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846 comments

EULA (5, Funny)

xsee (469209) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764057)

Really. Spyware? You dont read ALL the license agreement?

CNET News.com (5, Informative)

geekboy642 (799087) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764148)

Salon.com requires a soul-sucking registration link.
Here's CNET News.com's version of the story:

Adware maker joins federal privacy board
Published: February 23, 2005, 5:19 PM PST
By Declan McCullagh
Staff Writer, CNET News.com
TrackBack Print E-mail TalkBack

An executive from Claria, formerly called Gator, will be one of 20 members of the committee, the department said Wednesday.

"This committee will provide the department with important recommendations on how to further the department's mission while protecting the privacy of personally identifiable information of citizens and visitors of the United States," Nuala O'Connor Kelly, the department's chief privacy officer, said in a statement.

Claria bundles its pop-up advertising software with ad-supported networks such as Kazaa. Recently, the privately held company has been trying to seek credibility by following stricter privacy guidelines and offering behavioral profiling services to its partners.
In an e-mail message to CNET News.com, Kelly defended the inclusion of a Claria representative on the committee. "I am proud of, supportive of and grateful for those individuals in the public and private sector who are willing to take on the hard tasks, fight the good fight, and who surprise us with creative, fresh and unconventional thinking, and who make change where change is needed through their hard work and personal dedication," Kelly said.

In the past, Claria's pop-up ad software has riled some users who claimed it was annoying, installed without permission, and not easy to delete. Publishers also were irked about pop-up ads for a rival's product appearing next to their own Web sites. Catalog retailer L.L. Bean sued Gator for alleged trademark infringement.

Claria's representative on the Homeland Security privacy board is company Vice President D. Reed Freeman, a former Federal Trade Commission staff attorney. Other members include executives from Intel, Computer Associates International, IBM, Oracle and the Cato Institute.
Kelly said Freeman will "bring his courage and conviction to the board, and will contribute productively--and constructively--to the board's and the public's dialogue on privacy and homeland security."

The committee is tasked with providing "external expert advice to the secretary and the chief privacy officer on programmatic, policy, operational and technological issues that affect privacy, data integrity and data interoperability."

In February 2003, Gator settled a high-profile case brought by The Washington Post, The New York Times, Dow Jones and other media companies. Terms of that deal were quiet, but Claria appears to have stopped delivering pop-ups to those publishers' sites.
Claria did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

CNET News.com's Stefanie Olsen contributed to this report.

Re:EULA (1)

caryw (131578) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764267)

I hope the government reads the fine print on his contract before hiring him.
Asshole probably wrote the EULA's for Gator.
--Fairfax Underground [fairfaxunderground.com]: Where Fairfax County comes out to play

fr0st (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764059)

fr0st p!ss!!

Those were the days... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764213)

*sigh* I miss troll tuesdays...

uh.. (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764062)

Are you fucking shitting me?

Agreed. (2)

hot_Karls_bad_cavern (759797) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764071)

Who is responsible for this appointment? This is just ... wow.

Re:Agreed. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764162)

"Who is responsible for this appointment?"

Who would have guessed the current administration would make such an appointment?

The Onion (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764063)

Jeez, with a headline like that I thought I was on the Onion for a second there...

Re:The Onion (2, Informative)

caryw (131578) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764138)

No not The Onion, Salon. Which isn't much better.
And I guess it's true as CNET [com.com] has picked up the story too.
He is apparently a Law Professor and teaches a class on The Regulation of Advertising. [findlaw.com]
My question is how can somebody such as himself be associated with a company like Gator that tries their best to trick consumers?
- Cary
--Fairfax Underground [fairfaxunderground.com]: Where Fairfax County comes out to play

Re:The Onion (2, Insightful)

anthropolemic (860028) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764229)

Coming from the administration that pushes the USA PATRIOT Act as a safeguard of liberty, hiring somebody who I'm sure has plenty of experience tiptoing around privacy rights in the Homeland Security Department is hardly unprecedented.

First Post (1)

Da Twink Daddy (807110) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764067)

First Post BTW, This is really ironic. How can the person most affiliated with privacy invasion be good at data integrity?

Re:First Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764082)

Know your enemy!

Re:First Post (1, Insightful)

brilinux (255400) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764099)

For the same reason that the military loves defectors during war; tbey can tell you how the other side operates, and therefore how to prevent their attacks.

This almost seems like a good idea.

Re:First Post (4, Funny)

rd4tech (711615) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764111)

no, there are some times when you want things done righ the first time, like an surgeon operating, or food testing, or sex...

Re:First Post (1)

rs79 (71822) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764191)

"For the same reason that the military loves defectors during war; tbey can tell you how the other side operates, and therefore how to prevent their attacks."

Other than the fact if he has a low enough moral barometer to do what he did it's doubtfull he should be doing what he's doing.

"Why'd you ask this guy"

"Everybody else just laughed at us and said no"

Re:First Post (2, Insightful)

rtb61 (674572) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764240)

How about this instead, who better to fullfill that role at Homeland Security, after all they want to invade the privacy of as many people as possible and get away with it. This nasty fellow has already managed to do just that at a private company, just imagine what he will be able to achieve working for that particular government agency.

Re:First Post (1)

somethinghollow (530478) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764107)

Don't be naive in your attempts to get first post (which you missed by a relatively long shot). How many hackers turned into security consultants? Plenty. People who invade privacy should know how to counter their own tricks, and figure out other ways that it could be done and prevent those.

What I want to know is why should I / we trust him when he has done wrong to a very large portion of the US population.

Re:First Post (4, Insightful)

Senjutsu (614542) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764261)

This might almost make sense if this guy had served in a technical capacity with Claria/Gator, but here's his job description, from a press-release they put out upon hiring him:

Claria Corporation, www.claria.com, today announced that D. Reed Freeman, Jr. will assume the position of Chief Privacy Officer and Vice President of Regulatory and Legislative Affairs for the company. Mr. Freeman, a partner in the Washington, D.C. law firm Collier Shannon Scott, PLLC, will spearhead Claria's continued commitment to industry-leading online advertising privacy practices. He will also represent Claria's interests both in Washington and internationally, coordinating Claria's efforts on policy matters.

In other words, he's a lobbyist. He knows fuck all about the inner workings of spyware software, and this isn't at all analogous to hiring an ex-hacker to evaluate your security.

Re:First Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764184)

> First Post BTW, This is really ironic. How can the person most
> affiliated with privacy invasion be good at data integrity?

In other news, Michael Jackson has been appointed head of child welfare, Darl McBride as new leader of the FSF, Pamela Jones will be stepping down as editor of Groklaw to give way for Rob Enderle and Maureen O'Gara to take the reigns, and Saddam Hussein will be taking over as the UN's Human Rights leader.

Rewarding incompetence, as usual (4, Insightful)

godless dave (844089) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764211)

What do you expect? George Tenet got a medal for being wrong about WMDs in Iraq; Paul Bremer got one for ignoring warnings about the Iraqi insurgency; and Condaleeza Rice got promoted for ignoring warnings about Al Qaeda and being wrong about Iraq. This administration rewards incompetence and duplicity while punishing competence and honesty.

In other news (4, Funny)

techsoldaten (309296) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764070)

In other news, Dr. Jack Kevorkian has been appointed National Director of Health and Human Services, Kenneth Lay was appointed Director of the Treasury and Bill Gates was appointed CIO of the whole Federal Government.

M

Re:In other news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764170)

There just aren't enough mod points in the world :)

/tips hat

Re:In other news (5, Funny)

deglr6328 (150198) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764207)

*POP* "Did you know your country might be infected with TERRORISTS? You can help to protect your country by downloading policestate V2.0 from GovSoft today! Click here now!"

FREE PSP!! (PLAYSTATION PORTABLE) (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764074)

Hey-

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I've joined and I think you should as well.

It's a completely legitimate offer, and this company has already given away $4 million in FREE stuff!

All you have to do is join, complete an online offer, and refer friends to do the same. That's it! The company makes money on the referrals, and you benefit with a free PSP!

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Hmm... I've an analogy for this... (4, Insightful)

Svartalf (2997) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764076)

Isn't this like putting a fox in charge of the security for a henhouse?

Honestly... DHS doesn't need to be worrying about this sort of tripe- they've got bigger fish to fry. Why in the HELL are they bothering with this when the things they're doing right at the moment wouldn't have done a damn thing to prevent 9/11 from occuring and wouldn't prevent a repeat?

Re:Hmm... I've an analogy for this... (1)

geekboy642 (799087) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764100)

Isn't this like putting a fox in charge of the security for a henhouse?

No, it's more like putting Bill Clinton in charge of a whorehouse.

Hmm... I've an analogy for this...What's in a name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764121)

Maybe we should title this story as "Gator at the gate"?

Re:Hmm... I've an analogy for this... (1)

FireballX301 (766274) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764172)

The government's gotten all paranoid about this kind of stuff recently, what with the very recent and very publicized hacker attacks.

And although your analogy is for the most part valid, wouldn't a fox know how another fox would get into the henhouse? Where do you think we get most 'security analysts'?

Re:Hmm... I've an analogy for this... (1)

luvirini (753157) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764215)

Preventing things like terrorism is basically impossible. One can try to make the probability of success low with many methods, starting at international politics and ending with properly trained policeforces.

what a joke! (5, Funny)

grimholtz (683825) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764078)

Ex-GAIN employees in the "Integrity Advisory Committee"??? That's like Richard Stallman working for the Patent Office!

Re:what a joke! (1)

rd4tech (711615) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764097)

"Ex-GAIN employees in the "Integrity Advisory Committee"??? That's like Richard Stallman working for the Patent Office!"


ssshhh.. quiet...

Re:what a joke! (4, Funny)

luvirini (753157) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764195)

Good idea, we need to start a campaign to get him appointed as Commissioner for Patents in USPTO.

In other news... (4, Funny)

EEBaum (520514) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764081)

Governor of New Jersey to head Environmental Protection Agency

Oh, wait...

Re:In other news... (1)

dauthur (828910) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764223)

And if you stay tuned to the 6:00 news, you'll catch a glimpse of the new Gay Rights leader, Varg Vikernes.

Wow (0, Flamebait)

opusman (33143) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764085)

Yet another front page ./ story of massive importance to the whole world!

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764185)

But even the world finds this story quite ironic...

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764252)

without going into how slashdot is a US based site and how it explicitly says that in the FAQ, this issue does have potential ramifications to the rest of the world, seeing as many countries follow us and what we do.

Makes sense (in a sick sort of way) (4, Insightful)

Javert42 (55387) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764088)

Who knows more about data privacy than somebody who has compromised the privacy of millions?

Re:Makes sense (in a sick sort of way) (1)

luvirini (753157) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764236)

Well, yes true in one sense. It is the same argument that anti-virus companies use to hire virus writers, and companies emply crackers. But in any of these cases there is the implisit understanding that the bad activities have ended and the person in question knows that they were bad and is willing to work for good instead. In this case this does not seem to be the case. Also the fact is, even with repenting, I would never fully trst such a person.

Re:Makes sense (in a sick sort of way) (5, Insightful)

bigberk (547360) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764250)

Who knows more about data privacy than somebody who has compromised the privacy of millions?
I see what you're getting at, but I really don't think it applies in this case. Sure, blackhats / crackers make excellent security professionals who can apply their skills positively. But note that these are always people who first and foremost were interested in technical skills and intellectual stimulation from pushing security systems.

On the other hand, the people who go into the field of marketing have one well defined goal: to manipulate and deceive consumers for profit. I have studied alongside these people when I made the huge mistake of wanting to take some marketing courses. The ideas I learned and people I met literally made me sick to my stomach.

I do not know a single marketing person who is in it for academic interest -- those people tend to be psychologists. Marketers are business oriented and highly profit motivated to the extent where everything else (privacy, ethics, environment, culture) take back seat. These people sell their souls in pursuit of money.

You might think I'm exaggerating. But look at the specific people in question. Who works at DoubleClick or Gator, unless they have a genuine professional interest in the wide reaching manipulation of the public for profit sake? I really have zero confidence in these people's s ability to make an honest, well meaning effort towards the rights and privacy of consumers and citizens.

Re:Makes sense (in a sick sort of way) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764275)

And of corse, by your resoning, who better to guard my bank account info than the thief walking down the street.

moron!!!!!!!!!

talk about oxymoron (5, Insightful)

bersl2 (689221) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764091)

"Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee"

"War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength."

Re:talk about oxymoron (1)

bersl2 (689221) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764129)

Let me preempt my fellow grammar nazis by saying that '"Chief Privacy Officer" of Claria Networks' would probably be an oxymoron.

I did mean to change the subject, but I forgot to after I checked the specifics of the definition of the word.

I don't know what to say. (0)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764093)

For the first time in quite a while I am speechless (and those that know me know I do not know how to shut up) :)

Give the government a Guiness... (1)

starX (306011) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764098)

...and call them brilliant. Any guesses as to whom will be invited to help co-author the next version of the DMCA or USAPATRIOT act?

one of the two (1)

Syini666 (622800) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764102)

I don't know if this should make me afriad that such people are advsing the DHS(see also: Gestapo) or laugh that they can't find someone better stuited to the position?

Suprised? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764103)

Well, I can't think of anyone better qualified to invade the privacy of the American Public.

He was probably appointed because of the vast amount of data they already have.

And people still laugh in ignorance when they here the term CEO President when talking about Bush.

Wolves in the Henhouse (1)

glowimperial (705397) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764105)

I can't imagine the pool of hires they had to be looking at for the position that would make any of GAIN's employees be the ideal candidate for any position in Homeland Security.

Sounds like... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764106)

the terrorists have won.

First DoubleClick, and now Gator (1)

kennyj449 (151268) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764114)

I do have to wonder... what on earth does the word "privacy" have to do with this? I've seen some bad misnomers before, but not so bad as this.

Perfect match (2, Interesting)

wannabgeek (323414) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764120)

He seems like the perfect choice for me for this administration. After all, he can do with technology what the government has been trying to do through legislation - making it easy for the government to spy on people.

Tell me this is a joke (4, Interesting)

bigberk (547360) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764127)

If this is for real (and I do trust Salon) this falls into the O.M.F.G. category. Someone slap me.

I recently listened to a documentary on CBC radio [www.cbc.ca] about pervasive irony in today's world. It was an interesting program because they were suggesting that the political scene these days is like a living satire. It's just too weird... and this news about a spyware marketer being appointed to a privacy committee is just insane. I see four fingers!

Re:Tell me this is a joke (2, Insightful)

grozzie2 (698656) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764239)

This actually makes a lot of sense. DOHS is not about protecting your privacy, it's about invading it. They have hired the experts.

There's No Bottom (5, Insightful)

Ray Radlein (711289) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764137)

I miss those heady days of yore, when there was still room for more outrage in my life. When I could stil be surprised by new examples of indifference, incompetence, and outright evil.

These days, I am no longer surprised at no longer being surprised by the ghastly things this Administration routinely does.

Re:There's No Bottom (2, Insightful)

antic (29198) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764260)

Wish I had mod points for you Ray. I, like you, (and as The Onion would say) can no longer believe this shit.

I couldn't make up a story this ridiculous, yet it's true. Go world, go.

Maybe (2, Interesting)

zaxios (776027) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764146)

the Administration thinks that keeping her out of the marketplace is the best thing they can do for data privacy. Or maybe this is a dream.

Excellent... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764149)

Python is quite the pile of shit. Fuck meaningful white space in code. Guido the Pedo the genius programmer fuck off and go to hell with this lump of crap.

DIE PYTHON USERS

Not Suprised (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764150)

"Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee"

AKA: The Department of Homeland Security wants to invade the Privacy of the American Citizens to collect Private/secret data on American's Private lives. All this to Strengthen the Integrity of of US Spying on it's citizens. To be advised by the people who know most about invading privacy.

Have a happy 4 years.

First Paris Hilton gets hacked and now THIS? (2, Funny)

ABeowulfCluster (854634) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764163)

I will NEVER trust my computer to keep anything safe. I can see homeland security buying Google just to do data mining.

Claria has a Chief Privacy Officer? (4, Insightful)

Garabito (720521) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764168)

It sounds as authentic as The Ministry of Truth.

Actually, "Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee" sounds much more like Ministry of Truth.

Private governments (1)

dauthur (828910) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764176)

Soon, he'll be able to run for President, if you use the current intellect climate as a gauge for next election's candidates. This is absolutely rediculous; Someone who can invade millions of computers in wonderfully covert ways under buckets of guises is appointed a chair in the government as a data securitist? Disgusting.

What's next? I'll be appointed "National Operation Flashpoint Advisor" simply because I'm slightly good at something completely unproductive and irritating to others?

Time to Switch! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764179)

So this is how they've decided to find would-be terrorists.
I assume there's a nice Gator surfing profile available for each 911 attacker. If you happen to fit it, be prepared for a nasty surprise visit in the middle of the night.
If your hobbies include steganography or encryption, think about switching to an abacus quick.

Ineffective (1)

Camel Racer (134168) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764183)

If the goal of the appointment was to find someone ineffective, then this is the guy to appoint. I'm only sorry that he was appointed to the position of Federal Bureau of Outsourcing or Department of Squashing Consumer Rights.

Only in America (5, Insightful)

AmoHongos (467830) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764186)

A spyware company has a "chief privacy officer?!" What's next, a security-obssessed government that makes us less secure? Oh, wait...

Seriously, though, I can almost see the logic in this appointment. One thing spyware companies know is computer security. They defeat it all the time. I'm surprised the fine folks from Cool Web Search weren't appointed.

On the other hand, the more cynical side of me sees how reminiscent this is of early 20th century American politics, when the government appointed Big Business leaders to commitees on workers' rights. Money and connections will buy you anything.

do something about it... (5, Insightful)

epanastasi (748107) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764189)

All I see posted are stupid remarks about how ironic this is... but nobody seems to want to do anything about it.

/. has enough people reading it to destroy the bandwidth of half the servers out there, but it looks like nobody is going to take this as a serious threat to privacy and call up their congressman or write a letter/email to major news networks, or anything else that will change things...

It's a sad day seeing this article exist, but it will be an even sadder day when 90% of these comments are scored "Funny" and we are doomed to sit idly by our world is taken away from us... thanks guys, i appreciate it.

Appointing a fox to watch the henhouse. (1)

Dark Coder (66759) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764197)

As incredulous as it may sound, this appears to be an asinine (sub)cabinet appointment.

Maybe it takes a spy-meister to sit on the other side of the table to deal with this illusive dilemna.

On a slight off-topic (and a risk of karma-whoring...) Simply put, if the software industry only (and only if) just tighten up their security vulnerabilities to the point of "none.", then (and only if then) we wouldn't need this haberdashers.

(sigh).
---
Make software industry accountable; abolish click-thru EULA that gets automatically enforced once the shrinkwrap is removed. How can one read this EULA before opening it?

Don't blame me, I voted for Kodos (2, Interesting)

astrashe (7452) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764221)

At least they're being up front about this. They back the companies that are screwing us out of our privacy over the consumers every chance they get. That's what they stand for.

As outrageous as this is, it's not nearly as bad as the prescription drug bill that prevents them from pushing the pharmaceutical companies for better prices.

I hope the story is big enough to be spun by the talk radio crowd. I'd love to hear how they'd defend it.

Re:Don't blame me, I voted for Kodos (1)

Frodo Crockett (861942) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764273)

I hope the story is big enough to be spun by the talk radio crowd. I'd love to hear how they'd defend it. I've got news for you: the "talk radio crowd" won't defend something like this.

This is a good fit (3, Funny)

grozzie2 (698656) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764226)

I dont see why you folks are surprised, this is a very good fit. DOHS wants to gather up and categorize the data on every person in the USA. They have hired an expert in the field. It'll probably take a few months to get this new program rolling, but it's a pretty good bet, if you visit a .gov website in the near future, you are going to see the pop up asking you to accept installation of an activeX. That is, until they get microsoft to ship out the update telling all windows the world over that .gov websites are trusted, and dont bother pestering computer owners with warnings about such things on .gov sites.

Mr freeman probably thinks he's arrived in heaven. he gets to keep on doing what he's best at, the spyware business, but this time it's for the government, so no more hassles from all those pathetic anti-spyware whiners.

CWRU Innovates First! (1)

ximenes (10) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764238)

My university totally beat the government on this one. We hired the dude from Doubleclick to be chief privacy officer on campus. I believe all the same ironies apply equally well.

When the fuck are you going to wake up? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764244)

This administration is pure dag-nasty evil.

You either voted for it, or you rolled over like a puppy with a milkbone when the election was stolen again.

You have forgotten what revolution is.

Umm.. yea.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764245)

So what does this make? Like bonehead Bush manuever # 385? If it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck and smells like a duck.. then its a bonehead president who is either a) clueless b) willfully seliing out c) doesn't care as long as his 'chosen folk' are unaffected.

All the Bush apologists wanna come out and start screaming everyone here is biased again?

In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764251)

... Dracula has been put in charge of the blood bank

"member of a committee" != director. (1)

ABeowulfCluster (854634) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764254)

"An executive from Claria, formerly called Gator, will be one of 20 members of the committee, the department said Wednesday." http://news.com.com/Adware+maker+joins+federal+pri vacy+board/2100-1028_3-5587653.html

How long untill.. (1)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764255)

How long untill we hear "Gator must be installed on all PCs before they are shipped so we can check for terrorist activity"?

I mean could you pick a worse guy to be in control of this sort of information!?

What the heck is going on at homeland security. (4, Interesting)

killjoe (766577) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764256)

They hired a deputy CIO who did not have a degree [computerworld.com]. More accurately she had a degree from on a non accredited diploma mill check it out [hamilton-university.edu] it looks like a church.

Normally I'd have no problems with a deputy CIO not having a degree but apparently the dept of homeland security did not check out their deputy CIO carefully enough and now they had to "put her on leave".

Now we find out they are putting the fox in charge of the hen house.

Something is seriously askew at this dept. How can we trust these guys to safeguard our country when they have shown such awful judgement?

What they're not mentioing... (2, Funny)

Hamster Lover (558288) | more than 9 years ago | (#11764259)

is the mandate of "Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee" is keeping this information from the public, not protecting the public's information.

YOUR ALL NUTS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11764263)

Living in Canada, it's like you guys are an evil siamese twin we can't get rid of. Now elect Bill Gates as President so we can all get armageddon over with.
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  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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