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Is Horse the New Mouse?

CmdrTaco posted more than 9 years ago | from the kinda-doubt-it dept.

Input Devices 349

lopati writes "Europhysics News writes about a new ergonomical mouse called Horse (jpeg) that reduces repetitive stress injuries by allowing 'the three middle fingers to adopt a flexed position to relax the tendons' and including a thumb scrool [sic:] wheel. Just a few simple changes for so much more comfort!"

cancel ×

349 comments

Praise Jesus. (-1, Flamebait)

Kill all Muslims (845937) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859372)

Kill all Muslims.

Repetitive Stress Injury is largely a MYTH (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859486)

"I hurt myself typing!"
Now I want 100% disability checks!
Yeah you might get injured gutting 100 chickens a minute on a fast poultry processing line but typing?
Not to say it hasn't happened but nowhere near the numbers of disability/workers comp claims.
And what factor correlates perfectly with the rise in RSI/carpal tunnel claims?
Thats right WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE!
And it is whiny over-privleged women at that.
Look at the statistics....women employed in manufacturing /processing industries where this type of injury is possible make claims at a far lower rate than "Office Ladies"
and for that matter of office workers most RSI claims are made by those who don't HAVE to make many keystrokes!
This is ALL a scam a sham a hoax a FRAUDELENT claim on insurance disability benefits by women who find they don't wanna "Have It All".
Look it up /.ers!

No (-1, Troll)

HawkingMattress (588824) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859378)

'nuff said

Re:No (-1, Offtopic)

ps2wayne (809931) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859434)

I'm at a lost for words....

Re:No (1)

mirko (198274) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859437)

I agree, it's some kind of ergonomically reshaped mouse but it's still a mouse.
It kinda reminds me of Microsoft Natural Keyboard... If it had been THAT revolutionariy, everybody would have gotten one nowadays.

And the poster... (1)

ElBorba (221626) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859663)

ergonomical? [reference.com]

Mirror? (0, Redundant)

larien (5608) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859380)

Slashdotted with 0 comments.... *sigh*

Less than 0 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859395)

It didn't even work for subscribers.

Re:Mirror? (1, Informative)

davron05 (778470) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859410)

try the coralized links: the article [nyud.net] and the picture [nyud.net]

Re:Mirror? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859456)

If that fails, as it did for me, you could also try the Google cache [64.233.161.104]

Re:Mirror? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859414)

I'd complain about the slashdot effect here, too, but that would be a bit like beating a dead horse.

Re:Mirror? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859432)

Ha ha, now stop horsing around.

Re:Mirror? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859417)

> Slashdotted with 0 comments.... *sigh*

even mirrordot didn't have the time to RTFA !

Re:Mirror? (1)

tarquin_fim_bim (649994) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859442)

Google cache [64.233.183.104]

Server shot (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859382)

That server must be powered by that Horse mouse..

Poof! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859386)

That was fast.

/.'ed (0, Redundant)

DesiGuy421 (782201) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859389)

One comment so far and site has already been destroyed.

X posts so far... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859390)

...yet no mention of the "mare", unarguably the best pointing device invented by man.

Been there, done that (5, Funny)

CtrlPhreak (226872) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859392)

This is something I've known for a long time, when I put my three middle fingers into my horse it relaxes me a lot too, let alone the horse. Including a thumb every once in a while is a simple change that gives so much more comfort.

Re:Been there, done that (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859529)

thank god some mods picked this up. fucking retarded puritans, rating it flamebait...

Re:Been there, done that (5, Funny)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859650)

when I put my three middle fingers into my horse it relaxes me a lot too, let alone the horse.

WikiAfterDark.com [wikiafterdark.com] What do you wanna do sexually?


I'm really not sure you're doing wikiafterdark.com any favours when your sig is attached to posts like that...

Dead mouse already? (1)

Bongoots (795869) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859396)

Slashdot is at it again!!

Any mirrors?

Re:Dead mouse already? (1, Funny)

SuperficialRhyme (731757) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859448)

Man, I feel like we're beating a dead horse... ba-dum-chhh

hmph. (0, Offtopic)

yourexhalekiss (833943) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859398)

They should call it the "ass."

Heh. (1)

Predflux (851314) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859400)

Do they run their server on 18.8k?

Mirror (5, Informative)

betaguy9000 (863878) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859403)

Mirror here [nyud.net] .

Re:Mirror (1)

SillySnake (727102) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859662)

It looks like a toy airplane.. With the wings out to the side and a big long tail :) I bet it'd float in the bathtub.

Short Answer: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859409)

No.

Re:Short Answer: (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859488)

No kidding.

"Is Horse the New Mouse?"
"Is Apple the New Microsoft?"
"Is Pink the New Black?"

The answer is "no, dumbass... STFU" in all cases.

Slashdot might need to change their slogan soon:

News for Nerds. Stuff that matters. Really fucking stupid questions.

That is one ugly mouse (2, Informative)

wormeyman (797562) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859412)

Re:That is one ugly mouse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859579)

Is it just me or does it look like a demented tooth...

Re:That is one ugly mouse (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859628)

doesn't look like that good to use if you need to move your hand off and back again on it regularly.

Re:That is one ugly mouse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859641)

I don't mind the ugliness, but it's got 2 buttons and a wheel. Mine has 7 and a wheel, and I'd really like to see there be 6 thumb buttons instead of 2 someday. Buttonwise, it's kind of a step backward.

But I agree that the shape is very ergonomic. I have tries a few difference mice (mouses?) and the ones that let me put the part of my palm closest to the fingers flush onto the mouse are the most comfortable.

Dodgy (5, Funny)

m50d (797211) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859416)

If you think I'm clicking a link to "Horse.jpg"...

Re:Dodgy (2, Funny)

kryogen1x (838672) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859515)

Yeah, especially after seeing goat.jpg!

Re:Dodgy (2, Insightful)

EnronHaliburton2004 (815366) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859536)

Relax, a horse is not a goat.

Although, the photo [europhysicsnews.com] , is a little disturbing. That thing looks like an alien probe of some sort...

if we keep clicking after the slashdot (5, Funny)

Gunsmithy (554829) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859421)

...would it be beating a dead horse? I'm here all week, ladies and gentlemen. Don't forget to tip the wait staff.

Re:if we keep clicking after the slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859464)

Moderators, don't encourage him.

Microsoft Trackball Explorer (1, Informative)

sahonen (680948) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859423)

It's slashdotted, so I can't tell, but I use a Microsoft Trackball Explorer [microsoft.com] , which is very comfortable for me.

Re:Microsoft Trackball Explorer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859481)

Yeah, I use a Logitech trackman marble plus, and it is WAY more comfortable to use than a mouse.

Just get a freaking trackball, people!

Re:Microsoft Trackball Explorer (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859497)

I use a drawing tablet..

Man i can OWN you on Unreal Tournament!! Take that!!! *scribble* *erase*

Re:Microsoft Trackball Explorer (2, Insightful)

einhverfr (238914) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859531)

I switched to trackballs for this reason too. This mouse might help, but quite frankly, there is nothing that can still beat a good trackball.

Not a horse (1, Funny)

moofdaddy (570503) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859424)

That's not a horse, its just a fat mouse. Maybe a pony at the most...

Re:Not a horse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859465)

Looks more like a duck to me.

Re:Not a horse (1)

alphan (774661) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859485)

Looking at this picture [nyud.net] , I believe the name "whale" would be more appropriate.

Re:Not a horse (1)

ibman (314773) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859660)

May this is one of those inkblots, but in a wooden form...How you interpret it may reveal your current psychological conflicts and processes...As for me, I think it's a penguin.

What's a [sic]?? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859428)

I looked it up but, found no definitions.

Re:What's a [sic]?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859474)

how is that a troll? I don't know what [sic:] means either, and yes, I did try google.
And I also can't figure out what a .sig is.

all you assholes are for free information but never give any out yourself.
act on your preaching buddies.

Re:What's a [sic]?? (1)

rah1420 (234198) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859581)

You could look here [erols.com] for a definition...

Re:What's a [sic]?? (1)

brian0918 (638904) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859560)

sic means that the typo was intentionally kept from the article, and was not the result of the editor, for once.

I love horses! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859429)

I love horses!

Here's the article, no pictures though (1, Informative)

bigsexyjoe (581721) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859430)

Europhysics News (2004) Vol. 35 No. 6 A new computer mouse called Horse C.J. Snijders and P.C. Helder, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands. In the early 60's Doug Engelbart, a scientist at the Stanford Research Institute in California, invented the computer mouse. This may certainly be seen as one of those brilliant tools we hardly can do without. However excellent the functionality of the mouse--we all use it with great ease--its recent form can also be a significant source of discomfort. Repetitive movements cause physical complaints. This is one of the causative factors of Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) or Occupational Overuse Syndrome (OOS) [1]. Rigid work patterns and prolonged periods of heavy work load can result in physical stress. Personality aspects are also considered to play a role in the development of RSI [2]. About 20% of the working population has complaints related to the neck-shoulder-arm region and overuse complaints can be the result of using the mouse. This is why a biomechanical research program was started by Erasmus MC,University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Biomechanical model The present study has identified one cause for several physical problems in the neck-shoulder-arm region. Based on a pilot study a hypothesis was introduced that forceful gripping or pinching goes with tension in the deep neck muscles. To investigate this, blood flow velocity was measured in the region indicated in Fig. 1 (with permission from Sobotta,Atlas of Human Anatomy). The drawing shows the costoclavicular gate between clavicular bone and first rib (see circle). Neck muscle tension results in a narrowing of this gate and thus impingement of the subclavian artery and vein. This conclusion is supported by a biomechanical model of the aetiology of tennis elbow [3]. It describes the role of extensor muscles in the hand and lower limb and substantiates the finding that restriction of blood flow is caused by forceful pinching. Therefore we conclude that certain force application by the hand is related to tension in the deep neck muscles which explains a variety of shoulder- and arm complaints. Design of a computer mouse called "Horse" The use of a conventional computer mouse requires continuous lifting of the fingers. This results in excessive use of extensor muscles to avoid unwanted switching which can be seen as a possible cause of tension in the deep neck muscles. It was therefore decided to design a mouse that does not provoke extensor muscle activity. This new concept is called Horse in view of its functional design: the palm of the hand as well as the middle three fingers "sit" on the main body while thumb and little finger rest at a lower level at the side as if supported by stirrups (Fig. 2). Thumb and little finger work together to realize optimal control in the horizontal (X-Y) plane. The design of the Horse allows for the three middle fingers to adopt a flexed position to relax the tendons. A major part of these fingers rests in a more or less vertical position. Fig 1 Narrowing of costoclavicular gate (see circle) resulting in impingement of artery and vein (with permission from Sobotta,Atlas of Human Anatomy) In view of this supported position of the hand and fingers, extensor muscles can relax. Extensor action is no longer required with the palm of the hand and fingers resting on the Horse. A light flexing action of the top of the fingers is sufficient to switch. This action results in a force on the touch switches situated at the lower end near the tips of the fingers. These switches react on touch force only which reduces or virtually eliminates the movement of the tendons when switching. Moreover, complete support of the fingers will reduce the necessity of co-contraction of the intrinsic muscles of the hand [4]. Other features as a result of the design of the Horse are: * a better stability control in the X-Y plane * the possibility to reduce friction of the Horse on the table Fig 2 Thumb at the side, major part of the three fingers more or less vertical, finger tips touch at the side of the switches. Result of development A working concept of the Horse was produced using Rapid Proto Typing (RPT). This technology generates prototype bodies directly from 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) files. The electronics of a conventional mouse were installed in the RPT body. The prototype was then tested in a day-to-day working environment.Horse and mouse could thus be compared. Figure 3 shows a hand on the Horse manufactured by means of RPT and on a conventional mouse.Relevant joints, phalanges and transversal contours are indicated in red clearly showing the difference between the two. Fig 3 RPT Horse, relaxed hand; conventional mouse, stressed hand. Production A working concept of the Horse was produced using Rapid Proto Typing (RPT). This technology generates prototype bodies directly from 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) files. The electronics of a conventional mouse were installed in the RPT body. The prototype was then tested in a day-to-day working environment.Horse and mouse could thus be compared. Figure 3 shows a hand on the Horse manufactured by means of RPT and on a conventional mouse.Relevant joints, phalanges and transversal contours are indicated in red clearly showing the difference between the two. Fig 4 Front view of the Horse manufactured by means of RPT with touch switches and scrool wheel. Conclusion The combination of fundamental research based on the anatomy of the human body and the availability of state of the art technology, enables the production of small series of custom made products prior to large-scale production. In this case the development and production of a computer mouse which aims to provide an appropriate extension of the human body. The selected approach aims at reducing the risks involved with market introduction of new products. About the authors Chris J. Snijders, PhD, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam Research on biomechanics of low back and pelvic pain and on neck-, shoulder- and arm-problems. Product design for a number of medical disciplines. Teaching: undergraduate and graduate courses for medical and engineering students in theoretical mechanics, biomechanics and product design. Paul C.Helder, MBA, BA, BSc Management of innovation, as member of the board of commercial organizations involved in various developments that combine mechanical engineering and biotechnology. References [1] Yassi A. Repetitive strain injuries. Lancet 1997; 349: 943-947 [2] Health Council of the Netherlands: RSI. The Hague: Health Council of the Netherlands, 2000; publication nr. 2000/22 [3] Snijders C.J.,Volkers A.C.W.,Mechelse K., Vleeming A. Provocation of epicondylalgia lateralis (tennis elbow) by power grip or pinching.Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 1987; 19(5): 518 523 [4] Leijnse J.N.A.L., Bonte J.E., Landsmeer J.M.F., Kalker J.J.,Meulen J.C. van der, Snijders C.J. Biomechanics of the finger with anatomical restrictions; the significance for the exercising hand of the musician. Journal of Biomechanics 1992; 25(11): 1253-1264 Copyright EPS and EDP Sciences , 2004

Re:Here's the article, no pictures though (5, Funny)

EMH_Mark3 (305983) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859458)

Holy lack of paragraphs, Batman!

Re:Here's the article, no pictures though (1)

A beautiful mind (821714) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859501)

Holy lack of ANY \n, \r, \t! and !

Re:Here's the article, no pictures though (3, Informative)

Neoncow (802085) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859518)

Europhysics News (2004) Vol. 35 No. 6 A new computer mouse called Horse C.J. Snijders and P.C. Helder, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands. In the early 60's Doug Engelbart, a scientist at the Stanford Research Institute in California, invented the computer mouse. This may certainly be seen as one of those brilliant tools we hardly can do without. However excellent the functionality of the mouse--we all use it with great ease--its recent form can also be a significant source of discomfort.

Repetitive movements cause physical complaints. This is one of the causative factors of Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) or Occupational Overuse Syndrome (OOS) [1]. Rigid work patterns and prolonged periods of heavy work load can result in physical stress. Personality aspects are also considered to play a role in the development of RSI [2]. About 20% of the working population has complaints related to the neck-shoulder-arm region and overuse complaints can be the result of using the mouse. This is why a biomechanical research program was started by Erasmus MC,University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Biomechanical model
The present study has identified one cause for several physical problems in the neck-shoulder-arm region. Based on a pilot study a hypothesis was introduced that forceful gripping or pinching goes with tension in the deep neck muscles. To investigate this, blood flow velocity was measured in the region indicated in Fig. 1 (with permission from Sobotta,Atlas of Human Anatomy). The drawing shows the costoclavicular gate between clavicular bone and first rib (see circle). Neck muscle tension results in a narrowing of this gate and thus impingement of the subclavian artery and vein. This conclusion is supported by a biomechanical model of the aetiology of tennis elbow [3]. It describes the role of extensor muscles in the hand and lower limb and substantiates the finding that restriction of blood flow is caused by forceful pinching. Therefore we conclude that certain force application by the hand is related to tension in the deep neck muscles which explains a variety of shoulder- and arm complaints.

Design of a computer mouse called "Horse"
The use of a conventional computer mouse requires continuous lifting of the fingers. This results in excessive use of extensor muscles to avoid unwanted switching which can be seen as a possible cause of tension in the deep neck muscles. It was therefore decided to design a mouse that does not provoke extensor muscle activity. This new concept is called Horse in view of its functional design: the palm of the hand as well as the middle three fingers "sit" on the main body while thumb and little finger rest at a lower level at the side as if supported by stirrups (Fig. 2). Thumb and little finger work together to realize optimal control in the horizontal (X-Y) plane. The design of the Horse allows for the three middle fingers to adopt a flexed position to relax the tendons. A major part of these fingers rests in a more or less vertical position. Fig 1 Narrowing of costoclavicular gate (see circle) resulting in impingement of artery and vein (with permission from Sobotta,Atlas of Human Anatomy)

In view of this supported position of the hand and fingers, extensor muscles can relax. Extensor action is no longer required with the palm of the hand and fingers resting on the Horse. A light flexing action of the top of the fingers is sufficient to switch. This action results in a force on the touch switches situated at the lower end near the tips of the fingers. These switches react on touch force only which reduces or virtually eliminates the movement of the tendons when switching. Moreover, complete support of the fingers will reduce the necessity of co-contraction of the intrinsic muscles of the hand [4]. Other features as a result of the design of the Horse are: * a better stability control in the X-Y plane * the possibility to reduce friction of the Horse on the table Fig 2 Thumb at the side, major part of the three fingers more or less vertical, finger tips touch at the side of the switches.

Result of development
A working concept of the Horse was produced using Rapid Proto Typing (RPT). This technology generates prototype bodies directly from 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) files. The electronics of a conventional mouse were installed in the RPT body. The prototype was then tested in a day-to-day working environment.Horse and mouse could thus be compared. Figure 3 shows a hand on the Horse manufactured by means of RPT and on a conventional mouse.Relevant joints, phalanges and transversal contours are indicated in red clearly showing the difference between the two. Fig 3 RPT Horse, relaxed hand; conventional mouse, stressed hand. Production A working concept of the Horse was produced using Rapid Proto Typing (RPT). This technology generates prototype bodies directly from 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) files. The electronics of a conventional mouse were installed in the RPT body. The prototype was then tested in a day-to-day working environment.Horse and mouse could thus be compared. Figure 3 shows a hand on the Horse manufactured by means of RPT and on a conventional mouse.Relevant joints, phalanges and transversal contours are indicated in red clearly showing the difference between the two. Fig 4 Front view of the Horse manufactured by means of RPT with touch switches and scrool wheel.

Conclusion
The combination of fundamental research based on the anatomy of the human body and the availability of state of the art technology, enables the production of small series of custom made products prior to large-scale production. In this case the development and production of a computer mouse which aims to provide an appropriate extension of the human body. The selected approach aims at reducing the risks involved with market introduction of new products.

About the authors
Chris J. Snijders, PhD, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam Research on biomechanics of low back and pelvic pain and on neck-, shoulder- and arm-problems. Product design for a number of medical disciplines. Teaching: undergraduate and graduate courses for medical and engineering students in theoretical mechanics, biomechanics and product design. Paul C.Helder, MBA, BA, BSc Management of innovation, as member of the board of commercial organizations involved in various developments that combine mechanical engineering and biotechnology.

References
[1] Yassi A. Repetitive strain injuries. Lancet 1997; 349: 943-947
[2] Health Council of the Netherlands: RSI. The Hague: Health Council of the Netherlands, 2000; publication nr. 2000/22
[3] Snijders C.J.,Volkers A.C.W.,Mechelse K., Vleeming A. Provocation of epicondylalgia lateralis (tennis elbow) by power grip or pinching.Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 1987; 19(5): 518 523
[4] Leijnse J.N.A.L., Bonte J.E., Landsmeer J.M.F., Kalker J.J.,Meulen J.C. van der, Snijders C.J. Biomechanics of the finger with anatomical restrictions; the significance for the exercising hand of the musician. Journal of Biomechanics 1992; 25(11): 1253-1264 Copyright EPS and EDP Sciences , 2004
====================

I added spaces in random places.. Let's see who notices.

A horse is a horse (4, Funny)

murderlegendre (776042) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859433)

Of course, of course.. unless, of course it's a mouse; in which case it's actually neither.

This isnt so good but is an option (4, Insightful)

Saven Marek (739395) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859435)

This is an option for some people but not others. In the late 1980s I used a device with a thumbwheel much the same and man a scroll thumbwheel after 5 minutes is hell on tendons more so than any other mouse I used.

But I can use a normal mouse all day long and not have a problem and have been doing so for years now.

So your mileage may vary.

Re:This isnt so good but is an option (1)

ShyGuy91284 (701108) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859661)

If so, I say replace it with two buttons that look like a two way switch so you just have to press your thumb forwards or backwards.

New hardware (2, Interesting)

clean_stoner (759658) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859438)

Various companies are always coming out with new hardware designs that they claim will revolutionize how we interface with computers, like those split keyboards, and that keyboard that looked like a video game controller, etc but none of them ever pan out. This will be no different.

Mirrordot (1, Offtopic)

PxM (855264) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859441)

The editors should just link to mirrordot in each story. Story [mirrordot.org] Picture [mirrordot.org]

--
Free iPod? Try a free Mac Mini [freeminimacs.com]
Or a free Nintendo DS [freegamingsystems.com]
Wired article as proof [wired.com]

Re:Mirrordot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859472)

"Hey man! The MirrorDot page you are looking for is not here."

Quality.

Re:Mirrordot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859509)

Thats what you get from a guy whose page design looks like it was vomitted on by a drunken disco greaser circa 1978.

Re:Mirrordot (1)

Neophytus (642863) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859593)

That won't work without editing the story after it's posted - MD only gets the story when the subscribers get it.

Hmm. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859444)

I assume they must have put at least a certain amount of research into the ergonomics of it, but I can't see how that would be comfortable to use -- particularly for someone who has bone or joint ailments like arthritis. Having your hand contorted over something that size seems like it'd probably be a little painful at best.

Re:Hmm. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859576)

Having your hand contorted over something that size seems like it'd probably be a little painful at best.

My wife doesn't have that problem :)

Ba-doom-chh...

Stupid article... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859446)

This will never catch on, especially on public computers. What about lefties? This thing doesn't look like it can be used properly with either hand at all.

Re:Stupid article... (1)

A beautiful mind (821714) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859523)

I kinda blame the bad angle of the picture.

Try to imagine it from another angle and try virtually putting your hand on it. I think it could work.

I don't think they would be that stupid to design something you cannot use. Especially if usefulness and comfort was their main goal.

What about lefties... (1)

blinkless (835747) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859582)

Just turn it upside down.

thats cool an all... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859449)

(even though you cant see it)
but would companies be willing to go the extra 45 bux (im guessing?) to benefit their employees?(im guessing not?)
And what about better designed keyboards? As I understand it, more stress on wrists comes from poor posture, bad keystroke habits, and a general crapload of typing, rather than moving a mouse around. Although, that can be a pain too.

Horse.. bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859471)

Looks like a dolphin to me. Cute too.

Kinda like my logitech (5, Interesting)

venomkid (624425) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859475)

I can (and do) grip my logitech MX1000 [logitech.com] in a way that looks like what they're trying to accomplish... Fingers bent a bit, hand relaxed over the top arch. Its buttons extend quite far along the body of the mouse, it's very comfortable.

Re:Kinda like my logitech (2, Interesting)

Rirath.com (807148) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859578)

I can (and do) grip my logitech MX1000 in a way that looks like what they're trying to accomplish... Fingers bent a bit, hand relaxed over the top arch. Its buttons extend quite far along the body of the mouse, it's very comfortable.

Funny enough, this sort of comfortable 'loose grip' on the mouse is great in FPS games. You'd be surprised the amount of control gained from the standard and limiting flopping the hand on the mouse. It works well enough for me with my mx510 and mx700.

How long... (5, Insightful)

Snommis (861843) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859476)

...until we find out what type of repetitive stress injury THIS causes? Face it, do something enough times, and it can cause problems.

Maybe we need a Horse, a mouse and a trackball each, then rotate them once a week...

But, Doctor Evil... (4, Informative)

argent (18001) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859478)

that [fentek-ind.com] already [quillmouse.com] happened [evoluent.com] ! [thehumansolution.com]

Biased towards right handers (5, Funny)

eviltypeguy (521224) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859480)

The world is full of right handed biased designers! Evil! Where's my left handed version? Don't you people know that your biased right hand designs make only a few of us left? (pun intended).

Re:Biased towards right handers (1)

isoteareth (321937) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859640)

Offhand mousing isn't hard. I used to mouse left when my right hand was injured. The on;y thing I had any trouble with was first person shooters, and even that wasn't too bad.

Still, I'd prefer devices were either hand-neutral of released for both hands, since I can reduce stress on my hands by swapping.

Alternative placement on a normal mouse. (4, Interesting)

PxM (855264) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859482)

When you use a mouse, do you have your forearm at an angle to the mouse with your index finger on the left button (assuming right-handedness), your middle finger on the right button, and your ring finger on the "forward" button on 5-button mice? I've found that having my forearm parallel to the mouse with my middle finger on the scroll, my ring finger on the right mouse button, and my pinky on the forward button reduces the stress on my wrist since my wrist is no longer twisted at an odd angle. I was wondering if anyone else did this too.

--
Free iPod? Try a free Mac Mini [freeminimacs.com]
Or a free Nintendo DS [freegamingsystems.com]
Wired article as proof [wired.com]

Next... (1)

g33ker (853100) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859490)

Next up is the Whorse... a multiuser mouse! Well it was funny in my head...

Let all the horse jokes begin (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859498)

You can take a horse to water .. but should we ?

What is so new? (4, Informative)

houghi (78078) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859503)

For me it just looks like a trackman that you move around. If you want to talk about really new things compared to the mouse, take a look at the Ergonomic Vertical Mouse [keytools-e...mics.co.uk] That one is realy inovative compared to the old mouse. Or any of the other mice on that site. Want something REALLY new? Thy this one [keytools-e...mics.co.uk]

Article Text (Google Cache) (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859512)

Google Cache [216.239.63.104]

I know... we all want the picture!

Did anyone else see: "Erasmus MC" and think that the author was also a hip-hop artist? Ewird.

Help with (3, Interesting)

saitoh (589746) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859519)

Since it causes the hand to be in a more downward (as opposed to a straighter possition) if you can find a spare baseball or rubber band ball it gives you a good idea of what this would feel like to use. I happen to have a rubber band ball from a conference I went to in September handy and noticed the similarity when looking at the pic.

Personally, I kind of like it, I can kind of tell the difference with the tendons, but I'm not sure how well it would react in uses where your moving your hand a lot now that the center of where your pressing on the input device (no longer can you just call it a mouse...) seems to be more toward the wrist, so forward or side to side movements would require more effort or at least leverage. Would be interesting to try it out though.

Re:Help with (1)

anon*127.0.0.1 (637224) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859589)

I've been looking for a thumb-wheeled mouse for a while now, so this looks interesting. The thumb seems to be a lot better adapted for... well, rotating little wheels. I'm not sure about the rest of the design, but I'll probably give it a test drive if/when it ever reaches market.

Special Slashdot version (5, Funny)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859541)

"'the three middle fingers to adopt a flexed position to relax the tendons' "

Why not a special version for Slashdot moderators which allows just the one middle finger to be used for moderation?

Re:Special Slashdot version (1)

vidarlo (134906) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859665)

Why not a special version for Slashdot moderators which allows just the one middle finger to be used for moderation?

This would give slashdotting a new dimension... Noone would be able to get hold of this mouse once moderators edition was let out.

Design better guis.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859548)

Better gui design is more important than mouse design. Clicking ones way through complicated processes is rediculous. Take spreadsheets, just imagine if every commercial business ap had the same MS style gui. Then half the work force would suffer carpal tunnel..what am I saying. Maybe the answer is to elimate the keyboard all together and do all the typing with the mouse.

Just imagine how efficient a system could be if you just had two mice working together, you could click type on a screen keyboard twice as fast. Not to mention get carpal tunnel in both hands at the same time!

similar to trackman marble FX (1)

aleksey (1519) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859552)

The design seems similar to the (sadly no longer available) Trackman Marble FX [google.com] from logitech. It's a trackball with an oversized ball and ergonomically positions buttons. Very comfortable. I'm hoarding three of them and will continue to use them with all my future computers. Fortunately, since the motion sensor is optical, it's very easy to clean, and so I expect mine to last approximately forever

My Mouse (0, Offtopic)

a_greer2005 (863926) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859556)

...is hung like a horse!

So whats the plural then... (3, Funny)

icypyr0 (636724) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859564)

horsies?

Re:So whats the plural then... (5, Funny)

fuzzhead (750413) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859642)

hice

Genetic engineering? (1)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859567)

Geez. I've already gotten use to the spider-goat [onlisareinsradar.com] pointing device used for navigating the Web and butting into blogs. Now I have to get used to this new horse-mouse!

they're flogging a dead horse! (1)

chalkoutline (854917) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859569)

People trying to create revolutionary new keyboard/mouse designs should just give it up, nobody will be easily persuaded to change even if they know that their current setup is harmful to them. Society today tells us that almost everything gives out a cancer risk, radioactive waves, or psychic mind control beams, so people have become disillusioned to it all.

...and the vertical mouse (3, Informative)

Opus01 (863572) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859577)

I've been using this for more than a year now. Love it. Solved my wrist pain almost immediately. The Vertical Mouse http://www.evoluent.com/

Well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859587)

We really rode that horse into the f%$#ing ground, didn't we?

-rt

Illicit Drugs (1)

Xoder (664531) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859600)

Am I the only one whose first thought was, "Heroin? WTF does that have to do with mice? Isn't that against some law, or at the least, a good waste of H?"

Minor Problem (1)

prichardson (603676) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859612)

One thing that manufacturers overlook is that not everyone has the same size hands.

I have fairly large hands (the original X-Box controller fit me nicely), and these form-fit mouses just don't work. I use Logitech's original optical scroll mouse and I move it around with my fingers, barely moving my wrist at all. I actually prefer this to moving my whole arm.

They call it a HORSE? And where's the trackball? (1)

WidescreenFreak (830043) | more than 9 years ago | (#11859631)

From the looks of the picture, it should be called the "Beluga (Whale) Mouse"!

I'm forced to wonder, however, why there is such a focus put on mice and not trackballs. Every person that I've ever convinced to switch to a trackball has said that they'll never go back to mice again. It offers finer control than most mice and doesn't need any desk space except where it sits.

Then again, Windows, like a mouse (not the live kind), is cluttered, unrefined, requires a lot of room, and can be a pain in places other than the wrist, yet people still go for that even when there are better alternatives, too. So, I probably shouldn't be surprised of the effort to push mice instead of trackballs.

I like my mouse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11859633)

I wouldnt trade my mouse for the world

http://onticfusion.sytes.net/ [sytes.net]
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