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When Should You Quit Your Job?

Cliff posted more than 9 years ago | from the how-much-is-too-much dept.

Businesses 1245

Moe Taxes asks: "I want to hear from Slashdot readers who have quit jobs or turned down offered jobs because it was not what they wanted to do. Why did you do it? Was it ethics, ambition, pride, or disgust? And how did it turn out? Did you get to do what you wanted to do, are you still looking, or did you come back begging for another chance? I have always written software for windows, but never with Microsoft tools. I don't feel like I have enough control over the product when I use Microsoft programming environments. My company was bought recently, and is in the process of becoming a C# VisualStudio shop. I said thanks, but no thanks and left. Am I a fool for giving up steady work and good pay?"

cancel ×

1245 comments

Better have something inline (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11826964)

Am I a fool for giving up steady work and good pay

Yes.


Don't ever quite (read it twice) unless you have something else in line.

Re:Better have something inline (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11826997)

Quite twice?

Re:Better have something inline (5, Insightful)

DoktorMel (35110) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827077)

Maybe not a fool, but definitely foolhardy. I think a lot in this situation depends on whether or not you have anyone else to support. Would I do the same? Absolutely not, but I've got a wife with MS and a need for continuous health coverage.

All that aside, the choice of programming tools strikes me as a very silly reason to leave a perfectly good job when you could have sat there getting paid to look for another one.

Re:Better have something inline (4, Interesting)

Alien54 (180860) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827119)

Don't ever quite (read it twice) unless you have something else in line.

the spell checking nazis will have fun with that

That said, I actually quit one job because the boss was a roller coaster alchoholic, smooth and polite one day, mean and vindictive and nasty the next. I left for mental health reasons, not wanting to become a news item in the local news paper. It is never a good thing when you start contemplating evil things to do to your boss.

In this case, it was a wise move on my part

This is really extrange (4, Interesting)

Charles Dexter Ward (554934) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827132)

(posted it somewhere else but the formatting was awful)

Two and a half years ago I was switching jobs and an Ask Slashdot on the topic gave me a few hints on how to do it well and it's been great since then. Now I have a new offer and am in the middle of a very hard decision:

I'm a programmer. I think I'll be a programmer all my life. When I do tasks in the real world I envision solutions almost as code. I was born to write code, and have done so for over 10 years now. But being a university drop-out my future has always worried me: I know people don't hire older programmers, and being 27 this is something that's hainting me.

So my current employer made me an offer to manage a new office in a town where it would be fairly easy for me to continue my university studies where I left them; but, as fate has it, I was given another offer to stay in the city I'm in with a higher pay (more than double of what I make now, almost three times) and a really high rank (Executive Manager of a really big company). When we got to the point of my lack of university degree, they downplayed it and said they could help me continue my studies, but as I see it is not a priority. Now, in the middle of this dilemma is the whole relocation problem.

My question would be this: How would you play it? I'd love to make a lot of money, but if I take the Executive Manager position I'll most probably never write code again, and may still not have a diploma; but if I take the lower, manager position with my current employer I'll be really comfortable in an environment that I like, but may never have a chance to climb up that higher in the positions ladder.

I tend to think that once I've gotten to the higher positions the university diploma will not matter much, but I'm not certain on how true this really is.

Re:Better have something inline (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827138)

Let me give you my own experience on this.

I quit my job as a ASP/MSSQL-developer because I found it boring, non-developing and generally fucked up (had a hourly charge-rate against customer @ ~130h & got paid ~16h - nothing exceptional for a junior consultant in sweden really).

Soo I went to university, studied a bit, worked a bit. Played around with code, ideas and concepts. This month I _almost_ pulled my old salary in adsense-ad-revenue. I guess I'm doing something right because I have alot of free time, can work with ideas I like, I can study what I find intresting.

Anyone staying at a workplace which doesn't intrest or make you happy is a stupid loser. But I dont complain, it makes it soo much easier for people like me to realize my ideas without the competition from those people.

So, you're wrong AC.

Re:Better have something inline (4, Funny)

Jakhel (808204) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827143)

Don't ever quite (read it twice) unless you have something else in line.

The same rule applies to relationships..don't ever break up with a girl unless you have someone else in line. :)

Re:Better have something inline (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827149)

I kind of agree with the other AC.

I live in a smallish college town and worked at the same place since about 1986 (with a one year hiatus in 1989). The only Microsoft tool we ever used was the Macro 80 assembler on CP/M. After moving to DOS and then Windows, we pretty much only used Borland products.

Though they were inching toward more Microsoft-centric programming (interfacing with Excel, Access, etc), I left for other reasons. Way too much travel, way too many hours, an insufferable boss and too much financial uncertainty. I left for a lower paying position elsewhere to avoid those things, but

I made damned sure I had a decent job lined up before leaving!

Now (5, Funny)

obrienb (579428) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826969)

About the time you start asking Slashdot if it is time to quit:-)

Well... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11826972)

Not if you can find another job.

The short answer (0, Troll)

PHPee (559830) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826975)

"Am I a fool for giving up steady work and good pay?"

Yes. Yes you are.

of course you are a fool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11826976)

You gave up a job when you didn't have another job. That's always foolish.

You are the only one (5, Funny)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826979)

who can know. It's like asking-- "I got Rocky Road at Baskin Robins with my Yahoo coupon, did I get the wrong flavor?"

Re:You are the only one (1)

garaux (515436) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827141)

Ha! Ha! Ha!

someone mod this guy up!

yes (5, Insightful)

SparafucileMan (544171) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826981)

Yes. I mean, ok, so it's your call. But does it really matter what OS/environment you work with? I always thought real programmers could care less... It's not like you're doing it for fun--you ARE getting paid, after all. Besides, you should have waited till you found a new job before you quit your old one.

Yes (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11826982)

>Am I a fool for giving up steady work and good pay?

Yes. Next Question.

I just turned one down last week... (0)

dnaboy (569188) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826983)

My rule is if they can't beat me in a sales call, I won't even consider it.

yeah, and I got the plum (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11826984)

I turned down the windoze job and took the linux job, dood.

Short answer? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11826986)

Yes.

When? (3, Insightful)

Snap E Tom (128447) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826989)

Simple. When I get 100% vesting in the 401(k). Meanwhile, I just suck up the BS and deal.

Yeah I've turned down work (3, Interesting)

toygeek (473120) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826990)

It was a job as a network/systems admin at a manufacturing and development plant. After doing some side work for them, and many long discussions with the owner, I realized the guy was full of himself and wanted somebody who was just as full of it as he was. I'm not that guy, so I bowed out. It turned out to be the best career decision I've made!

Re:Yeah I've turned down work (1)

Heem (448667) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827140)

err..terrifyingly, I just interviews for a system admin at a manufacturing and development plant. Without being stupidly specific (unless you don't care) can you tell me at least maybe.. what state this was in, so I don't make the same mistake?

thanks

Need more info.... (2, Insightful)

elid (672471) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826991)

Are you married? Does your spouse work? How much money do you have saved up? What was your income? Where do you live? How old are you? How much experience do you have? etc, etc.

Always have another paycheck lined up... (5, Insightful)

stankulp (69949) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826994)


...before quitting any job with a paycheck.

Unless you have no use for money.

When should you quite your job? (1)

hendridm (302246) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826996)

"Nothing for you to see here. Please move along."

Wow, my employer must have updated their content filtering. Pretty sophisticated!

Joking aside, you should quit your job when you have a better one waiting for you, unless you live with your parents... Then I guess it doesn't really matter.

A fool? Maybe. (1)

MeanMF (631837) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826998)

If you really needed the paycheck and you're going to have financial problems because you're not drawing a paycheck then you're a fool. If that's not the case, then there's no reason to keep working while you devote yourself to finding a job that you will not hate.

Why work when you can stay home and watch '24'? (0)

LibertineR (591918) | more than 9 years ago | (#11826999)

Then, when the US is saved from disaster, you and your buddies can become professional gamers. That is, if you havent sold your computer for food.....

I would have.. (1)

bot (235273) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827001)

.. found another job before quitting.

That said, if your heart isnt in it, it doesn't make any sense to continue.

Have a soul. (0, Flamebait)

Seth Finklestein (582901) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827005)

I know this might sound intolerant, but I refuse to work at any job where their software conflicts with my ideologies. To use Microsoft's closed-source, insecure, untrustworthy computing in this day and age is inexcusable. If the morons who made that choice aren't fired for their incompetude, then you don't deserve to work for them.

That's all.

Sincerely,
Seth Finklestein
Moral Champion of the People

When You get Bored (4, Insightful)

moofdaddy (570503) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827006)

Life is very short, if you don't believe in god then this is truley the only go at things you'll have. Every day should be fun and everything you do you should enjoy, you should be interested in, it should intrigue you. Because of this you shouldn't spend time doing something you dislike, that bores you, etc. A smart person can find a good job, one that they like, one that they love, if they look hard enough.

A great indication of when you should quit your job is when you wake up every morning and dread going into work. Its okay to wish you were doing something else, but if you wake up and always hate the idea of going into the office then it is probably a good time to find a new line of work.

Re:When You get Bored (5, Insightful)

TonyZahn (534930) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827142)

"A great indication of when you should quit your job is when you wake up every morning and dread going into work." I've always told people I base it off the quality of my Sunday afternoons. If you get a sick feely in the pit of your stomach Sunday afternoon knowing that you have to go back tomorrow, it's time to leave.

Re:When You get Bored (1)

martok (7123) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827144)

Though this sounds nice in theory, it doesn't quite work for most people. If you have a family to support, it's not exactly practical to quit a job just because you don't enjoy working. I've been on both ends of this, in jobs I enjoy and those I don't and I would never leave a job, no matter what it was unless I had something else lined up which I am certain could support my family.

Be A Whore (0)

Hawkeye477 (163893) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827010)

OK the one piece of advice I can give is BE A WHORE and go wherever the money is. Money = Happyness in anything unless u are doing what u truely love (and come on, who is reallllly doing what they truley love?) . Anyone who tell u otherwise is a poor son-of-a-bitch trying to make himself feel better about his situation. GO AFTER MONEY, that is it. You will be happier, wealthier and have more fun toys to play with in long run!

first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827011)

First. You should quit it first. Jobs are for losers and the overemployed. If you want to do work in the world, you can only depend upon yourself.

Re:first (1)

halivar (535827) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827092)

First. You should quit it first. Jobs are for losers and the overemployed. If you want to do work in the world, you can only depend upon yourself.

Well, to be more exact, jobs are for losers, the overemployed, and the parents who want you to quit playing Halo 2 move out of their basement.

If you have to ask. . . (1)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827016)

then you've already made your decision.

RE: (1)

rdilallo (682529) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827018)

If it's a big company, there's a chance that you can get reorganized to a different area, possibly getting away from what ales you. However, I've always believed that money talks...

When? (3, Funny)

MarkGriz (520778) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827019)

Just before your boss catches you reading "When Should You Quit Your Job" on slashdot, when you're supposed to be working.

Re:When? (2, Funny)

0racle (667029) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827137)

Shit.

This is really extrang (0, Redundant)

Charles Dexter Ward (554934) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827021)

Two and a half years ago I was switching jobs and an Ask Slashdot on the topic gave me a few hints on how to do it well and it's been great since then. Now I have a new offer and am in the middle of a very hard decision: I'm a programmer. I think I'll be a programmer all my life. When I do tasks in the real world I envision solutions almost as code. I was born to write code, and have done so for over 10 years now. But being a university drop-out my future has always worried me: I know people don't hire older programmers, and being 27 this is something that's hainting me. So my current employer made me an offer to manage a new office in a town where it would be fairly easy for me to continue my university studies where I left them; but, as fate has it, I was given another offer to stay in the city I'm in with a higher pay (more than double of what I make now, almost three times) and a really high rank (Executive Manager of a really big company). When we got to the point of my lack of university degree, they downplayed it and said they could help me continue my studies, but as I see it is not a priority. Now, in the middle of this dilemma is the whole relocation problem. My question would be this: How would you play it? I'd love to make a lot of money, but if I take the Executive Manager position I'll most probably never write code again, and may still not have a diploma; but if I take the lower, manager position with my current employer I'll be really comfortable in an environment that I like, but may never have a chance to climb up that higher in the positions ladder. I tend to think that once I've gotten to the higher positions the university diploma will not matter much, but I'm not certain on how true this really is.

Re:This is really extrang (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827093)

I'm a programmer

Based on the formatting of your post, I'll go out on a limb and assume you are not an HTML programmer.

Re:This is really extrang (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827131)

HTML isn't programming, it's formatting

Re:This is really extrang (1)

sabernar (245306) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827134)

You're 27 and you're worried about being an "older programmer"???

Re:This is really extrang (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827153)

What kind of idiot is offered an Executive Manager decision and then has to ask the /. community, "What should I do? What should I do?"

And what's the crap about 27 being too old to be a programmer (or anything even close to that)?

What is steady? (2, Insightful)

ravenspear (756059) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827022)

I think "steady work" in this case is a bit of a misnomer. If you hate your job, don't like the work, or desperately want to leave, then you are not going to be productive, you will have a lot of stress, you will probably be irritable most of the time, and in general you will not fit very well with the position. I don't think I would characterize that as a "steady" employment situation. It would likely be very tumultuous.

Burn any bridges? (1)

Ransak (548582) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827023)

You can always look for work, but if that dream job doesn't turn up you can always try to go back with your tail between your legs. I've never done it, but I've worked with a few people that have quit and came back anywhere from a few weeks to months later.

Moral of the story - burning bridges closes doors, so be careful with your napalm.

We'll make it easy for you. (2, Funny)

halivar (535827) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827024)

Dear Mr. Johnson,

Our IT department has been monitoring your web activity these past few months, and we're sorry to say your continued employment is no longer necessary.

Mr. Szleswinsczky
Management

In the post dot-com bubble world... (5, Interesting)

KiltedKnight (171132) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827025)

Yes. You should've held on, but been actively looking. For whatever reason, business logic is, "We'll wait 2-3 weeks for the person who has a job instead of hiring the person who's available immediately because they're out of work."

How well prepared are you? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827027)

Do you have cash income stored up to last you through downtime? Do you have job possibilities? Are you just being stubborn because you hate Microsoft? How do you like the taste of Ramen noodles?

Not a Smart Move (5, Insightful)

EastCoastSurfer (310758) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827028)

Unless you were being forced to do something illegal it doesn't make a lot sense to quit a job before having another one lined up. It sucks to be forced into an unfun job situation but there is a reason why work is called work. Sometimes you have to do things that suck. Good luck on finding another job.

Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827030)

Yes you are a fool. You should say it loud and proud in a mirror 10 times a day. Having a pay check in hand gives you a lot more time to find the job you want without having to take something that comes a long. You have now put your self in a situation where you may have to take a job that may be less desireable then the one you had. You should have looked while you were employed. Paycheck vs. No Paycheck duh.

i luv my job (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827035)

head IT guy at a non-profit, i have flexible hours, semi-decent pay, caual dress, lots of time off.

i could be making probably 10k more (easily), but i don't think i could find a job i luv like this one.

when (1)

kv9 (697238) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827037)

when the environment doesnt suit you anymore, its perfectly alright to quit. i know i did. no regrets either.

Are you a fool for quitting? In this case ... (3, Insightful)

osewa77 (603622) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827038)

In this case, you probably made a mistake. Microsoft tools are excellent for Windows development. C# is easier to use than C++. If a job makes you unhappy, you shuld probably look for a new one but I don't see that there's any reason to believe that using the latest Microsoft tools for windows development will make you unhappy. Sorry.

hmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827041)

I want to quit my job, but don't have anything worthwhile lined up. I can't afford to leave this shithole behind, purely for financial reasons. Should I quit anyway? Probably. Will I? Probably not.

I said no to COBOL (2, Funny)

digitalgimpus (468277) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827044)

No thanks...

Punchcard and a hole puncher were all I needed.

Trendy keyboards... damn hippies.

Like to see how many kiddies out there can code a if/then/else in under 5 minutes. /me is 21 years old.

IMO (1)

Coneasfast (690509) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827048)

remember, it's a job, it pays the rent, and unless you actually hated it, you should have kept it.

anyways, you can still honour your ethics and values when contributing to open source projects.

just my 2 cents.

tools are tools (2, Insightful)

vidalsasoon (555891) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827050)

microsoft tools too good for you?

Good luck... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827054)

I don't feel like I have enough control over the product when I use Microsoft programming environments.

Good luck finding another job writing Windows software using non-Microsoft development tools.

Anyway, care to elaborate on this lack of "control"?

Common sense... (1)

aventius (814491) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827055)

You only quit after you have your next job lined up. Working at paying job you hate is better than sitting on the couch watching soap operas and not getting paid. Use vacation time to job search. Of course, I have never followed this advice but oh well...

ehem... (2, Insightful)

bjk002 (757977) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827057)

Kinda late to worry about it now isn't it?

Don't quit until you have found another job. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827058)

Do yourself a favour. Keep working steadying at your current job (don't overwork) and start looking for other work. Being jobless really really sucks.

Not Worth It (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827059)

I left a job I hated with nowhere to go from there. After driving around and hearing a story on the radio about psychological experiments performed on Jews by Nazis wherein they were ordered to move piles of rocks from one side of a yard to another and back again until they lost their minds, I decided no job was worth waking up and dreading my day every morning and put in my notice. I ended up going back to a previous job (in a completely different industry) and never regretting my decision.

Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827065)

Why did you do it? Was it ethics, ambition, pride, or disgust?

My company stopped offering donut day, so i quit

yes (1)

wren337 (182018) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827066)

Am I a fool for giving up steady work and good pay?

Yes.

Next time, try doing a half-assed job while creating a poisoned atmosphere by trash-talking the company with your co-workers. You'll get the same pay for very little work. Then, once it's clear to everyone that you're not interested in the job, start fishing for a new one.

Foolish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827069)

I assume you are young, free and fairly single.
One day you will not be; One day you will have no income. You need to be putting a fairly large chunk of your salary away for retirement *now*, or you will end up in the same situation I am; 40, no savings, likely to have to work till I die. Want to join me in that? No, I suspect not.

P.S. when I say you are foolish, I speak from experience :o)

Get another job first (2, Insightful)

farnz (625056) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827070)

Where you're in a job which is making you unhappy (whatever the reason), it's inadvisable to leave before you've found something else to pay you.

If you've left, and don't find other work that you enjoy doing soon, you're at risk of ending up stuck doing stuff that you feel is a waste of your skills - something like flipping burgers, answering phones, whatever. You also have an issue getting back into your field later - saying that you quit because you didn't like the tools your employer was using is a potential red flag to a future employer, and may make it impossible to return to a field you enjoy.

Good luck finding a new job!

boss was arrested for child pornography at work .. (2, Interesting)

Spectre (1685) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827073)

Kind of an unusual thing, but I quit a job working at a small computer consulting firm a while after the police showed up at work and arrested my boss for child pornography.

He was convicted, but was sentenced to probation with monitoring ... he kept making remarks about it not being a "real crime" especially since he hadn't been locked up for it.

The job market being pretty good for programmer-types at the time, so I left. The fact that the business was hugely in debt certainly didn't encourage me to stick around, either.

Dear Slashdot, (5, Funny)

wolf- (54587) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827074)

I got a burr up my rear when my company changed hands. I'm an arogant bit of a programmer, and thus left my well paying job.

Now I'm regretting it, and want this forum to bless my rather hasty and immature decision to leave my employee.

Well, I'm not really regretting it, but Mom says it was a fool thing to do, and I'll have to move out of the basement if I dont find work soon.

Thank you.

Proper way (2, Insightful)

killermookie (708026) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827076)

The proper way would have been to do a job search before you quit your job. If you're already employed but want to move on, secure yourself first by having a new job lined up before turning in your notice.

Yeah, I'm sure it really sucks the direction your current job is going but unless your skills are amazingly solid or your name is Linus Torvalds, chances are you're about to have a lot of free time on your hands with no solid income for a while.

Similar Situation (4, Interesting)

The_Real_Nire (786847) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827080)

Right now I am the lone PHP programmer where I work, and I have total control over what operating systems and applications I want ot use on my workstation and servers. However, I recently was offered a job about 3 hours away, where I would have to code in C#, and use Visual Studio, but the pay is 2x what I make now, so I'm going to try at least.

I think its difficult enough for programmers in the US to even get jobs right now, so for me to have the option of doubling my pay in exchange for swallowing my pride, it seems like a smart move. Plus I can always go home and cleanse myself with Linux after work :)

Times have Changed (1)

RetroGeek (206522) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827081)

Am I a fool for giving up steady work and good pay?

During the Dot.com boom, no.

Right now, yes.

The times, they have changed. Unless you have a REALLY good range of skills, and moreover can meet the version number test*, AND are not too old, then the job market is really tough right now.

* This is where an HR department sees that you have experience with Java 1.4.02, but they want Java 1.4.03. Obviously you are not qualified....

Depends (2, Insightful)

nurd68 (235535) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827085)

If you had another job lined up, no. If you didn't but have some money in savings, no dependants, probably not. If you have kids and no money, then it probably was a little too impulsive. Of course, if other working adults within your household are both able and willing to take up the slack, then it's probably not so bad.

I left my company recently, but only resigned after accepting another position.

In short yes... (1)

robotoil (627969) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827086)

A good job and good pay with nothing lined up? I would have stayed until I had something else. I guess you can afford not to have a paycheck. Also, if you're programming in windows anyway, what would the harm be of learning a new set of tools before you left? Is it safe to say you are under 25, no kids, no mortgage, no car payments...etc?

anytime (1)

alfrin (858861) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827087)

Anytime is a good time to quit your job, as long as make sure you file for unempoyment, then they pay you not to work, what isn't cool about that! Or As long as you have the money to back-up your extended not workingness

You're more than a fool. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827090)

You're a moron.

You quit a job over not wanting to use Visual Studio. If some one told me they were going to quit because they didn't like text pad I'd say don't let the door hit ya where the good Lord split ya. In fact I'd seriously look at firing them for sheer stupidity.

How friggin unflexable are you!?!

Moron.

Yay Sabatoge (2, Interesting)

moofdaddy (570503) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827091)

I always knew that it was a good idea to quit working when I started to sabatoge the company I was working for. Honestly, it would always be a reliable sign. I started working as a telemarketer for MBNA for a while I enjoyed annoying people it was kinda fun to see how bad I could get them to yell at me. Then it became a little less fun and i started to fool around. Eventually I got to the point where I would try and waste as much time as possible, I would sneak away to the bathroom when no one was looking and I would turn off every single toliet and urnal (there is a little valve you can twist with a flat headed screw driver). I decided it was time to quit.

I started with Walmart and my first day I started trying to sabatoge them. i decided I should probalby quit the next day. I use my destructive habbits as an indication of when I should probably look for a new place to work.

imho (1)

to_kallon (778547) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827095)

Am I a fool for giving up steady work and good pay?

probably, but i'll qualify it as well. while i wouldn't blame you for leaving if you had another job lined up, given the opportunities for programmers in today's market i, personally, would certainly not burn a job bridge before being securely on another. just my $.02.

Choices (1)

torninfinity (817597) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827097)

I wouldn't have quit the job because of the environment but I would have seriously started looking. I turned down a job (really good money) but because of the amount of travel (80%) but only when I had a sure thing (less money, less travel) to fall back on. If I didn't have the sure thing I would never have turned it down. Having been unemployed and hating it I will do what I must.

Windows (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827105)

What kind of moron programs Windows software without using Microsoft tools? Reality check, MS knows the most about Windows and produces the best programming tools for Windows. Based on your "lack of control" comment I can only surmise you have some hatred towards MS or are just inexperienced. You certainly have as much "control" over writing software as you do with any other toolset under Windows.

Yes and No (1)

peragrin (659227) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827107)

It depends on your situation. You are always a fool for giving up a good job. Of course If you aren't happy then it is wiser to leave.

Of course In this market I would of at least had several interviews lined up before I left. I would make it clear that I am not happy and am looking else where. Leaving with out planning is Generally not a good Idea. I would also try not to leave on a bad note(pick up things to make the tranistion easier)

If anyone can't understand that Ignore them.

Yes I have done this.

It's not easy, it can be ugly. But sometimes Logic doesn't apply

Duh (5, Insightful)

bored (40072) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827110)

Am I a fool for giving up steady work and good pay

Yes, especially if it was just because you hate M$. If you had stayed there long enough to learn C# and then decided it wasn't in your best long term interest that might have been something different. As it is you just lost a perfect opportunity to learn something new and expand your skill set.


It depends (1)

nekoniku (183821) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827111)

If you support yourself, don't have any dependants, and aren't mooching off someone else (for example, your parents, a roommate, or spouse), it's your call. If you've got a household of other people you need to help support, morally you probably would have been wiser to take the unappealing job until you could find another one. FWIW, it's almost always easier to find a job if you already have one.

When your paycheck fails to clear. (2, Informative)

Nonesuch (90847) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827113)

If your employer misses payroll, it's time to take a hike.

True even if (especially if) you are self-employed.

Ask yourself ... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827115)

Did you quit your job because of a personal bias? Did you quit because you don't like Microsoft tools, or because you didn't like the way you thought the company was going to go?

Ask yourself ... "Would I take a job where they said I would be using Microsoft tools for development?" If the answer is no, then you did the right thing. If the answer is yes, I'd say you did the wrong thing.

Personally, I would never quit a job based on the tools they wanted me to develop with. It's like an accountant saying, "We're going to change from using Peoplesoft to Great Plains? I quit, I don't like that tool.". You'd still be doing the same thing, just in a different environment.

I think there is more to this then just "I don't think I have enough control in MS Visual Studio".

Maybe he won the power ball lotto and left such a (1)

My_guzzi (306998) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827116)

Maybe he won the power ball lotto and left such a small detail out ...

depends (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827118)

Am I a fool for giving up steady work and good pay

If you did not have something else lined up definitely "Yes."

if you did. "No."

Your way (1)

raarky (653241) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827120)

I'm not sure about the U.S. but in other places, if they change your role a significant amount, then you have the right for a redunancy option.

I'm assuming you were some sort of *nix developer and if thats the case I think that could be basis enough for redundancy.

The next part is if you are confident your skills can land you another job easily.

I say it's good that you stick to your guns and choose the path that you want as opposed to be a sheep and following the rest of the herd.

Now the next step is the tweak that resume and come up with a good reason why you left your last job and word it in a way that doesn't make it seem like you abandoned your role.

You are idiotic. (2, Insightful)

NipsMG (656301) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827122)

The reason you quit your job is rediculous.

It's asinine to quit your job without another in line just because you wanted to be a l33t pr0gr4mm3r and not write with Microsoft tools. Staying on only would have given you experience with a language you probably don't have much practical experience with, furthering your resume and expanding your knowledge.

You could easily have stayed on and stuck it out while looking for something else. Attitudes like yours make me want to quit this profession.

problem? (1)

grumpyman (849537) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827123)

What is your problem with using C#/VS anyway? If you're concerned about corporate "evilness", then it's just a matter of more or less no matter where we work. How do we escape? Write open source and ask for donations?

Does what feels right (1)

aspx (808539) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827124)

I've learned to trust my instincts when making big decisions. Even if you can't verbalize why something is a good/bad decision, go with your gut. My gut is right more often than my head.

Leaving MS for FOSS (2, Interesting)

Foofoobar (318279) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827129)

I myself am leaving a Microsoft vendor and heading to FOSS as a result of our compnaies inflexible rules. Here is an example:

- Everyone at the company wears the exact same uniform (supplied by the company)

- I'm not allowed to decorate my office, bring in furniture other than their supplied furniture and can only have one picture in my office.

- I'm not allowed to have facial hair, wierd haircuts (dreads count as wierd), tattoos, peircings, etc.

- I am micromanaged to death

This is hell but now that the market has rebounded, I'm finding I can mae easily 1.5 times as much as I make here and I don't have to deal with this bullshit anymore.

You are considering the wrong data. (5, Insightful)

mo26101 (518770) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827130)

In deciding to leave a job or not, you are looking at the wrong data. IMHO, the important thing in a job is not the OS or programming tools. The main factor is do you like working with your co-workers. If you like your fellow workers, then you are a fool to leave over the programming tools.

At the end of the day code is code no matter where you wrote it. What gets us interested in getting up and going to work each day is do we like the working environment, not the coding environment.

To quit in protest of using an IDE is... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11827133)

To quit without having another job lined up is not very smart, but to quit in protest of using a new IDE is one of the dumbest things I've ever heard. And it's made worse by the fact that the new IDE in question is the best one available for the platform you're developing for. The way I see it, yr old company is better off this way. You aren't.

Are you a fool? (1)

TIMxPx (859220) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827136)

I'd say courageous, more like it. People just don't have the balls to quit a job based on principles anymore. Chances are, though, you're the kind of guy who's steadfast enough in his principles, and cerebral enough, having made a plan and stuck to it, that most companies would be more than happy to hire you. If not, do contract work. As long as you can hack it, and have decent qualifications, you're much more likely to be happy.

They're lucky (1)

majkeli (787507) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827145)

You quit a good job because you didn't want to use Visual Studio? I think they're better off without you. Don't come to my shop looking for an interview.

Personally, I'm wanting out of the IT game (1)

AbRASiON (589899) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827148)

I'm thinking about getting myself some university / college / tafe (whatever) qualifications and doing something else.

The question is, what.

What did / do smart people do before IT? (serious question)
and no I don't want to be a rocket scientist, I'm no genius but I'm also not a shovel or broom operator either...

I don't know about foolish... (1)

winkydink (650484) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827150)

but I don't believe it was your best decision. I'll be blunt. Are you independently wealthy? So skilled as a programmer that people line up outside you house taking numbers for the chance to interview? If you answer no to both of these questions, you may be in for a bit of a shock when you discover the job market kind of sucks these days. The old adage of it being easier to find a job when you have a job is mostly true. What kind of recommendation do you think you're going to get from your former employer if you're labelled as quitting because he didn't like our development methodology? While your peers may admire and praise your decision, a potential hiring manager may look at you as difficult and wanting to do things your own way. There is litle possibility that quitting under the circumstances you describe can be career enhancing. Good luck with your job search.

Stupid (4, Funny)

realmolo (574068) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827151)

You're an idiot.

You do realize that you're going to be remembered as "that guy who quit because he didn't want to use Visual Studio"?

They're going to laugh every time someone tells that story. Of course, they'll be laughing on company time, and getting payed for it.

Are you a fool? (1)

mranchovy (595176) | more than 9 years ago | (#11827157)

My company was bought recently, and is in the process of becoming a C# VisualStudio shop. I said thanks, but no thanks and left. Am I a fool for giving up steady work and good pay?"

Yes. Unless you have another job lined up, or the work environment is completely unbearable. Unless coding in C# with VisualStudio is about as bad as trying to develop applications using Notepad, that wouldn't qualify as an unbearable work environment.
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