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What Linux Distribution is the Best for Games?

Cliff posted more than 9 years ago | from the introducing-the-Lbox dept.

Wine 178

CodeGeekGuy asks: "I've been thinking of doing the big switcheroo from Windows to Linux. I have, in the past, had various levels of success using Linux, but I generally have to give up as soon as I feel like playing a game. I've done dual booting before, but find it a pain if you're waiting for something to finish and just want a quick game of Half Life 2 or WoW. I'm willing to give this another shot (as I hear that Cedega plays HL2 and WoW quite nicely). I've used Mandrake and Fedora Core and even Redhat, is there another distribution out there that is the best distro to use to get Cedega (and ultimately games) to work well? "

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arch is slim-est! (0, Flamebait)

biryokumaru (822262) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620430)

arch, as it is designed to run uber-fast and be supar-slim!

Re:arch is slim-est! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11621511)

The best Linux-distribution for games is Windows [microsoft.com] .

If you are playing console-based games like nethack or asciijump, you can use a slow, bloated distro like Gnetoo.

SUSE Linux Rocks (1)

Gherikill (825515) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620491)

Suse is a good choice. It usually detects your video card drivers, which IMO is the hardest part of setting up linux for gaming. SAX2

Re:SUSE Linux Rocks (1)

joggle (594025) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621232)

Not suse 9.1 personal. It seems to detect many cards, but not my ATI Radeon 9800 pro. They have a page on their ftp site with instructions on downloading a newer driver and installing a kernel patch, but what a pain. Even now I can't use SAX2 without having to hand edit the XFree86 file afterwards to re-enable hardware 3D acceleration. Also, text isn't rendering correctly in a couple of the 3D games either (ie, not visible).

Regardless of the Dist you use (3, Informative)

KingBahamut (615285) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620500)

Your still going to be bound by Cedega's working game list only. That aside, Ive had fairly good success with Suse, Fedora, and Gentoo.

Re:Regardless of the Dist you use (1)

nocomment (239368) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620569)

Check out the Gentoo games project.

Re:Regardless of the Dist you use (1)

supersuckers (841107) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621034)

AFAIK, gentoo games has been dead for a while. I run gentoo, and actually got introduced to it through gentoogames, as they had a bootable cd with unreal tournament on it. It used to be available on http://www.gentoogames.com/ [gentoogames.com] but that site has been blank for some time. Is there anywhere else to get info on the project?

Gentoo (5, Insightful)

ClassicG (138845) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620529)

If you have the patience to set it up intially, I think Gentoo might be your best bet, as the flexibility of Gentoo and it's packaging system is second to none. Compiling the initial system shouldn't be a serious problem on any machine beefy enough to run modern games - my last stage-one complete rebuild from scratch took less than a day, including KDE.

Re:Gentoo (3, Interesting)

Tr0mBoNe- (708581) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620721)

I've "sat through" the install on a less than uber system and it can take upwards of 3 days to build and install all the needed and wanted packages for a complete system. But, it's worth it.

I've had Cedega running with Steam for CS quite well. It only took 2 tries and 32 wtf's. Also, for games that run in linux when a patch is properly applied, you can emerge them. but you need the cd's or images as the emerge only comes with the patch. but it does the install for ya. Gentoo is teh slick... I just wish their install process was a little more automated. HINT HINT!!

Gentoo's manual install is arguably a -good- thing (3, Interesting)

ClassicG (138845) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621560)

Heh, I know it's not to everybody's liking, but I think the manual install process of Gentoo is actually one of it's strengths. I learned more about Linux in the two days it took me to get Gentoo set up the first time than I did after months of playing around with RedHat and Mandrake and the like.

Re:Gentoo's manual install is arguably a -good- th (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11621931)

Re:Gentoo's manual install is arguably a -good- th (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11621955)

I was just going to mention that, but I'm astounded that this guy is yet another certifiable case of Mandrake Expatriate Syndrome [greenfly.org] .

The guy who wrote that is a freakin genius.

Re:Gentoo's manual install is arguably a -good- th (1)

_xeno_ (155264) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622448)

Uh, an automated install would just set up your system for you. The compiling part ("shit scroll by for hours") is all automated already.

Gentoo's "manual" install is basically paritioning and mounting the partitions you want to use and then extracting a giant tarball onto that structure. You then need to configure your fstab, network settings, compile a kernel, and install a bootloader.

Once you're done with that, then you move on to the automated part. The entire point to portage is to automate the compilation process.

You could, conceivably, manually install Debian or RedHat in the same way if you wanted to.

Re:Gentoo's manual install is arguably a -good- th (2, Insightful)

ClassicG (138845) | more than 9 years ago | (#11624607)

Um, no, no it doesn't. :)

But partitioning and formatting your HDs manually, building your own /etc/fstab, creating user accounts, and the other similar stuff that is needed to set up Gentoo -is- a good way to learn your way around some of the basic stuff that you might not know about otherwise. Plus, it also gives some insight into all the things that are running in the background on the system, because each of them was set up manually by hand, rather than being done invisibly by some automated setup program.

I'm not saying that an automated install is a bad thing, just that by doing it manually, one learns a lot more about what goes into the process than they would otherwise.

Re:Gentoo (1)

Curtman (556920) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623032)

I just wish their install process was a little more automated. HINT HINT!!

Agreed. Porthole [sourceforge.net] is a step in the right direction, but its pretty buggy still.

Re:Gentoo (1)

Phleg (523632) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622190)

If you have the patience to set it up intially, I think Gentoo might be your best bet, as the flexibility of Gentoo and it's packaging system is second to none.

You, sir, have never used apt.

Regardless, you did nothing to answer the OP's question, which is what distribution would be best for gaming. The real answer is that any distribution will be equally good for gaming (within a reasonable margin) since Cedega is the part that makes Windows games run.

The only factors the distribution contribute are: a) performance, which is virtually identical for most distributions, and b) whether or not Cedega is easy to install on the distribution.

Re:Gentoo (1)

polyp2000 (444682) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622736)

Discover Vidalinux -
Vidalinux is basically Gentoo without the painful install. In addition to its easy graphical installer it has knoppix style hardware detection. I've installed it on two machines already (including a relatively low end Thinkpad T22) . I will probably install it over this stock gentoo machine sooner or later. With it you get the latest gnome desktop and a good selection of packages. It uses the standard gentoo portage. And switching to KDE is just an emerge away if you prefer KDE. Id recommend it both to seasoned gentoo users and those who'd like to try it but are put off by install process.

You can always tweak your make.conf - if that is your bag and recompile stuff afterwards - but all in all Vidalinux is a sterling gentoo based distro IMHO...

Nick...

None... (0, Flamebait)

windex82 (696915) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620530)

None and all... dont suport these half assed attempts at "emulation" to play your games. Everyone using cedega or wine are just giving the devs reasons NOT to make native ports of their games. Why should they when your happy with 70% preformance and major instabilities? But any (major) distro will play the native games just as well as any of the others.

Either play fully supported Linux native games, hold on to windows, or duel-boot. But whatever you do DO NOT SUPPORT the efforts of these emulators! They are not for the greater good, as far as gamming goes. Using them to run old unsupported software is another story.

Re:None... (0, Troll)

KingBahamut (615285) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620540)

Yes, God, thank you for your input.

Re:None... (1)

windex82 (696915) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620605)

No problem.

Re:None... (1)

KingBahamut (615285) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620630)

God...while your at it, can you go on ahead and actually give me a list of games that have native ports? Who I can pay money to, to get them, other than Loki, whos not freelance, last I heard?

Re:None... (1)

windex82 (696915) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620710)

Lets see, every unreal tournamant has had a native client. Doom 3 was much more smoother in linux than windows. Neverwinter Nights also has a native client. Of course your against Loki for some reason... so I guess I shouldn't mention Simcity 3000, or any of the other games they have ported.

Re:None... (1)

KingBahamut (615285) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620781)

Neverwinter Nights, UT and its variants, Doom and its variants, Quake and its variants, Wolfenstein and its variants, Kohan and its variants, (all of which I own and support, if someone makes a linux port sold with a product I preorder it IMMEDIATELY). I can only hope and pray for Dragonshard to have a linux installer to go with it, what else have I left out? IF and only IF atari continues its current motif, then great. But RTSs like Age series, Total War, Empire Earth ( that Titan 2.0 engine is the shiz ), So I guess I should give up on playing RTSs because none of the decent ones come with a decent native installer. Freeciv forever.....woohoo.

Re:None... (1)

windex82 (696915) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620909)

If you knew what games that were available why the hell did you ask? You seem to be in the same boat I am, except for the small issue of thinking there is nothing wrong with supporting these "emulation/wrapper" projects. I on the other hand see a big problem with them. Mostly in the "why should we if they will be happy running our product at a performance loss and without support " area of game publishing.

Perhaps if you want the publishers to realize they ARE infact loosing sales by not supporting an entire OS then yes you should give up on them. Unless you want the publishers to contiune thinking, "Why should we make a native port, they can just run it in a wrapper, then we wont have to provide support to them either." that is. I hate civilization all together, and am majorly bummed by there not being any good real times available as well, but I'm not about to pay a company to flat out ignore my operating system of choice either.

Re:None... (1)

KingBahamut (615285) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620949)

Ok Windex, untie your panties, and try to drink some Herbal tea, mebbe itll help the PMS your experiencing. Then, calm down, go out and give Transgaming techs a few measley dollars of your money, instead of waiting for the industry to catch up, because while largely decentralized as it is, almost segemented in places, if a wrapper/emulator allows me to play with a few , VERY FEW, displaced frames, then im happy, and you should be too. Break out the Yanni or Enya or something, and try to chill. Anger Management buddy, it works...trust me.

Re:None... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11621082)

Damn, theres nothing like resorting to the "little girl" cut-downs. ^~

Re:None... (1)

ChoGGi (522069) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622851)

maybe he understands the more people using wine on linux means a better chance of game companies realizing people use linux for games and start making a native linux version

Re:None... (1)

KingBahamut (615285) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623515)

Thank you for validating my argument Choggi. But of course I see why he makes the argument. Most Die Hard Linux users that I know, and I know a few, dont have a problem supporting developments like Transgaming. I dont feel that they are anti-wine, but more wine with the nessecary tweaks to get a game running on the system. Do I wish that all games had a native linux installer, you better believe I do. It would make my life , and everyone else's life alot easier. There certainly wouldnt be these large fights over which game goes one way and which game(s) go another. Of course I substantially assume that some very good games (Rise of nations, Age of Empires and all of its derivatives, and so forth) wont ever have native linux installers with them, the companies that produce them are expressedly owned by M$, this of course also dooms them from ever running under any emulator/wrapper application, like Cedega or Wine. What does that mean for guys / gals like us. We miss out because M$ wont support us. Why? Because M$ hates us and wishes we would go away and stop taking their market share away.

Im not too young a gamer to remember that there were games that were released that had OS/2 installers on them for that very reason. Support of the community. But then its never seen that way by Gates , Ballmer and the rest of his Zombies. Ce La Vie.

Still The notion that I should not support applications who try to help us in the gaming community, is asinine.

And to honestly validate the digression argument used with cedega and wine. I run a fairly high end card on my system, when I play FPS I "realistically" get a few less frames on say Doom 3 ( not much more than 10 at worst ) , and on other games such as WarHammer 40k, I get a better frame rate than I did on my windows partition. If this is all I have to deal with is minot frame rate differences, then Ill get over it. The object isnt for me to have the most uber frame rate, but a game thats playable and enjoyable. Isnt that what the rest of us what? Or is FPS gaming still about how many Frames per second you can get?

Re:None... (1)

joeljkp (254783) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622032)


Here ya go [icculus.org]

Re:None... (1)

mahdi13 (660205) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622934)

Why stop at the commercial only ones (besides that's what he did ask for) when there are many very good free games available
Full Icculus Game List [icculus.org]

Re:None... (3, Informative)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620735)

Thats why i experience a 2 FPS drop? You just pulled that number out of your ass.

It doesn't emulate. It's a wrapper - it translates the calls to the appropriate API, rather than drawing it in software with occasional help from your hardware(as would be emulation).

But, you do have a point in that using them doesn't push devs to develope cross-platform. But, neither does the small market share making noise.

Re:None... (1)

Minna Kirai (624281) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621539)

It doesn't emulate.

Windex82 never said it did. Note her scare quotes around "emulation".

rather than drawing it in software with occasional help from your hardware(as would be emulation).

That sentence demonstrates that you don't know the definition of "emulation". If you'd like to learn it, you could either check a dictionary, or read about other emulation projects such as UltraHLE [ultrahle.com] (Ask yourself if that one does all its drawing in software)

Re:None... (0, Troll)

k98sven (324383) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621576)

But, you do have a point in that using them doesn't push devs to develope cross-platform. But, neither does the small market share making noise.

But he doesn't. It's a bad argument, and it always was.

So, since Win95 is backwards-compatible with Win 3.1 then why would anyone write a Win95 application? Since Windows XP is backwards-compatible with Win95, why would anyone write a Win XP application?

The problem is not that compatibility takes away incentive. The problem is that there is no incentive to begin with: You must first have a better platform to migrate to. And Linux is not yet a better platform for writing games than Windows is.

Re:None... (2, Insightful)

brunson (91995) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622999)

That's pretty untrue. Linux is as good a platform, if not better to write games for. The difference is market share, and that is all.

Re:None... (1)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620774)

I very much disagree. The games Linux gamers want to play by and large are not available on Linux. With wine and cedega, at least some of those games are available. Why keep around a Windows partition if you're happy with 70% performance? What added incentive do game developers have to develop native Linux games if you're just going to keep your native Windows partition around anyways?

I say we support the emulation efforts. Through the support of a strong community, the emulation quality and performance will improve. The more the quality of emulation improves, the less likely gamers are to keep that Windows parition around. If enough gamers drop their Windows partition, then game developers will begin to be penalized financially for not writing code that is compatible with the emulators. When that happens, game developers will look at Linux as a viable platform to support, initially in emulation and perhaps eventually as a native platform.

Re:None... (1)

KingBahamut (615285) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620837)

Thank you Hal, I felt like I was the only one to jump up and defend Transgaming and its efforts. I dont feel like the only lone ranger here.

Re:None... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11620967)

Why the crap are you defending a proprietary software company that took advantage of WINE and never contributed back promised patches? Transgaming is the reason why the GPL should be mandatory for all open source projects. Fuck businesses that lock up formerly open source code.

Re:None... (1)

joeljkp (254783) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622179)

Contributed back their full patchset, no. But a quick search reveals 1736 [gmane.org] CVS commits to the WINE tree by Transgaming employees. Also note that ReWind [sourceforge.net] is maintained by a Transgaming employee. Finally, remember that WINE's license at the time expressly permitted this behavior (and ReWind's still does).

Re:None... (1)

Curtman (556920) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623170)

But a quick search reveals 1736 CVS commits to the WINE tree by Transgaming employees

Also, Transgaming's own CVS [transgaming.com] . Although they are a little weird about it. See the Gentoo ebuild for winex-cvs for the following:

  • This package was removed from portage tree due to the request from Transgaming. Here is an extract from their email:

    The primary reason for the WineX CVS tree being publicly available under the Aladdin Free Public License (AFPL) is to give outside developers who have an interest in the project the ability to track our most current work, and to assist us with code or testing. Our work is very complex though, and only a limited number of developers have the skills required to contribute. The intent of the public CVS tree is *not* to provide a 'free' version of WineX that can be used without paying for it.

    We want everyone with an interest in the project to contribute, whether they contribute code, or money to assist us with our development efforts.

    We felt that the AFPL was a good compromise to allow that to happen, which is why we chose it.

Re:None... (2, Insightful)

mahdi13 (660205) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623049)

There more then a few people that support Transgaming's work, but the anti-wine groups tend to be louder.
I've been a subscriber for over 21 months and support their work, as it does NOT make companies not want to port to Linux. That is a decision usually made long before the product hits the shelves, ideally in the planning stage before any code is written.

Those that say company A won't port game B to Linux because it runs fine with Cedega are delusional and use that as an excuse. Transgaming is looked down on because they have "stolen the code" and "don't return their changes".

The GPL at the time of the WineX fork was completely within the rights and they do give back. They are also legally bound to not redistribute the copy protection code, other then that all the code of freely available in their CVS.

If you don't like it, don't use it as we don't need to hear the same hallow excuses over and over again.
All the 'proof' I've seen has been bogus and nothing but more ranting (someone with your same argument doesn't count as proof).

Re:None... (1)

windex82 (696915) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621024)

Hmm... looking at things from that way makes a lot of sense. I would then simply ask anyone playing with an emulator (wrapper) to at least write one email a week to the publishers asking that games be written in such a way, and eventually givin native ports as not everything reports home and says "Hey this guy is running the game in linux using an emulator" to provide statistical evidence of not using windows.

Maybe one of you can answer this slightly off-topic question I've had for quite some time.

Games like R6:3 Raven Shield use the unreal engine, and should basicly just be some mods and graphic packages. Why are game like this with an engine that is fully supported not being "ported". I used "ported" because it wouldn't seem a real port is needed since the major component of the game is already available. Graphics wouldn't cause cross-platform issues, and the engine should be taking care of loading the mods. So why aren't these types of games automaticly native to both windows and linux? It seems like the publishers of such games would have to go out of their way to make it non-functional outside of windows.

Re:None... (1)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621185)

I'm not too familiar with the unreal engine, but is there a way for the end-user to integrate the mods and graphics packages into the Linux unreal engine? Is there some code in the mod that is not cross-platform? How much liberty was taken with the engine? Will the developers for the R6 game (RedStorm?) answer your question?

Other than those considerations, the only other reason I can think of is lack of interest on the game developer's part. They see $"cost to do QA testing on Linux version" > $"loss from Linux-only gamers". That may be true or it may not be true. The only way for them to be sure is for the gamers to take your advice and send an e-mail or phone call or letter to the game developer and encourage them to create games for your OS (and maybe even point out how easy this could be in the R6 example).

Re:None... (1)

windex82 (696915) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621250)

I'm not too familiar with the unreal engine, but is there a way for the end-user to integrate the mods and graphics packages into the Linux unreal engine? Is there some code in the mod that is not cross-platform? How much liberty was taken with the engine? Will the developers for the R6 game (RedStorm?) answer your question?

I have no idea. But it just seems to me that working with an engine thats already cross platform would require very very little effort to make your game also cross platform. Was just wondering if anyone had any logical ideas, other then because of cost, because there shouldn't be any extra cost when your lisencing an engine that already supports the two platforms.

Re:None... (1)

mahdi13 (660205) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623096)

The reason I heard that Unreal II wasn't ported was because it used an earlier version of the Unreal Warfare engine which would need to be re-written with later builds to make the ports.

The porters have no idea what the others do to the code and it could take years for a simple rewrite

Re:None... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11621425)

Because Linux is too fragmented. What do you mean by Linux?

A game requires a graphics engine. So for a game to run, you really mean "Linux + X server". Except that modern games will want graphics, so now we're at "Linux + X server + OpenGL." Then you have sound, and here we go all fragmented. ALSA? OSS? Which do you use?

Next up, you have desktop integration. KDE? Gnome? Which do you use?

If a game company were going to support Linux, there are a half-million variants they'd need to look at. Of course, they'd probably just go the "RedHat, Mandrake, and SuSE" route.

Windows is much more consistant. If you write for Windows 2000 and Windows ME, then you're almost guarenteed to have a working app on Windows XP, too, along with Longhorn. It's a more stable platform (as in, doesn't change, not doesn't crash).

There are simply too many variables when it comes to Linux support that Windows doesn't suffer from.

Re:None... (1)

joeljkp (254783) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622246)

Things are improving, however. For graphics/sound/control, use SDL [libsdl.org] .

For desktop integration, go with the Freedesktop.org menu spec [freedesktop.org] .

And for package management, there's RPM, standardized by all LSB-compliant [linuxbase.org] distributions.

Re:None... (1)

Eccles (932) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622039)

Everyone using cedega or wine are just giving the devs reasons NOT to make native ports of their games.

Because God knows we developers are leaping at the chance to develop for an OS with a small marketshare and may of whose users have a disdain for commercial software.

Re:None... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11622434)

Give me a break. Every single person who has ever attempted to use WINE could boycott PC games and the video game companies wouldn't care one whit. Boycotts aren't effectice when only .05% of the market participates. Although maybe it makes you feel more involved.

Re:None... (1)

Bob MacSlack (623914) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622886)

I disagree with you. I feel that if developers see a large enough number of people playing their game using a less than optimal solution, they'll come to the logical conclusion that there are even more who aren't playing because of lack of support. Once the number of people using cedega is large enough, a developer will start to consider linux a profitable enough segment to spend the time/money/effort to improve the experience, and thus keep them buying that developer's games. Their smartest route is most likely to make a linux port rather than rely on another company to make their games function.

I'm certain that what you suggest is a smart route to go. If every linux user refuses to play games unless they're supported natively, then developers don't see a market waiting for their games to be ported, they see a total lack of interest. They have no way to gauge whether spending the resources to make a linux port will be profitable. I wonder if any of the games out for linux now (Unreal Tournament is the big one that comes to mind) would have been ported if no one had shown interest in getting it and other games working through "emulation." I think when you say "Everyone using cedega or wine are just giving the devs reasons NOT to make native ports of their games," that the opposite is the case. Cedega and wine give developers lots of reasons to make native ports, and those reasons are each and every customer. Once they have you as a customer, they'll be more likely to want to make you happy, and spend the money to do so.

IMHO (1)

Kleedrac2 (257408) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620531)

I've had great luck with Ubuntu, Suse, or Mandrake. I've had bad luck with Fedora Core. Other than that I really couldn't speak for any other distros as these are the ones I've tried to game with.

Kleedrac

Re:IMHO (1)

superpulpsicle (533373) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621708)

You know, I wish there was just a website that shows you how to get the most popular games working on 1 linux distribution. Unfortunately there is no such thing.

Re:IMHO (1)

mahdi13 (660205) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623153)

A one distro solution doesn't mean anything when it is all driven by Cedega/Wine/WineX

The most something like that could accomplish would be tweaks to fix things that the distro may have broken.

The closest you will get right now is the Unofficial Transgaming Wiki page [digital-conquest.ath.cx] which mentions which version work better with what games and what tweaks maybe needed to get it to work.

Cygwin on Windows XP Pro (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11620668)

The best Linux distribution for gaming would have to be Cygwin running on Windows XP Pro.

Face it, if you want to do gaming, Linux just isn't there yet. Using Wine is half-assed at best - it may work, but there frequently will be bugs with the games and it will cause extra flakeyness. I've tried gaming with Wine, and it just isn't worth the hastle.

If you want Linux apps, compile them for use with Cygwin or find actual Windows binaries. With Qt/Windows and GTK for Windows, you can use all your favorite Linux programs under Linux, along with getting a really good gaming experience.

Trying to game on Linux is still, even now, a lousy experience. If you want to game on your PC, Windows is where it's at. Linux has a LONG way to go if it wants to change that.

Re:Cygwin on Windows XP Pro (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11620912)

With Qt/Windows and GTK for Windows, you can use all your favorite Linux programs under Linux, along with getting a really good gaming experience.

Obviously I need more coffee. That should say "Linux programs under Windows" because running them under Linux isn't that great an accomplishment.

Unless you're like me and have screwed up your fstab, repeatedly, in different ways, so that half the libraries are in /home/lib, some are in /boot/lib, some wound up in D:\lib, and...

Er, anyway, pay attention when assigning those drive numbers.

Re:Cygwin on Windows XP Pro (2, Interesting)

fm6 (162816) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620933)

Cygwin has its uses, but it's just not a substitute for Linux. You don't switch to Linux because you want to run a particular Linux-only program -- those are actually pretty rare. You switch to Linux because you're tired of the flakiness, lack of security, and nonconfigurability of Windows.

Re:Cygwin on Windows XP Pro (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11621010)

Which, if you're going for gaming, is a bone-headed reason to switch.

On my system, Windows XP is rock-solid, and Linux is flakey as all hell. The mouse will completely cut out under X in 10 minutes, after which the only way to get it back is to reboot. I've yet to get the Back and Forward buttons on my mouse to work, and only recently figured out how to get the scrollwheel to work.

Under Windows XP, things Just Work. Under Linux, things just won't work, and I can never figure out why. I'll go to Google, and find answers that basically say "do what you've already done."

If you want to game on the PC, Linux is not the OS to use.

Re:Cygwin on Windows XP Pro (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11622483)

Linux Only programs which prompted me to get a linux only desktop/personal server:
NoteEdit
phpiCalendar
gpsdrive
mythtv

There are a ton of others that I don't remember. But when freshmeat is your search engine, such programs are easy to find.

Re:Cygwin on Windows XP Pro (1)

brkello (642429) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622713)

Actually, XP is very stable and is just as secure as anything connected to the network if you understand basic security (i.e. virus protection, firewalls, not downloading stupid stuff). If you are playing games, XP is the way to go. Linux is great because it gives you access to stuff you can never go near in Windows, so I will grant you configurability. But they are different tools for different jobs. The guy wants to live in some magic world where you can join the two together. Someday maybe...right now, the guy who suggested the KVM got it right.

The best Distro for Games is still (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11620674)

... Windows =]

Gentoo (2, Informative)

Apreche (239272) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620685)

Gentoo is by far the best distro for gaming. I've used just about every major distro there is. Gentoo is the only one where I could reliably make games work. I've got nvidia drivers, alsa, the doom3 demo, emulators. Heck, I've got Mechwarrior 2 running in DOSbox on this thing. It didn't work when I tried it on fedora.

Re:Gentoo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11623544)

Mechwarrior 2...ah yes, brings me back to the days of my 6 medium range lasers...I called it the Chevy Nova. I wasn't a fan of the weapons that needed ammo. Cooling was a bizzatch, though. 8D

There is no best Linux for games (5, Insightful)

SPQRDecker (762669) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620688)

As much as I hate to say it, if you want to play games that are designed for Windows, the best thing to do is boot into Windows. No matter how good Cedega gets, it will still be an attempt to imitate the environment that the game was designed for, and will always have some performane lag. Not only that, but if it is a graphically intensive video game, as most are, you will want the best possible video drivers for direct rendering and such, and in that respect, Linux is nowhere nere as adept as Windows yet. But, on the bright side, since the game is full screen, you won't have any of the annoying widgets like the 'start' menu around to remind you what OS you're in. If, however, you still want to play your game on Linux, I don't think that the distribution really matters. What does matter is that you are using the vendor supplied proprietary driver, either from nVidia or from ATI, rather than the open source equivalent, which is not nearly as good at demanding rendering tasks. Most distributions, including Fedora and Redhat, only include the open source version, so be sure to go to your video card maker's website and download their linux drivers.

Re:There is no best Linux for games (0)

OppressiveGiant (558743) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620953)

UT2K4 runs great under linux. It behaves itself better under linux than windows, in my experience. I haven't tried Doom3 but there is supposed to be a linux version. There are starting to be some games out there that will run native in linux. This is a good thing. I've had good experience running some games in wine/cedega. Some games could be better but all in all its not a bad experience.

Re:There is no best Linux for games (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11621003)

The fact is that different distributions can make this emulation process smoother & faster, which in turn make the gaming better. I run CS (1.6) through Point2Play (Cedega frontend) on Ubuntu, works flawlessly, I run nVidia drivers which are pretty damn good, though my FPS is down about 30% from 100 on Windows, it isn't noticeable (in a game like CS 1.6, anyway).

Some people experience better FPS through Linux/Cedega than they do on Windows XP. I'm not sure why, to be honest, but it can happen.

You can certainly have better gaming distros, ones with good pthreads configuration, for example. Also, the kernel you choose will be very important for obvious reasons, as well as Xorg.

Personally, I would strongly suggest Mandrake because it's defaults are very nicely set up for gaming, it should be the simplest and easiest to get everything set up, with lots of support (you'll find a lot of Mandrake users running games through Cedega) from the regular Mandrake channels and ofcourse on the Transgaming website itself.

Also, This thread [transgaming.org] entitled "Which distro is simplest for Cedega and P2P" sounds like a needed read for the submitter.

Re:There is no best Linux for games (4, Interesting)

Sparr0 (451780) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621291)

great speech, from someone who has never used cedega. linux HAS the best video drivers, with as many or more features as the windows counterparts (for my nvidia cards at least). for performance lag, thats on a game by game basis. linux native games (savage, ut2004, every single ID game) run faster in linux almost 100% of the time. SOME windows games run faster (WoW being a prime example). most windows games run slightly slower on the graphical end, but almost every single windows game runs faster on the computational end, because the cedega emulation of various windows system calls such as disk access and paging are faster.

Nvidia features? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11623574)

Am I missing something? I dual boot and have a GeforceFX. The linux and windows drivers both give solid openGL acceleration at about the same speed, but on windows I get about a dozen pages of fancy options with my nvidia drivers such as screen rotation, colour profiles, overclocking, image quality, forced FSAA and anisotropic filtering...
I know some of this is already included in linux by default, but how do I access all the other features in linux?
Plus, windows has direct3d - although maybe that's a liability rather than a feature :)

Re:There is no best Linux for games (1)

thryllkill (52874) | more than 9 years ago | (#11624281)

I hate to do this, but I have got to call bullshit on this. I run WoW both on WinXP and VidaLinux with Cedega. Cedega's performance is crap for this game. Just one look at their forums could tell you that, but I am telling you from experience, it sucks. Especially if you want to go anywhere there are other people.

In windows my average fps hover around 50 - 60 when soloing somewhere, and 35 - 45 when in a populated area. On Linux with Cedega however it hovers around 15 - 20 when solo and drops to an unplayable 5 - 10.

All that being said, I am impressed with what the Transgaming folks have done, but please don't spread shit like that. I'm not entirely sure what you mean by runs faster computationally, but even if it is doing things faster, if you can't see what's going on the performance is still crap.

You are correct about native games though, they no doubt run better and smoother on Linux than on Windows (except maybe Neverwinter Nights, and my only gripe there is that the mouse feels slugish sometimes).

Why are you considering Linux? (5, Insightful)

ratboy666 (104074) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620931)

Let me put it this way:

You are buying a vehicle. You want something fun, fast and sporty. You go and buy a 3/4 ton pickup. Mistake!

Select your OS based on what you want to run. If what you are running is "Windows Games", examine the first word -- Windows -- and run them on that platform. If you want to run Linux, go and buy VMWARE, and run Linux on the same box. No big sweat, and no particular problem.

Or, use the money you would spend on VMWARE, and buy another box for Linux.

I am sure that you will get a lot of "Red Hat sucks", "Gentoo rules", "SuSe rules", "Mandrake is the schiznit" answers.

Ignore them. Again, pick a REASON as to why you want to use Linux -- is it a hobby? if so, Gentoo or "Linux from Scratch" may be suitable. Do you want to do real work? Red Hat/Fedora Core or SuSe. Whatever, its your choice.

If you *do* explore VMWARE, you may want to pick a VMWARE supported system.

Anyway, the OS is a commodity (at least in the Linux world, with Microsoft, it tends to be forced on you based on applications -- it's the platform). So don't sweat it.

Ratboy.

Re:Why are you considering Linux? (1)

Datasage (214357) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620997)

Im pretty sure VMWARE does not support hardware acceleration for video or sound card. At least when I last checked. If they have recently added some king of passthrough to get hardware acceleration, then it may work.

Re:Why are you considering Linux? (1)

ratboy666 (104074) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621720)

Run the Windows version of VMWARE, and run Linux under that, of course.

Ratboy.

KVM switch (2, Interesting)

doorbender (146144) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621521)

When I get home I game and have grown tired of trying to get linux to run the games i want to play, AND don't have the budget to buy a second virtual OS.

SOOOOOO

I recommend a KVM switch. Run lin on one box and win on the other.

AND ATI suck as it is THERE fault they have crappy support (if you can find any) for linux.

I feel like a jilted lover. 5 years ago I swore by ATI but now I only allow myself to have one ATI card at a time so I can use linux on the other pcs.

Windows (-1)

infojack (25600) | more than 9 years ago | (#11620972)

I'm guessing windows is the best platform to play windows games. Well unless you are a fucking moron. Which it sounds like you are.

Everytime you use Cedega... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11620978)

...you kill a puppy. It's true.

See: 10 Points to Consider Before Buying Cedega [curmudgeongamer.com] .

Heh.

Gentoo is a possibility (2, Informative)

the_greywolf (311406) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621023)

i run Gentoo and had no trouble getting Cedega working.

that said, i also use Con Kolivas' kernel patchset. initially i had problems, but we came up with a nice list of audio tips [kolivas.org] to help get things working right.

i'm waiting right now for some work Ingo Molnar has indicated he's going to do that could help Wine out dramatically. be prepared to recompile your kernel several times in the near future.

3 letter answer (4, Insightful)

gothzilla (676407) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621040)

KVM

Just get a KVM switch and hook it up to a linux box and a windows box. Problem solved.

Re:3 letter answer (1)

Malohin (167866) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622405)

Unfortunately, a KVM switch introduces other problems. I've tried this, with limited success: fuzzy video at higher resolutions, poor mouse support, little or no mouse-wheel support, little or no three-button support, etc.

The more capable switches are trying to do more than simply connecting to the target machines. In general, the "dumber" the switch is, the better it should perform as a "game toggle."

-- Dr. Bob

STL (DuBourg, STLSFS, Rivendell, The Shire, Archon, Fontbonne)
CA (Planet 10, Realty Fault)

zen linux (2, Informative)

jbltgz (549512) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621053)

try zen linux [zenlinux.org] , then apt-get install wine.

SuSE (3, Informative)

TheRealJFM (671978) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621111)

I recommend SuSE here, simply because of its driver support. It installs the nvidia drivers at install time if you have a net connection, and provides a good GUI to control all of that.

One click enabling of direct rendering (3d acceleration) is something that I think would be a godsend to most new users.

Also SuSE's exellent documentation cannot be ignored.

On the cedega front I suggest you do try this! It plays Counter Strike via Steam perfectly here, though I can't comment on WOW or anything like that.

I've heard Half Life 2 support is pretty good, and there are a lot of revies on the net that show it's working pretty well. In fact its cedega that's tempting me to go and buy HL2 - an interesting fact since I don't own a windows pc :p

The best thing to do is to just *try* all these things. SuSE isn't free, but there is an FTP install that should cover everything you need for gaming (the commercial extensions wont help you here and the drivers for nvidia are downloaded at install time or during a later online update).

The only problem with SuSE is a lack of a good package manager, but the installation of Apt For SuSE (http://linux01.gwdg.de/apt4rpm/) solves any problems here.

As for stability I'd recommend SuSE over Mandrake, in usablilty i'd recommend it over just about everything, and I'd recommend it for gamers over the other distros.

I'm happy to answer any questions. :)

(I recommend other distros for other things (eg slackware or debian for servers) but thats not the point. For home users its SuSE all the way)

Re:SuSE (1)

brkello (642429) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622648)

Personally, I would avoid SuSE at all costs. While I don't use it for home use, I have a lot of experience with it at work. I don't use this by choice, just an external company decided to go with it, so we do all our related testing on it as well. I have had so many problems with SuSE, I don't know where to begin. The first one that was really bizarre, is that if you have multiple NICs in it, it will sometimes decide to flip which interface is associated which eth (as in, eth0 and eth1 are now flipped). If these use different drivers, or are on different networks, you have to reassign them. On the current version I am using, man pages seg fault, and it refuses to run a 2.6 kernel. The list goes on and on, it is just an inferior product. I never have any of these weird problems with Red Hat/Fedora...so yeah, I am sure your experience may vary, but I will never touch SuSE again unless I have to.

Re:SuSE (1)

TheRealJFM (671978) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622744)

SuSE is one of the few distros i've used where everything works without excess playing around.

i wouldn't recommend it for a business environment, though. maybe xandros for that

I think you must be using a very old and pre-novell version, since 9.2 comes with kernel 2.6 installed by default.

i haven't experienced any of those problems, and i am on some *very* weird hardware ;)

Since Fedora Core 1 came with a 2.6 kernel (tell me if i'm wrong, it might have been fedora core 2) its a bit unfair to compare a very old distro to a brand new one :p

Fedora for me has been a nightmare, so it *is* different for everyone! Mandrake has always been ok, as has debian and so on...

I still stand by my SuSE recommendation. With creative partitioning you can try a linux distro a day without ever losing your data, I suggest to everyone that they at least *try* these things! :)

Re:SuSE (1)

brkello (642429) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623003)

Well, if they don't have to pay for it, yeah, try everything! And you are correct, I am having to use an older distro. That's how this business works is that you take the latest and greatest at the time and then make it stable and standard. So I am using something that is just pre-9. But my experience with it scares me off from future use. Like, YAST2 is a real easy way to configure stuff for people unfamiliar with Linux. But it is extremely irritating when you make changes the normal way and they don't take. Everyone I work with who has played around with SuSE has been very displeased. I would hope that later releases improve (they usually do or the product dies), but the lack of quality and stability in the past really discourages me.

Re:SuSE (1)

TheRealJFM (671978) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623177)

yeah... this is all a matter of opinion, of course ;)

I am not a corporate user, so I tend to take very simple approaches where I don't have to worry about compatibility, etc

however, now Novell are at the helm of SuSE things have changed quite a bit in that respect.

its also all LSB, so things should be fine as far as manually configuring stuff

I don't really know, though, i'm usually happy just to use Yast which i think is a good tool, although for a lot of things (antivir, ntp, apt, etc) i do it by hand

no problems so far, but then this is all relative... :)

of course, if manufacturers designed hardware specifically for linux I would have far less problems...
oh well..

Get a console (3, Insightful)

fr0dicus (641320) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621272)

Install Linux, get a console, and simplify. The Xbox has or is getting 75% of what's decent on the PC. Joypads take five minutes to learn unless you're mentally deficient.

Re:Get a console (1)

Suddenly_Dead (656421) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623815)

75% of what's decent? I play lots of RTS's that won't ever get on the Xbox, what with the fact that consoles rarely ever get traditional real-time strategy games. I really wouldn't mind playing them with a controller and low-res TV. Empire Earth 2, Age of Empires 3, these are two to look out for on the PC (blah blah, sequels, blah blah). There are FPS's that likely won't get on the Xbox. What good FPS games are going to be / were ported? I don't care for Doom 3. The Tribes games, UT200X, Battlefield *, and Half-life 2 won't likely get ported, and if by some chance they do I would bet against modding and mapping working. I like modding, and the Xbox has a dang hard drive. RPGs? Xbox is doing okay in this department. KOTOR 1 and 2 are there, and Jade Empire is coming (yay Bioware). Morrowind was released on the console, but lacking the ability for mods and such wasn't so good. Other than those, the only RPGs I've cared for "recently" are NWN and Guildwars. Xbox would rock if it had Guildwars. No proper flight simulators on the Xbox, nor realistic combat flight sims. Freeware? No freeware =(. I've had fun recently with some free / open source games, such as the free ones from ABA Games. Fun fun. And, of course, NO MODS / CUSTOM MAPS. Blar. I play mods and custom maps on many of my games, and they increase the playability by a huge amount.

Re:Get a console (1)

Suddenly_Dead (656421) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623877)

Crud, I messed the other comment up. Please ignore, really, just ignore it. It shouldn't be hard with that huge, unformatted mass anyways. 75% of what's decent? I play lots of RTS's that won't ever get on the Xbox, what with the fact that consoles rarely ever get traditional real-time strategy games. I really wouldn't mind playing them with a controller and low-res TV. Empire Earth 2, Age of Empires 3, these are two to look out for on the PC (blah blah, sequels, blah blah). There are FPS's that likely won't get on the Xbox. What good FPS games are going to be / were ported? I don't care for Doom 3. The Tribes games, UT200X, Battlefield *, and Half-life 2 won't likely get ported, and if by some chance they do I would bet against modding and mapping working. I like modding, and the Xbox has a dang hard drive. RPGs? Xbox is doing okay in this department. KOTOR 1 and 2 are there, and Jade Empire is coming (yay Bioware). Morrowind was released on the console, but lacking the ability for mods and such wasn't so good. Other than those, the only RPGs I've cared for "recently" are NWN and Guildwars. Xbox would rock if it had Guildwars. No proper flight simulators on the Xbox, nor realistic combat flight sims. Freeware? No freeware =(. I've had fun recently with some free / open source games, such as the free ones from ABA Games. Fun fun. And, of course, NO MODS / CUSTOM MAPS. Blar. I play mods and custom maps on many of my games, and they increase the playability by a huge amount.

Re:Get a console (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11623912)

Anony post this time. I have HTML formatting enabled by default, swapped it to plain text, and accidentally switched back before reposting. Please, kill me (karma-wise) now.

Re:Get a console (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11624069)

console pads are great for some types of games but suck for others.

driving games work well on console pads

rts games totally such on console pads

first person shooters are ok on consoles IF they are designed for consoles (its near impossible to aim both accurately and fast with a pad console games get around this with a small degree of auto-aim and/or a slower pace that makes fast accurate aiming unessacery)

beat-em-ups are generally pretty good on consoles

and then you have all the mods for PC games that can carry a games value way beyond the original content.

Re:Get a console (1)

the_greywolf (311406) | more than 9 years ago | (#11624365)

then i must really not like 75% of what's decent on the PC.

the only reason i can even remotely see for buying an XBox is Halo and Halo 2. but i simply can't justify buying a $150 console for two $70 games that require a $35 addon and a $50/mo service, and then plug all tat shit into a $100 TV i don't yet own.

you can keep your XBox. but keep it away from me.

A follow-on question... (3, Funny)

fmaxwell (249001) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621290)

What Linux Distribution is the Best for Games?

And which Lotus is best for off-roading?

just one user's opinion (3, Informative)

rogabean (741411) | more than 9 years ago | (#11621526)

As a longtime Cedega (wineX) user I've had best luck under Mandrake in general. Suse was my preferred distro prior but as of the last year I've had nothing but trouble gaming under it... Fedora seemed to do ok, but the most solid so far (currently playing the two games you mentioned) has been Mandrake for gaming purposes.

Go Native! (2, Interesting)

JTorres176 (842422) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622064)

Okay, well, maybe not native. I use slackware and SuSE 9.2. I haven't been able to get ATI's drivers to work for Slack for almost a year now, but SuSE's downloads work well if you follow their instructions EXACTLY! I'd say go native for gaming though. There's flight simulators, Seach and Rescue, and a good number of others available. Also, playing Return to Castle Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory on Windows yields about 80fps at 1024x786 on my RV350AP, in linux, it's over 100fps, occasionally spiking to about 120 even with all of the effects maxed out. I tried playing the windows port of ET under cedega, and I was getting about 60fps with much less effects turned on. That's just over half of the usual performance I get from the ported linux version. If you can help it, get a ported linux game, or even a native linux game. First, showing support for native linux games shows developers that there's a market out there for linux gamers.. Second, they just work better than trying to emulate another OS on top of an OS that's already running.

Ubuntu (2, Interesting)

sn0wman3030 (618319) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622513)

I run Ubuntu and play WoW all the time. While games don't run as fast as they do nativly in Windows, the convenience is undeniable. I'd recommend any debian or rpm based distrobution because Transgaming distributes Cedega packaged with both of those.

As I see it (1)

agraupe (769778) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622564)

As I see it, unless you have your *very first ever* gaming computer, there is no reason to not run Windows in addition to Linux. Eventually you will get a new one, and when you do, your old one can serve as your everyday linux box, with no dual booting, and only the additional cost of the KVM switch.

Vidalinux or Ubuntu (3, Insightful)

mushroom blue (8836) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622590)

if you're wanting an OS to play games, I'd say try Gentoo [gentoo.org] , and maybe check out Ubuntu [ubuntulinux.org] as well.

I'm a Gentoo guy, but I totally understand why people wouldn't want to go through the long install process. This is why VidaLinux [vidalinux.com] exists. VidaLinux is essentially a precompiled Gentoo (with Gnome 2.8, etc), installed with Redhat's Anaconda Installer. works amazingly well Full working Gentoo distribution up and running in under an hour.

don't want to compile future packages? that's allright. just check out Project Chinstrap [alternating.net] , which has precompiled packages for Gentoo. Easy as pie.

Ubuntu has its share of issues, but overall, it's a top-notch choice as well. both should work amazingly well for games.

Ubuntu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11622653)

i mod for the ubuntu forums as jdodson. anyways, i would recommend *shock* ubuntu for gaming. the reason why i would is that setting up your nvidia(ASSuming you use nvidia) card is a breeze. run three commands from console and you are done. also i have succesfully run Halflife2, War3, Starcraft(via cedega) and even native games like UT2004, Neverwinter Nights, Tuxkart, chromium, etc, etc. Anyways, setup for Ubuntu is a breeze if you follow the documentation on http://www.ubuntuguide.org for setup of said video drivers. we also maintain a list of native gnu/linux games at this URL: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=5153

Doing the big switcheroo (1, Interesting)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | more than 9 years ago | (#11622767)

I've been thinking of doing the big switcheroo from Windows to Linux.

If you're really thinking about dumping Windows, have you considered OS X? While there aren't anywhere near as many games on OS X as there are for Windows, the ones we do get are quality titles with native support, like World of WarCraft, Halo, The Sims, etc. You can find a pretty good list of games at Apple's web site. [apple.com] You can easily dip your toes into the water by ordering a Mac mini.

Any one is fine, with exceptions... (2, Interesting)

ftgow (791708) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623290)

Any distro will do fine, so in that regard whatever distro is fastest, will in turn be fastest for games. Slackware (my distro) and Gentoo are the obvious choices. I game Doom 3 and UT2004 on those. Fedora on the other hand really fucks around with the kernels, games will work, but unless you for some reason NEED Fedora, don't even use it at all. For instance, all kernels shipped with it by default are set to run with 64 GIGABYTE high memory support. Thats a waste, and they use the same kernel even your lil 32 bit athlon XP. Your best bet for speed in terms of desktop-interactivity is something like Slackware or Gentoo with a fast kernel you compile yourself. Take an hour to really work up a good kernel config with either the gentoo-dev-sources 2.6 package, or for something like slackware use the kernel source package for the 2.6.x-ck3 patchset from linux-milita.net. At the bair minimum use a 2.6 pre-emptive kernel. One thing to note about my favourite Distro, Slackware (with the aformentioned kernel) is that cedega detects it doesnt use 'pthreads'. Since midway into the wineX version 3 products they started checking for it, as some games can use them/wont work without them. Slackware's glibc doesnt support pthreads, but for all intents and purposes all the games I tried were unaffected by THAT... Not for WineX/Cedega itself. It REALLY isnt worth it. Believe it or not, the games don't work. If your game doesnt work in WineX it is really worth a shot to run it in wine, if it doesnt work in there, dont reboot into windows. Just stop playing the game. Not because it will 'fuel the linux gaming revolution!!!' but because the game probably sucks. The really really good games with the excellent mod support (half-life 2 and Source blows) get Linux ports. Regardless the way WineX works is when a game comes out they Transgaming Rushes and hacks in support into cedega, and it really doesnt work well accorss everyones systems. Your best bet, if you REALLY can't live without the latest shitty starwars game, or the latest piece of directx garbage, Wine will soon have support for it. If you look into Winehq.com you can see that they are already doing very well with their start up work for DirectX9 implemations. And unlike transgaming they are taking their time to do it right. They are making a platform to run the games, Transgaming forked Wine, and now are trying desperatily in vain to use the executable and hack in all the needed stuff to make the game work as best as humanly possible. Plus Wine is FREE. In conclusion, Forget about Fedora, and use 2.6 kernels, the distribution from that point on in irrevlant. And hasnt this question been posed numerous times in the past? It always ends in that same kind of conclusion. PS Gentoo is the fastest of them all, but if you dont mind losing a frame or to in your games use slackware.(thats all you really get it you do your own kernels in something like slackware) You also dont have to compile everything and (insert gentoo complaints here), if thats your beef. I LIKE gentoo's emerge, but my school's connection sucks balls so it would be really difficult to get my stuff downloaded and compiled.

My solution (1)

drakethegreat (832715) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623929)

Well this is not reasonable for most people but the way I did it is just by having two systems with one running Windows and the other Linux. Then I just use Windwos for games. I'm hoping someday that game studios will stop this kind of situation but until then I have a monitor switch and two systems.

OSS games (1)

soupdevil (587476) | more than 9 years ago | (#11623996)

So where are the OSS games, written for Linux by the OSS community?

It seems there is a double standard with games -- many who preach the superiority, or at least usability of apps like Gimp, Firefox and Open Office, apparently go home and play Windows-only games.

I, for one, would be quite interested in supporting games developed specifically for Linux.

Swappable Hard Drives (1)

Phrogman (80473) | more than 9 years ago | (#11624221)

I have 2 swappable HDs and a HD bay on my computer here. When I want to work under Linux, in goes drive A and I can do some serious computing. When I want to fuck around playing Windows games, I put in drive B and I can play City of Heroes.

Its superior to dual booting to my mind, each OS is completely separate and cannot possibly affect the other one, and its relatively painless to switch them around. At the same time while I am in Linux, I am not tempted to fire up a game as a distraction :P

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