Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Webcam Jigsaw Solver in 200 Lines of Python

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the not-lines-of-coke dept.

Software 199

leighklotz writes "Jeff Breidenbach and 200 lines of Python code have brought us the Glyphsaw Puzzle solver. Hold a puzzle piece up to a webcam, and the display sgiws exactly where in the puzzle the piece belongs. The solver uses the Python Imaging Library (PIL), Numerical Python, and the PARC DataGlyph Toolkit. By the way, you can make your own DataGlyphs."

cancel ×

199 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

First (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11818858)

Oh, but I bet it uses a bunch of libraries post.

Re:First (1, Funny)

stupidfoo (836212) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818905)

The code:


from puzzlesolver.puzzlepiece import puzzlepiece
from puzzlesolver.placepiece import placepiece


Yes, my python skills are quite good.

Re:First (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819679)

I bet it uses a bunch of libraries

It's a shame all those libraries are interfaced with Python: the ugliest language ever to have lived.

Re:First (1)

Fahrenheit 450 (765492) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819720)

JCL says, "Talk to the hand!"

sgiws? (5, Funny)

MaineCoon (12585) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818864)

and the display
sgiws exactly where in
English, please?

Re:sgiws? (5, Funny)

JPickard (727790) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818908)

What's wrong with sgiws? it's a perfectly cromulent word.

Re:sgiws? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11818949)

And you are a perfectly homosexual [xdfgf.com] lady, huh?

Cunt.



Re:sgiws? (1)

ari_j (90255) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819317)

Fycj tiym tiy fycjubg cybt!

Re:sgiws? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819475)

Fycj tiym tiy fycjubg cybt!

Translation from Welsh: Never ask for directions in Wales. You'll be washing spit out of your hair for a fortnight.

Re:sgiws? (3, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818919)

and the display sgiws exactly where in

English, please?

It's a welsh word, you insensitive clod!

Re:sgiws? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11818923)

I believe sgiws is "shows" with a rightwards 1 key transpose error on "ho" only -- very strange behaviour.

Ytu s foggrtrmy lrunpstf@

Re:sgiws? (1)

SmartSsa (19152) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819468)

It's not strange, it's one hand shifted. It is strange how the submitter, and the editor didn't catch it.

I for one can't even force myself to type with one hand shifted. My fat fingers collide when they encounter shared keys :(

Re:sgiws? (1)

jericho4.0 (565125) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819676)

If by 'strange' you mean 'normal editor lapses'.

Re:sgiws? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819801)

The strange thing is, if the submitter's right hand truly was shifted, how did he type the rest of the article just fine? The editor fixed a submitted typo with HIS right hand shifted?

Google knows all (5, Funny)

jesser (77961) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818929)

Google Search: sgiws [google.com]

Did you mean: shows

Re:sgiws? (4, Funny)

gambit3 (463693) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818962)

See, if you had the jigsaw solver, it would solve this puzzle for you!

r;r,rmystu. ,u frst Esydpm///

Re:sgiws? (2, Informative)

Shut the fuck up! (572058) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819247)

r;r,rmystu. ,u frst Esydpm///

elementary, my dear Watson...

Re:sgiws? (1)

yossarian dent (828672) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819036)

In Soviet Russia, proper spelling bastardizes you!

there's a nub on the j key for a reason... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819217)

ruggt gabd us ibe soace iver

Re:sgiws? (1)

hunterx11 (778171) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819264)

from the come-on-fhqwhgads dept. [homestarrunner.com]

Re:sgiws? (1)

niteice (793961) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819731)

Hmm? I don't think SB said anything even resembling "sgiws" (no matter how awesome the song and video are).

Re:sgiws? (3, Funny)

CitznFish (222446) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819336)

Maybe you needed to pay more attention in Engrish class?

Re:sgiws? (1)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819433)

It's a perfectly good flutzpah.

Re:sgiws? (1)

stuntpope (19736) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819495)

He's mixed up with that other reptile-themed programming language, Jabberwocky.

(Please, no Spanish Inquisitions over my seeming ignorance of the etymology of Python.)

Re:sgiws? (1)

Cryptnotic (154382) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819526)

Did you notice how "g" is just to the left of "h" and "i" is just to the left of "o" on an English-language keyboard?

(His left hand was in the right place, but the right hand was shifted left by one key).

Re:sgiws? (1)

Fahrenheit 450 (765492) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819787)

That's funny... I've got an "a" to the left my "o", and a "d" to the left of my "h".

I guess I'm not typing in English...

i want one of those! (0)

lardtree (863947) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818870)

and the display sgiws exactly where in the puzzle the piece belongs. (!!!!!!!)

its (1, Insightful)

mr_tommy (619972) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818878)

It's amazing how beautiful code can be - it's simple, to the point, and functional. Bravo - a good lesson here for anyone who's thought about doing anything at code level.

Re:its (1)

nacturation (646836) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819089)

It's amazing how beautiful code can be ... a good lesson here for anyone who's thought about doing anything at code level.

Are there other levels on which to achieve beautiful code?

Re:its (1)

mickyflynn (842205) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819540)

print out the source code and throw paint on it Jackson Pollock style?

Re:its (1)

Prophetic_Truth (822032) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819101)

Its beautiful, but i feel sorry for the poor soul who beta tested this.

Re:its (2, Insightful)

gfody (514448) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819636)

this isn't a jigsaw solver. the puzzle needs to be created with the glyph marks already. its like each peice has an embedded watermark telling the program where it goes.

at first glance I thought it was a program that could solve jigsaw puzzles by analyzing each piece, its shape, the image on it and figure out where it goes in realtime. that would be really interesting as it would probably have to employ some crazy neural net algo to avoid exponential time.

Re:its (0, Troll)

MattJakel (815179) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819804)

But it's still misleading to say "only 200 lines of Python" when really all of the module imports add up to thousands of lines. This isn't a downside of course, but such a description makes the program sound simpler than it is.

Other applications? (3, Interesting)

RM6f9 (825298) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818879)

Facial recognition? Or, was this a by-product of same?

Not really, sadly. (4, Informative)

Yobgod Ababua (68687) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819034)

The technology is that they can embed arbitrary digital information into arbitrary images, and do it in such a way that it's resistant to errors, damage, blurriness and other rigors of the real world.

If you have a jigsaw made using this technology where the embedded data indicates the location within the original image, you can use this software to decode that data and display where the piece should go. It doesn't look at the actual image at all, and thus wouldn't help you solve any 'normal' jigsaws, or do any sort of general image recognition.

It does use some similar techniques to facial recognition to identify the intersection points and enable the glyph decoding, but that's all.

Re:Other applications? (1)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819103)

Reconstruction of Mafia victims.

Re:Other applications? (1)

Danimoth (852665) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819587)

Facial recognition? Or, was this a by-product of same? Only if you cut up the face first.

Why now? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11818880)

I think this has been in the pipeline for some time... We just didn't know how big the cakes were.. it was all belly up, and stuff.

Research grant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11818888)

However much money these people received in order to research this ...

I want it doubled. I'm going to research the effects on time consumption of playing online FPS games.

Needs DataGlyphs (5, Informative)

commonchaos (309500) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818892)

This code will only work if the puzzle pieces are printed using DataGlyphs [parc.com]


A Glyphsaw Puzzle starts out as a computer graphics file generated by the PARC DataGlyph Toolkit. The image is sent to a professional jigsaw puzzle manufacturing company, which creates cardboard puzzle pieces. From a distance, the pieces look similar to those from any other jigsaw puzzle. Up close, one can see individual glyphmarks.

Re:Needs DataGlyphs (1)

ckemp.org (667117) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818927)

Still, it's built with a surprising degree of intelligence - able to deal with motion and throw away uncertain glyphs.
That's pretty damn impressive.

Re:Needs DataGlyphs (3, Informative)

oliverthered (187439) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819758)

It's an advert for DataGlyphs, showing how:

"PARC DataGlyphs are a robust and unobtrusive method of embedding computer-readable data on surfaces such as paper, labels, plastic, glass, or metal.

Basic DataGlyphs are a pattern of forward and backward slashes representing ones and zeroes. This pattern forms an evenly textured field.

Unlike most barcodes, DataGlyphs are flexible in shape and size. Their structure and robust error correction also make them suitable for curved surfaces and other situations where barcodes fail.
"

oh well (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11818895)

and what about the number of lines of code in those librarys?

Made especially.. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11818898)

..for those troubled enough to need it.

Neat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11818899)

But that's like an automated crossword puzzle solver or maybe god mode. Where's the fun?

Anti-spam image checks? (0)

caryw (131578) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818901)

Wow 200 lines? I bet it has tons of includes though. If image recognition is this good in 200 lines of python how have those anit-spam boxes that make you copy an obscure string to prove you're human not been broken yet. Or maybe they just have?
- Cary
--Fairfax Underground [fairfaxunderground.com] : Where Fairfax County comes out to play

Re:Anti-spam image checks? (3, Interesting)

James_G (71902) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819023)

Wow 200 lines? I bet it has tons of includes though

"The Glyphsaw Puzzle solver is implemented in less than 200 lines of Python code by making good use of the PARC DataGlyph Toolkit, the Python Imaging Library (PIL), and Numerical Python."

^ I bet you'd win that bet.

Re:Anti-spam image checks? (1)

mikiN (75494) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819490)

#include "everythingbutthekitchensink.h"

void main(void)
{
MakeItSo();
}

That's it, 6 lines. Everyone can write short programs, if all you do is include some doitall libraries...

Re:Anti-spam image checks? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819521)

If you don't like code reuse...

It's not image recognition (2, Insightful)

Yobgod Ababua (68687) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819063)

It reads digital information encoded into the image... it doesn't look at the actual image itself. It's still quite cool, but no good for what you are thinking.

I already explained more about this to a comment Here [slashdot.org]

Re:Anti-spam image checks? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819437)

If you don't like code reuse you are welcome to program in machine code.

Re:Anti-spam image checks? (1)

jay-be-em (664602) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819605)

Wow, now /. users not only fail to read the article, but don't even read the complete summary.

Somone should sgiw them (5, Funny)

amling (732942) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818913)

exactly where the 'h' and 'o' keys are.

Wrong section? (5, Insightful)

NemesisStar (619232) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818920)

Shouldn't this news be under programming instead of software? The image for programming is a jigsaw getting solved!

Since it can use anything it wants (3, Funny)

Neil Blender (555885) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818922)

Here's a one line puzzle solver

[user@localhost] perl -e '`python glyphsaw`'

Re:Since it can use anything it wants (1)

BobNET (119675) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819093)

Not bad, in only 28 characters (including the newline at the end). But try this:

sh -c python glyphsaw
Only 22 characters this time, and it could probably be even shorter if you prepare symbolic links ahead of time.

Re:Since it can use anything it wants (2, Funny)

Sweetshark (696449) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819176)

[user@localhost] perl -e '`python glyphsaw`'
Bah! That must be a fake! Real Perl should be unspeakable and unreadable!

More importantly... (2, Funny)

gabecubbage (711618) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818928)

Yes, very nice.

But the important question is, can it assemble the puzzle faster than Gary Kasparov?

Re:More importantly... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819231)

> can it assemble the puzzle faster than Gary Kasparov?
No, Gary Kasparov takes a much longer time to assemble.

200 lines? (5, Insightful)

PoopJuggler (688445) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818930)

Big deal. I can write the same thing in C in a single line of code. Oh but you have to link in 100,000,000 lines of libraries and include files, but that doesn't seem to count...

Re:200 lines? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819570)

Do you happen to work at Microsoft?

Hmmm (1, Interesting)

winstonmeister (863683) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818942)

My Mom used to subscribe to some pretty kooky Religious Right publications (unfortunately, she quite possibly still does). I remember one of them was heavily pushing a Net-Nanny type program, and the advertisement claimed it could actually analyze the images and selectively block out sites where the images contained naughty bits but didn't have textual cues for other, competing pieces of software to pick up on. Of course, now that such things might actually be possible, they'll just block all the sites that have pictures of balloons. ;)

Re:Hmmm (1)

stevenvi (779021) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819362)

I know what you're talking about, and it wasn't a hoax, it was for real. While learning about neural networks last semester I remember that being an example of application.

I don't recall the company's name, but they had image classification that was trained on many pictures to tell if a picture is pornographic or not and eventually some sort of pattern was found. Perhaps images which contain many flesh tones.

Re:Hmmm (1)

mikiN (75494) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819683)

I'm pretty sure that the application would reject the images here [vatican.va] , even though they are among the 'safest' you can get...

Messagelabs (1)

Dejohn (164452) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819693)

Messagelabs has a product that will detect pornography in images. It works incredibly well. We've been using it to block emailed pornography here for a number of years.

Jiglyph (4, Interesting)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818943)

A "jigsaw" is a nifty tool that dances around a pattern in a sheet of wood, a narrow saw band that cuts like a laser along curves (OK, compared to its 19th Century prececesors). A "jigsaw puzzle" is a puzzle made by jigsawing a picture, and putting it back together along its deceptively simple interlocking contours. This device substitutes an AI scanner for the saw, in inverse operation to the jigsaw. So, if anything, it's a "Jiglyph", not a "Glyphsaw" - unless they mean that it "saw" the "glyph".

Re:Jiglyph (1)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818990)

Can you define "Pedantic" ?

Re:Jiglyph (3, Funny)

PedanticSpellingTrol (746300) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819038)

In soviet russia, Pedantic defines me!

Re:Jiglyph (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819533)

ha ha
thats just awesome
+5 for matching name

Please no more Jiglyphs (1)

cgenman (325138) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819385)

...I can't take any more Bill Cophbies.

External libraries (3, Insightful)

R.Mo_Robert (737913) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818947)

200 lines of Python? At least this time they mentioned the additional external libraries, unlike with that "15-line" P2P program [slashdot.org] a while back...

:)

Re:External libraries (3, Informative)

lcracker (10398) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819303)

The "15-line" P2P program didn't use any libraries that don't ship with the Python interpreter. This uses several 3rd party packages.

Python == cock sucking shit (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11818950)

I know lets name my software on a stupid pathetic old TV series that nobody with even a tiny bit of self respect finds funny anymore apart from stupid Americans and idiotic Germans. It's highly stimulating lefist wacky zany humour ironically about highly educated and priviledged English people jumping about appeals to those who code. It is on their wavelength. Also I will make my whitespace meaningful unlike every other language on Earth. Ho ho ho I am so clever. It is so cool. yay I am in my own little world and prefer life here.

Years later the only useful app written Python is bittorrent. That tells you something.

like the tetris-playing bot (4, Insightful)

bodrell (665409) | more than 9 years ago | (#11818996)

Anyone remember that? It was pretty cool--the guy wrote a scoring algorithm and brute-forced all possible positions for whatever piece was about to fall.

Oh, and I also think it's pretty stupid to talk about how few lines it took to write the program when it's using a bunch of libraries. I could just write a one-liner that calls this program, by that rationale.

Here's the Artificial Intelligence Tetris [colinfahey.com] I was mentioning.

Re:like the tetris-playing bot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819643)

That's what I tend to do, to make a program short.

I write all the actual code into functions and then, for example, in C, the actual program just looks like this:

int main () {
exist();
return 0;
} ... with the 'exist() function doing all the actual work. This way I can say all my programs are four lines long, and it does kind of give a sort of poetic beauty to the code.

Re:like the tetris-playing bot (1)

Boronx (228853) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819696)

Oh, and I also think it's pretty stupid to talk about how few lines it took to write the program when it's using a bunch of libraries.

You are so correct, my man. What is the point of a library if you didn't write it yourself? Why, it would be utterly useless!

I could just write a one-liner that calls this program, by that rationale.

Well it's not the same, because you'd just be doing what someone has already done, now wouldn't you? This guy did something original, and he did with economy.

Puzzle (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819004)

This glyph thing is all very nice and all, but it CHEATS. The puzzle is specially printed and each piece has a unique address. Where's the challenge in that?

NOW if they could do this with an off the Walmart shelf puzzle, THAT would be something.

Facial barcodes (1)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819124)

Pesky smallprint.

Could also use this technology for foolproof facial recogtion. Just need to have barcodes stamped on your face!

Wow !!! (2, Funny)

kabz (770151) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819041)

Finally ... something on Slashdot to interest my grandmother !!

A REAL puzzle (3, Funny)

sburnett (540700) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819053)

If you hold a piece of their Slashdotted Web server up to the camera, will this program be able to reassemble it?

Re:A REAL puzzle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819102)

No, but it *CAN* redirect you to http://mirrordot.org just fine.

One Line! (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819061)

I wrote one in one line of code! It uses the PuzzleSolver8 library, I must mention :-)

Re:One Line! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819499)

Another machine code coder?

SPcONGE (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819073)

Coral link to this (2, Informative)

Announcer (816755) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819112)

For when the server melts down, here it is...

http://www2.parc.com.nyud.net:8090/istl/members/jb reiden/glyphsaw/ [nyud.net]

Interesting article, but it's using a special digitally encoded pattern to "help" the software identify the pieces. You can't just input the picture from a puzzle box, then start showing it pieces, and have it solve them for you.

Didn't they just... (2, Informative)

Chuckstar (799005) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819145)

...overlay a two-dimensional bar code over the image?

Tell me if I'm mistaken, but didn't the summary imply that it was identifying the puzzle piece by the picture on it? Now that would be cool.

So much for using this to make a face-scanner, unless we tattoo bar codes on everyone's faces.

I guess this is an interesting academic exercise, but I don't see how they've really done anything new.

This isn't as clever as you think (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819158)

Neat, but not amazing. You have to read the article to realize that the system only works if all the puzzle pieces have been printed with special marks, DataGlyphs [parc.com] . It's like printing registration marks on all the pieces. Sort of. The dataglyphs actually have more interesting properties, but the point is that this isn't the vision system you expect. It isn't even a general puspose puzzle solving system. As soon as the system recognizes the glyph marks it knows exactly where the piece belongs. It doesn't "solve" anything. It doesn't have to figure out where the pieces go. You couldn't show it pieces from a puzzle off the shelf and have it solve it.

Re:This isn't as clever as you think (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819287)

puspose? Somebody needs to sgiw you how to yaw a keyboard.

It's a cheat (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819249)

They can only solve puzzles that have been printed with their special dataglyph patterns. So, matching the piece to its location is trivial.

The real challenge would to do this with a regular jigsaw puzzle, not a specially rigged one.

The computer vision technology necessary to do this exists today. It's just a matter of putting it together.

Re:It's a cheat (1)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819722)



"The real challenge would to do this with a regular jigsaw puzzle, not a specially rigged one."

If it's precise enough it should be able to put the puzzle together by only looking at the back of the pieces, perhaps with intervention whenever two pieces happen to hash to the same shape. Otherwise you should not even need the picture.

sgiws once again (1)

harkabeeparolyn (711320) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819266)

... that this page was indeed assembled by a herd of dyspeptic zebras or whatever. Are the editors so stupified by their jobs that glaring typos roll right past them now?

200 lines of code? (1)

Alban (86010) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819295)

Yeah, 200 lines of code using a few libraries compiled from 50000 lines of code.

Re:200 lines of code? (1)

LanceUppercut (766964) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819397)

Exactly. I can do the same thing in C++ using only one line of code, provided a have proper library :)

Lame! (5, Insightful)

CyberVenom (697959) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819348)

Somebody please amend the OP. When the site finishes melting down no one will have a clue what this is about:

Essentially it is just a bunch of puzzle pieces with 2-D barcodes printed on them, and a computer+webcam+python used as a barcode reader.

(oh, and as a bonus, the 2-D barcodes are somewhat colored so that it looks like a picture from a distance.)

It is no more a "Jigsaw Puzzle Solver" than a locomotive's wheels are an autopilot decive. They each achieve the end goal only when the rails have been laid in advance.

-CV

Oh yeah, GlyphMarks (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819425)

I liked them better when they were called "two-dimensional bar codes".

This /. post is a little misleading by the way... the webcam and software doesn't "solve" the jigsaw puzzle, it just reads the coordinates which are encoded on each piece.

You wanna repeat this experiment at home? Buy a small jigsaw puzzle. Solve it. Label each piece with it's (x,y) coordinate in the solved puzzle. For instance, top-left could be (1,1), the one to its immediate right could be (2,1), and so on.

Then take the puzzle apart and AMAZE your friends when you can deduce the position of each piece simply by HOLDING IT UP TO YOUR EYES!

Why?? (1)

AdityaG (842691) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819473)

I thought the whole point of jigsaws was to kill time without your brain sleeping on you. Or just have fun with family. What's next? Have a robot do your fishing while you and your father stay home?

Pointless in my opinion. And not technologically innovative either like some people have already said.

This uses Reed-Solomon coding for error correction (2, Interesting)

hqm (49964) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819539)

I made a C library of the Reed-Solomon error correction routines and published it as the rscode library on Sourceforge at http://rscode.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net]

I wrote a version of this library originally as a contractor for PARC when I was in grad school, to use as the error correction coding for their data glyphs. This is bsaically the same algorithm used for audio and CD-ROM data.

This defeats the entire purpose of doing jigsaws. (2, Insightful)

i41Overlord (829913) | more than 9 years ago | (#11819594)

If you wanted the picture put together for you, you'd buy a poster, not a jigsaw puzzle.

When the entire purpose of buying a puzzle is to make you do some mental work, then having that work done automatically is self-defeating.

Dataglyphs (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11819769)

Recall the stories about how printers where marking reproductions of bills- well this is how it's done.
Fairly neat.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>