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Asteroid To Be Naked-Eye Visible In 2029

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the not-in-all-jurisdictions-see-local-listings dept.

Space 240

An anonymous reader writes "SPACE.com is reporting that asteroid 2004 MN4 will fly so close to Earth in 2029 that it'll be visible to the naked eye. Other than barely-visible Vesta, this is a first. And 2004 MN4 will be about magnitude 3.3 -- like a dim but easily visible star. A moving star in this case. You might remember 2004 MN4 is the one that sparked worry, in December, that it would hit Earth. No worries, NASA says, just a once-in-a-millennium sky show."

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cool (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578393)

cool

Re:cool (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578674)

hey not offtopic, just expressing my wonder at the universe. I was the fp anyway so there :)

First (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578396)

Don't I wish...

fp!? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578399)

Oh, wow! how interesting, I'm going to go have sex now.

Re:fp!? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578495)

Ha ha...sure you are.... [grin]

SELL YOUR SOUL TO THE DEVIL FOR YOUR FREE MAC MINI
http://www.freeminimacs.com/?r=14663027 [freeminimacs.com]
SELL YOUR SOUL TO THE DEVIL FOR YOUR FREE MAC MINI

Now? (5, Funny)

solowCX (796423) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578401)

Remind me in 24 years, my memory isn't that great.

Re:Now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578433)

Well that is why it's slashdotted.
Dont you look through the slashdot archives daily?

Re:Now? (1, Redundant)

bark76 (410275) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578440)

Should I put a reminder in my Palm handheld?

Re:Now? (1)

mboverload (657893) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578478)

No, by then you will be in the Matrix, and they forgot the plugin for near-earth asteriods.

Re:Now? (1)

Eric Giguere (42863) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578531)

Other than barely-visible Vesta, this is a first.

Then it isn't a first, is it? Or is this the same kind of logic that says that a "near miss" isn't actually a hit?

Eric
How to detect Internet Explorer [ericgiguere.com]

Re:Now? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578660)

Naaw, no need. /editors will dupe this story about 15,000,000 times between now and then.

Re:Now? (1)

inertia@yahoo.com (156602) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578698)

People in Soviet Russia, however, appear to be afflicted with amusing juxtapositions of the aforementioned situation.

Re:Now? (3, Funny)

legirons (809082) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578714)

Visible to the naked eye... but still a 2% chance of it being rather too visible?

Almost a quarter of a century? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578407)

If we put together a mission, any chance we can park it at one of the Lagrange points?

Re:Almost a quarter of a century? (3, Funny)

Sabaki (531686) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578636)

Yep, no chance that could go horribly wrong.

Remind me to take a shuttle off-planet in case they get metric and English units confused again.

Re:Almost a quarter of a century? (5, Interesting)

dabigpaybackski (772131) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578707)

Or just put it in an orbit outside the Van Allen belts. A big, rugged space station there would be nice. Somebody get Virgin Galactic on this, or reshuffle the consortium that brought us the International Space Station boondoggle in favor of a truly worthy multinational project that will:

a. Give us an opportunity to explore techniques for redirecting asteroids.

b. Provide a test bed for asteroid mining techniques.

c. Become an orbiting space station.

d. Promote international cooperation.

Re:Almost a quarter of a century? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578778)

1. Parallel Park Asteroid
2. ???
3. Mobile Suits!!!

Re:Almost a quarter of a century? (1)

Capt'n Hector (650760) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578820)

Yes, but we better be prepared to defend from alian civilizations wanting to steal our roids.

I Always Wonder... (3, Insightful)

md10md (828419) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578416)

how they can predict that closely 24 years in advance. There's got to be some margin of error.

Margin of error (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578466)

Sure

+/- 1 Apocalypse

Re:I Always Wonder... (4, Informative)

pjt33 (739471) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578496)

They've been tracking it for a while, and NASA has some pretty good quadrature software for numerical solutions to the N-body problem. I don't see any particularly precise figures in the summary anyway, and I'm not going to read the article, am I?

Re:I Always Wonder... (1)

md10md (828419) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578530)

Hmmm... didn't intend this as flamebait.. Just curious as to how they compute either a near miss or a spectacle in the sky.

Re:I Always Wonder... (4, Informative)

CanSpice (300894) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578675)

Go look at this JPL press release [nasa.gov] . See the white line in the closeup view? That's the error on the position. If that white line intersected Earth, then there would be some probability that this asteroid would strike us.

They can predict these things through hundreds of observations from observers around the world. Through mathematical modelling they can calculate what the orbit is going to be. As more observations come in and as the forecast time comes closer the errors go down.

So (1)

temojen (678985) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578788)

If it passes within the orbits of geosynchronous satellites, what's the chance of it striking one of them? If it does, might it lose enough momentum to enter earth orbit?

Re:So (2, Insightful)

pcmanjon (735165) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578905)

"If it passes within the orbits of geosynchronous satellites, what's the chance of it striking one of them? If it does, might it lose enough momentum to enter earth orbit?"

I don't think so, imagine a car hitting a shopping cart full of grocerys at 50MPH. The car's not going to go off it's path much (unless driver swerves to avoid basket)

Re:I Always Wonder... (1)

fimbulvetr (598306) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578790)

But there's possible way the could predict how much the path of the object will be influenced by other large bodies, right? I'm just wondering.
I mean, it's kinda like saying I can drive from here to downtown in 6 minutes, but then you forget it's lunchtime...

Re:I Always Wonder... (1)

Rares Marian (83629) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578771)

There is. Last time they said it would hit so I guess the margin is +/- 24 years.

Re:I Always Wonder... (1)

Tribbin (565963) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578881)

And if something hits us with the speed of light?

Scientists will say: "we didn't see that one comming..."

Yup...too far from now (-1, Redundant)

Rodrin (729362) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578417)

I guess I should buy a calendar for that year and write in the date! Can't forget it now can I? Or maybe I should just print out the article...that is if the ink lasts that long. Ohy.

Re:Yup...too far from now (1)

zarthrag (650912) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578492)

We may still own a palm pilots by then?

Re:Yup...too far from now (1)

benchbri (764527) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578929)

Thank god. I was waiting to see a refrence to "Dig"

First... duh (2, Informative)

larry2k (592744) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578419)

The following table lists potential future Earth impact events http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/risk/2004mn4.html

Nuke it (3, Funny)

mboverload (657893) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578421)

We should nuke it anyway, just to be sure.

Also a good test for our naquadria-enhanced nuclear warheads =)

Re:Nuke it (3, Funny)

pv2b (231846) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578607)

Bad idea.

The asteroid will turn out to be rich in Nadquada and would cause a much bigger "boom" than expected.

Although you could always just extend the hyperspace field of the Goa'uld cargo ship... just for a few seconds...

Re:Nuke it (1)

mboverload (657893) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578705)

pv2b, you and me are the choosen few, the ones who have heard the gospel of the Stargate!

I commend you.

Re:Nuke it (1)

pv2b (231846) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578733)

I wouldn't call Stargate "gospel". But I would call it pretty damn good.

Now, Babylon 5 on the other hand...

Re:Nuke it (1)

centauri (217890) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578781)

Preach it, my brothers!

Re:Nuke it (1)

mboverload (657893) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578806)

w00t, stargate possie. Finnaly, people who know REAL tv =)

Re:Nuke it (1)

centauri (217890) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578873)

Unfortunately, that particular episode suffered from its technobabble solution. Seems like the Enterprise was extending its warp-bubble every other week. Perhaps that's just the aspect of the episode that stands out more strongly for me.

Re:Nuke it (1)

Tribbin (565963) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578902)

First telescope it to see if there are beautiful women on it, just to make sure.

Re:Nuke it (1)

QuickFox (311231) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578916)

We should nuke it anyway, just to be sure.

Don't. The Ramans might object. You don't want to upset the Ramans, as they make three of everything.

Visibile to Naked I? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578427)

I is nekkid, heehe

btw, fristo prosto

Plan now (4, Interesting)

tqft (619476) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578429)

what do we want to land on it?

Large stable platform.

Within Earth orbit (mostly).

A (radio?) telescope?

Re:Plan now (2, Funny)

k4_pacific (736911) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578450)

How about we build a Starbucks on it?

Re:Plan now (2, Funny)

Anonymous Cowpat (788193) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578467)

Just the one? What if you're on the other side of the asteroid and want liquid refreshment?

Re:Plan now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578885)

whoa whoa whoa... the guy said starbucks... he didn't say anything about liquid refreshment...

Re:Plan now (1)

glenebob (414078) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578709)

Oh yeah, I bet you get a wicked head on your latte in space!

Re:Plan now (1)

Tribbin (565963) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578918)

Yeah, if some aliens didn't think of that already and got there first.

Re:Plan now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578536)

Bruce Willis?

Re:Plan now (1)

CanSpice (300894) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578780)

Go look at this orbit simulation [nasa.gov] . If you run it into the future you'll see that the vast majority of the time this thing is pretty far away from the Earth, farther away from the Earth than the moon. And given it's a small body, we can't accurately predict where it's going to be in 50 years. It'd be much better to put something on the Moon than on this asteroid.

Sweet (5, Funny)

ckemp.org (667117) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578434)

My ride outta here, man. It's comin'.

Re:Sweet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578796)

Make sure to buy those white sneakers, and shut down your website business.

24 years? pshhhh.... (3, Funny)

mboverload (657893) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578447)

What about Skynet? Are the evil robots just going to put their plan on hold so we can watch the asteriod? I don't know about you, but I would be much more concerned about the polished-chrome evil robots with freakin' lasers, if you know what I mean.

Re:24 years? pshhhh.... (3, Interesting)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578548)

Don't push your luck. Look at today's article in Technology Review: "The Ascent of the Robotic Attack Jet" [technologyreview.com] O.o

OMG (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578448)

OMG!!1!! i totally have to tell my AOL buddies about this. theyre nt going to BLIEVE THIS!!!

Re:OMG (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578754)

ME TOO!!!!!!!!!111

Obligitory Dr. Strangelove Quote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578452)

Major T. J. "King" Kong: Survival kit contents check. In them you'll find: one forty-five caliber automatic; two boxes of ammunition; four days' concentrated emergency rations; one drug issue containing antibiotics, morphine, vitamin pills, pep pills, sleeping pills, tranquilizer pills; one miniature combination Russian phrase book and Bible; one hundred dollars in rubles; one hundred dollars in gold; nine packs of chewing gum; one issue of prophylactics; three lipsticks; three pair of nylon stockings. Shoot, a fella' could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with all that stuff.

I'll keep waiting (2, Funny)

DrKyle (818035) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578453)

I'm still waiting to see Halley's comet for the second time in my life (1986 when I was 10) and hopefully in 2061 (I'll be.... 85). Why ruin the fun by seeing this mere asteroid?

Re:I'll keep waiting (1)

Id guy (847060) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578528)

Have you ever read 2061:Odyssey 3? If you want Halley's comet read it. It does have a bunch of junk theory in it,but t's not a bad SCI-FI story.

How good is the Palm? (1)

kc01 (772943) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578457)

I'll be 70 then, and I'm sure I'll have LONG since forgotten. I wonder if my Pilot will last that long?

Of course, when the time comes the hype for it will no doubt be bigger than the hype for Kohoutek, Y2K, Star Wars episode I, and every version of Windows.

Excellent Chance to Test Anti-Asteroid Technology (4, Interesting)

reporter (666905) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578470)

This new asteroid actually provides an excellent opportunity to test some of our anti-asteroid proposals. They are intended to prevent an asteroid from actually colliding with earth. This new asteroid will not collide with earth but would provide an opportunity to test anti-asteroid technologies.

Two ideas to test in 2029 are (1) dumping a bunch of white paint on the asteroid from a passing nuclear-powered interplanetary missile and (2) 1 week later, detonate a nuclear warhead loaded on another interplanetary missile that will fly close to but will not impact said asteroid. We had better test these ideas on a safe asteroid instead of waiting for the day when an asteroid aimed at earth actually arrives.

Given the fact that engineering is not perfect, if we do not actually test these anti-asteroid technologies in advance, then we run the high risk of failure when we use them for the 1st time on an actual asteroid destined for earth. To my knowledge, very few engineering products work correctly on the first try. 'Tis better to be safe than sorry.

Re:Excellent Chance to Test Anti-Asteroid Technolo (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578518)

Stop reading so much sci-fi nerd boy.

Re:Excellent Chance to Test Anti-Asteroid Technolo (1)

Quetzo (753720) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578608)

OR..... (3) Douse it with gas, set it on fire and give DrKyle a reason to die early.

Re:Excellent Chance to Test Anti-Asteroid Technolo (5, Insightful)

xstonedogx (814876) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578612)

We had better test these ideas on a safe asteroid instead of waiting for the day when an asteroid aimed at earth actually arrives.

I have a differing opinion on what constitutes a safe asteroid. A mistake on this asteroid could potentially be just as devistating as a mistake on one destined to collide with us.

I'd rather poke a few asteroids that don't come within 22,600 miles of Earth.

Re:Excellent Chance to Test Anti-Asteroid Technolo (1)

mboverload (657893) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578738)

Nukes couldn't even move this thing, how are we going to shift it 22,600 miles?

Re:Excellent Chance to Test Anti-Asteroid Technolo (1)

xstonedogx (814876) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578860)

We don't have to move the asteroid 22,600 miles. We only have to change it's vector a fraction of a degree and wait.

Re:Excellent Chance to Test Anti-Asteroid Technolo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578814)

I'd rather poke a few asteroids

Wow. I'd never heard of that fetish before.

Re:Excellent Chance to Test Anti-Asteroid Technolo (1)

brer_rabbit (195413) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578841)

not only that, but the parent talked about sending up nukes. Remember the deal when the Cassini launched? People don't like nukes, especially nuclear material attached to a rocket that may malfunction while trying to leave the atmosphere. Their is so much liability involved with this that it's just not practical.

Re:Excellent Chance to Test Anti-Asteroid Technolo (1)

Antonymous Flower (848759) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578711)

Meanwhile, on 2004 MN4:

Alien technician: We will be flying close to Earth shortly, Lord.
Alien Overlord: Yes! This provides us an excellent opportunity to test some of our anti homo sapien proposals.

In other news (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578477)

Asteroid-2004MN has been named in a lawsuit filed by the RIAA. It's their claim that the asteroid made thousands of available on p2p networks. The asteroid was not available for comment. It is the RIAA's hope that the near pass in 2029 will make it easier to issue a supena.

There will be other stuff to watch... (4, Interesting)

Sheetrock (152993) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578484)

The northern lights are particularly fascinating, and are visible to about 25% of the Earth with the naked eye during the fall and spring equinoxum -- and take note, a similar phenomenon, referred to as the southern lights, occurs in the lower hemisphere to treat the other 25%.

There are also shooting stars occurring quite often, more now with the space junk we've got floating up there. And there should be at least two comets, which are effectively luminescent asteroids, visible this year as well.

Just make sure you get away from light pollution if you want the best opportunity to observe these spectacles. About fifteen minutes in any direction out of town will do, and will make you think seriously about more serious astrology (you'd be surprised how much can be done with under $1000 of equipment!)

Re:There will be other stuff to watch... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578603)

Sorry to be a grammar Nazi, but don't you mean serious astronomy? "Serious astrology" is an oxymoron if ever there was one.

Re:There will be other stuff to watch... (1)

Rares Marian (83629) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578787)

If we're looking at the things shouldn't it be astrography?

Re:There will be other stuff to watch... (0, Redundant)

dahl_ag (415660) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578641)

and will make you think seriously about more serious astrology (you'd be surprised how much can be done with under $1000 of equipment!)

I'm guessing you meant Astronomy [reference.com] , not Astrology [reference.com] . These two terms haven't been equivilent in quite a few years. Sorry, pet peeve.

Re:There will be other stuff to watch... (0, Redundant)

The Wannabe King (745989) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578642)

Cough, cough....
s/astrology/astronomy/
cough, cough...

Re:There will be other stuff to watch... (2, Informative)

pv2b (231846) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578665)

[It] will make you think seriously about more serious astrology (you'd be surprised how much can be done with under $1000 of equipment!)

Astrology? Or astronomy? There's a difference you know.

may i be the first to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578500)

i for one would like to be the first to welcome our earth crushing asteroid overlor..... oh its not going to hit?

*tears down the "Welcome earth crushing asteroid overlords" banners*

as you were.

light pollution (2, Interesting)

mboverload (657893) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578511)

By the time 2029 comes along, light pollution will remove all detail in the night sky.

Re:light pollution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578854)

And in 2029 [hubbertpeak.com] what exactly will be powering all those lights?

Nasa says (0, Troll)

Id guy (847060) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578586)

I for one would not trust NASA. I mean look at what they were saying 12 years ago about "The sun burning itself out". Though I admit that they have a few genius men in their crew, they have a lot of dolts too. I conclude that in 2029 MN4 will crash into the Earth and destroy London,Oxford,Greenwhich, and a few other important cities.

Hopefully the math is good (1)

canuck57 (662392) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578671)

Heck, I hope their math and assumptions are good. With this many years, and assumptions you don't have to be far off for the big bang. That is, hit this blue marble instead of passing by.

Let's kill it! (1, Funny)

glenebob (414078) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578687)

Let's land on it with vaguely space shuttle looking craft (with coolness enhancements) that somehow manage to make noises and maneuver like an air craft in a near-perfect vacuum! They could even send two, and they could film each others maneuvers, and then we'd get a documentary about it! Let's man the craft with completely inexperience, untrained non-astronauts who will drill into the asteroid and plant nukular bombs to blow the asteroid in two!

Cool, totally original idea huh :-)

Re:Let's kill it! (1)

TiggertheMad (556308) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578801)

Nah, it sounds really bad. I expect that at least one of the shuttles will probably get hit on the way in and crash. In addition, there is always the very real posssiblity that one of your crew will go totally nutzo out of the blue, and just when he has access to a dangerous weapon. Finally, I'm sure that al least one astronaut will have to stay behind and sacrifice himself when the bomb triggers go haywire. But perhaps I'm just thinking negatively...

What about the satelites? (1)

djtripp (468558) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578723)

Since the asteroid is set to cross below the geosynchronous satellites, anyone report on the possibly of the asteroid taking out a handful of satellites? Like the GPS and communications satellites (i though they are in geosync orbits)

Re:What about the satelites? (1)

xstonedogx (814876) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578766)

I wonder about space junk. I wonder if this thing will take some with it.

Re:What about the satelites? (1)

glenebob (414078) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578822)

A handfull??? Even one would be against collossal odds... A handful would be down right impossible I think.

2029 predictions. Asteroid is the omen! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578725)

in 2029:

Microsoft will have collapsed but Bill gates will be kept alive in an exo skeleton and run a criminal gang

Linux will have split into 2 branches: the new one is called Flinux and it's kernel will be 890 Terrabytes of polymorphing code

but you will be able to download it in a half a second and store it on a device the size of a pea. or pinhead. i'm not sure

Apple will have come out with the 100th generation iPod which will be a glowing sphere you stick up your rectum and will beam music rays into your brain

Steve Job's head will be kept alive attached to an iMac

Slashdot will run on 1 quantum computer

Natures finds a way... (4, Funny)

FrostedWheat (172733) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578728)

No worries, NASA says, just a once-in-a-millennium sky show.

Sure, that's how all these things start. But then later there is running and screaming!

Links? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578745)

Do any of you star gazers have favorite sites that give updates on what will be visable each night?

Check your math (4, Funny)

Laconian (578463) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578756)

this is a first
once-in-a-millenium

My friend, if this was a once-in-a-millenium occurance, this would be classified as "a 4,600,000th".

Or if you be of the Christian faith, a 6th.

Re:Check your math (1)

CypherXero (798440) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578815)

Actually, he is correct. It's a first for the visibility factor.

Re:Check your math (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578825)

Christians don't believe that, only the ones that have their heads up their asses do. Don't catagorize.

Should we believe them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578764)

NASA is accountable to the (ZOG) Government - without a doubt I can say that their assertion that MN4 is safe os more political than scientific.

Re:Should we believe them? (3, Insightful)

CaptainCarrot (84625) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578842)

Are you kidding? If an asteroid really was going to collide with the Earth in 24 years to you honestly think NASA would pass up a funding opportunity like that? The adminstrators (and aerospace contractors) would all be doing their Happy Dance o' Money like they haven't done since the Apollo program.

Why so upbeat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578776)

Everyone knows that visible asteroids/comets are a harbinger of doom.

Maybe the Queen will die or something

Added to my Calendar (2, Funny)

Jiggily (834042) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578805)

After 288 clicks on the little calendar thingy I was able to add this event to my Outlook Calendar.
Though I REALLY hope I don't still work here then.....

Will Outlook 2029 be able to read my old calendar by then?

Dupe coming up .... (1)

sigjuice (769539) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578818)

... in 24 years.

sry, just had to do it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11578883)


thats no asteroid... thats a space station!

My eyes! My EYES!!! (1)

Ced_Ex (789138) | more than 9 years ago | (#11578893)

My eyes will be too old to see it by then. And chances are from now till then, I'll likely look directly into lasers before I'll get a chance to look at the asteroid.

Whoa is me!
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