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SF Writers Sting Supposedly Traditional Publisher

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the snobby-neighbor-gets-the-eggs dept.

It's funny.  Laugh. 474

deeptrace writes "A group of SF writers all submitted purposely awful stories to a publisher that purported to publish only selected high quality works. They created the worst story they could come up with, and it was accepted for publication." Their press release is pretty funny -- and if you'd like a sample of their insane prose, it's available through the book's Lulu site. (Where, Yes, you could also buy the whole thing.)

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Insane (1)

TruePaige (834087) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588073)

Well, that'll be written in history.

Nothing new... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588074)

Didn't the same thing happen a few years ago
with the people on one usenet group submitting intentionally
bad manuscripts to some company and get most of them
published?


Oh yeah, not first post!

Re:Nothing new... (1)

BigFire (13822) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588217)

I believe it was 5 years ago when this psychologist submitted a paper to a peer review paper written by his cat.

Another fake paper was submitted to a humanities magazine deliberately written by a physicist as obstuse as possible.

Re:Nothing new... (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588254)

I seem to remember a physicist or chemist that made up a bunch of hogwash and managed to get it published in a psych journal.

Re:Nothing new... (4, Informative)

belmolis (702863) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588310)

I think parent is thinking of the Sokal hoax, in which Alan Sokal [nyu.edu] , a physicist at NYU, wrote a completely non-sensical physics paper and submitted it to Social Text [jhu.edu] , the leading journal of postmodern pseudo-intellectuals. Social Text accepted the paper and published it, thereby demonstrating their complete ignorance of modern science, which they purport to understand and be in a position to critique. Sokal then exposed their foolishness in a piece in Lingua Franca (sadly defunct). He has links to the hoax article, his Lingua Franca article, the statements by the editors of Social Text, and much other material here [nyu.edu]

"please read it completely from start to finish" (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588075)

no time to read the whole email! time to first post in slashdot!

time enough to FAIL IT, baby! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588083)

sorry, let me elaborate (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588186)

my wang some seven inches, my belly at 30 around
yup, i'm a slim little motherfucker
i gots bones sticking out where my wrists should be
i got smokes going in where patience should go
i got nerves like crackling static
i gotta get a new thing before this one gets too old
cold filtered tins of joy are keeping me going
for long enough to change, i suppose
i gotta get a new thing cause i've worn this one through
job applications and interviews laugh at me
unemployment checks don't come
when there was a jesus looking down, this was easier
but you know that kinda thing wears down
like everything does
in the end you got this skinny little sick man
running on alcohol and fear
well, baby, that's enough to get tomorrow here
so tell me is this little poem art
or is it just some no-name fuckjerk making no sense?
well no matter what it is here it is
just some rambling type shit
and if you read this and think this cat may be on to something
something real
well, sucker, you're way off
real is a fucking suit sucking cock at a corporate job
real isn't gonna cut it here, daddy
if real worked, i'd be you

From the site (2)

bobbagum (556152) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588077)

"A note of caution: reading this thing may cause temporary brain damage."

The Press Release Text (-1, Offtopic)

Freeform (838372) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588078)

Science Fiction Authors Hoax Vanity Publisher "Atlanta Nights," by Travis Tea, was offered a publishing contract by PublishAmerica of Frederick, Maryland. Washington, DC (PRWEB) January 28, 2005 -- Over a holiday weekend last year, some thirty-odd science fiction writers banged out a chapter or two apiece of "Atlanta Nights," a novel about hot times in Atlanta high society. Their objective: to write a deeply awful novel to submit to PublishAmerica, a self-described "traditional publisher" located in Frederick, Maryland. The project began after PublishAmerica posted an attack on science fiction authors at one of its websites (http://www.authorsmarket.net/). PublishAmerica claimed "As a rule of thumb, the quality bar for sci-fi and fantasy is a lot lower than for all other fiction.... [Science fiction authors] have no clue about what it is to write real-life stories, and how to find them a home." It described them as "writers who erroneously believe that SciFi, because it is set in a distant future, does not require believable storylines, or that Fantasy, because it is set in conditions that have never existed, does not need believable every-day characters." The writers wanted to see where PublishAmerica puts its own quality bar; if the publisher really is selective, as the company claims, or if it is a vanity press that will accept almost anything, as publishing professionals assert. "Atlanta Nights" was completed, any sign of literary competence was blue-penciled, and the resulting manuscript was submitted. PublishAmerica accepted it. From: PublishAmerica Aquisitions [e-mail protected from spam bots] Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2004 Subject: Atlanta Nights As this is an important piece of email regarding your book, please read it completely from start to finish. I am happy to inform you that PublishAmerica has decided to give "Atlanta Nights" the chance it deserves....Welcome to PublishAmerica, and congratulations on what promises to be an exciting time ahead. Sincerely, Meg Phillips Acquisitions Editor PublishAmerica The hoax was publicly revealed on January 23, 2005. PublishAmerica withdrew their offer shortly afterward: From: "PublishAmerica Acquisitions" Sent: Monday, January 24, 2005 Subject: Your Submission to PublishAmerica We must withdraw our offer to publish "Atlanta Nights". Upon further review it appears that your work is not ready to be published. There are portions of nonsensical text in the manuscript that were caught by our editing staff as they previewed the text for editing time assessment pending your acceptance of our offer. On the positive side, maybe you want to consider contracting the book with a vanity publisher such as iUniverse or Author House. They will certainly publish your book at a fee. Thank you. PublishAmerica Acquisitions Department

Re:The Press Release Text (3, Funny)

elSpike (678416) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588087)

Dear Writer, Your posting of the Press Release Text is rejected as it does not seem to have paragraphs of any kind. Regards, Slashdot readers.

Re:The Press Release Text (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588110)

c'mon it was "freeform" we're talking about.

Re:The Press Release Text (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588182)

You're absolutely right.

With their server melting due to /.-ing, they may now mold --or 'freeform', as were your words-- it into anything..

Re:The Press Release Text (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588214)

If you're gonna Karma Whore, at least do it right.

Science Fiction Authors Hoax Vanity Publisher

"Atlanta Nights," by Travis Tea, was offered a publishing contract by PublishAmerica of Frederick, Maryland.

Washington, DC (PRWEB) January 28, 2005 -- Over a holiday weekend last year, some thirty-odd science fiction writers banged out a chapter or two apiece of "Atlanta Nights," a novel about hot times in Atlanta high society. Their objective: to write a deeply awful novel to submit to PublishAmerica, a self-described "traditional publisher" located in Frederick, Maryland.

The project began after PublishAmerica posted an attack on science fiction authors at one of its websites (http://www.authorsmarket.net/). PublishAmerica claimed "As a rule of thumb, the quality bar for sci-fi and fantasy is a lot lower than for all other fiction.... [Science fiction authors] have no clue about what it is to write real-life stories, and how to find them a home." It described them as "writers who erroneously believe that SciFi, because it is set in a distant future, does not require believable storylines, or that Fantasy, because it is set in conditions that have never existed, does not need believable every-day characters."

The writers wanted to see where PublishAmerica puts its own quality bar; if the publisher really is selective, as the company claims, or if it is a vanity press that will accept almost anything, as publishing professionals assert.

"Atlanta Nights" was completed, any sign of literary competence was blue-penciled, and the resulting manuscript was submitted.

PublishAmerica accepted it.

From: PublishAmerica Aquisitions [e-mail protected from spam bots]
Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2004
Subject: Atlanta Nights

As this is an important piece of email regarding your book, please read it completely from start to finish. I am happy to inform you that PublishAmerica has decided to give "Atlanta Nights" the chance it deserves....Welcome to PublishAmerica, and congratulations on what promises to be an exciting time ahead.

Sincerely,
Meg Phillips
Acquisitions Editor
PublishAmerica

The hoax was publicly revealed on January 23, 2005. PublishAmerica withdrew their offer shortly afterward:

From: "PublishAmerica Acquisitions"
Sent: Monday, January 24, 2005
Subject: Your Submission to PublishAmerica

We must withdraw our offer to publish "Atlanta Nights". Upon further review it appears that your work is not ready to be published. There are portions of nonsensical text in the manuscript that were caught by our editing staff as they previewed the text for editing time assessment pending your acceptance of our offer.

On the positive side, maybe you want to consider contracting the book with a vanity publisher such as iUniverse or Author House. They will certainly publish your book at a fee.

Thank you.
PublishAmerica Acquisitions Department

Those who wish to see the novel, "Atlanta Nights" by Travis Tea, for themselves can find it at
http://www.lulu.com/travis-tea

Publication at Lulu.com is free.

For more information about PublishAmerica and vanity presses, see:
http://www.sfwa.org/beware/
http://www.wash ingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A251 87-2005Jan20.html

# # #

Just wait till the apostrophe nazis come (1)

koreaman (835838) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588079)

"We will therefore just monitor his sign's"

Re:Just wait till the apostrophe nazis come (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588159)

His sign's what?

Should have let them publish it.... (1)

Rolan (20257) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588081)

Then no claims of finding it in "editorial review."

old news (-1, Troll)

pcgamez (40751) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588086)

This news is at least 2 or 3 days old, what's wrong with /. lately???

Re:old news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588216)

lately??!!! where have you been?

Re:old news (5, Insightful)

Mr. Slippery (47854) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588227)

This news is at least 2 or 3 days old, what's wrong with /. lately???

The same thing that's been wrong for years: people who don't understand that something that happened a few days ago - even a few weeks ago - is still news.

Great, you heard about it days ago, doubtless you monitor all sorts of websites and cable news channels 24/7 and know everything before the rest of us. Congratulations, you win. But those of us who occasionally turn away from the various glass teats appreciate hearing about things that may have happened more than five minutes ago.

A bad story in print. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588088)

A great news on Slashdot.

An AC complaints about it instead of get out from his mother's basement.

I am pethetic.

Continuation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588135)

An AC gets modded down.

Sees no purpose in life.

Wants to kill himself.

Is a loser.

Whom no one loves.

And wants to have sex with.

Even after reading ESR's sexy-looking HOWTO [catb.org] .

Live sucks.

Badly.

Great preview, but (1)

realdpk (116490) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588089)

But I wish they'd publish the whole thing (all that was accepted, that is).

"just monitor his sign's". Ha ha. Soooo sexy.

Re:Great preview, but (1)

Spacejock (727523) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588289)

They did:

http://critters.critique.org/sting/

oh thats easy (4, Funny)

zephc (225327) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588090)

copy-paste any chapter of Battlefield Earth

Re:oh thats easy (5, Funny)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588115)

We're steal waiting for someone to reveal that that was just a great hoax, then we can all laugh together. Until then I will continue to shudder here in my basement, away from the light, away from one John Travolta.

Re:oh thats easy (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588184)

PublishAmerica claimed "As a rule of thumb, the quality bar for sci-fi and fantasy is a lot lower than for all other fiction.... [Science fiction authors] have no clue about what it is to write real-life stories, and how to find them a home." It described them as "writers who erroneously believe that SciFi, because it is set in a distant future, does not require believable storylines, or that Fantasy, because it is set in conditions that have never existed, does not need believable every-day characters."

Unfortunately this is a valid point. ;-)

No surprise here. (5, Insightful)

SpaceCadetTrav (641261) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588091)

How do you think stories get published on Slashdot?

OT: your homepage (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588106)

Are you really a travsite or trasexual? Pre- or post-op?

Re:No surprise here. (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588180)

How do you think stories get published on Slashdot?

I submit them from a virtual post office box in Schenectady.
KFG

Re:No surprise here. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588207)

How do you think stories get published on Slashdot?

I know! I know! The correct answer is: "multiple times", right?

Slashdot editoral process ? (5, Funny)

jaiyen (821972) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588095)

Maybe the editor who accepted the book for publication could fill michael's position at slashdot - sounds like he'd fit right in !

Re:Slashdot editoral process ? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588173)

s/position/anus

In a slightly related topic... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588099)

The AP is reporting that The NY Times [nytimes.com] pays news accumulator Topix.net [topix.net] 'an undisclosed price' for story placement as relayed by Forbes [forbes.com] . It should be noted that '[a]ll but a few of the topics are focused on New York City and New York state.'

Given the recent tales of editorial misconduct do /. editors have anything to declare?

Well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588103)

This isn't surprising. Seriously, the only books you ever hear about are the good ones. But there are thousands of writers and thousands of books published, and someone has to read them, right? It's kinda like how there's a few good TV shows and everyone raves about them, but tons of "reality TV" where you can't help but wonder why they even exist. Yet, someone, somewhere must watch them. It's the same with books.

Weird acronym use (2, Insightful)

papaskunk (718169) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588104)

I understand that SF can be meant to stand for "Science Fiction," though I don't think I've ever heard anybody say "I like to read a lot of SF." However, when we have virtually unlimited screen real estate, is it really necessary to shorten 'SciFi' to 'SF'? It's just a difference of three letters. Living in the Bay Area, I immediately thought this was an electic group of liberal-minded San Francisco writers publishing something scandalous under a "traditional" publisher. Guess the joke's on me.

Re:Weird acronym use (2, Interesting)

Anubis350 (772791) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588122)

remember, its not shortening "scifi" to SF it's shortening "Science Fiction" to SF. The abbreviation does come in handy, for example I belong to a group on my campus known as the "Science Fiction Forum", abbrev. to SF4M, :-).

Re:Weird acronym use (1)

lachlan76 (770870) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588131)

Yeah well I read it as Sourceforge ;)

Re:Weird acronym use (1)

wan23 (636995) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588160)

Hey my school had an SF4M! That reminds me, I really should return that book I borrowed five years ago...

Re:Weird acronym use (1)

Anubis350 (772791) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588269)

what school did you go to, its not exactly common (hell we own the website, sf4m.org).... stonybrook by any chance?

Re:Weird acronym use (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588275)

Why not just abbreviate it to SFF and not look like a bunch of gays from San Francisco looking for men?

You do realize that "M4M" doesn't stand for Mystery Forum, right?

Some people I know (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588148)

including one professional writer, use the term SF because they use it to refer to "Speculative Fiction".

This is due to a realization that a lot of "science fiction" doesn't really contain all that much science.

Interpret this how you like.

SF is broader than sci-fi (2, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588151)

The abbreviation "SF" for speculative fiction arguably includes fantasy as well.

Re:SF is broader than sci-fi (4, Funny)

Leo McGarry (843676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588169)

I don't believe that the word "to speculate" is often used as "to make up ridiculous stuff in order to entertain 13-year-old girls with a Welsh fetish."

Re:SF is broader than sci-fi (1)

miu (626917) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588313)

Hmm, better be careful about that kind of talk, I bet there are lots of Mercedes Lackey and Melanie Rawn fans hanging about a story like this.

Re:Weird acronym use (3, Informative)

quarter (14910) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588166)

some posters above give the speculative fiction answer, but i read a long time ago (and i wish i could remember who wrote it) that SF was used by (serious?) science fiction writers to distance themselves from SciFi movies about giant brains attacking people.

Re:Weird acronym use (1)

segmond (34052) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588211)

I live in Detroit, I thought of San Francisco and not Science Fiction...

Re:Weird acronym use (5, Informative)

SEE (7681) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588235)

You clearly have never been the subject of the traditional rants of the written science fiction community about how they do not write "sci-fi" or "skiffy", which is the domain of bad '50s monster movies. They write "science fiction" or "speculative fiction", which is SF if you must shorten the term.

To understand, think "Linux" vs. "GNU/Linux".

Because traditionaly it is SF (1)

aepervius (535155) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588247)

I never heard of SciFi before the net and before the infamous scifi tv channel was born. It was always referenced as "SF genre", in bibliothek under the "SF thema" and we wrote about SF book. Heck it was sometimes SPOKEN as S.F. but first time I heard of it as SciFi in the last 25 years was in the late 99 on the net. Now granted it could also be a country/culture difference on how you name it.

Re:Weird acronym use (1)

miu (626917) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588302)

SciFi or 'skiffie' has a strong association with television and franchise potboilers with a futuristic setting.

So what are they trying to prove? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588116)

So they're trying to prove that this publisher, who claimed to publish only high-quality stuff, really publishes crap? Meaning THEIR crap? Meaning all their stuff they were writing they thought was high quality was actually crap?

Sounds about right.

Re:So what are they trying to prove? (1)

dtfinch (661405) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588293)

It may be crap, but it's humorous intentional crap, and now it's famous humorous intentional crap. It's not like a book where something tried to make something good and ended up with crap. They tried to make crap and made a masterpiece. They'll sell millions.

Editorial quotes... (2, Informative)

Mhrmnhrm (263196) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588119)

Forget trying to read the very short sample... it hurts. The quotes at the end, however, are a hoot. All of them are things someone could easily say about a true masterpiece of any literary era. Verne, Asimov, Clarke, Hemingway, Chaucer, Homer... and coming to a bookstore near you, a genius named Travis Tea who will soon be storming the NYTimes bestseller list!

My Review of "Atlanta Nights" (1, Funny)

lildogie (54998) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588134)

This book is better than any book ever written. It is better than any book that will ever be written in the future. And I haven't even read it yet.

Re:My Review of "Atlanta Nights" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588223)

Do you review books for FOX?

Precedent (5, Informative)

clem.dickey (102292) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588142)

An earlier effort by 25 Newsday staffers produced the 1969 best seller Naked Came the Stranger [museumofhoaxes.com] .

Re:Precedent (1)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588201)

Yes, but the big difference between that hoax and this one was that that hoax had a nake women on the cover of the book and this one, well, this one doesn't.

Follow a publishers formula = get published. (4, Insightful)

infonography (566403) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588144)

Good or bad doesn't matter. If you sync with their expectations you get published. Karma whores here have realised that. The Slashdot process is impartial to a degree and otherwise blind. The decline has encouraged Group Think and UNPOPULAR opinion is caught by the mechinism.

Like here at slashdot there isn't a variety of styles mingling. One theory has won the darwinian battle and thus realising it they have gamed that system.

Entropy is a law after all.

Re:Follow a publishers formula = get published. (1)

Leo McGarry (843676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588181)

I think people who try to spin this fact of nature as either a good thing or a bad thing are missing the point. There's nothing insightful or revelatory here. It's a simple tautology: People like to read what people like to read. Duh.

Vanity publishers (4, Informative)

Dmala (752610) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588149)

I worked with a guy once who fancied himself a writer of love poetry. I thought it was pretty awful, saccharine stuff myself, but he had a couple of fans on some amateur poety website. Who was I to criticize?

I always felt bad, though, because he put together a book and found some vanity publisher to publish it for him. He apparently didn't know how the publishing business worked, though, because he was convinced that he was being published for real, and that the book would be his ticket to fame and fortune. I remember him being very excited when they "accepted" his book, and would publish it as soon as he came up with $4000. He then started hitting up everyone he knew to "invest" in his book, which he was sure would be a bestseller. I never had the heart to explain to him that real publishers pay you when they put out your book.

A movie with that element - 'What Happened Was' (1)

Szplug (8771) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588318)

Pretty painful, and IIRC depressing.

Naked Came The Stranger (4, Informative)

strider44 (650833) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588150)

This is an example of the brilliant hoax first devised by "Naked Came The Stranger [museumofhoaxes.com] " (first link in Google), where a group of reporters wrote a book deliberately designed to be bad to show the crap and lack of taste that was coming out of the trashy romantic novel genre. At least 2 explicit sexual acts per chapter, the more deviant the better. Good writing and grammer were to be thoroughly sponged out of the book. They hired the sister of one of the writers I think to play the author and go around on TV shows saying rediculous stuff supposedly to promote the book.

The funny thing was that the book was published and then became so popular and the money grew so much that they spilled their guts and told the world about the hoax.

Re:Naked Came The Stranger (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588218)

Fortunately you didn't extend this RIDICULOUS GRAMMAR to your own post, hmm?

Well, we can all be thankful for that...

preview (3, Informative)

Opie812 (582663) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588157)

Pain.
Whispering voices.
Pain.
Pain. Pain. Pain.
Need pee--new pain--what are they sticking in me? . . .
Sleep.
Pain.
Whispering voices.
"As you know, Nurse Eastman, the government spooks controlling this hospital will not permit me to give this patient the care I think he needs."
"Yes, doctor." The voice was breathy, sweet, so sweet and sexy.
"We will therefore just monitor his sign's. Serious trauma like this patient suffered requires extra care, but the rich patsies controlling the hospital will make certain I cannot try any of my new treatments on him."
"Yes, doctor." That voice was soooo sexy! Bruce didn't care about treatments. He cared about pain, and he cared about that voice, because when he heard the voice, the pain went away, just for a few seconds, like.

Re:preview (1)

bersl2 (689221) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588174)

Ugh. I'd rather look at goatse than this.

Re:preview (1)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588183)

Wow, I don't know what all the fuss is about? Hoax or not, this looks like a great story. I mean, rich patsies, soooo sexy Nurse Eastmen, Bruce, government spooks, people that will "monitor his sign's", and "pain, pain, pain". You can't ask for much more than this. Now... if they'd only make this into a screenplay and revive MST3K the world would return to balance.

Re:preview (5, Funny)

Vampyre_Dark (630787) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588193)

Pain.
Whispering voices.
Pain.
Pain. Pain. Pain.
Need pee--new pain--what are they sticking in me? . . .
Sleep.
Pain.
Whispering voices.


Woah.. slow down... is this a preview of the story, or a first hand account of reading the front page of Slashdot?

Re:preview (2, Funny)

Kufat (563166) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588206)

The last time I read something that bad, I was surrounded by Vogons.

Re:preview (1)

metlin (258108) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588314)

Funny. The last time I read something that bad it was on Slashdot.

Oh well, Slashdot, Vogons it's all the same.

Except that on Slashdot you keep coming back for more. Addictive Vogon poetry. That will be the day :-|

Re:preview (4, Funny)

starling (26204) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588225)

We will therefore just monitor his sign's,

Aieee!!! Feral apo'strophes. Oh noe's th'ey're spr'ead'ing !!!'!' G'et the'm o'ff!!''!'
TH'E'Y'RE A'LI''V'E''''''''''''''''''''''

SourceForge? (1)

IoN_PuLse (788965) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588165)

Did anyone else immediately think of SourceForge when they say the acronym SF used? I know they don't have writers, but seeing how this is slashdot, SourceForge came to mind before Science Fiction did. ...weird.

Re:SourceForge? (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588220)

Did anyone else immediately think of SourceForge when they say the acronym SF used?

Nah! I like to read a lot of SF.

KFG

correction (1)

IoN_PuLse (788965) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588233)

What the heck did I post? Must be getting tired. I meant, "Did anyone else immediately think of SourceForge when they saw the acronym SF used?"

Re:SourceForge? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588278)

SF = San Fran

Only complete poo head like to likkk! Konw, waht are you ginog to do aubot it?

Re:SourceForge? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588296)

I sure did...

Here's the sample (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588170)

Pain.
Whispering voices.
Pain.
Pain. Pain. Pain.
Need pee--new pain--what are they sticking in me? . . .
Sleep.
Pain.
Whispering voices.
"As you know, Nurse Eastman, the government spooks controlling this hospital will not permit me to give this patient the care I think he needs."
"Yes, doctor." The voice was breathy, sweet, so sweet and sexy.
"We will therefore just monitor his sign's. Serious trauma like this patient suffered requires extra care, but the rich patsies controlling the hospital will make certain I cannot try any of my new treatments on him."
"Yes, doctor." That voice was soooo sexy!
Bruce didn't care about treatments. He cared about pain, and he cared about that voice, because when he heard the voice, the pain went away, just for a few seconds, like.

Ironically... (1)

stox (131684) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588171)

"Atlanta Nights" goes on to become the best selling novel of the year.

You know how dumb the average american is, just remember, statistically, half of them are even dumber.

Re:Ironically... (1)

flatface (611167) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588213)

Actually, I want to buy this just because it sounds so horrible. It's the same thing that happened with Naked Came the Stranger.

The real question is (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588176)

Where's the alanta_nights.torret?

Better late than never (1)

kiwidefunkt (855968) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588179)

Just when you thought you'd heard the last of MTV's Punk'd, it's... Punk'd 2000: Sci-Fi Edition

more information (3, Informative)

jaiyen (821972) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588192)

The Washington Post also has a very interesting article on the likes of PublishAmerica at http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A25187-20 05Jan20?language=printer

Love the name... (2, Funny)

vspazv (578657) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588198)

You'd think someone would have realized something was wrong with the pen name Travis Tea...

Sample of the book (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588205)

is here [lulu.com]

it was a dark and stormy night... (1)

ABeowulfCluster (854634) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588222)

.. and was posting some drivel on Slashdot when the aliens landed and sucked my brain out. Da End.

Karma Ho'in (1)

Obiwan Kenobi (32807) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588236)

Here's the free blurb from the publisher:

--------------
Atlanta Nights
by
Travis Tea

Chapter 1

Pain.
Whispering voices.
Pain.
Pain. Pain. Pain.
Need pee--new pain--what are they sticking in me? . . .
Sleep.
Pain.
Whispering voices.
"As you know, Nurse Eastman, the government spooks controlling this hospital will not permit me to give this patient the care I think he needs."
"Yes, doctor." The voice was breathy, sweet, so sweet and sexy.
"We will therefore just monitor his sign's. Serious trauma like this patient suffered requires extra care, but the rich patsies controlling the hospital will make certain I cannot try any of my new treatments on him."
"Yes, doctor." That voice was soooo sexy!
Bruce didn't care about treatments. He cared about pain, and he cared about that voice, because when he heard the voice, the pain went away, just for a few seconds, like.

----------------------

Need pee. Sign's. Hahaha, unbelievable.

Evan
My CCG Design Blog [misterorange.com]

\mod dow8 (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588238)

There are formed his own non-fucking-existant. The Cathedral thing for the sorely diminished. as liitle overhead

MOD PARENT UP! (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588299)

In this thread incoherent trolling is actually on-topic!

coming soon (2, Funny)

prockcore (543967) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588249)

I hear WB bought the rights to the stories and have hired Travolta.

Manuscript (1)

nadolph (661727) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588257)

The manuscript for the entire book can be downloaded from here: http://critters.critique.org/sting/StingManuscript .pdf

Its 280 pages or so but you can shrink it down to about 30 if you're good at reading small text.

Book Text (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11588262)

This is the freely available first page of the book. Mod up if (when) the site collapses.

Pain.
Whispering voices.
Pain.
Pain. Pain. Pain.
Need pee--new pain--what are they sticking in me? . . .
Sleep.
Pain.
Whispering voices.
"As you know, Nurse Eastman, the government spooks controlling this hospital will not permit me to give this patient the care I think he needs."
"Yes, doctor." The voice was breathy, sweet, so sweet and sexy.
"We will therefore just monitor his sign's. Serious trauma like this patient suffered requires extra care, but the rich patsies controlling the hospital will make certain I cannot try any of my new treatments on him."
"Yes, doctor." That voice was soooo sexy!
Bruce didn't care about treatments. He cared about pain, and he cared about that voice, because when he heard the voice, the pain went away, just for a few seconds, like.

(commentary) It should be noted that this is only the first page of the book, and therefore even a quick glance should have discovered the unprintable nature of this work.

it dosen't hold a candle... (2, Informative)

sailforsingapore (833339) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588263)

to The Eye of Argon [google.com]

I can't wait (1)

dtfinch (661405) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588267)

When will they make the movie?

not fair (1)

samot84aol.com (554299) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588297)

I'm an English major and I would say that an writer's attempt at their worst story is still a form of creative expression. Just my .02

Re:not fair (1)

samot84aol.com (554299) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588309)

*a writer's

Re:not fair (1)

Bob MacSlack (623914) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588312)

There's a lot of creative expression out there. Only problem is 99.999% of it is still crap.

Here's another explanation... (2, Funny)

wizard_of_wor (849406) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588298)

This could simply support my own theory that science fiction is like flan: there's no difference between the good stuff and the bad stuff.

Actually, I'll amend that: reading nearly any science fiction is like eating flan, but reading Neal Stephenson is like eating flan from between Jennifer Connelly's breasts while you're high.

PublishAmerica is a Known Fraud (5, Informative)

Sundroid (777083) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588300)

Associated Press has an article about it and points out: "Some writers organizations will not accept PublishAmerica authors or offer only limited memberships. Those organizations include the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, the Mystery Writers of America and the Authors Guild, whose members include Stephen King and Scott Turow. The organization gets about 50 membership requests a year from PublishAmerica authors. All are rejected, said executive director Paul Aiken." Here is the link to the article: http://www.redlandsdailyfacts.com/Stories/0,1413,2 09~23371~2682604,00.html [redlandsdailyfacts.com]

Samuel Beckett: Rejected (2, Interesting)

Jack Action (761544) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588301)

Sorry, Mr. Beckett, but you need a more coherent story.

An alternative weekly sent [eye.net] stories by famous writers (Beckett, Garcia Marquez, Angela Carter) out to 20 literary magazines under different names. 12 were rejected and 8 got no reply. Choice quotes from the rejection letters:

"Not quite, but it's a convincing bit of ventriloquism. I think the Beckett's a bit too loud, especially in the first two pages."

and

"Musical writing; need a more coherent story."

What's the point? (1)

bw5353 (775333) | more than 9 years ago | (#11588317)

I cannot see the point with this. It is difficult to write good literature. Everyone agrees on that. If it had been easy to say what's good in literature, everyone would have written master pieces. Here are some people who put a lot of effort into a book. Someone else realises that a lot of effort has been put in there, and that it is highly original. That the intent of the effort was to "be bad" was not obvious, because the writers simply did not know what "bad" was in the eyes of the reviewer. Your book does not automatically become very bad because you claim that you intended it to be bad, as little as it becomes very good, if you intend it to be good. No one can with any confidence tell what makes a book good, and no one knows for certain what makes a book a bestseller. There is no joke here - it is simply an illustration to what has been known for a long time.
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