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Mozilla Sunbird's First Official Release

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the integration-time dept.

Mozilla 266

jcraveiro writes "MozillaZine announced yesterday that Sunbird, Mozilla's standalone cross-platform calendar project, has reached its first official relase: version 0.2, for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X." This is good news for all of us waiting for decent free calendaring software.

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266 comments

Waiting, eh? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11583785)

This is good news for all of us waiting for decent free calendaring software. Are you going to download Sunbird and put a reminder in it to "continue waiting for decent free calendaring software"? ;-D

Re:Waiting, eh? (1)

maroonhat (845773) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583862)

remember that sunbird is on its 0.2 release thats like a 1.0 release of commercial software..

Re:Waiting, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11583881)

Um...no.

Re:Waiting, eh? (0, Flamebait)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584396)

Then why did so many people say "Of course Firefox is buggy, it isn't at 1.0 yet." Are you saying Firefox is commercial software?

Re:Waiting, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584260)

That was beautiful, man.

Re:Waiting, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584323)

No, because that will no longer be the case. :)

Any Onamous

Coming Soon: Mozilla, The OS (2, Funny)

TheWanderingHermit (513872) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583859)

Okay, so the Lizard is split into Firefox, Thunderbird, and Sunbird. With XUL, you can write applications that run on Mozilla. It does about everything but play games and work as an office suite. So when are we going to see Mozilla integrated in with OpenOffice and the two together turned into MOS (Mozilla OS)?

Re:Coming Soon: Mozilla, The OS (4, Informative)

0x461FAB0BD7D2 (812236) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583906)

Mozilla games: http://games.mozdev.org/

Mozilla can't be integrated with OOo, because of licensing issues, and the enormous bloat it would create, given the two different codebases.

In any case, a web-utilities suite and an office suite aren't enough to constitute a web browser. They would be enough for a simplistic out-of-the-box experience though.

Re:Coming Soon: Mozilla, The OS (2, Interesting)

Eriky (724600) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584357)

Would it be interesting to write a decent Office suite based on XUL and mozilla? Maybe code can be reused from NVU [nvu.com]

That could ultimately lead to a whole range of Mozilla based products. Sounds cool to me!

Re:Coming Soon: Mozilla, The OS (3, Interesting)

B3ryllium (571199) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584453)

I would be far more interested in a Mozilla IDE, capable of handling PHP, C++, Python, and Java. Mostly PHP, in my case. HomeSite-style.

What I'd *LOVE* is for such a PHP IDE to have code-folding and a tree view that actually checks my *includes* for functions and objects that will be used. Not to mention, the potential for live-testing would be neato. :)

whine whine (0)

psavo (162634) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583893)

This is good news for all of us waiting for decent free calendaring software.

You know, there's KOrganizer and loads of other that are free and actually useable..

Re:whine whine (3, Insightful)

Matt Perry (793115) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584025)

You know, there's KOrganizer
You assume we all run some form of Unix.

Re:whine whine (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584185)

There's rainlendar for windows.

Re:whine whine (1)

emidln (806452) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584299)

KOrganizer runs under Cygwin on WinXP if you really want it to.

I know what you mean, but just saying.

Re:whine whine (2, Funny)

joib (70841) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584311)


You assume we all run some form of Unix.


Ok, so there's also planner-mode in emacs, which works just fine under unix, windows, and probably whatever platform you fancy.

The System Tray (4, Insightful)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583923)

Like Thunderbird, Sunbird is hampered by the fact that it will not minimize to the system tray in Windows XP. I don't want to leave it on all the time because it takes up a lot of space on the task bar. And what use is a calendar program that isn't on all the time?

There are third party fixes to this, and for all I know extensions that do the same thing, but it would be really nice to have system tray minimization as default behavior.

Re:The System Tray (2, Insightful)

Refrozen (833543) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583986)

Yeah, that is a problem, but Thunderbird has a lot of other problems as far as I've seen (making me choose Refrozen [refrozen.com]-WebMail as my client of choice, no you can't use it, for my personal use only :-))

With Thunderbird, if you save a letter to send later, you have no way (that I can find) to send it, you have to restart the program for it to send it self, (in other words, there is no send button, just a recieve button)... Maybe I am wrong, or have the concept mixed up, but, that's how I see it.

Re:The System Tray (3, Informative)

hey! (33014) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584051)

Maybe I'm missing your point, but I believe what you do is double click on the message in your drafts folder to open it, then click the send button that is the leftmost item on the toolbar.

Re:The System Tray (1)

maroonhat (845773) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583995)

afaik doing that in outlook takes a registry hack under windows (or mabe i just never found the option box)

Re:The System Tray (1)

rsmeds (539318) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584112)

If I'm not mistaken, you can actually config Outlook 2003 to minimize to the tray without any reg hacks.

Re:The System Tray (1)

wwahammy (765566) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584538)

Yes it does; it's a nice feature. I wish there was a standard choice in Thunderbired and Sunbird to do that. Doesn't have to be the default just have it in the preferences or something. This is offtopic but does anyone know of a media player for windows that minimizes to the taskbar like WMP 10 does? As much as I dislike their library interface, this keeps me using WMP.

Re:The System Tray (4, Informative)

Zugok (17194) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584115)

Try Suntray [dart.net.au] . It's not part of the Sunbird package but minimises it into the tray nicely and I am very happy with it.

Re:The System Tray (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584134)

I moved by Taskbar to the right side of the screen. It's takes a little getting used to, but now its one of the first things I change when I get a new computer. It also gives you more usable vertical space and you can stack a lot of apps onto the taskbar this way. I also use virtual desktops and have my apps in different desktops based on function.

Re:The System Tray (1)

spdt (828671) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584588)

If your workspace is real cluttered, I'd suggest using VirtuaWin [sourceforge.net], which works much like workspaces in Linux. You can give yourself an entire virtual desktop dedicated to email. Hit a couple of keys, and you have a clean, new desktop.

Looks like iCal... (-1, Flamebait)

Gob Blesh It (847837) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583932)

...if iCal got clubbed in the face with a truncheon [mozilla.org].

Also, this is cribbed [mozilla.org] directly from Mac OS X [arstechnica.com]. Good job, fellas. How about coming up with something new and better for once?

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Refrozen (833543) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583957)

"Also, this is cribbed directly from Mac OS X. "

That is also the exact same window used in Firefox, thus, I doubt they stole it, they adopted it from Firefox. You do need SOME WAY to control the toolbar, just because two apps use the same doesn't make it 'cribbed'.

Of course, I don't want to start a fight, so I'll back out now. :-)

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Gob Blesh It (847837) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584014)

Well, you'd think the Firefox developers could come up with a better (easier, faster, more efficient, more intuitive) way to do it than Mac OS X does. Like I said elsewhere, you can't innovate and improve upon an original by making a direct copy. And I don't think there's any way to look at those two screenshots and say one wasn't ripped off the other.

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

tehshen (794722) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583967)

It is cribbed directly from Firefox [kmgerich.com] actually. And making up part of a suite, it isn't surprising.

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Gob Blesh It (847837) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583996)

And where did Firefox rip it off of? Yeah, that's right: the "customize toolbar" panel built into Mac OS X's Cocoa framework.

An exact copy is never better than the original. In order to make it better, it must, at a minimum, be different (not that everything different is automatically better).

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

tehshen (794722) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584046)

Why shouldn't Firefox and Sunbird have the same customize toolbar box, though? It works, so why mess with it?

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Gob Blesh It (847837) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584081)

I think I was trying to point out that the Firefox developers could have come up with a way of doing things, crossplatform or no, that didn't give the appearance of ripping interface features shamelessly off the Mac. And in the process, who knows--maybe they could have come up with something better than Cocoa's customize toolbar panel.

I mean, it seems to me you could just as easily say: iCal works, so why mess with it?

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Refrozen (833543) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584087)

"An exact copy is never better than the original. In order to make it better, it must, at a minimum, be different (not that everything different is automatically better)."

I see NOTHING that can be improved with something as simple as a customize toolbar window. When you develop applications do you ever have a button that says "Ok" or "Yes"? I betcha you do, and so does everyone else, doesn't that make you unoriginal? Why not put "kjfdgnfs" on the button? People want "Ok", not "kjfdgnfs".

Other than that, you are 100% right, something cannot be better by being the same.

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Gob Blesh It (847837) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584202)

True. I still think it's dangerous to suggest the "customize toolbar" dialog couldn't possibly be improved or completely reimplemented... there's always a zillion ways to do these things that no one's imagined yet.

It just rubs me the wrong way when you hear (from some people) open source foo is superior to proprietary foo, or more conducive to creativity, or more original or whatever. Because even as they speak, the other hand's busy ripping off proprietary innovations like this toolbar interface.

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Refrozen (833543) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584268)

Yeah, you are right, I take that back, the customize toolbar dialog, in theory, could be improved. And, I have nothing more to say on it, but, they have been using it since an early, early, EARLY version of Firefox, it just seems that they would continue to make things work similarly throughout their applications. (their = mozilla org's)

"It just rubs me the wrong way when you hear (from some people) open source foo is superior to proprietary foo, or more conducive to creativity, or more original or whatever. Because even as they speak, the other hand's busy ripping off proprietary innovations like this toolbar interface."

I agree completely, one thing I try to get across to people with the Slashdot mindset is that if you are just USING software, it makes no difference if it is open source or proprietary, the thing that makes a difference is how well it works, how efficent it is, how easy it is to use, and how much you can accomplish with it. Open source doesn't directly tie in to any one of those things, granted, some open source software is better than some proprietary software, but vice-versa as well.

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Gob Blesh It (847837) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584408)

Yep, it's never helpful to say open source is always superior to proprietary software, or vice-versa for that matter. I shudder to imagine what the world would be like without Apache, but I think I could probably live without Sunbird... as you might have guessed. :)

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Trillan (597339) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584324)

While I don't refute that Firefox and Sunbird rippped off Mac OS X, they did manage to improve it a little. In Firefox and Sunbird, dragging a tool icon out of the window and into the tool bar causes it to disappear from the window. This makes it much easier to find the tool icons you're not using.

While confusing to Mac users like myself (and thus, probably not a good idea on the Mac at all), it is a better way to do it.

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Matt Perry (793115) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584047)

Why the obsession with being original? If someone has a good idea what's wrong with using it? Not everyone has to 'innovate'.

Re:Looks like iCal... (4, Insightful)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584195)

Theres always a big bruhaha whenever MS comes out with a product or feature not 100% origional and unique. Why ignore it when OSS does it (and blantantly so)?

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

bcmm (768152) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584118)

That customization interface has been in Mozilla suite, Firefox and Thunderbird for a *long* time. Who cribbed from who, troll?

And what is wrong with copying interfaces? Where did Window's, Mac OS's and X11's window manager concept come from? (Hint: it wasn't Apple, Microsoft, or X).

Re:Looks like iCal... (0, Redundant)

Gob Blesh It (847837) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584239)

Fact is, this particular interface innovation appeared, in its present form, first in Mac OS X circa 2000--long predating Firefox and Thunderbird.

Nothing's wrong with copying interfaces, of course, but doing so sort of undermines the argument that open-source software is creative and original in its own right.

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584309)

THeres a difference between copying the concept and outright copying the interface. Ones acceptable, the others not.

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

bcmm (768152) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584336)

This is in Seamonkey too. This was probably in Mozilla (or even maybe Netscape) before 2000. So what? They must have got the idea somewhere as well.

It amazes me the way some people think that all innovation comes from Apple.

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Gob Blesh It (847837) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584454)

In this case, it's pretty clear that the Mozilla suite's toolbar editor is pretty much a widget-for-widget, if not pixel-for-pixel knockoff of Cocoa's.

And while I certainly don't think Apple is the font of all wisdom, even I've gotta say this is far from the only example of OSS copying interface features from the Mac. Frankly, I'd be happy if they copied less from Windows and more from the Mac OS. :)

Re:Looks like iCal... (2, Interesting)

FuzzzyLogik (592766) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584122)

You seem to be a big proponent of recreating the wheel. see iCal is pretty sweet for calendaring and _individuals_ plans. it isn't great for collaborative calendaring but i lays a good groundwork for it, it's possible to make iCal a lot better, but the groundwork is there.

sunbird uses the same thing, why fix something that isn't broke? besides the best part of this is, you can export your iCal calendar and load it into Sunbird and it does the exact same thing. it coexists with iCal, unlike Outlook which obviously wants to remain closed and unopen to any outside influence.

it might look ugly but that's easy to fix after the functionality is built in big guy. why not get something working first, then make it pretty? if you're so upset about the ugliness, why not commission someone to go in and make it prettier? or do it yourself. there's only so many people working on it, so why not contribute instead of bitch?

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Refrozen (833543) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584146)

No, I'm not. I am 100% for innovation, but only where innovation is going to give substantial improvemnt.

Sunbird should not just be an iCal ripoff, however, there isn't much more I can add to this discussion, because I don't understand your view point in the post (maybe you were being sarcastic in some spots, or maybe you were talking to other people, or... I don't know)

Re:Looks like iCal... (1)

Gob Blesh It (847837) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584304)

"it's possible to make iCal a lot better, but the groundwork is there"

Good point, and oftentimes I do wish it were possible to hack proprietary software to add missing features and the like.

How do you suggest I contribute, though? Should I submit a bug to Bugzilla titled "Interface is wretched"? Should I write to the developers with a point-by-point list of what might be improved, or would they consider this whining?

I suppose I could commission a graphic artist to make it look better, but iCal already suits me fine... :)

Is it integrated with Thunderbird yet? (1)

Refrozen (833543) | more than 9 years ago | (#11583939)

Re:Is it integrated with Thunderbird yet? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584111)

Sunbird is a stand-alone version of Mozilla Calendar (which is linked in the sidebar on the Sunbird page). Mozilla Calendar is an extension that you can install into Mozilla, Firefox, or Thunderbird. In other words: Sunbird is not going to be integrated into Thunderbird, as the project it's based on already is.

Re:Is it integrated with Thunderbird yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584206)

If its not integrated kiss goodbye to getting people to switch from Outlook, Mozilla Calender is not integrated, its just a damn button on the toolbar, you call that integration? Laughable. Stick with outlook.

Not to be taken seriously until its integrated for groupware.

Re:Is it integrated with Thunderbird yet? (1)

bcmm (768152) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584175)

If they went down that road, they would be in danger of just reintegrating everything, and might as well just abandon the standalone applications and devote resources to Seamonkey.

Thunderbird integration and the Lightning project (4, Interesting)

CritterNYC (190163) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584330)

Have they/are they planning on integrating it in to thunderbird? It looks a lot like Outlook's calendar, I think integrating it with Thunderbird (and even Firefox? Maybe let you add items through Firefox?) would be their greatest 'next' step.

The Mozilla Calendar Project is actually a plugin for Firefox and Thunderbird that adds a calendar to either program. Mozilla Sunbird is the standalone version of this.

The calendar plugin doesn't really "integrate" into Thunderbird as most would like, though, which is why the Lightning project [mozilla.org] was begun (it was mentioned on Slashdot [slashdot.org] in December.) The Lightning project aims for "tight" integration with Thunderbird, so you get more of a seamless program to handle all your email, calendar, contact and task needs. Expect to see more about Lightning later this year.

Nice (4, Informative)

tsa (15680) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584057)

I've used Sunbird for Linux for a while now and I must say it's fairly good. There are a lot of bugs of course but it's usable and I like it. But that's also because I didn't try anything else. Because I have a Mac, Xp, and Linux I love all Mozilla stuff because it runs on all those platforms almost exactly the same.

Re:Nice (3, Informative)

Epistax (544591) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584301)

I'd really like to use it but as a linux user who isn't an expert, I can't install this software. The readme mentions two different ways to install Sunbird, of course both mention scripts which don't actually exist (mozilla-installer and mozilla). All I'm left with is a bunch of .so's and executables.

I know this isn't the place to ask for tech support so I'm not asking for any. I'm just saying they didn't make it obvious to me how to install Sunbird.

Re:Nice (3, Informative)

tsa (15680) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584480)

I haven't tried version 0.2 yet but the earlier versions you could just unpack and then run the executable. Maybe you can try that.

Re:Nice (1)

terrab0t (559047) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584473)

"Because I have a Mac, Xp, and Linux I love all Mozilla stuff because it runs on all those platforms almost exactly the same."

That's what I like about these apps too. They truly unbind us from the OS. This is good for Linux users who want decent apps without a crappy OS, and Windows users who can't abandon some of their software lock-ins regardless of how good they apps they could run under Linux are.

You know what else runs great on all platforms? GMail. It's the best mail app I've ever used. It's extremely light, and ultimately portable. I don't even have to install it on other machines, I just go to the page and my mail app is there. I no longer use Thunderbird, just Firefox.

Now all we need is a decent online calendar app to replace Sunbird and we're all set. Hotmail has one but, like the rest of Hotmail's web interface, it's too slow and cluttered to be useful. We need somebody to step up, make an open standard for calendars, and make a slick, useable web app for it.

Offices can use Microsoft Outlook (pretty useful design) by forcing everyone to install it, but an open calendar format would let friends and loose organizations use whatever calendar service / app they wanted and still work and interact with one another as easily as they email one another.

In the meantime, I'm off to get this new Sunbird release. It doesn't help me work with other people, but it at least helps me keep myself organized. I highly reccomend it to students. If you find yourself getting distracted or procrastiniating, get this app and make yourself a daily schedule.

Download is pretty slow... (1)

Karl Tacheron (841799) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584085)

It's coming in at around 10kbps. Is there a mirror or torrent of the download?

Re:Download is pretty slow... (1)

Refrozen (833543) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584101)

Oddly enough, I am downloaded it at 150kb/s at about the same time your comment was posted. Could it be your end that is slow? Maybe someone could mirror it anyways, it's free karma after all. :-)

Re:Download is pretty slow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584241)

Is there a torrent or mirror? Yes, I believe there is.

Doesn't solve my problem (1, Interesting)

Simon Lyngshede (623138) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584088)

I gave up using calendars. What I can't keep in my head or on post-its doesn't get done. It's not that I don't like the idea, caledars are great, both the page and software version, but I can't remember to add stuff to them. Result: My calendars are always blank and therefor of no use.

What I need is a calendar which will add tasks automaticly.

Re:Doesn't solve my problem (2, Funny)

TekMonkey (649444) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584100)

I've never needed the use of a wall callendar, let alone an app that runs on my PC. I'll stick to writing everything down on my arm, thanks.

I tried it... (1)

flamechocobo (792168) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584104)

And I didn't really like it. When Linux still worked on my computer (driver issues drove me insane and eventually just didn't support my computer), I loved Evolution. I'm just going to wait until Evolution gets ported to Windows. Sunbird just seems less usable than the rest.

Does it work with Exchange? (2, Interesting)

jpmoney (323533) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584119)

I know this is setting me up for a'Floggin', but does it integrate with MS Exchange? The only thing keeping me in Windows on my work PC is the need for a calendar system that works with the company's Exchange system.

I've looked at the site, but can't see any mention of it.

Re:Does it work with Exchange? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584354)

If you don't see any mention of a feature then it isn't there.

Sunbird is a personal calendar; if you want "enterprise" calendaring try Evolution.

Re:Does it work with Exchange? (1)

CritterNYC (190163) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584377)

I know this is setting me up for a'Floggin', but does it integrate with MS Exchange?

Nope. Right now the Mozilla Calendar Project and, hence, the standalone Mozilla Sunbird, only support open calendering protocols (CalDAV and ICS). While there is demand for Exchange support, noone has stepped up to offer it. I'd guess, as Sunbird and the Lightning Project [mozilla.org] mature (and if enough demand builds up), someone may release a pay component that handles Exchange connectivity first... followed by an open source one at some later date.

Head to the Calendar:Protocol/Storage_Providers [mozilla.org] section of the Mozilla Wiki for more info.

Re:Does it work with Exchange? (3, Informative)

ajaf (672235) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584578)

1- Evolution + plugin for exchange.
2- Kmail (or Kontacto) + plugin for exchange.
3- Microsoft Exchange web access.

The days of "I stay with windows becouse of outlook+exchange are over"
Come on, you don't need Windows ;)

PocketPC sync (2, Interesting)

rxmd (205533) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584208)

As long as it doesn't synchronise with a PocketPC, it's pointless for me as an iPaq owner.

OK, you can blame MS on not opening the ActiveSync protocol, but it should be possible to synchronize Sunbird or Thunderbird with a small client application running on the PocketPC, similar to how IntelliSync works.

PalmOS sync (2, Informative)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584436)

This is the dream app for me as a college student (I hate using PalmOS's default calender app). But whilever it doesn't install and syn on PalmOS (Tungsten E), it's useless to me as well.

Re:PocketPC sync (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584441)

Fully agreed! However, given the relatively short lifespan of PDAs (I read recently the average is 2 years), I wouldn't expect any movement towards improving already-existing models in this way. Of course, the good news is that our PDAs are likely to die within a few years, so if they do open a future version of activesync, it won't be terribly long (in the timescale of things other than technology) before we'll have reason to acquire the latest.

Good job (5, Interesting)

Snap E Tom (128447) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584209)

Way to be oblivious to the big picture, Slashdotters!!!

The sooner that Exchange is emulated in OSS, the sooner there will be no reason to run Microsoft products on the backend for small and medium sized offices.

* IIS? Gone with Apache.
* File/Print? Gone with Samba.
* Email? Not so fast. We like the groupware functionality of Exchange.

And of course, consultants who don't know any better see that there's no OSS to fulfil the groupware need, and therefore, there's no reason to learn/pitch Apache/Samba. Why bother with those when you can have the "nice integration" of MS products? Once Sunbird/OpenGroupware, et al reaches the ability of invitations, seeing busy/free on other user's calendars, and inviting resources, then Redmond will run real scared.

Good job, Sunbird. You're the missing link and you're looking good.

Re:Good job (1)

njcoder (657816) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584319)

In some news clippings, Sun has talked about releasing their Java Enterprise System as open source. It includes messaging and calendar as well as a number of other enterprise applications. If it's open sourced and available free it would be cool. There's already a plug in for Evolution.

For small shops, less than 100 employees, i think it may still be free. Otherwise you can get some peices of it for $50/employee/year.

Palm? (3, Insightful)

rscrawford (311046) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584217)

I know that the major thing keeping my wife tied to Outlook on Windows is that her Palm won't sync with Thunderbird or Sunbird.

ScheduleWorld works far better (3, Interesting)

MarkSwanson (648947) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584248)

ScheduleWorld is free, works on Linux, Mac OS/X, Windows, Solaris. It is by far more standards compliant and interoperates really well with Exchange/Outlook and Notes. Check it out and see for yourself.

Re:ScheduleWorld works far better (1)

gh5046 (217974) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584421)

Basic calendaring and scheduleing is free for now. Our intention is to keep the basic calendaring and scheduling features free and generate revenue via advertising and corporate extensions.

It isn't totally free, and it isn't open. Sunbird might have its bugs, but at least it truly is free.

Re:ScheduleWorld works far better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584546)

That looks pretty cool. I'm definitely going to try it out.

And this is good because (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584297)

Unlike the extra shovelware in Mozilla Suite, if I don't want to download this, I don't have to.

Wait for 0.3 (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584298)

From the above linked Sunbird page;

Tuesday, February 4th, 2005: The Sunbird team is proud to announce its first official release: Sunbird 0.2 for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X. You can find builds for the different platforms on our download page.

Maybe the day-of-the-week problem will be fixed in 0.3;-)

mozilla composer (1)

lethe1001 (606836) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584337)

Mozilla also had an html composer component. I liked it. I wonder if we'll ever see that as a standalone XUL application.

Re:mozilla composer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584415)

There already is. NVU - http://nvu.com/

It's being developed by Linspire, of all companies.

bobjuanjoe

Release date.... (5, Funny)

ribo-bailey (724061) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584395)

Tuesday, February 4th, 2005:

You'd think a site for a calendar app would be able to get it's own release date correct...

otherwise, it's a neat app

Too heavy (3, Interesting)

Ecio (824876) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584422)

i've found sunbird too heavy for my needs: Thunderbird is already eatin 50MB of my memory and i dont want Sunbird to do the same so I'm currently using EssentialPIM [essentialpim.com] a small (1MB) and free PIM for Windows and it's quite ok for small todos and appointments. I think that Evolution could be the right solution on Linux, but i've not tried it too much...

Does printing work yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11584428)

nt

New GOOD Software is driving me batty (4, Interesting)

chia_monkey (593501) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584442)

I'm loving the fact that there are so many new alternatives to IE (I mainly use Safari and Firefox), Outlook (I use OS X's Mail and am still dabbling with Thunderbird) and now calendar (I use iCal and am now testing Sunbird) apps. It's driving me batty though...I get used to using one particular app and then new, better ones come out. Not one to be stuck using the old stuff, I gotta try the new releases. The only problem...there's a small learning curve and I have to redo the way I used to do them before.

I'm an early adopter and I admit it. It's one of the things I have to deal with. My concern however is, just how many people in the everyday world are willing to stop using Outlook to learn an entirely new way of doing things. Some apps, such as browsers, don't matter as much. A browser is a browser, with a few features here and there, but the underlying concept is the same. Type in a URL and go. Other things though...aye...

Less than stable on Mac OS X (1)

TimmyDee (713324) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584463)

After launching Sunbird for the first time on Mac OS X (1.0.3.7), it quit (like Firefox often does on a first run) and informed me that any old extensions I had would be deleted. Fine, as I don't have any Sunbird extensions. Then it relaunched automatically (again, like Firefox) but then "unexpectedly quit". I tried relaunching it only to have the icon appear momentarily in my Dock and then disappear. Again. And again. I've tried ejecting the disk image, but it can't because it's "in use".

Repeated trips to 'ps -ax | grep Sunbird' reveals that Sunbird is caught in a nice little loop that spawns a new PID and then kills it each time it appears in my Dock. By the time I try to kill it, it's already killed itself and grabbed a new PID. Thankfully, Apple has included 'killall' and my problem is over.

Obviously this is an early beta, but I was hoping it was going to be more stable than this. I seem to remember Thunderbird being pretty stable at 0.2 At least I have faith that things will settle down in a few point releases.

P.S. I know, I know. . . submit a bug report. Don't worry.

Another impending naming debacle? (3, Funny)

Eil (82413) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584481)


Had to chuckle when reading this on the main page:

At the moment the "Sunbird" name is a project name. It is not official and may change in the future.

At least they got that out of the way from the get-go.

Re:Another impending naming debacle? (1)

wpmegee (325603) | more than 9 years ago | (#11584550)

What's with this freaking obsession with car names? Firebird, then Thunderbird, now this. They should just call all 3 the SunFireBird Browser/Email/Calendar and get it over with.

And *why* have they not been sued over Thunderbird yet??
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