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Biggest Identity Thief Ever Gets Put Away

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the no-that-would-be-the-government dept.

Privacy 293

Anonymous Brave Guy writes "Apparently computer helpdesk employee Philip Cummings had more than just a day job: he's just gone down for 14 years in the biggest identity theft case ever. Lots of fascinating nuggets of information in that story: apparently fake ID goes for as little as $60, and the total stolen over just a couple of years was somewhere in the $50m-100m range."

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Just write it off I guess (4, Interesting)

Lindsay Lohan (847467) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328567)

Philip Cummings, 35... a computer helpdesk employee...
Losses have been estimated to be between $50m (£38m) and $100m (£76m).
Cummings, who is still free on bail, must report to prison on 9 March. He is also due to pay compensation to be agreed at a later date.
Something tells me the 30,000 people he scammed aren't going to see a dime. Since Phil is not allowed to compensate with stolen funds, and he is unlikely to be returning to his lucrative helpdesk job anytime soon, I doubt he'll be able to fork over even $1 per victim.

Re:Just write it off I guess (5, Informative)

m3j00 (606453) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328637)

Something tells me the 30,000 people he scammed aren't going to see a dime. Since Phil is not allowed to compensate with stolen funds, and he is unlikely to be returning to his lucrative helpdesk job anytime soon, I doubt he'll be able to fork over even $1 per victim.

The actual "victim" in these cases is almost always the creditor, not the person whose identity was stolen. It costs the person a bunch of time and energy to correct the problems, but the stolen money comes from the creditors, and they have a budget for fraud.

Re:Just write it off I guess (1)

Steve Embalmer (783552) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328678)

The actual "victim" in these cases is almost always the creditor

OK... but isn't GP still making a valid point re: his ability to repay the stolen money?

Re:Just write it off I guess (2, Informative)

Ayaress (662020) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328927)

It is a valid point, but the people themselves will get their money back (possibly less some fees depending on their bank). I'll use the example of my parents.

A few years back, my mom lost her credit card, and the wrong person found it. They rang it up to the limit buying all sorts of stuff. They bought a couch, a few DVD's, paid their bills, and even set their car loan to automatically bill the card. My mom rarely uses it for anything, so the sudden spending spree must have set off alarm bells, and they called her within a couple days, even before she'd realized she lost it.

It took my parents almost three months to get the mess all settled. The guy who found the credit card was on the verge of bankruptcy. It went to court, and his creditors testified that he was days away from getting his car reposessed, and that the couch he bought was probably to replace a living room set that he'd bought on credit and then failed to pay for.

There was no way he could afford to pay back what he'd stolen, but my parents got all their money back (Even the $50 limit they had to pay initially) through the credit card company, who have systems in place to protect themselves against things like this.

Re:Just write it off I guess (1)

ePhil_One (634771) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329149)

There was no way he could afford to pay back what he'd stolen, but my parents got all their money back (Even the $50 limit they had to pay initially) through the credit card company, who have systems in place to protect themselves against things like this.

Umm, sorta...

The anti-fraud halted the theft after three days, in that time he bought a lot stuff (>$1000). Since they have identified the charges as fraud, they'll not pay the charges, meaning the stores that sold the DVD's get shafted for the payments. They might get their merchandise back, but it will be open, used, worth a fraction of it value. Fortunately, in this case most went to bills that weren't going to get paid anyway...

Re:Just write it off I guess (5, Interesting)

mindstrm (20013) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329516)

Yup, and that's how it is supposed to work. The onus is on the merchant to ensure that the person using the credit card is, in fat, authorized to use it.

The credit card is a token, a symbol to show that a given issuer is extending you credit, and will pay the merchant on demand. It is not the credit itself.

Far too many merchants do not check signatures and/or ask for identification.. and that's fine, because it's their gamble, not mine.

You can generally contest any payment made on your credit card, and the merchant will have to demonstrate that you authorized the transaction, or he's out of luck. Barring a signature, or stuff shipped to your address, or perhaps video evidence, there isn't much they can do.

Re:Just write it off I guess (4, Funny)

nizo (81281) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328668)

But how much are all of his body parts worth at auction? Kidneys, corneas, heart, etc. Seems fair to me. Sadly still not enough I am sure.

Re:Just write it off I guess (2, Insightful)

nonicenamesleft (826555) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328915)

But how much are all of his body parts worth at auction? Kidneys, corneas, heart, etc. Seems fair to me. Sadly still not enough I am sure.

Writing this and being modded insightful +3...and they call the moslems barbaric.

Re:Just write it off I guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329196)

Well, you see, they waste the body parts. That's the difference.

Re:Just write it off I guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329380)

He can turn tricks in the prison shower and repay his debt in cigarettes. :)

Re:Just write it off I guess (1, Insightful)

fiftyLou (472705) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328695)


Sure write it off. Or go after Teledata Communications the guy's employer. They should have some liability in this. 30,000 people makes for one powerful class action.

Re:Just write it off I guess (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328863)

As this is a criminal case, the Feds may be able to recover whatever they can of the stolen funds and return it to the victims. That's assuming, of course, that they can find it.

Re:Just write it off I guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328991)

Compensation may mean restitution in which case it would be equal to returning your stolen money.

Re:Just write it off I guess (2, Interesting)

glitch23 (557124) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329483)

I got ripped off on Ebay many years ago (when other auction sites were still around, and I don't think there are any others nowadays) and I filed a complaint with the Post Office. After about a year or 2 the Attorney General of Idaho (the thief was from there) eventually contacted me and said the guy had been caught after other people had filed complaints. He was convicted and sent to jail. I was ripped off $750 or so and got back about $30 of that recently (about 5 months ago) because the guy is working while in jail and is paying people back as he makes money. I believe the priority of who gets money back first is being based on who got ripped off the most. I don't know where in that list I fall. I have a feeling it might be a while before I see the other $700+ he owes me because it took 5 years to see the first $30.

Sorry (3, Funny)

savagedome (742194) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328572)

I absolutely did not see this Cumming.

Re:Sorry (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328756)

How the fuck is this funny?

Re:Sorry (1)

xami (740208) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329362)

wait I know.. Jenna Jameson, right?

That should be good (4, Informative)

albn (835144) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328582)

People like this should be put away for a long time for ruining one's credit rating and making their lives a living hell. Restitution will be good too, but how much can you make in the can? not much.

Good riddance.

Re:That should be good (3, Insightful)

Thunderstruck (210399) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328685)

While I agree, having been a victim of identity theft (only once that I know of) Perhaps part of the problem is credit ratings themselves.

There are other ways for a lender or landlord to learn whether a person is a risk. Most people have a reputation in their community that one need only ask to learn. Most credible people can provide credible references. The current addiction to putting everyone's number in a New Jersey database does more harm than good, especially when folks like Cummings come along.

Re:That should be good (1)

papadiablo (609676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328802)

Perhaps part of the problem is credit ratings themselves.

I agree with this but...

There are other ways for a lender or landlord to learn whether a person is a risk. Most people have a reputation in their community that one need only ask to learn. Most credible people can provide credible references.

There is no way companies are going to do this. It is more expensive than having the computer check not to mention what's to stop people from lying. I think the problem is that it is not easy to reverse one's credit rating after it has been ruined by an identity theif. If this were more easily done then the credit rating system wouldn't be such a problem. That is assuming the person has reasonable evidence that their identity has been stolen so people can't just request things be taken off their credit rating.

Re: Perhaps part of the problem is credit ratings (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329037)

Amen. My mother experiences about 10 attempts to steal her identity each month. She put a "lock" on her credit report (I don't know if she had to pay for it) and the attempts have failed so far. But all it takes is her name, SSN, and address for the thief to get a new account. The account is set up at her home address, but after it is set up it's easy for the thief to change the address to their PMB, crack house, etc. She got wise when she started getting unsolicited credit cards in the mail, and letters from XYZ store telling her she shouldn't apply for a XYZ store account when she already had one.

Basically, I should be aboe to lock and unlock my credit for free, whenever I want. And I can't - but I can pay for the "privilege".

No way (2, Insightful)

siskbc (598067) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329182)

There are other ways for a lender or landlord to learn whether a person is a risk. Most people have a reputation in their community that one need only ask to learn. Most credible people can provide credible references. The current addiction to putting everyone's number in a New Jersey database does more harm than good, especially when folks like Cummings come along.

Like hell. First, that would be as useful as the references on a job application - no one pays attention to those, because if you can't get 3 friends to lie for you, you must be a real psychopath, let alone a credit risk. Second, those recommendations are only any good when considering the character of the referrees, so this quickly becomes a boundless recursive problem.

Also, where are these little communities anymore where everyone knows each other? Do you live in Mayberry? I know like 5 people in my entire building.

Overall, this process of trying to holistically determine credit worthiness without a centralized system would be slow as hell and obscenely expensive, if for no other reason than it would be so ineffective that banks would have to charge higher rates to account for their inability to determine credit worthiness. I don't like credit fraud either, but let's not toss the baby with the bathwater here.

And if nothing else, what if you move? Do you just get charged the highest possible rate in your new town because the community doesn't know you?

Re:That should be good (1)

nizo (81281) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328691)

People like this should be put away for a long time for ruining one's credit rating...

I guess there are advantages to having a horrible credit rating after all!

Re:That should be good (1)

albn (835144) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328755)

Yes, my credit does suck, and cannot get any worse than it already is. The thing is, it might be a shocker for those who may have filed chapter 7 bankruptcy before the seven years are up and get a credit card bill for $20,000.

I feel really bad for victims of identity theft, and these days of phishing, dumpster diving and the Internet for everyday users it is getting easier and easier to rip people off. It's sad and frustrating.

I also have to agree the cost of unraveling the mess of trying to prove it was *not* you making all the purchases and it seems credit card companies are trying to make headway by asking if an old guy actually bought the monster truck (Citibank commercial), but then again, I can see people yelling for questioning what they buy and don't buy. I guess you cannot make everybody happy.

Re:That should be good (1)

loraksus (171574) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328924)

You know, that wouldn't be such an issue if the credit reporting bureaus weren't incompetent arrogant dipshits when it comes to dealing with things like this.
Harsh? Maybe, but I don't think it is overly so.

Have you ever wondered why there are dozens of credit bureaus (3 major ones, I know) and why folks who are thinking of giving you a loan will check the 3 major ones and maybe some of the minor ones?
It's because the data that each one has is so highly suspect that it is essentially useless.

Credit bureaus normally DO NOT share data with each other in what is apparantly a childish and futile attempt for each one to corner the market. Data like corrections (or mistakes) are not necessarily passed on and your "credit report" can (will?) vary from one to another. I'm not going to even go into the dispute "investigation" process or how folks with the same social security number have to deal with this again and again.

In any other industry, this shit would not be allowed to go on, it is just that as someone who needs money, you're the bitch, plain and simple.

Think about it for a second - FTC states that you have a 1 in 3 chance of having an significant error on your credit report. The error will affect your purchasing power and most likely (for some odd reason, credit reports tend to err in the negative) cost you hundreds, if not thousands of dollars in the long run (you'll also get fucked on car insurance rates now).
. /spent over a year, a fucking goddamn year, dealing with these arrogant sonsafuckingbitches trying to get a bogus credit card account removed. The card was issued 8 years before I was born.
. //no, not bitter, why do you ask?

Re:That should be good (2, Interesting)

sjames (1099) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329606)

I'll bet that if the credit agencies were held legally responsable for the hearsay they recklessly spout about people they would do a much better job verifying the accuracy of their information. If you or I published a report based on hearsay that did significant damage to someone's reputation, we would end up in court. If we couldn't show darned good reasons why we believed the information we published, we would end up being ordered to pay restitution.

Financial institutions aren't much better. Identity theft wouldn't be a problem if they would either stop issuing credit based on easily obtained 'proof' of identity without even a phone conversation (and apparently wondering why you want your bills sent to another state), or at least admit that they really don't have any idea who they sent a credit card to.

Honestly, an adverse report from a credit card isn't all that credible these days. While it's unlikely that the report is malicious or fraudulant, it's really quite likely to be in error.

Indeed. Send the jerk to prison...make an example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328937)

As a victim of identity theft, I can sympathise with his victims. It took an anormous amount of time over the course of 4-5 months to clean up the mess. It completely interfered with my ability to get a home loan until things were fixed and I still get bogus inquiries about it years later. Now multiply that headach times thousands of victims. I hope he's spending the next 14 years face down with a playboy pasted onto his back....prison is too good for people like that.

Re:That should be good (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329364)

Sure, this guy deserves to be punished, as he will be. But a share of the blame belongs to the people at Ford Motor Credit and Teledata, whose sloppy security enabled this crime. Nothing's been about any penalties for them, and I'm guessing there won't be any.

Re:That should be good (1)

koko775 (617640) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329624)

Hmm. No. While it should ruin their lives, taking them out of the picture for a really long time (insert standard rapist argument here), they shouldn't get put away for so long it destroys their lives. That would be the ultimate hypocrisy, IMO.

frist psot1!1 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328584)

l33t

Mac Mini, Somebody please explain this!?!?! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328591)

I dont get the Mac Mini thing. You can already easily get a Micro ATX case that is just as small, for example, this Inwin case [newegg.com] . Thats like $50. Then you can build out a great system with more RAM, more HD space, faster CPU for less than $499.

Its just as small, cool, and quiet. So whats the big whoop?

Re:Mac Mini, Somebody please explain this!?!?! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329342)

It comes with Mac OS. How much is XP going for these days? Linux is free, but why bother when for $1-200 more you can get a nice-looking, actually usable GUI? Apache, MPlayer, MAME etc. will work on both. Plus there's GarageBand. Pretty tempting if you ask me.

Curious... (5, Funny)

MarkRose (820682) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328600)

What I want to know is, when they caught the guy, did they have a positive ID?

I wonder.... (1)

JediTux (747874) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328611)

How much would my 'secret' identity go for?

Re:I wonder.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328926)

Why don't you put old 'HomoFudge' up on Ebay and find out?

Why? (4, Insightful)

grahamsz (150076) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328629)

Why does a help desk operator have access to my credit report?

Surely you can design a system where very few humans ever have contact with all of a persons information.

I've dealt with on UK bank where when you wanted to perform certain transactions using telephone banking you were passed to a second tier operator and instructed not to give them your name.

Presumably the system was set up such that no one person had enough confidential information on a single customer.

The US really needs far stricter controls on SSNs - it's insane how often i need my ssn for day to day transactions.

Re:Why? (3, Informative)

DoctorMO (720244) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328683)

The UK has Data Protection laws now which mean that if employees have access to personal information they have to have a damn good reason, and if they don't the company is liable.

Re:Why? (1)

bersl2 (689221) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328714)

The Social Security number is being used for things it was not intended to be used for.

Re:Why? (3, Informative)

me at werk (836328) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328891)

Social Security numbers [wikipedia.org] were originally just a Tax ID, people wouldn't get them until age 16 or so (this was changed, according to wikipedia, in the 1980s when SSN's were required to list "dependants). It's sad, it was (as i'm told, I did not experience this) stated that it would "never be used as a national id" or something to that effect, and it has.

At least it's not to the same extent (i think) that it is in the UK [theregister.co.uk] . But that's not to say it won't be.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328810)

The US really needs far stricter controls on SSNs - it's insane how often i need my ssn for day to day transactions.
Don't be an idiot. The SSN is one of your (many) legal names, just specially-assigned so that it is unique. What we need is a law that says "use a public name or number as a security authenticator, and you get to fully compensate everyone for all losses that result". I think if you get hit by identity "theft", you should be able to hand it to a lawyer and not think about it at all, and the lawyer gets to bill the creditor the actual costs. That would force financiers to, you know, actually find out who they're handing big wads of money to before they actually hand it out.

I also want world peace.

Re:Why? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328850)

SSN's aren't unique, they get reused

Depends on the industry (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328887)

When I worked for a broker, I had access to client SSNs, clearing house info for EFT, the whole nine yards. We were monitored, but that only went so far. Our tech support guys had all the same info.

Oh, we passed all the industry regulation background searches, etc. In fact, I saw a number of people kicked out of my training class when the searches uncovered bounced checks, forgeries, and other financial crimes. But that's the thing - many people who do that stuff do keep trying to get jobs in the industry. Which makes me think there's a high likelihood that people prone to doing that in general try to take those jobs. I know it's a bit presumptuous, like assuming all pedophiles without records will try to get jobs with kids simply in order to molest them - I'm sure less than 100% of them molest, but as an aggregate group they're unsafe - and it scares me to know how open this access is, especially when I know what they get paid and the educational requirements involved for the job.

Re:Why? (1)

Skater (41976) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328935)

What sort of day-to-day transaction do you need your SSN for? I can't remember the last time I had to put SSN down on any form... Possibly my tax forms last January, but that's the point of the SSN.

--RJ

Re:Why? (1)

Tarous Zars (769077) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329397)

At the College I go to my SSN is my Student ID. It is even used to check a tshirt out in the PE department.

Have you tried saying no? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329456)

Up here in Canada only goverment agencies, employers and banks are allowed to require SIN (equivilent to SSN). Anyone else you just tell them no you won't give them your SIN, and they have to provide whatever service or product anyways.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328983)

Why? Because they can look up your account info, which contains billing address and phone number and your social security number. Just because you're asked for the last 4 digits doesn't mean the rep can't see the whole thing (I did helpdesk stuff for about a year a while back). Heck, the system where I used to work was such that you could basically browse all customers -- closed account or open -- and look at the data whenever you wanted. I moved from helpdesk to actual network grunt stuff within that same company and knew the guys that ran the AS-400s pretty well. There might have been logs for actual account modifications, but for viewing stuff and the actions of everyone logged in? Not a chance it was tracked anywhere.

Where to go? (1)

Efialtis (777851) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328634)

Hay, so I could use a second identity ;-} Where can I go and get one? For $60, it is a bargain! ;-}

Re:Where to go? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329108)

Hey ;-} you're a fag ;-}

How... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328638)

Are you sure you've got the right guy?

fake ids (1)

frogger01 (806562) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328643)

apparently [a]fake ID goes for as little as $60

funny, before i was legal age to drink, we just made our own for free. nothing like a good printer and a dark bar/drunk doorman.

Re:fake ids (1)

Ayaress (662020) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329091)

We just did everything we could to try to grow convincing facial hair. I was lucky (or unlucky, depending on how you think of it), since that and premature grayness run in my family. I could pass for 18 easily when I was 15, and even when I was 14 I had a hard time convincing the theater that I was still young enough to get the under-18 discount. Only a few places carded me for liquor by the time was 17 since I'd developed some visible gray streaks in my hair. That was before my state passed tougher laws on that, though, I doubt I could get away with it now givin the same circumstances.

Oh good call, your Honor. (4, Funny)

mikeophile (647318) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328655)

Cummings, who is still free on bail, must report to prison on 9 March.

It's not like the guy could change his identity or anything.

Re:Oh good call, your Honor. (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328876)

I wonder how he came up with the money to make bail? Hmmm...

It would be better for consumers if (4, Interesting)

museumpeace (735109) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328666)

this s**tbag's employer, Teledata Communications, was heavily fined...they must have had hundreds of complaints over the course of the thievery and never turned enough scrutiny on their own orgnaization to see the problem until way too late. I will be looking at which credit card issuers, banks, etc use Teledata Communications services and seeing if I can avoid doing business there.

but who says their competition is any safer?

Re:It would be better for consumers if (2, Insightful)

MLopat (848735) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328823)

I totally agree. The employer should be somewhat accountable for the actions of their employee and the negligence on their part. Obviously the system was designed in an insecure manor if the help desk technician had access not only to the accounts, but to the codes as well. The company is the one that should be on trial here.

Re:It would be better for consumers if (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329137)

While I agree that it is the responsibility of the company to set appropriate safeguards in the workplace, I have trouble seeing how the security at the system designer's residence played a part in this identity infringement.

Re:It would be better for consumers if (1)

MLopat (848735) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329237)

I have trouble seeing how the security at the system designer's residence played a part in this identity infringement


I don't follow you... could you elaborate on that...

Re:It would be better for consumers if (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328911)

"I will be looking at which credit card issuers, banks, etc use Teledata Communications services and seeing if I can avoid doing business there."

Good luck finding that information out. You have access to internal company info that'll tell you who they use for contractors, etc?

Re:It would be better for consumers if (2, Insightful)

loraksus (171574) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328981)

It is shocking, simply shocking that someone who gets paid $10 an hour steals customer information if he has the chance because the company's security policies were virtually useless.

It never ceases to amaze me... (4, Interesting)

bennomatic (691188) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328687)

...that these folks just don't learn. People who do this get caught because they keep going and going and going. Once you have a few million, you don't need to scam anyone any more! Just invest and retire! You will eventually mess up, and you WILL get caught!!

Of course, this sort of idiotic greed is what got them to start doing these bad things in the first place. I can't imagine trying to steal identities no matter how much the profit, myself.

Re:It never ceases to amaze me... (1)

Anita Coney (648748) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328761)

Anyone greedy enough to do it would be greedy enough not to stop.

Re:It never ceases to amaze me... (3, Insightful)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328923)

i'm sure someone retired with that money.

just not this little drone in the circles...

Re:It never ceases to amaze me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329139)

People who do this get caught because they keep going and going and going. Once you have a few million, you don't need to scam anyone any more!

"I've got enough money, I think I'll retire", says Cummings to the accomplices with the semi-automatics.

Re:It never ceases to amaze me... (1)

Steffan (126616) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329336)

Yes, but when is it 'enough'. Maybe he was going to quit at 5M, or 3M, or maybe only 100K. He'd never know at what point he was being too greedy. Arguably after the very first transaction he should have quit.

from the no-that-would-be-the-government dept. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328726)

Fuck you and your assface editorials.

NOT the biggest ID thief ever... (3, Insightful)

Anita Coney (648748) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328733)

... but the biggest ID theif ever caught.

Let The Company Know They Suck (1)

blackage (92956) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328737)

Sales Support
Tel: (800) 824-9069 option 2
e-mail: sales@tcicredit.com
Technical Support
Tel: (800) 492-2001, option 1
e-mail: support@tcicredit.com

Corporate Offices
Tel: (631) 231-6700
e-mail: kpalmer@tcicredit.com

Re:Let The Company Know They Suck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328929)

MOD PARENT DOWN! KARMA Wh0R3!

Cummings, who is still free on bail, must report.. (1)

the-build-chicken (644253) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328740)

...to prison on 9 March.

Are you kidding me? 14 years in Jail or move to Ecuador, hmmmmm?

Re:Cummings, who is still free on bail, must repor (1)

RockClimb (235954) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328847)

I agree. When I read the story, my first thought was.... "I'll bet this guy skips the country." After all, they're giving him 2 months to plan where to go. Bye bye Phillip! or given the fact he helped steal millions should that be Buy Buy Phillip?

Re:Cummings, who is still free on bail, must repor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328851)

Oh, but this is white collar crime!

It's not like he's part of the stupid and dangerous prole that go around committing physical violence!!!! Dear Lord, those savages must be put away as soon as possible - no bail for them! After all, they might beat one more person up before going to jail.

On the other hand, this fine member of the white collar establishment only destroyed the lives and credits of thousands of people - of course he should be allowed to be free until incarceration!

Re:Cummings, who is still free on bail, must repor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328943)

If you are stupid enough to rob a mini-mart for $39.04 and a pack of cigaretts, you deserve jail. Everyone knows to commit white coller crime so you only get a slap on the wrist.

14 years in Jail or move to Ecuador and (1)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328916)

mom loses her house.

bail coulda been secured by someone's residence...

Re:14 years in Jail or move to Ecuador and (1)

CarlDenny (415322) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329610)

Or possibly some of the ENORMOUS PILE OF MONEY HE STOLE.

(Yes, he just resold them, but $60*30,000 = $1.8 Million at least in his pocket.)

Re:Cummings, who is still free on bail, must repor (1)

pasde (657790) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329547)



Are you kidding me? 14 years in Jail or move to Ecuador, hmmmmm?

And how would you get there? Hidden in the back of a car or in someone's luggage? You won't get through customs. Your passport is definitely revoked in such case.

Why is it? (2, Interesting)

modemboy (233342) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328747)

Seems like all the huge criminal acts these days are inside jobs. Companies from grocery stores to office buildings are spying on their employees for this exact reason.

free on bail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328750)

Cummings, who is still free on bail, must report to prison on 9 March.

Uh-oh, and he sounds like a flight risk... Won't be seeing him again.

Fake ID (3, Interesting)

MrRuslan (767128) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328767)

Here in NYC anyone can obtain a fake ID for under $50 bucks and it looks legit enogh to pass...And it's legal too because it has a disclamer in he back. I used to use one to get into clubs but i also used it (with my real info on it) to goto the bank because i always loose my wallet and i just get one for $30 bucks and i never had a problem with it...People who deal with money should be educated on whats real and whats not.

Re:Fake ID (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328793)

Legal? Yeah right.

Re:Fake ID (1)

MrRuslan (767128) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328871)

its ligal to make as long as there is a diclaimer in the back...not legal to abuse!

Re:Fake ID (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328944)

"because i always loose [sic] my wallet"

I would think you'd keep a tighter grip on something as important as a wallet. Instead of wasting money on fake IDs get yourself a wallet chain.

This isn't about fake id's (2, Insightful)

Phil John (576633) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329228)

it's about stealing people's identities (by obtaining as much information about them) and setting up loans etc. in their name. The criminals then don't repay, the loan company comes knocking on the victims door and they then have to spend time and money reinstating their good name and credit rating.

Identity theifs really are the lowest of the low as far as "white collar" crime goes, I hope this guy rots in a stinking cell for as long as possible.

As a victim of identity theft.... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328805)

I'd like to see the sentence doubled, if not tripled.

For those of you that haven't experience it, you have no idea what a living hell identity theft can make your life.

Come to think of it....maybe a public execution would be in order.

Re:As a victim of identity theft.... (1)

MLopat (848735) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328976)

A 14 year sentence is pretty substantial. Its important to tamper justice with mercy. I'm empathetic to anyone that has been a victim of this kind of crime. I can only imagine the kind of personal violation you must feel. However, take comfort in knowing bubba is going to have a new little bitch on C-block :)

What!?!?!? (5, Funny)

mr_resident (222932) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328833)

HE's not Philip Cummings!

I AM!!!

Re:What!?!?!? (1)

spectre_240sx (720999) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329038)

Funny, yes, but an underrated or two would be good, too. Parent was at 0 when I saw the post.

Re:What!?!?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329098)

CC company says you're Sparticus.

wow.. (1)

theshan (848767) | more than 9 years ago | (#11328843)

there's also a "see aslo" link on the side of that story that's talking about the same thing...the real kicker is the quote right from the article.. If convicted, he faces up to 30 years in prison for fraud, and millions of dollars in fines. '$30 a time' nice..only gonna take a couple years to get that one paid off.

he will be fine (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11328950)

He will do his time and sell his story, make a movie, and make 100m legit.

Re:he will be fine (2, Interesting)

MLopat (848735) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329021)

I'm not sure how the laws are down in US, but up here in Canada, the judge can rule that you are forbidden from profiting from your crime.

Specifically the law can provide that you are not permitted to sell publishing rights of any sort. Hopefully this will apply, and if not, it would be nice to see 30,000 people take up a class action law suit to recoup their losses after he makes his supposed $100M.

Where are the rape arguments? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329026)

This isn't intended to be a troll, but I have to ask where are the "he'd spend less time in jail for rape" comments?

It wasn't too terribly long ago that a story was posted about a guy who broke into either Lowe's/Home Depot/whatever to steal customer credit card numbers? The rape comments were all over the place in that story. Do you have any idea how much financial damage could be done to a persond with just their name and credit card number? So how is this new story any different from the older one? Is it because this guy was successful and the other one was caught before the information could be used? So we should offer lighter sentences to stupid/incompetent/unsuccessful criminals?

Perhaps it's time the /. devotees re-examine their position on computer crime.

Re:Where are the rape arguments? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329100)

Idiot.

Re:Where are the rape arguments? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329167)

Nice. Avoid discussing the topic and throw an insult. You sir, are a bastion of intellect.

Re:Where are the rape arguments? (1)

binary paladin (684759) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329243)

Actually, that's me.

that's not a lot of money (1)

theNetImp (190602) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329179)

and the total stolen over just a couple of years was somewhere in the $50m-100m range."

I don't see where $0.05 to $0.10 is a lot of money. (^_~)

In Other News... (2, Funny)

AmberBlackCat (829689) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329233)

To add insult to injury, Mr. Cummings has now learned that everything he has purchased with his stolen ID's has been confiscated, including his new robot... his new girl robot. Heh heh heh...

Id Theft (1)

Antonymous Flower (848759) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329268)

Those who do the most for the system should get the most out of the system. These 'ID theives' destroy the system and can possibly profit the most. Every time I give my personal information to some rude unknown face behind a desk I feel the paranoia take over. If he, she, or their shady friends in the back decide to use my information to destroy the quality of my identity it is definate that I will suffer. Yet it is not definate that they will be caught. We aren't reading the story of the guy who made X millions and willingly moved to unknown paradise. You'll never hear the story of the ultimate hack. The solutions of tiered systems, biometrics and others may bring profit to corporations but ultimately the information still exists and may still be abused. Debt has no meaning if it applies to anyone who can claim to be anyone. The "Information Age" is flawed indeed.

Philip CUMMINGs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11329474)

His cellmates anyway.

Meanwhile, at George Mason University.... (2, Interesting)

44BSD (701309) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329476)

32,000 staff and student ID records, including photographs and SSN's have been exposed [usatoday.com] to {h|cr}ackers, possibly for as long as two months. GMU is home to The Center for Secure Information Systems [gmu.edu] . In other news, the cobbler's children are going barefoot...

UK credit reports? (1)

IO ERROR (128968) | more than 9 years ago | (#11329586)

Does the UK still file credit reports by physical address? This bit quite a few people when they moved into an address, and the previous resident racked a bunch of bad debts. The new residents suddenly found they were being denied credit based on the history of the address.
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