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List of Polish Spies Leaked On The Internet

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the here-have-some-szarlotka dept.

The Internet 336

An anonymous reader writes "A list of 240,000 names of Polish secret agents, informers, secret service employees, and victims of persecution was leaked on the internet in the last days and became an instant hit. The search for "lista Wildsteina" (Wildstein's list) sky-rocketed to 300,000 per day in the second most popular search engine in Poland (onet.pl) outperforming "sex" (former top query) by more than 30 times. The list appeared on many web sites, p2p networks, and was made into a searchable database. There are worries the list might contain names of active security agents, still working abroad. Google news has more coverage."

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336 comments

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588556)

Good job, make sense poland, GNAA

Re:fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588612)

Semprini?

Text of An Article (4, Informative)

Omkar (618823) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588558)

A leaked list containing the names of some 240,000 people who allegedly spied for Poland's former communist regime has overtaken sex as the hottest search item on the Internet in Poland, press reports has said. "This thing is huge. We have recorded around 100,000 Internet searches a day for the list, which is 10 times the number looking for sex," Piotr Tchorzewski, who works at Poland's biggest Internet portal Onet, told Rzeczpospolita daily. The list, which contains in alphabetical order the names of alleged agents and collaborators of the communist-ero secret service, mixed together with the names of those who were allegedly spied on, has also been put up for auction on the Internet, but its bid price late yesterday -- 2.99 zlotys (around 75 euro cents) -- was hardly breaking records. On Onet's web portal, it tops the list of search items, and visitors are referred to 650,000 links for the controversial collection of names that has pushed the attorney general to launch legal proceedings and Prime Minister Marek Belka to express concern for the safety of active intelligence agents whose names "might" be on the list. The list, dubbed the Wildstein List after Bronislaw Wildstein, the journalist who secretly copied it around two weeks ago at the national archives, can change from one Internet consultation to the next, as hackers have been adding or taking off names, press reports said. From The Hindustan Times [hindustantimes.com]

First Polock Joke! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588559)

...Allright, which of you polocks leaked the list?!

Re:First Polock Joke! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588584)

I believe the word you're looking for is "Polak"

Re:First Polock Joke! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588616)

or "Jackson."

Woah, that can't be good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588564)

The list is in the OPEN! My team is dead, and the list is in the OPEN! /your mission, should you choose to accept it...

Industrial espionage (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588604)

240,000 polish spies? I never imagined the cleaning products industry was so secretive,

Re:Woah, that can't be good (1)

riqnevala (624343) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588637)

These guys are trained to be ghosts. We taught them to do it for christsakes.

- Eugene Kittridge

Wonder who leaked this? (-1)

Omkar (618823) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588565)

I doubt it was the guy, nobody would want to get on the bad side of former-communist spy agencies.

RTFAs!!! (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588622)

Wonder who leaked this? I doubt it was the guy, nobody would want to get on the bad side of former-communist spy agencies.

God! This is the most stupid comment I've ever read! No one "leaked" it, because it was a PUBLIC LIST anyone could read in the libraries of Polish Institute of National Remembrance [ipn.gov.pl]! No one bothered to actually go there and read those names until Bronislaw Wildstein, a journalist which just an ordinary access to those files as any citizen, copied the files and gave them to few fellow journalists, who gave it to others and made a big fuzz about it calling it a "list of spies" which it isn't and which Wildstein never misrepresented as such. Please get some clue before you post another misinformation. Thank you. What is a much more important issue here is the fact that Wildstein has lost his job in a supposedly independent newspaper Rzeczpospolita [rzeczpospolita.pl] because of giving others public documents which were not even classified. This is a serious question about the freedom of speech in Poland. The fuzz about "spies" is just bullshit. What is important here is that most of independent journalists think that Wildstein shouldn't have taken that list and given it to others and that any "responsible journalist" would never do it. We are talking about a publicly available not classified data here! This is important, not your Orwellian phobias about being "on the bad side of former-communist spy agencies." Take off your tinfoil hat and think about free speech for a while. And actually read something about this list.

MOD PARENT UP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588653)

This post explains everything, much better than any other post here. Why is it modded as Score:0? It is Score:5, Informative. Mods, be careful and do your job right.

MOD PARENT UP! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588660)

I agree, this needs to get modded up from Score: 0

MOD PARENT UP! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588670)

indeed, /., get a f-ing clue, please.

Re:RTFAs!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588697)

WTF? Mod parent up! The misinforming grandparent post is Score:2 and parent is Score:0??? It is not only the most informative post in the whole story, but even has links to English versions of Polish instututions it talks about! Score:0? God... Mods are on crack today...

Re:RTFAs!!! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588715)

I've just modded the parent up. To other moderators: this is seriously a Score:5 post. Mod up. Thanks.

Pathetic... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588730)

Welcome to slashdot where stupid jokes [slashdot.org] about Poles and toilets are modded higher than actually on-topic posts explaining this entire misunderstanding. Bravo.

Re:Pathetic... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588787)

Yes, but does it run Linux?

(just posting a +5, Funny comment to make your insightful, but not moded up comment more visible...)

Re:Pathetic... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588800)

Thanks a lot. I really appreciate it.

Mod parent down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588761)

Mod parent -1 clueless. See follow-ups.

Not a list of spies (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588567)

This is not a list of spies but a list of people who were on the records of former communist Polish spies, which includes spies, would-be-spies, people who refused to be spies and victims of spies. Saying that it is a list of spies is harmful for most of the people from that list. Please don't spread outright lies.

Re:Not a list of spies (3, Funny)

Daleks (226923) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588582)

Ah. I thought the number of 240,000 seemed high for spycount for a country the size of Poland. The CIA would be jealous if it had the budget for 240,000 actual clandestine agents.

Re:Not a list of spies (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588623)

Ah. I thought the number of 240,000 seemed high for spycount for a country the size of Poland.

Not really. The list is from Communist party days. In Poland and other Eastern European countries, there were very many domestic spies. The government was paranoid. Millions of people were spied on. Also there were spies to spy on other spies, (like in Juvenal's satires) and so on.

Re:Not a list of spies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588641)

~3% of adult males being spies would be indeed ridiculous. See Poland [wikipedia.org] on Wikipedia for more informations about population and Polish history. See People's Republic of Poland [wikipedia.org] article for that specific time period of communism in Poland (1945-1989).

Re:Not a list of spies (4, Insightful)

biglig2 (89374) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588760)

Also, while I'm not an expert on espionage, I suspect that most agencies try to avoid writing the names of all their spies on one piece of paper. That would seem to me to be a basic.

Re:Not a list of spies (1)

ocelotbob (173602) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588776)

It's probably an issue of something that was locked in some anonymous file cabinet and lost after Mother Russia passed on. couple personell moves, and files can grow legs.

Re:Not a list of spies (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588651)

The better word would be "informers" or "snitches". The point is about people who would snitch on their coworkers or neigbours.

The problem is, the list does not have any real info what the particular person was doing. They infer record type from file id accompanying the name, but it seems not exact. Then when you find someone you know there, you don't know is he was reporting on you, been spied on, employed in ministry of internal affairs or maybe just "checked out".

According to one version I was secret police officer. They must have wiped my memory as I can't remember working for them...

Holy Bondage, Batman! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588571)

240,000 secret agents?!

If everybody is a secret agent, it doesn't seem that 'secret' anymore...

Re:Holy Bondage, Batman! (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588630)

the levels of paranoia and spying ran so deep in some Warsaw Pact countries that ratios as high as 1/7th of the population were in some way affiliated with the intelligence agencies. Romania and East Germany were especially bad in this way.

There is alot of carryon about Soviet Russia, but post-Stalin it was actually one of the better 'communist' countries in live in. But Yugoslavia was probably the best until it blew up.

Or you could both just RTFA... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588659)

to see that the list included many others besides spies.

Re:Holy Bondage, Batman! (0, Flamebait)

ysegalov (849765) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588712)

In Poland, everyone is a secret agent.
BTW, do you know that the Polish invented the toilet? Yes, it is true! (only some years later the Americans invented the hole in the toilet, though)

Re:Holy Bondage, Batman! (1)

acb (2797) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588808)

East Germany had something similar; the Stasi had hundreds of thousands of informers, with them literally being everywhere.

Quick! (1)

tavilach (715455) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588572)

Polish Spies: Quick! Turn off the internet! Seriously, though, this must be a horrible predicament to be in for anyone who was once a Polish spy.

The Internet is at it again! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588574)

The Department of Homeland Security should definitely do something about this Internet thingy.

Re:The Internet is at it again! (4, Funny)

PsiPsiStar (95676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588606)

They will as soon as the guys over at the National Security Agency will tell them how to use it.

What do you think all this 'information sharing' is about, anyways.

It's just a secret plot to rope the guys at the NSA into doing tech support for the other departments.

"URLs? Um... the CIA told me that they were a mountain range in Western Russia.... Yeah, they seemed pretty sure sir, but I keep typing that in the little white box and it doesn't seem to be able to find them... No sir, I don't know why we're looking for them on the computer. Yes sir, It probably would be easier just to use a map."

Re:The Internet is at it again! (1)

grozzie2 (698656) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588742)

Not to worry, this came from the spies, and is about spies. It's just as accurate as the reports of imminent attack from iraq, with all the stockpiles of nuclear and chemical weapons they have.

Maybe they were looking for sex... (4, Funny)

PsiPsiStar (95676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588576)

Who wouldn't want to have sex with a spy?
You could play some James Bond theme song in the background for added effect, and even wear an eyepatch.

Re:Maybe they were looking for sex... (3, Funny)

aurb (674003) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588626)

Who wouldn't want to have sex with a spy?

Damn, I wish I was on that list.

Re:Maybe they were looking for sex... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588645)

and then the woman dies in an explosion or in some massive, whirly-blades thingambob the next morning.

kewl....

Re:Maybe they were looking for sex... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588674)

and then the woman dies in an explosion or in some massive, whirly-blades thingambob the next morning.

Well, every method of birth control has its drawbacks but that one is pretty effective.

Re:Maybe they were looking for sex... (2, Informative)

mikelang (674146) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588648)

You obviously do not know, what communist regime spies were acting like.

They were searching in the country for evidence of any "unlawful thinking" using any means possible. More like Orwell's "1984".

Main modes of operation included blackmail and intimidation. When it didn't work, then suspects went to prison or "disappeared" (a.k.a. were assassinated) like famous priest [popieluszko.xt.pl] - Popieluszko [nycgovparks.org].

Re:Maybe they were looking for sex... (1)

PsiPsiStar (95676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588718)

In "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" a Communist agent has sex with one of the heroines and takes pictures for the purpose of blackmail.

Kundera was sufficiently acquainted with communist regeimes to know what he was writing about.

So nyahh.

Re:Maybe they were looking for sex... (1)

yess (678141) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588686)

You gave a flamebait. Remember that Poland used to be ruled by totalitary system. Polish Security Service was similar to such services in Saddam's Iraq (just an example). It fought against democracy and basic civil laws. It's daily routine included tortures, kidnapping innocent family members etc. It just doesn't sound like James Bond movie to me.

Re:Maybe they were looking for sex... (1)

PsiPsiStar (95676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588727)

Not to mention the fact that the people doing this spying would probably be over 40 by now. yuck

Hackers are just so dang tricky (4, Funny)

bbkingadrock (543696) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588578)

Hackers are so good with computers, did you read what they can do these days (from an article on google news)

"hackers have been adding or taking off names"

that is amazing they have figured out how to compromise the security of a text document and add or delete names from it

Re:Hackers are just so dang tricky (1)

physicsphairy (720718) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588620)

I'm guessing the Polish ops probably have an interest in compromising various lists and distributing numerous altered copies to do as much as they can to protect their agents.

The obligatory joke (0, Offtopic)

Roosey (465478) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588583)

Q: Why did the Polish spy bug the enemy's toilet?
A: So he could monitor every movement.

Re:The obligatory joke (0, Flamebait)

ysegalov (849765) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588738)

BTW, did you know that the Polish invented the toilet? Yes, it is true! (only some years later the Americans invented the hole in the toilet, though)

NOC NOC (0, Redundant)

Brian Brian (849676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588589)

NOC NOC Who's there? Spieski chicken. Spieski chicken who? Have you tried the new spieski chicken and McDonalds.

Will you do your patriotic duty? (4, Funny)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588590)

The search for "lista Wildsteina" (Wildstein's list) sky-rocketed to 300,000 per day in the second most popular search engine in Poland (onet.pl) outperforming "sex" (former top query) by more than 30 times.

I don't know about you, but I'm going to do my darndest to help make sure this oversight is rectified.

Re:Will you do your patriotic duty? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588600)

I'm still trying to figure out who this Wild Steina is. She must be pretty hot if her name was searched for more than sex.

Why? (1)

Freon115 (672518) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588592)

Why post about it on slashdot then? It will make it even more popular.

Oh snap, after all they are only polish, nobody cares about what happens to them.[/sarcasm]

Polish spies and undercover agents... (5, Funny)

ATAMAH (578546) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588599)

I can just imagine how it would sound in a movie: My name is Wolschansky, Vojzeh Wolschansky.

Polish joke about Starbucks (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588798)

I can just imagine how it would sound in a movie: My name is Wolschansky, Vojzeh Wolschansky.

Quite frankly, it's always a problem for me in Starbucks, when they ask me about me name to write it on my cup of latte. When I say my real name - there will always be a surprised "Voi... WHAT?" from the poor underpayed Starbucks employee and then some stupid conversation, while the rest of the queue wants to lynch me for the delay. I never know what to do - sometimes I choose a fake English name that sounds remotely like mine (Walter usually), sometimes I say "just W". I wonder how other fellow slashdotters from overseas solve this problem, especially those with weird names that are hard to prononuce and just plain impossible to transcribe in Latin characters.

After all, Starbucks is just Starbucks, but just try to make a hotel reservation spelling your name to a hotel clerk...

There are worries? (4, Funny)

splatterboy (815820) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588605)

"There are worries the list might contain names of active security agents, still working abroad."

"There are worries..."?

There's an understatement.

as a former polish spy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588607)

as a former polish spy, i am very relieved to see my name NOT on that list...

Re:as a former polish spy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588634)

Aw, slashdot can check their logs for your location...

Re:as a former polish spy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588649)

as a former polish spy, i am very relieved to see my name NOT on that list...

Off the record and posting anonymously, can you tell us a little about it? Were there separate divsions for shoe polish, furniture polish, floor polish and of course nail polish or did you have to be versatile enough to cover all four?

happened before (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588618)

google for udba

WAY TO GO /. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588627)

just because this happened in poland, /. is even linking to websites providing the list on their front page.

I wonder if you could post such a lame piece of american arrogance if the list was out in the USA.

Shame, really

mod me down for this, americans...

I believe it was Churchill who said... (4, Insightful)

flopsy mopsalon (635863) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588628)

"If you pick at the scab of history, the blood will flow in the streets. Could there be more appropriate words for this event? I think not.

Years after the fall of communism, it seems some still bear enough of a grudge at the discredited regime that they will painstakingly assemble and disseminate a long list of names of individuals involved in espionage-related events. That the list was so quickly spread around the net and even turned into a database, together with its phenomenal popularity among internet users, indicated that many in Poland still have axes and possibly even scythes to grind over wrongs perpretrated during the Communist era.

Doubtless, reputations will be besmirched and careers ruined, some no doubt unjustly. And to what end? The ills of communism were many, but they are in the past. This obssessive assembling of databases serves only to dig up moldering corpses just to piss on their shoes.

People need to look ahead. Whether it be Poles still smarting over Communist-era misdeeds, Islamic radicals seeking to undo the fall of Muslim civilization, or outraged citizens suing television networks over breasts bared at Superbowl halftime shows, this endless fretting over the past only engenders further dismay. The dead cannot be unkilled, last year's breast cannot be covered today. Let it go.

Re:I believe it was Churchill who said... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588661)

The ills of communism were many, but they are in the past. This obssessive assembling of databases serves only to dig up moldering corpses just to piss on their shoes.

Yeah, you tell them. Okay so they were forced to live in a harsh and repressive regime. People they trusted may have ruined their lives to enhance their own with a bit of incriminating information. Some of them may even have had loved ones tortured or murdered. But you know, that was years ago. They should get over it already.

Re:I believe it was Churchill who said... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588664)

where on the list are you again, komrad?

Re:I believe it was Churchill who said... (1)

r84x (650348) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588668)

those who are ignorant of history are doomed to repeat it

Re:I believe it was Churchill who said... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588681)

Whether it be Poles still smarting over Communist-era misdeeds, Islamic radicals seeking to undo the fall of Muslim civilization,

I see you weren't brave enough to list retaliations over 9/11 on your list. Or maybe too hypocritical, hard to tell from this angle.

Re:I believe it was Churchill who said... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588717)

Neither, too stupid. This idea espoused has numerous holes and is a logical house of cards. Think about it for a moment, more a troll than anything (perhaps calling him (or her) a troll gives him too much credit?).

Re:I believe it was Churchill who said... (1)

PsiPsiStar (95676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588774)

No, those corpses are still fresh.

If we're lucky, we can still get another war out of them before they're cold and forgotten.

Or at least a few covert operations\assassinations.

Re:I believe it was Churchill who said... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588765)

Churchill was a complete fuckup until the late 1930s, so it doesn't surprise me that he said that.

Why don't we extend the same courtesy to Osama and co., or maybe the Enron crooks? After all, their crimes are in the past now.

Re:I believe it was Churchill who said... (1)

PsiPsiStar (95676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588768)

If something like this were released, I suppose the only way to 'hide' it would be to release a bunch of false copies so the information was not reliable.

Well, as long as we're quoting Churchill (0)

PsiPsiStar (95676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588793)

Churchill seems to be a very odd choice to head your message. He was far more adept in war than in peacetime, and then mostly because he recognized Nazi Germany for what it would become and placed himself at the head of the charge when others were smarting from WWI and looking for 'peace in our time' and appeasment. If it weren't for WWII, it's doubtful anyone would remember Churchill's name, and if so then only for his failings in strategy during "WWI" (soft underbelly of europe, etc.)

One of Churchill's more famous speeches;

"I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our Island home, to ride out the storm of war, and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone.

At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty's Government-every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation.

The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength.

Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail.

We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our Island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this Island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old."

Did you hear about the polish kamikaze? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588647)

he completed 52 missions.

Presidential Debates (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588667)

At last we understand why Bush said "don't forget Poland". Obviously we've been outsourcing all our
intelligence to them.

Fun Fun Fun! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588677)

Let's all make our own lists and spread them...

Does it really matter at all, as everything in the Internet can be fabricated?

1989 (2, Insightful)

r84x (650348) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588678)

It was only 16 years ago that Poland [wikipedia.org] threw off communism with the first free elections in the former Soviet bloc. This list likely contains the names of people that did great harm to others (and also many unrelated people). To simply write offf the list as something that should be forgotten, as some have suggested, would be foolish. We as americans must still atone for injustices done to others during the civil rights era, and many europeans are still dealing with the spectres of war from sixty years ago. To "forget" something that happened as recently as sixteen years is foolish and unreasonable.

Re:1989 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588687)

ok, COOL! let's start with the Abu Gharib scandel, next gitmo, and vietnam, and the list goes on.

In a war, only the losers are prosecutable.

Re:1989 (0, Flamebait)

grozzie2 (698656) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588749)

yes, and as americans, you are busy building up the list of things to atone for again. your children will the ones that ultimately have to pay retributions for what's happening now.

Re:1989 (2, Informative)

Trurl's Machine (651488) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588777)

It was only 16 years ago that Poland threw off communism with the first free elections in the former Soviet bloc. This list likely contains the names of people that did great harm to others (and also many unrelated people). To simply write offf the list as something that should be forgotten, as some have suggested, would be foolish.

It's not that simple. Surely this list contains the names of people that did great harm - but it also contains the names of people that were harmed. It's just a catalog of everyone who was in scope of the Polish secret service - either as an informer or just as someone who is being followed. It's a list of both the torturers and their victims and there is no easy way to distinguish betwenn both groups (you could be blackmailed or just tortured into being an informer). You could as well take a telephone directory - it would also probably include names from those who do the harm and those who suffer it.

Interesting (0, Troll)

Pan T. Hose (707794) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588705)

According to this story, Poland seems to have the second largest population of communist spies in the world, right after China. Suddenly some [slashdot.org] of [slashdot.org] the [slashdot.org] recent [slashdot.org] news [slashdot.org] stories [slashdot.org] about an unusual resistance of certain people against the introduction of capitalism [microsoft.com] in Europe which would be obviously harmful to the communistic status quo [fsf.org] start to look much less surprising.

Thank you Slashdot! (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588708)

Thank you Slashdot! I'm from Poland and exactly here's the first time I'm reading about this. But I'm a bit worried also. My family name is very popular on the list.
But seriously, most of you got the wrong idea about this thing. Of course it's not like we had 240,000 Bonds here. Those posts mentioning 'snitchers' ('denunciators' maybe) are closer to the real image.

Re:Thank you Slashdot! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588754)

Not really a list of spies. More info here [slashdot.org]

Re:Thank you Slashdot! (5, Funny)

Trurl's Machine (651488) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588757)

Thank you Slashdot! I'm from Poland and exactly here's the first time I'm reading about this. But I'm a bit worried also. My family name is very popular on the list.

Well, your family name is also quite popular here on Slashdot. Stick around for a while and you will see many other Anonymous Cowards.

Similar (5, Interesting)

simgod (563459) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588709)

A similar incident happened in Slovenia a year ago, where an Australian (moved there after WW2) published the list of people who spied and people who were beeing watched by the Yugoslavian secret police UDBA.
First the government tried to block access to the list's server, but soon all the people who were interested learned how to use a proxy connection. Their server was slashdotted for a month, becuse the idiot put the list in 800K jpg pictures and so the whole thing was something like 40 GB and difficult to search. After the initial "shock" in the media and public, a month after nobody, there was hardly any interest for the list anymore.

Re:Similar (5, Informative)

gihan_ripper (785510) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588762)

The name of the Slovenian emigre in question is Dusan Lajovic, and the database of Slovenian 'spies' can be found here [lycos.co.uk].

This could be a great excuse... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588728)

For certain people to blame p2p of supporting terrorism...

OK, I've read this entire thread... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588744)

...and 90% of the misunderstanding is explained here [slashdot.org]. Please read it before posting another confusing posts. Thanks. (I don't know how I can post it to be more visible, I usually don't post here.)

wow (2, Interesting)

Bolshoy Pimpovich (846605) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588782)

being a Russian-speaking American of Polish/Czech descent, and growing up in a Polish naighborhood in a major American city... I can say that some form of every slovak last name I could think of from my neighborhood is on that list... they may have well posted a by-name roster of the population of eastern Europe... wtf...

nothing to see here, move along

stupid! (1, Insightful)

freeplatypus (846535) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588804)

First of all, this is not technology related topic so I don't know why it is on /.

The guy, Wildenstein, or whatever, is a complete moron. The list, which is currently being held by the IPN (the official government institution) is going to become public. I assume that some people, like active agents, won't be listed, otherwise this would be the highest possible stupidity.

The Internet. There are few meaningless list on the internet, they differ in contents. You can't be sure which one is the proper one. After all, this is only the name index. Without cataloges (which are in posession of IPN) the list is useless, or in worst case, missleading.

Cheers!
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