?

For example, shouldn't the MPAA be able to download the source code and modify encoding so that if (Random() % 1000) a chunk flips some of the bits in the payload? Wouldn't installing this code on a farm of drones eventually "corrupt" the datastreams on BitTorrent?

Or are their safeguards in place for this kind of attack?

Re:Why isn't BitTorrent defeatable? (1)

PatrickThomson (712694) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277778)

the .torrent contains an MD5 of each chunk, and the entire file, and I think the tracker itself does something to protect against corrupted .torrents.

Re:Why isn't BitTorrent defeatable? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277814)

It's not a GUID. It has the hash of the chunk. If it's corrupted (it happens sometimes), the receiving bittorrent will simply drop it.

Re:Why isn't BitTorrent defeatable? (4, Interesting)

Ford Prefect (8777) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277866)

Or are their safeguards in place for this kind of attack?

Yup - each 'GUID' for a Bittorrent block is an SHA1 cryptographic hash. If you find a way of generating collisions for those, many computer scientists and mathematicians would love to know. ;-)

From the FAQ [bittorrent.com] :
BitTorrent does cryptographic hashing (SHA1) of all data. When you see "Download succeeded!" you can be sure that BitTorrent has already verified the integrity of the data. The integrity and authenticity of a BitTorrent download is as good as the original request to the tracker. Checking the MD5/CRC32/other hash of a file downloaded via BitTorrent is redundant.

I gather that if a client was pumping out corrupt blocks, or if they were corrupted at some point during transmission, they'd simply get dropped and re-requested. No idea if there's anything to permanently ignore a client that's pumping out nothing but junk, though - but on a busy tracker, it would get drowned out by all the others. Anyone know?

Incidentally, is anyone else worried by the way the article concentrated on the distribution of television shows, almost to the exclusion of everything else? I've used Bittorrent quite a bit, but only ever for completely legal purposes [filerush.com] - plus, I've always thought of it being a rubbish way of distributing dubious stuff, what with IP addresses of everyone downloading available straight from the tracker to whoever might be investigating...

Re:Why isn't BitTorrent defeatable? (1)

GodOfNothing (675212) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277883)

Further to the above replies (each chunk is md5 hashed, as is the whole torrent) some of the clients out have the option of ignoring peers that supply corrupt data.

Money (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277703)

The article states that he is living off his Paypal donations. Anyone have any guesses on how much money he may be making off Bittorrent? Of the people here that donate, how much do you send?

bittorrent weakness (4, Insightful)

helix_r (134185) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277705)


I like bittorrent, but my problem is that I can't easily search for what I want in torrent form.

Please, I hope I am wrong, but it seems that one is forced to go to "seedy" (I mean, really seedy, as in icky) websites to get the links.

Re:bittorrent weakness (5, Informative)

314m678 (779815) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277823)

go to www.google.com type in FileIwant filetype:torrent Press search.

Re:bittorrent weakness (1)

dtfinch (661405) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277879)

That's because you're using it to download things you ought not to be downloading.

Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277877)

72 comments and gone. New record.

A related cause (4, Insightful)

ShatteredDream (636520) | more than 9 years ago | (#11277924)

The big media would love to take him down personally for creating bit torrent, and the only thing stopping them is that Bit Torrent is just legitimate enough to be a hard case to sell. Enough users use it legally, that they couldn't argue it's primarily for piracy. But what if that were to change?

Bit Torrent is just a tool, it cannot do anything illegal by itself. The user must choose to do something illegal with it. Going after Cohen is no different than going after a gun maker for gun crime. The exact same arguments used against gun makers could be used against Cohen. He's not screening his users, is he? Neither are the gun makers. In both cases, some of their users are committing crimes. Different types of crimes, but either way, a legitimate tool is used for an illegitimate purpose.

In the long run, the only way to win against the forces opposed to individual liberties is to link our causes. This is the IP equivalent of what the NRA faces with guns, so it only makes sense for both camps to realize we are fighting the same ideology just in two different manifestations.

Allies, even allies that don't really understand your cause as well as you do, are important. Many of the gun owners' postings I have read on right wing boards frequently have derisive attitudes toward the **AA now and see them as the computer equivalent of "gun grabbers." It's a fitting analogy because the **AA want to be the "computer grabbers." Mandatory DRM is akin to mandatory trigger locks because either way, some bureaucrat is telling you how you must maintain and use your property.

To protect our rights we must continue to assert individual responsibility as the solution and push for solutions that go after perpetrators of crime, not their tools. That is the only way we can not only cut down on crime, but also protect people like Cohen from amoral, mercenary attorneys like those behind the **AA

Judas (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277947)

Sorry, but Bram is nothing more than a Judas. He's turned his back on the scene, now the greedy corporations have filled his pockets with silver.
Hope he chokes on his pay-pal donations

piratebay /.'d (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277957)

what's funny is that the pirate bay got slashdotted due to this story. by the third page its basically "hey everyone get free movies, television etc.!" to people who didn't even know what BT was...plus not too many people knew about piratebay before. haha. stupid Wired

P2P connectes??? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11277997)

His Program connects everyone, I am impressed. But What about me, the person who has lost his love life on the Shores of US.

Article author either misleading or misinformed (3, Informative)

josecanuc (91) | more than 9 years ago | (#11278009)

I read the article (no, really!) and found it to be mildly interesting. What bothered me, though, are the statements that, basically, "the more clients that are uploading pieces, the faster the download gets"

That's all fine and dandy, but the author makes it sound like this gets around the limitation of one's own pipe to the Internet. If you're on a modem, there's no way you are going to cut down a 500MB download from hours to a few minutes, yet the article has a paragraph that implies that an hours-long Kazaa download is cut down to a few minutes with BitTorrent.

Obviously, if the limiting factor is the source pipe, then more sources equals faster download at the destination. This kind of writing bugs me since it doesn't mention such obvious limitations -- it all sounds "miraculous" (or "marketish"?).

1 page version (3, Informative)

Eslyjah (245320) | more than 9 years ago | (#11278059)

It would be nice if the submitter or "editors" had linked to the printer-friendly 1 page version [wired.com] .

MPAA plans cohens retirement (5, Funny)

AmericaHater (732718) | more than 9 years ago | (#11278074)

Cohen has even started sketching out ideas for his own puzzles. He dreams of making enough money to buy a 3-D prototyping machine and retire."

(MPAA exec on intercom to his secretary): "mrs Jones find me a 3D prototype manufacturer".

[delay]

(secretary):"I found four of them, but Jesus, they're $5million each!!!"
(exec): "buy four and ship them to that fucker Cohen by the end of the day - and my names not Jesus it's God"

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