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Not Much Happening in Hard Drives This Year

michael posted more than 9 years ago | from the booooring dept.

Data Storage 449

yahooooo writes "CoolTechZone.com has an article that talks about desktop hard drive developments in 2005. It looks this year is going to be a dud for the storage industry."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

GNAA (-1, Offtopic)

Black Is Beautiful (850279) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379644)

GNAA declares boycott of all foods that make sperm taste bad
GNAA declares boycott of all foods that make sperm taste bad

Washington, District of Columbia (USNS) - Gathered on the steps of the Justice Department, gay niggers worldwide announced their most ambitious ploy for political power to date, a boycott of all foods that make semen taste awful. GNAA president timecop led the rally with a pink megaphone, shouting over the noise of riot cops assembling in case the peaceful assembly turned violent.

"My friends," he lisped at the top of his lungs. "As America's - no, the world's - foremost consumers of sperm and without a doubt its greatest enjoyers and advocates, we plead - no, we demand - that these prostate poisons be eliminated from the modern diet." Around him, a surging throng of foamy devotees showed their approval with a shower of bodily fluids.

According to timecop, numerous studies prove that gay volunteers not only found that tobacco left a lingering moldy taste in semen, but that such commonplace items as coffee and multivitamin pills could make semen taste muddy and like insecticide, respectively. "These are intolerant, I mean, intolerable substances," timecop spluttered.

GNAA member DiKKy, on loan from NATO class dunce Norway, as if on cue dumped a 55 gallon drum of whipped semen into the Justice Department's Martin Luther King, Jr. meditative koi pond. As carp drowned in the sticky mucosal fluid, DiKKy took the microphone from a timecop overcome by emotion at the sacrifice of so much precious gay nigger seed. "Gummy bears make it taste like rubber cement - no, that's not a pun. And salmon, of course," said DiKKy, "which makes it taste oily. Oh, and here's a big no-no: asparagus. Yucky."

United Asparagus Growers President Ralph Gruntligel was interviewed by CBS' "60 Minutes," which, in trying to downplay its recent scandal over forging records to replace the lost forged records of a famous politician, has changed focus to such cutting edge topics as sitting room makeovers and loose candle wax.

"While we support every group who wishes to consume asparagus, and do not discriminate on the basis of age, sex, race, gender, sexual orientation, bondage role, condom use, ethnicity or major league baseball fan identification," Gruntligel said from a leather sofa in his Greenwich Village headquarters, "to indict a source of income for roughly one in 65,536 Americans that is ranked fifty-fourth among the world's most valuable vegetables, is not only a crime against asparagus, but a terrorist action against one of nature's most perfect foods and an important source of revenue for government and industry."

Back at the rally, timecop sniffed in response. "Like his ugly fat bitch of a wife will ever give him this kind of head," he said, demonstrating on Morgan Freeman, who happened to be passing on his way to testify before a Senate committee on racial discrimination in the color of fingernail clippers. "Desist -- cease, I say!" began Freeman, but then, in his characteristic basso profundo, began moaning rhythmically to the motion of gay nigger tongues.

Semen, the technical name for the fluid of male sexual emission which occurs at ejaculation, has a generally salty or sweet taste, depending on what the person responsible has consumed since his last ejaculation, said Dr. Ben Rodriguez-Silverstein. "It's entirely possible that these foods make semen taste disgusting," he said. "But unfortunately, most of them are necessary for survival."

He was immediately mobbed by gay niggers wielding placards reading "READ MY LIPS: NO RANCID SEMEN."

Contacted via phone, Robert Liebovitz, lead counsel for the Association of Confection Producers, said, "Can I get AIDS from this?"

Rodriguez-Silverstein, who was later spotted receiving $250,000 in small denomination bills smeared with a sticky, mushroom-smelling substance, announced that his lab was conducting independent tests using AOL Afghanistan employees to sample semen from every ethnic, racial, social and animal family group. "We will get to the bottom of this," he vowed, "and we will discover the culprit foods that leave a repellent taste lurking in your Cowper's gland."

At that moment, GNAA member Penisbird staggered into the room, having consumed all of the samples collected so far, and vomited iridescent fluid across the rug, desk, sofa and commemorative bust of Hilary Clinton. The demonstration will continue throughout the week and end abruptly on Saturday night, probably after they start playing the "boom-boom techno" at the Rainbow Lounge in Montrose, Texas, said timecop.



About GNAA:
GNAA (GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) is the first organization which gathers GAY NIGGERS from all over America and abroad for one common goal - being GAY NIGGERS.

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Talk to one of the ops or any of the other members in the channel to sign up today! Upon submitting your application, you will be required to submit links to your successful First Post, and you will be tested on your knowledge of GAYNIGGERS FROM OUTER SPACE.

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If you have mod points and would like to support GNAA, please moderate this post up.

.________________________________________________.
| ______________________________________._a,____ | Press contact:
| _______a_._______a_______aj#0s_____aWY!400.___ | Gary Niger
| __ad#7!!*P____a.d#0a____#!-_#0i___.#!__W#0#___ | gary_niger@gnaa.us [mailto]
| _j#'_.00#,___4#dP_"#,__j#,__0#Wi___*00P!_"#L,_ | GNAA Corporate Headquarters
| _"#ga#9!01___"#01__40,_"4Lj#!_4#g_________"01_ | 143 Rolloffle Avenue
| ________"#,___*@`__-N#____`___-!^_____________ | Tarzana, California 91356
| _________#1__________?________________________ |
| _________j1___________________________________ | All other inquiries:
| ____a,___jk_GAY_NIGGER_ASSOCIATION_OF_AMERICA_ | Enid Al-Punjabi
| ____!4yaa#l___________________________________ | enid_indian@gnaa.us [mailto]
| ______-"!^____________________________________ | GNAA World Headquarters
` _______________________________________________' 160-0023 Japan Tokyo-to Shinjuku-ku Nishi-Shinjuku 3-20-2

Copyright (c) 2003-2004 Gay Nigger Association of America [www.gnaa.us]

What about reliability? (5, Insightful)

liquid stereo (602956) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379646)

No more technology is needed. How about reliability?

Re:What about reliability? (4, Interesting)

Coneasfast (690509) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379681)

there is not much demand for higher capacities (very few people would need >160gb).

as for reliability, most HD's are acceptable, but you can never fully rely on them to never fail, you must always have a backup system for important data.

speed is one of the areas which is always welcome for improvement (until of course it reaches the max interface speed, eg 150mB/sec for SATA)

Re:What about reliability? (1)

liquid stereo (602956) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379713)

I'd like to see high-speed/performance mechanisms make their way down to the lower-price range.

Re:What about reliability? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379723)

very few people would need >160gb

Surely you meant to say 640k?

Re:What about reliability? (2, Interesting)

eggstasy (458692) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379778)

Acceptable my ass. I haven't seen a hard drive last more than a year since, oh, single-digit capacities.
I bought this box in mid-2001. I'm on my 4th HD and 3rd graphics card. The rest is all very much alive and kicking.
A hard drive is a critical component. Its emphasis should be on reliability FIRST and then everything else.

Re:What about reliability? (1)

Kent Recal (714863) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379808)

What are you doing to your hardware?
Some of my IDE-drives are 2yrs and older and still ticking fine.

Re:What about reliability? (1)

Smidge204 (605297) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379817)

That sounds unusual. What's the temperature inside your PC case?

Or maybe you're buying cheap hardware...?
=Smidge=

Re:What about reliability? (4, Interesting)

sevensharpnine (231974) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379831)

Four hard drives in four years? I'll admit modern disks are built poorly, but that seems excessive. It's possible that you have had a string of bad luck, but if they all failed in the same machine, you might want to check you power supply and/or cooling setup. The drives might have been killed.

Re:What about reliability? (5, Insightful)

wernercd (837757) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379881)

No doubt. I've had an external for 2+ years that has been dropped, around the world twice now (Second deployment to Iraq for me), taken apart, put back together, reformated a couple times... Needless to say this thing should have died a long time ago

I think reliability is fine in a majority of drives. No different than operating a car. Gotta take care of it to get it to last 100-200k+ miles.

Re:What about reliability? (4, Insightful)

Znork (31774) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379810)

"very few people would need >160gb"

Dont have a media system yet, eh?

Let me tell you, when you start recoring video and storing your DVD's on disk for easy access, not even multiterabyte disks will seem enough.

Add to that storage for backups which doubles or triples your needed space and you start seeing the problem. Then add mirroring and longterm archives...

"but you can never fully rely on them to never fail"

I'd rather say you can fully rely on them to eventually fail. Which is why you need so much space for backups.

"speed is one of the areas which is always welcome"

Welcome, but not essential. For actual system performance you're often better off with more memory for disk caches. If you have some very intensive applications needing very high speed you can improve performance with striping anyway, and in desktop systems it's often a better solution as heat and noise from faster disks make them unsuitable.

Re:What about reliability? (1)

wernercd (837757) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379704)

Correct me if I'm wrong but your one of those that still believes we'll never need more than 64k of ram?

Always room for new technology. And you call yourself a Nerd. Pffft.

Re:What about reliability? (2, Insightful)

JPriest (547211) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379772)

Exactly, HDD read/write times are one of the worst bottle necks in computing today because they rely on actual mechanical movement. The new HDD technologies that come out this year will be what mom and pop are using in 4 yers to store files from their digital cameras, camcorders, music, and media center.

Also, cheaper/better consumer HDD's = things like more mail storage, web space, voice mail capacity etc. from providers.

Re:What about reliability? (1)

norton_I (64015) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379802)

It isn't that we'll never need more than 120/160/250/320/400/500 GB of storage, it is just that most users don't need that *right now*. As mentioned, the WD raptor drives are very popular despite having much lower maximum capactities. We need some new developments in some or all of processors, network bandwidth, video cards, busses, and storage interfaces before it will become practical for most people to take advantage of even the capacities available now.

Some additional speed would be nice, but realistically, after startup my computer is rarely disk speed limited, since I have enough memory. For most people it would not be worth trading the increased noise and failure rate as well as decreasing reliability to get 15K rpm drives.

Hard Disk Drive: End of an Era (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379707)

The reality is that the hard drive, in addition to the floppy drive, is reaching extinction. The density of flash memory is increasing so rapidly that, within 10 years, the hard drive will not be necessary. IBM saw this inevitable demise of the hard drive and sold its hard drive business to a competitor.

The good news is that only Chinese companies [phrusa.org] [phrusa.org] will be making hard drives and will be driven into bankruptcy while Western companies will develop better technologies. Such an end is most fitting for barbaric Chinese society. Here, "Chinese" refers to anyone from mainland China, Taiwan province, or Hong Kong.

To understand how inhuman Chinese society is, consider the following list of donations to the tsunami relief effort.

1. USA, $350 million plus hundreds of millions of dollars in indirect aid (per the military rescue effort in South Asia)
2. Japan, $500 million
3. Australia, $810 million
4. Norway, $183 million
5. China (including Taiwan province and Hong Kong), $80 million

As you can see, Western society is, at least, 1 order of magnitude more compassionate and kind than Chinese society. We can literally measure the amount of compassion in dollars.

Note that Norway has only a population of 4.5 million, is much smaller economically than Taiwan, and does not enjoy the special business privileges that Taiwanese companies enjoy in China to reap billions of dollars of profit in the Chinese market. Taiwan gave a measily $7 million, and Norway gave $183 million.

What is "going down" here? Chinese society is barbaric.

Re:Hard Disk Drive: End of an Era (2, Informative)

Lisandro (799651) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379776)

The reality is that the hard drive, in addition to the floppy drive, is reaching extinction. The density of flash memory is increasing so rapidly that, within 10 years, the hard drive will not be necessary. IBM saw this inevitable demise of the hard drive and sold its hard drive business to a competitor.

Flash memory has still a lot of improvements to do in the write cycles department (the number of times you can write to it before it fails), which basically hasn't changed a lot since it was introduced to these days. The exact number dpendens on the manufacturer, but it ranges between 10k and 100k. It's also still very slow.

But i agree, hard drives will be phased out in the short term, probably by new technlogies like MRAM [wikipedia.org] memory, which doesn't have the limited write cycles problem and is as fast as DRAM.

SLC flash is more durable than MLC flash (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379836)

Flash memory has still a lot of improvements to do in the write cycles department (the number of times you can write to it before it fails), which basically hasn't changed a lot since it was introduced to these days.

I agree that the 10K figure for multi-level cell (MLC) flash memory is a bit low, but with modern wear leveling, sector remapping algorithms, and file systems [redhat.com] , 100,000 writes per sector for single-level cell (SLC) flash isn't too bad. In practice, the only things you can't put on flash memory under a typical workstation work load are 1. a swap file (get more RAM instead) and 2. a database (but for this, you're already RAID 5ing your drives and, if you're serious, mirroring transactions off-site).

Re:Hard Disk Drive: End of an Era (1)

mod_critical (699118) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379862)

Hmm, then I wonder why the largest compact flash cards are actually just containers for micro hard disks...

Flash memory density is increasing rapily, but so is the cost. Look at solid state drives from M-Systems [m-sys.com]

-- They are rediculously expensive. I have used them for storage in hostile environment experiments, as that is what they are made for, but they are wayyy to expensive for consumer use. Obviously, the prices will come down. However, the prices to make postage stamp size hard disks with many gigabytes of storage are very low. Lower cost will win in the end, no matter how dense flash memory is.

Re:What about reliability? (4, Informative)

Lisandro (799651) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379715)

Make that both reilabilty and speed for me. PATA/SATA disk are still lagging horribly behind stuff like SCSI disks and their 10k RPM offerings.

PS: If you want reilabilty for cheap, check the Seagate Barracuda series (i own this one [seagate.com] ) - cheap, VERY reliable and also damn quiet. I can't tell if the thing is running or not by listening to it.

I want IDE drives that don't lie about fsync. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379796)

A big reliability problem for databases is that many IDE drives like [freebsd.org] about when data actually gets written to disk (as opposed to just written to cache).


Bigger caches will only worsen this problem; but the drive makers "need" to keep up these lies to win benchmarks. Aargh.

No news (1, Interesting)

saider (177166) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379647)

Is good news?

Re:No news (3, Funny)

deft (253558) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379695)

"No news Is good news?"

I think you mean "no news IS news".

Re:No news (1)

saider (177166) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379739)

This reminds me of a "Bloom County" cartoon where the TV newspeople are pondering the lack of anything going on. I belive the punchline was Tom Brokaw doing a segment called "Nothing: Is it Something?"

i think not (-1, Offtopic)

CannonR1 (735861) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379649)

sata2 3gb ncq FIRST POST!!!!

If you need more than a few hundred gigs (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379651)

Then you are a theif or a pervert and belong behind bars.

This is news? (2, Funny)

christopherfinke (608750) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379652)

I can't wait for the next two Slashdot stories: "The sky is still blue" and "There's nothing interesting to report."

Re:This is news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379667)

So why do you fucking come to this site? Good god people your getting a free news service and you still bitch about the content. Go start your own damn site if you want to bitch.

waaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!!!

Re:This is news? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379677)

free news service????
what news?

Re:This is news? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379756)

for the fucking intelligent discussions

Re:This is news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379771)

lol

Re:This is news? (1)

Solder Fumes (797270) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379789)

It's just like when the Garfield strip lost all ambition, and every strip thereafter is "Bored. (next panel). ZZzzzzz. (next panel). I'm bored, Odie."

great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379654)

now we're getting no-new news. pfff

Nothing Happening (1)

JamesP (688957) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379657)

It's a slow day today. Really!

For "news" that atually say "hey, nothing happened"

What we need (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379658)

Are cheap, super large disks that don't need to be the fasted. I'd love a 500 gig hard drive that was running at maybe 5400 rpm. I just want to use it for storage of media, and that should be plenty of speed.

Slow news day? (5, Funny)

sulli (195030) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379662)

Not much happening in hard drives this year. [slashdot.org]

The calculated scores don't carry much weight. [slashdot.org]

Nothing particularly surprising here. [slashdot.org]

Did anything happen today that does matter?

Well I heard this rumour: (1)

RobertTaylor (444958) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379764)

"Yes, I shat in woods," admits bear

Just looking on the news channels but no one is confirming it....

Re:Slow news day? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379783)

Yeah, some pretty cool stuff has been happening today, such as the release of Xfce 4.2, but nobody is talking about that.

Re:Slow news day? (1)

brutus_007 (769774) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379811)

I do believe so... the next article's title is: "Despite slow news day, Slashdot editors maintain consistant daily volume of stories for readers."

News Shortage Grips Nation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379837)

has always been the headline I've wanted to see.

Re:Slow news day? (1)

mutantcamel (213431) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379838)

My thoughts exactly...I'm half expecting a /. headline like "Man dies of natural causes" anytime now...

Re:Slow news day? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379896)

Sun sets in west. NASA launches investigation.

Re:Slow news day? (1)

ari_j (90255) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379875)

Don't worry. They'll post a few more urban legends as fact on the front page by nightfall.

Storage (5, Insightful)

spike hay (534165) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379665)

I'd like to see more speed, but capacity hardly matters to anybody these days, now that 200+ gig drives can be had for ridiculously cheap.

Re:Storage (2, Insightful)

GreatDrok (684119) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379733)

I'd like to see more speed, but capacity hardly matters to anybody these days, now that 200+ gig drives can be had for ridiculously cheap.

You know, 200+ gigs isn't going to go very far once you start storing your DVD collection. Certainly mine would occupy over 2TB if I were to rip it to disc and use a network media player to access it.

Video, especially HD, is going to eat these discs pretty quick. I remember my first PC (previously I had avoided x86 boxes) had 200MB of disc and that seemed huge at the time (able to run a pretty complete Slackware install). My current machine (ten years on) has 200GB and it is already damn full.

Re:Storage (1)

wernercd (837757) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379832)

lol I feel your pain.

Being overseas, me and my fellow Americans have ALOT of downtime out here. So I have 2 300gb hard drives FULL of movies, tv shows and clips for people to watch. Makes time go by SO much smoother when work can be broken up by watching a movie or two. I was surprised to think that I might have to upgrade to a couple 500's when they come out lol.

Now that I've mentioned Movies being shared, it's been nice knowing you. I need to get ready for the Feds *snicker*

Peace

Re:Storage (1)

Homology (639438) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379858)

I'd like to see more speed, but capacity hardly matters to anybody these days, now that 200+ gig drives can be had for ridiculously cheap.

What I would like is cheap and reliable harddisks. Too often I've got problems with IDE disk that starts failing for no good reason. When I buy a harddisk it seems like lottery if the drive will last or not. (Yes, I do cool the drives)

So, I've finally bought a good SCSI controller and is in the process of buying SCSI HDD for my home servers. For my servers 74GB is plenty of space, and I don't need a 300GB unreliable harddisk.

What I would like to see... (4, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379668)

What I would like to see is more and cheaper network attached storage devices like the Ximeta Netdisk. With networks being so popular in homes, it's amazing that they don't have one place to store their files without a actually having a specific computer turned on. And most people, including myself, don't see the need in devoting an entire computer to serving files.

Re:What I would like to see... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379686)

Actually, the Ximeta disk requires a computer to share the disk before it's available on the network for other computers. This is a serious flaw in the engeneering!

Re:What I would like to see... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379781)

those ximeta products are pieces of shit. its not "network attached" its a USB disk with a crappy USB over ethernet driver attached to it.

its unroutable, it doesnt have an IP stack. its worthless as network attached storage for the vast majority of people.

What's next? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379669)

CPU speeds won't increase [slashdot.org] ?

TFA says consumers aren't demanding more (5, Insightful)

filmmaker (850359) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379670)

Part of the reason why hard drives haven't kept up with other components is because consumers don't demand more features. Seems like people don't want their hard drives to do more - though I know that I'd like better performance when working with large video files.

Re:TFA says consumers aren't demanding more (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379720)

Well, I'm ordering a 10K RPM SATA drive today, so that's something anyway. Yeah, it's nearly a year old already, but most users' PCs haven't got one, so I think the HD industry is still ahead of the game. Didn't Hitachi just announce their 500GB drive?

Re:TFA says consumers aren't demanding more (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379777)

I'd rather have my hard drives do less (i.e. solid state), not more.

Flash Memory Based 'Hard Drives' (1)

SmellsLikeFish (640407) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379672)

When will I be able to buy one ?

Re:Flash Memory Based 'Hard Drives' (2, Informative)

R.Mo_Robert (737913) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379736)

Even if you could, flash has a limited number of writes/rewrites (between thousands and hundreds of thousands, as far as I know and depending on whom you believe), and it wouldn't be well-suited for typical use as a "hard drive"--and definitely not one that has a swap file. And to top it all off, any capacity comparable to that of a hard drive is way more expensive.

Re:Flash Memory Based 'Hard Drives' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379801)

512MB-1GB storage is the $100 range. It wasn't many years ago that the same sized hard drives were more. Ignoring the number of writes issue, flash storage is catching it pretty quickly.

Re:Flash Memory Based 'Hard Drives' (1)

geeber (520231) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379812)

Ummm, isn't that what USB sticks are?

Article? Or usenet rant? (5, Insightful)

coupland (160334) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379673)

This article is terrible. Looks like nothing more than a usenet rant to me. The author decries the terrible progress of the storage industry, obviously completely ignorant of the fact that the storage industry has consistently bested Moore's Law for at least a decade. If processors increased in speed at the pace that hard drives increase in size, we'd have processors in the tens of gigahertz today. Besides moaning about the slow pace of one of the fastest-paced areas in the industry, what is it the author thinks they should be focusing on? In his own words:

we would certainly like to see a set pattern where users can expect something significant in this industry

"Something." That's as specific as the author gets. Storage capacity is doubling every 12 months, but we need to see something significant. Nothing in particular, mind you. Just something. Go figure it out, come back to us when you're done. That's 5 mins of my life I'll never get back...

Re:Article? Or usenet rant? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379798)

hard drives besting Moore's Law? What are you smoking?

Reading your post was 1 minute of my life that I can never get back. Amazingly, mods gave it 5 Interesting. sigh.

Re:Article? Or usenet rant? (1, Insightful)

Speare (84249) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379818)

obviously completely ignorant of the fact that the storage industry has consistently bested Moore's Law for at least a decade

Can you please tell me how you think that Moore's Law [intel.com] is supposed to relate to the capacity of persistent, non-volatile data media? Or could you please just stop suggesting that it applies?

Re:Article? Or usenet rant? (1)

UID1000000 (768677) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379866)

This is a good point that you bring up. The author of this article leaves a lot of angles out. Such as the development in smaller hard drives such as 1.8" and less. The increase in speed for 9mm 2.5" drives. The fact that more corporations would like to remain on drives that don't impact images when changed. Compaq plans on offering their 15K 146.8 GB drives until mid-07 that's production. They'll be around for longer than that. Desktop side too - the bandwidth hasn't really increased - the new Intel chipsets are pushing for SATA drives which means higher capacity too.

Where did this author come from? He probably attended a roadmap for Hitachi and decided that there wasn't anything useless for the people who read is articles? Screw that.

A lot of the major drive makers are focusing on the next generation of the DVD media too.

Disk Drive: End of an Era (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379674)

The reality is that the hard drive, in addition to the floppy drive, is reaching extinction. The density of flash memory is increasing so rapidly that, within 10 years, the hard drive will not be necessary. IBM saw this inevitable demise of the hard drive and sold its hard drive business to a competitor.

The good news is that only Chinese companies [phrusa.org] will be making hard drives and will be driven into bankruptcy while Western companies will develop better technologies. Such an end is most fitting for barbaric Chinese society. Here, "Chinese" refers to anyone from mainland China, Taiwan province, or Hong Kong.

To understand how inhuman Chinese society is, consider the following list of donations to the tsunami relief effort.

1. USA, $350 million plus hundreds of millions of dollars in indirect aid (per the military rescue effort in South Asia)

2. Japan, $500 million
3. Australia, $810 million
4. Norway, $183 million
5. China (including Taiwan province and Hong Kong), $80 million

As you can see, Western society is, at least, 1 order of magnitude more compassionate and kind than Chinese society. We can literally measure the amount of compassion in dollars.

Note that Norway has only a population of 4.5 million, is much smaller economically than Taiwan, and does not enjoy the special business privileges that Taiwanese companies enjoy in China to reap billions of dollars of profit in the Chinese market. Taiwan gave a measily $7 million, and Norway gave $183 million.

What is "going down" here? Chinese society is barbaric.

Re:Disk Drive: End of an Era (0, Offtopic)

FiReaNGeL (312636) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379748)

I won't touch the "Chinese are barbarians" thing.

But you left out Canada of the list! Consider that 50% of the total population of the country gave something of their own pocket [canoe.ca] , that the federal aid amount to 425 millions (CAN, but still) and that were only 10% of the US population... I think we made our effort! :)

Re:Disk Drive: End of an Era (1)

boomgopher (627124) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379752)

I realize you're trolling, but Indonesia also has a history of treating the Chinese living in Indonesia like shit [bbc.co.uk] , so it's not surprising if the Chinese didn't do as much. (Note, I'm not defending this reaction, but it's not surprising.)

Re: Chinese Society (1)

[cx] (181186) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379825)

I don't think you're exactly an expert on one of the eldest still surviving cultures in the world. The amount of money they are donating is in no way evidence of them being barbaric one way or another.

I didn't donate any money to the tsunami relief at all, I suppose I'm inhumane as well. 50% of Canadians or more donated money almost $450,000,000 in federal money as well, I guess that means Canadians are not as barbaric as Americans or Norwegians.

Nobody cares about compassion, if they did the Americans would have spent the 80 billion on Africa instead of Iraq and could have saved lives instead of ruining cities and killing people.

I think starting senseless wars that end up in tragedy is better evidence of being a barbaric culture, rather than not donating to a relief fund.

Re:Disk Drive: End of an Era (1)

WoBIX (819410) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379833)

So you're basing the entire society on the actions of the current government in power.

Seeing as the current government doesn't apprise it's own people of disasters within it's territories, why would the people be any wiser about the situation following the tsunami, and how would they be able to donate.

Just what country do you happen to be from? Is it Utopia?

Go back under your bridge, stupid little troll.

Re:Disk Drive: End of an Era (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379880)

So you're basing the entire society on the actions of the current government in power.


Uh, that does seem fair, doesn't it? Isn't it the people's responsibility to make sure that the governing system they live under is reasonable?
Societies choose what governments they tolerate. Not he other way around.

Re:Disk Drive: End of an Era (1)

killa62 (828317) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379835)

50 percent funny?
What's so funny about that?
and also, how much did you donate? .000000001 million?

Western Digital's SATA II plans? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379675)

When will Western Digital make a native SATA II hard drive? Currently all of their SATA offerings use PATA with a SATA bridge chip. UGLY!

Surely we can expect them to upgrade their product line this year to match Seagate and Maxtor, right? The Raptor is fast and all, but I'd like NCQ before I plunk down $180 for a hard drive. And of course, we all want more cache.

less to archive, more to remember (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379680)

.. sorry what was that (checks permalink)?

A chance to take a breath... (4, Insightful)

Dzimas (547818) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379689)

I somehow doubt that HD manufacturers have pre-announced all of their little secrets. That said, there comes a time with every technology when things mature - there are a limited number of bits you can fit into a finite space. My feeling is that solid state drives will be the next extremely big thing. 1GB flash memory is no longer a "big deal" and I suspect that with a few significant innovations, solid state might dominate. It would certainly reduce power and space requirements (I can just imagine Steve Jobs demoing the headless Mac Shuffle right now: Smaller than a stick of gum, except for the port adapter...)

Re:A chance to take a breath... (2, Informative)

bob65 (590395) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379806)

I, for one, can't wait until solid state drives replace the current hard drives. The big advantage I see would be noise and vibration elimination. Combine that with a cool-running processor with a passive heatsink, a fanless power supply, and videocards/motherboards without fans, and we might just be able to have a truely silent computer that does not get louder over time. Given that we can find a good case design with appropriate convection of course...

Re:A chance to take a breath... (1)

brutus_007 (769774) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379840)

there are a limited number of bits you can fit into a finite space

As soon as the right disk manufacturer joins up/merges/acquires ACME, they'll have access to those Bugs Bunny type portable black holes, at which point bit density and the laws of physics which currently apply to disk storage development shall no longer be relevant.

dud? (1)

froggero1 (848930) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379694)

How can it be a dud for the storage industry? Hook up a couple of these [lacie.com] and you won't have to buy more for a while, I'd hope.

But seriously, how are they mesuring the quality of year that it will be? By just size, maybe you're right, but then again, you could just hook up as many SCSI drives as you'd like, and when you run out of those, create yourself a SAN.

Yes, size does matter. (4, Insightful)

astebbin (836820) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379697)

I think that what the industry should focus on in this point in time should be the miniturization of such memory storage devices so as to fit them into smaller devices such as cell phones, PocketPCs (ugh), etc... most of the technology is already out there, it just hasn't been utilized to its full potential on a widespread commercial level. The most notable exception that comes to mind would be Apple, with their 40gb iPod.... if only we had as much storage on our Palms as well!

Re:Yes, size does matter. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379721)

You can fit an awful lot on a palm.

Just write really small. :^)

storage industry? (1)

chunkwhite86 (593696) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379714)

"...about desktop hard drive developments in 2005. It looks this year is going to be a dud for the storage industry."

"The storage industry" can hardly be categorized by desktop hard drive sales. I can assure you that high-end fibre-channel RAID controllers, FC fabric switches, and 15k rpm FC drives are the big profit makers.

Besides, in the personal desktop PC segment, current IDE and SATA technology provide way more than enough capacity to satisfy even the most MP3-hungry 14 year-old, and the most email-crazy grandmas. The vast majority of personal desktop PC buyers out there are not going to spend extra money to get a 600GB drive instead of the 400GB model - they just don't need it.

Drives, hard and otherwise (5, Interesting)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379726)

Most of the best news for most HD consumers is price drops, which will probably accelerate. Most of the HD price reflects recouping investment in R&D and retooling factories, not a per-unit cost. So HD companies aren't spending lots more money this year - that means they'll be charging even less, competing on price without other differentiators.

For consumers, that can mean qualitative improvements through passing quantitative thresholds. Buy 2 HDs instead of 1, make a RAID, and watch both uptime and fault recovery become minor bumps in the road, rather than a job-threatening days-long surprise nightmare. While filling the coffers of the vendors, who can reinvest in integrating that kind of redundancy in the HD unit itself. This year's nonevents might just give sysadmins the chance to become the most obviously important link in the IT chain, eclipsing the usually exaggerated developer rockstars.

FWIW, HD consumers probably aren't defined by "HDs", but rather storage in any medium, determined by usage. So the real news in "HD" is really Flash memory, which is seeing huge leaps in capacity, cheapness, perfomance and manageability. When will someone ship a $100 SDIO 1GB/WiFi card? With gumpack-sized, 8-SDIO-socketed battery for a pocket-PSAN (Personal Storage Area Network)? Or start sewing these things into hats and sweatjackets?

2004 was also a dud for PC HDDs (4, Informative)

PenguinOpus (556138) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379730)

Ever since Maxtor announced (but didn't ship) a 320GB drive in August 2003, things have moved too slowly in the PC (3.5") drive market. Maxtor finally shipped 300G and that was king for a while before Hitachi (and now others) shipped 400G. The lack of motion is very unusual compared to the historical size increases we've seen over the last 20 years.

I think the article doesn't make it clear that manufacturers' focus has moved to several other areas:

- 2.5" drives for use in servers (density of machines, not data)
- 1.8" drives for iPods (now up to 80G)
- 1" drives for mini-iPods and CF cards
- sub-1" drives (Cornice...) for CF and cell phones

Even though some of us need TBs of storage, most of the CE world would be happy with 10G for their music/video-recording.

Notebook hard drives not a dud (2, Informative)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379765)

This year we're expecting the max size on 7200RPM notebook (2.5") drives to jump from 60GB all the way to 100GB, a huge jump.

And I'd also expect to see a jump in 5400RPM storage capacity from the current 100GB.

My ideal notebook drive for 2005 would be a 100GB 7200RPM drive with a 16MB cache, SATA(2?), and NCQ. But who knows when that will happen. The best drive available today is a 60GB 7200RPM drive with 8MB of cache, though as I mentioned earlier that will jump to 100GB this year.

Mop your brow and head on home... (5, Funny)

Marko DeBeeste (761376) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379766)

Everything worth inventing has been invented. We've hit the ceiling. No more unexpected advances. Have a nice day. Smoke if you've got em.

400gb @ 35cents/gb (4, Interesting)

purduephotog (218304) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379774)

Thats what I'm waiting for.

I have 3x200gb, 2x160gb, 2x120gb, 4x80gb (and more down the line).

The 200gbs are running at 83% full because... they all mirror each other.

Yup I know it's particularly anal, but I'll agree with the first post: We need more reliable drives. All of my photos are backed up 2x on DVD- one goes into a jukebox, the other goes onto a spindle, and all are stuffed into something called CDStorageMaster (fun proggy).

The HDs mirror each other but I've not yet had time to test a catastrophic failure of this. I had a manual raid before and, when my system crashed due to a bad PSU (note: Antec replaced it free of charge) I was eventually able to get all the drives back up and running, but I was left with a very nasty taste of bad-dynamic disks in my mouth.

So please... more storage at 35cents/gb and I'll be happy. Or 3.5 cents/gb would make me happier, but one can hope.

Re:400gb @ 35cents/gb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379844)

If your 3 mirrored drives & DVDs are all in the same building; you're really not protecting yourself more than having 2 drives.


Any failure likely to wipe out 2 of your drives simultaneously (bad power surge/lignthing/fire/flood/burgler) is likely to hit the third at the same time.


A far better strategy would be to have a mirror on a removable drive that you at least store in your car, or better, a bank safety deposite box. Pesonally, I have a single mirror & home (about 750GB), one in an external drive in the car (about 240GB - yes, it's on an encrypted filesystem) - and about 10GB is rsynced nightly to a remote server.

In other news... (2, Funny)

GLowder (622780) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379784)



Generalíssimo Francisco Franco is still dead!

Re:In other news... (1)

new death barbie (240326) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379834)

Actually, the Spanish government is reporting that the General is in very, very, serious, but stable condition.

price (2, Insightful)

dickens (31040) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379790)

So the only way for them to move is lower prices.

Sounds like a good year for consumers. Who needs more than a couple hundred GB anyway ?

Storage market slowing down? (0)

SpamMonkey (850104) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379800)

I think we're looking at this the wrong way. yes the amount of technological jumps that hard drives have made has slowed down but how can this be anything but a 'pause for air'. With the advent of more and more personal devices (mobile phones getting smarter, Sone PSP, PDA's, Palmtops, USB Storage, USB wireless etc. etc. ) people are getting more comfortable with hand held digital devices and will be looking at storing more data.

Bullshit... (1)

killa62 (828317) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379803)

What about the-
109.5 GIG RAPTOR!!!

have we reached the limits of spinning bits? (1)

ZuggZugg (817322) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379807)

15K RPM drives have been around for a long time, does anyone know if this is the fastest they can spin them from a physics perspective, do the bits start to fly off? Seriously what is preventing them from ramping up the speed further? I would think in the server world where fast throughput could be used that they would at least be pushing 20K+ RPM drives by now...

Solid State Drives (1)

hsmith (818216) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379826)

is all i care about, until we see these i could care less about movable drives.

TFA not up to date (1)

imnoteddy (568836) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379845)

From TFA:

Hitachi and others will continue to push the limit and introduce a 500GB model to the market very soon.

I guess very soon means last week, since the MacMall catalog that hit my mailbox last week offers a 500GB drive.

one TB? (1)

mattthateeguy (850214) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379857)

What happened to the Buffalo TeraStation? I would call 1TB of storage (though overpriced) an improvement. http://www.cnet.com/4520-10602_1-5618710-1.html?ta g=hot

except, you know (4, Funny)

geekoid (135745) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379864)

size increases, but that doesn't count as an improvment..
I mean, if they would put neon on them, now THAT would be an improvement.

sheesh

Serial attached SCSI isn't here yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379867)

so we can start using drives like the savvio [seagate.com] without those bulky cables. The 2.5" form factor is supposed to allow higher speeds w/ lower power consumption.

HD tech doesn't move at the same pace? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379874)

My first computer was a 14MHz 80286 in 1988. It had a 60 MB hard drive. I now have a AMD 2.1 GHz chip and 4 drive RAID of 75GB drives plus a couple of other drives. In other words, my speed has gone up less than a thousand times, while my storage capacity has gone up almost 10,000 times.

Sure, they aren't as exciting as CPUs, but hard drive tech seems to have a pretty good track record.

No News For Nerds. (1)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379892)

Stuff that doesn't matter.

300GB SCSI drives... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11379893)

Oh. I disagree.

SCSI drives have started to get bigger. 146gb's are $500. 300gb are $840. These are for ultra320's screamin' fast drives.

I've been waiting YEARS for that...

http://www.zipzoomfly.com/jsp/ProductDetail.jsp? Pr oductCode=100104-1

How about a drive that lasts longer then a year? (2, Insightful)

sideshow (99249) | more than 9 years ago | (#11379894)

I've had three drives in a row that fail to spin up after 12 months.
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