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Microwires Can Replace The DVD-ROM

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the not-your-kommandant's-wire-recorder dept.

Data Storage 416

neutron_p writes "A former Soviet Union military development finds its use in modern technology and still remains fascinating." The development comes in the form of a flexible microwire, 10 micrometers thick and 10cm long, with a metal body and a glass coating, which the linked article says "can store 10 Gigabytes of information. It is possible thanks to their magnetic properties. Anyway, it's not that easy. Researchers say that the greatest difficulty will be with the reading of information."

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416 comments

Isolinear chips (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868906)

Star Trek geek in me coming out... :)

What military purposes? (4, Funny)

winkydink (650484) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868907)

3 or 5 times thinner than a human hair, these fine threads were invented in the old Soviet Union for military purposes... Data wig? What?

Re:What military purposes? (2, Funny)

UWC (664779) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868957)

And the reading device can be disguised as a Flowbee!

Re:What military purposes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869036)

Think of it like shigawire from the Dune books!

Since when did CD's store data MAGNETICALLY?! (4, Interesting)

vivin (671928) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869084)

the microwires become diminutive substitutes for the CD-ROM, given that information can be stored magnetically on them, as with CDs.

Since when did CD's start storing data magnetically? I thought it was optically? Where can I buy these new-fangled magnetic CD's?!

i predict that there will be (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868909)

1000 in soviet russia jokes

In Soviet Russia... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868974)

Microwire reads YOU!

Re:i predict that there will be (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868992)

In soviet russia, thousands predicted your statement.

2nd (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868913)

yay, eat me.

Write Only Memory (5, Funny)

sjbe (173966) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868915)

the greatest difficulty will be with the reading of information

Is the long anticipated write-only memory here at last? Huzzah!

Re:Write Only Memory (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868955)

Fortune quote at the bottom f the page as I am reading this:
It's not an optical illusion, it just looks like one. -- Phil White

shove it (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869062)

Aah, memory that you can give to someone and tell them to insert it where the sun don't shine.

I want a crateload to give to my boss. thanks!

Re:Write Only Memory (2, Informative)

Golias (176380) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869147)

This kind of sounds like a cold-war Soviet press release.

"Yes, of course Comrade! Our new media-writing technology is vastly superior to that of the decadant Americans. It holds far more data, there's no dispute. Eh? You want to read the data you say? Well no... We are still working on reading device, but all the data is there, no doubt about it! Just look at it! Just by looking at it you can tell it is holding much more data! It's obvious! Another victory for the revolution! Rejoice!"

Truly "Write Once Read Never" (2, Funny)

vivin (671928) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868923)

Researchers say that the greatest difficulty will be with the reading of information.

Excellent! Now my Perl scripts will truly become Write Once Read Never!!

W.R.O.N.G.! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869177)

Write:Read == Once:Never Got-it?

No way (3, Funny)

CDOS_CDOS run (669823) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868924)

[tinfoilhat]I am sticking to my 5.25" floppy, it's the only reliable way to backup data.[/tinfoilhat]

Re:No way (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869104)

In Soviet Russia tinfoil hats read you!

Re:No way (1)

Oen_Seneg (673357) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869123)

Let me guess: You then attach all your floppies to a whiteboard with magnets?

so... (2, Insightful)

to_kallon (778547) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868925)

Microwires Can Replace The DVD-ROM...Researchers say that the greatest difficulty will be with the reading of information.
i can write lots of data but then it's lost??
where do i sign up for this great *new* technology??

Re:so... (1)

Dues (786223) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868985)

its like saying "i have a lifetime supply of captain crunch, but no one has figured out how to eat it yet..."

Re:so... (1)

Oen_Seneg (673357) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869001)

A slightly more common method: Buy the cheapest Dual-Layer DVD media you can find, and leave it out in the sunlight for a while.

Anyhow, you'd most likely lose the microwire before you could attempt to read it.

hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868926)

so, startrek brought us atom teleportation, so can we thank hogan's heros for this one...?

How long before these are removable media? (1)

pete.com (741064) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868930)

and those of us in Info security were worried about 1G thumb drives ...

Reading the information? (5, Funny)

nobuzz (636720) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868934)

Researchers say that the greatest difficulty will be with the reading of information.

How the hell can they tell it's there if they can't even read it?

It's probably quantum. (5, Funny)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868987)

How the hell can they tell it's there if they can't even read it?

If 10GB of MP3s are written on a wire, and there is no reader to play it. Does it make a sound?

Re:It's probably quantum. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869076)

Yes, the sound RIAA slaping a lawsuit on the writter.

Re:It's probably quantum. (5, Funny)

Smidge204 (605297) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869098)

No, but the RIAA will sue you anyway!

=Smidge=

Re:Reading the information? (1)

Capt James McCarthy (860294) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869066)

dd if=/dev/null of=/dev/rmt/mw0

Re:Reading the information? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869074)

Elaine: Can it cut that thin?

Kramer: Oh, I've cut slices so thin, I couldn't even see them.

Elaine: How did you know you cut it?

Kramer: Well, I guess I just assumed.

Re:Reading the information? (1)

chrisnewbie (708349) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869150)

It's like a flea circus just got to believe in the magic

Why the fuck doesnt slashdot render in firefox (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868939)

properly?

I thought slashdot was run by open source fags, why does it look better in M$ Internet Exploder.

(+5 funny for combination of M$ and Internet exploder ROFLOLOLOOLOLOLO!!!1!)

Re:Why the fuck doesnt slashdot render in firefox (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869018)

This is a fairly famous bug. It has been resolved in trunk and 1.01, IIRC. In the meantime, the workaround is , , which enlarges the font, then shrinks the font, and will cause the page to render correctly.

Re:Why the fuck doesnt slashdot render in firefox (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869106)

wrong you shiteating homosexual faggoty cock-smoking teabagger. and learn you some posting abilities shitbird. the fix is in 1.1 and slashdot still sucks major ass for not fixing it regardless of whether or not it's a bug in firefox. now please fuck off and die.

Re:Why the fuck doesnt slashdot render in firefox (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869063)

Clearly you are doing something improper. Firefox and the Slashcode CMS are open source, therefore are immune to software bugs. Slashdotters say so, so it must be true. If you happen to find a bug in the rendering of Slashcode, please send a patch to Slashcode.com where it will be promptly ignored in place of their clearly superior coding efforts.

Great. Just great. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868940)

I'm already going batty trying to not lose these fucking tiny cartriges for the Nintendo DS. Now I'm going to have to keep track of a 10cm molecular-width wire and find myself losing them like pencils as they fall out of my pocket.

I have seen the future and it is inconvenient

Would you trust someone who... (5, Insightful)

PornMaster (749461) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868943)

thinks that CDs use magnetism to report on new tech?

"The microwires become diminutive substitutes for the CD-ROM, given that information can be stored magnetically on them, as with CDs."

Re:Would you trust someone who... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869037)

Magneto-Optical drives stored their data on magnetics materials, but were CD-shaped, and used lasers for the writing process.

I dont know if they meant M-O or not, but they appeared similar, so its possible.

Re:Would you trust someone who... (1)

justforaday (560408) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869071)

Are you saying they don't?!?

Sounds like my backup strategy. (5, Funny)

Trigun (685027) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868947)

Backup is easy! The restore is the tricky part.

incredible (1)

sla291 (757668) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868954)

omg, you'll be able to hide several terabytes in your hair !?

Remerber johnny mnemonic ? No wait, sardaukars with their shigawires in dune ?

Not going to happen (1)

nmb3000 (741169) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868958)

It seems obvious that magnetic mediums are going to eventually become a thing of the past, especially for removable media. Optical and solid-state memory like Flash are the way it's going to be.

Personally, I think three-dimensional optical media will be the next huge leap in removeable data storage, though these tiny metal wires do remind me of those little rings the Seleeches wore in Battlefield Earth :)

Re:Not going to happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869108)

Why?

MOTHER RUSSIA (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868962)

Is the MPAA going to make us suck on their microwires from now on???

Bit vs buye (4, Interesting)

prakslash (681585) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868963)


From the article:

The researchers calculate that a 10 cm long microwire can carry out 10 million divisions or cells and in each one of these a byte can be stored. In order to store the byte, each one of these cells is magnetised in one orientation or the other.

Don't they mean a "bit"? How can you store a whole byte with just two magnetic orientations?

Re:Bit vs buye (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869029)

Maybe a cell is a long enough piece of wire to hold 8 bits.

Re:Bit vs buye (4, Interesting)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869067)

They also say that CDs store things magnetically. This source is somewhat questionable.

Re:Bit vs buye (1)

k96822 (838564) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869182)

I think he meant CD-RW's. Unless my knowledge is way out of date (wouldn't be the first time), CD-RW's work by magnetically changing the surface of the disk. They are still read optically, though. CD-R's aren't magentic, however, which is why once the laser etches the disk, it is permanent. Now, this is a technology that changes so fast, I could very well be wrong (or, if we wait 10 minutes, I'll be wrong then). Does anybody know if this is done differently now?

Re:Bit vs buye (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869099)

Maybe that's why they're having problems reading the data back.

<sarcasm>
But you've got to admit, 8:1 compression is pretty good!
</sarcasm>

Re:Bit vs buye (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869132)

Maybe this so called "revolutionnary invention" is just another bullshit like the previously seen on /. "battery-charging sticker"?

Re:Bit vs buye (1)

uucp2 (731567) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869141)

Don't they mean a "bit"? How can you store a whole byte with just two magnetic orientations?

I guess that is exactly the question the researchers were thinking when they said "the greatest difficulty will be with the reading of information".

Re:Bit vs buye (1)

demonbug (309515) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869168)

Never mind that if you have 10 million of them you either have 10 megabits (well, in HD manufacturer lingo, anyway) or 10 megabytes, not 10 gigabytes.

Re:Bit vs buye (4, Insightful)

LurkerXXX (667952) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869188)

What about the heading for the paragraph?

10 Gigabytes in 10 cm long

followed later by:

The researchers calculate that a 10 cm long microwire can carry out 10 million divisions or cells and in each one of these a byte can be stored. In order to store the byte, each one of these cells is magnetised in one orientation or the other.

Pardon my math, but isn't 10 million bytes 10 Megabytes, not Gigabytes? Isn't the articles claim of data density off a thousand fold?

Maybe I'm the stupid one. (1)

unique alias (862076) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868967)

The microwires become diminutive substitutes for the CD-ROM, given that information can be stored magnetically on them, as with CDs. Right. Magnetic CDs, AKA floppy discs.

Heinlein came up with this... (4, Interesting)

Theaetetus (590071) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868970)

Years back, he hypothesized that future aliens contacting us might bring along their entire libraries on a single piece of titanium. Doesn't matter what size: just mark one end with A, one end with B, and make a notch somewhere in the middle.
Measure A/B, convert the resulting fraction into a hexadecimal string, and there's your data.

Only problem is that your microscope has to be really good.

-T

Re:Heinlein came up with this... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869195)

If Heinlein knew anything about math, he'd know this would never work. There is something called "impossible numbers" which are numbers that simply do not and cannot exist. Take for example the number 0.43223400240983312345432. It doesn't exist. It can't. It's impossible to generate by any means. And if that was the number you needed to express yoiur data, you couldn't. Which is why this would never work.

The novelty is the size. (1)

idontgno (624372) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868976)

This appears to be just wire recording [wikipedia.org] writ exceedingly small.

And if you thought getting glass fiber in your skin itched...

From TFA: (4, Interesting)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868978)

The researchers calculate that a 10 cm long microwire can carry out 10 million divisions or cells and in each one of these a byte can be stored. In order to store the byte, each one of these cells is magnetised in one orientation or the other.

Assuming they didn't mean "bits" when they said "bytes", that only sounds like 10 megabytes to me... Not gigabytes. If they meant bits instead of bytes, which seems likely given the description, that's only 1.25 megabytes in 10 cm...

Re:From TFA: (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869050)

maybe there will be 1000 wires???

Reading is Hard! Math is Hard Too! (1)

billstewart (78916) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869069)

Does sound a lot like you're correct, and the author's off by a factor of 1000, or 8000 (or maybe just 100 or 800 if it's 10 million cells per centimeter.) I suspect from the description "magnetized in one orientation or the other" that it's probably one bit per cell.

Stopped reading after... (1)

sunnydayjj (398448) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868983)

"The microwires become diminutive substitutes for the CD-ROM, given that information can be stored magnetically on them, as with CDs. "

CDs store information magnetically? Wha?

How reliable can the rest of the article be?

I'm confused (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868984)

"The researchers calculate that a 10 cm long microwire can carry out 10 million divisions or cells and in each one of these a byte can be stored. In order to store the byte, each one of these cells is magnetised in one orientation or the other."

To me, that reads 10 megs, not 10 gigs. Where am I going wrong? Is my brain really just not working today?

Yeah, that's got to be it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868993)

Let's see, from the article...
given that information can be stored magnetically on them, as with CDs
and
In order to store the byte, each one of these cells is magnetised in one orientation or the other.
Yep. They definitely must be on to something here.

10 Million "bytes" = 10 Gigabytes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11868997)

Is it me or does:

"The researchers calculate that a 10 cm long microwire can carry out 10 million divisions or cells and in each one of these a byte can be stored. In order to store the byte, each one of these cells is magnetised in one orientation or the other. "

not sound like a 10 million bits? "One orientation or the other"...sounds like a bit to me.

AFAIK 10M 1G...again, I must be dumb. Yup.

Magnetic CDs? (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 9 years ago | (#11868999)

From TFA: The microwires become diminutive substitutes for the CD-ROM, given that information can be stored magnetically on them, as with CDs.

Looks to me like a fundamental difference in uses: these wires would be great in pendrives or MP3 players, where flash memory is currently used. No need to use them in place of DVDs or CDs though: we've already got ~50GB optical storage on the way and nobody will be happy if they change the size/shape of the media.

I have unlimited storage! (3, Funny)

erroneus (253617) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869000)

I just save everything to /dev/null and I never have a problem with storage space.

In other words (4, Insightful)

b1t r0t (216468) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869003)

The development comes in the form of a flexible microwire, 10 micrometers thick and 10cm long

There's already a name for this. It's called tape.

(Tape storage started with metal-wire recorders, but esentially they're the same idea, only it's harder to strangle someone with magtape.)

Wearable data (1)

damsgaard (168662) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869004)

Ahh, the perspectives for a knitted vest with all my data. Only catch is that I'm not sure that I would want to store all my pr0n on something my mother made!

Whose Math Be This? (1)

kortex (590172) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869008)

"The researchers calculate that a 10 cm long microwire can carry out 10 million divisions or cells and in each one of these a byte can be stored. In order to store the byte, each one of these cells is magnetised in one orientation or the other."

10mil divisions - each holds a byte.
How does that make 10Gb in 10cm?

HEY! There should be an... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869009)

"In former Soviet Russia" joke by now. What gives - are you people sleeping or something ?!?

Re:HEY! There should be an... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869082)

In former Soviet Russia, the article screws up the Slashdot Editor!

Has to be said... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869019)

In Soviet Russia media read you!

"In Soviet Russia..." Jokes (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869022)

"A former Soviet Union military development finds its use in modern technology and still remains fascinating."


Please post all of your "In Soviet Russia..." jokes here.

whoops (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869023)

Read that as "Micro*waves* can replace the DVD-ROM" -- my bad. I'm able to confirm that this is not true because I've put CDs and DVDs in my microwave and they certainly don't replace them.

More or less, the microwaves displaces the information on them. Definitely the ultimate in "write once, run never" technology.

In communist Russia... (-1)

cfpresley (832019) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869028)

the storage of massive amounts of information is easy, its reading it later that is the hard part.

Is this a joke ?? (2, Informative)

tajan (172822) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869033)

The microwires become diminutive substitutes for the CD-ROM, given that information can be stored magnetically on them, as with CDs.

Since when information is stored magnetically on CDs ????

10 Gigabytes in 10 cm long
(...)
The researchers calculate that a 10 cm long microwire can carry out 10 million divisions or cells and in each one of these a byte can be stored. In order to store the byte, each one of these cells is magnetised in one orientation or the other.

Seems more like a bit on each cell, not bytes ... And "10 million" is not a Giga ... So we are talking about 1.25 MegaBytes in 10 cm long. Hmmm ....

What the hell is this article ???

What is Anisotrophy? (2, Informative)

vivin (671928) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869038)

the divisions are carried out internally by means of a process of anisotrophy.

Anisotrophy? What kind of "trophy" is that? However, there is something [reference.com] known as anisotropy [wikipedia.org] .

Southern Hickese: Awww that's nuthin'! (2, Funny)

eno2001 (527078) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869040)

Hyuk!! I got me a storage dee-vice that exists on every Unix system in the world and it's got In-Fi-Night capacity!!! It's called /dev/nul and that sucker seems to have more storage in it than the ocean has water! Of course, like these microwires, I need to figure out how to recover the data from it too.

[No Offense meant to southerners unless you voted for Bush]

Re:Southern Hickese: Awww that's nuthin'! (0)

k96822 (838564) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869083)

Oooh, you just HAD to get in a poke at Bush there, didn'cha?

Re:Southern Hickese: Awww that's nuthin'! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869162)

ln -s /dev/null /dev/tty9 (or ttyS0 or cua0)

Re:Southern Hickese: Awww that's nuthin'! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869180)

Does Badnarik count? And can I still kick your ass?

More crummy data storage (1)

Friar_MJK (814134) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869044)

Yay! Another medium of data storage. Floppies, hard discs, cd's, dvd's, holographs, and now wire? I guess on the upside it would be a really secure means of storage seeing as though nobody (not even you) can access it. Think of it as a digital time-capsule. You can write all your pictures and movies on it, and even if you tried, you wouldn't be able to access it for at least another 50 years, so voila! No dirt, no mess!

Hmmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869046)

A physics news site that describes CD-ROM's as magnetic storage, is talking about super-duper microwires...

Yea. Right. So, who should I make out the VC cheque to?

Innovation? I think not. (1)

Ced_Ex (789138) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869053)

They say they are able to store 10GB of data, but can't read it.

How is this any different from deleting, except you are limited to 10GB at a time?

Communication Skills (1)

k96822 (838564) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869058)

The entire article should be two paragraphs long at most. This is just another example of a scientist trying to sound smart by making a very simple concept sound complex.

GB or Gb ? (1)

Merlin42 (148225) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869060)

From the article

The researchers calculate that a 10 cm long microwire can carry out 10 million divisions or cells and in each one of these a byte can be stored. In order to store the byte, each one of these cells is magnetised in one orientation or the other.


From reading the description it would seem 10cm could hold 10 Giga BITS or about 1.25 Gigabytes at best.
This is still impressive, expescially if some media could be created that used several wires or packaged one very long wire, perhaps in a spiral, like a CD.

So thin.... (1)

fitten (521191) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869072)

Don't accidently drop it and try to catch it! It'll cut off your fingers! (as seen in sci-fi shows... the molecular blade)

Who writes this stuff? (2, Funny)

Tibor the Hun (143056) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869085)

It is possible thanks to their magnetic properties. Anyway, it's not that easy. Researchers say that the greatest difficulty will be with the reading of information.

L. Ron Hubbard?
What, do they also use renegades?

Lengths of Wire...? (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869086)

This is beginning to sound a lot like..... *tape*
Dear god help us!

Solution? (1)

Neurotoxic666 (679255) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869094)

it's not that easy. Researchers say that the greatest difficulty will be with the reading of information.

How about putting 10,000 of those sticked together and set up in a RAID-like manner? Wouldn't that 1) make it easier to read information 2) make it friggin fast to read information and 3) make it ultra-safe thanks to a crazy amount of redundancy?

I'm not too sure if this is possible, but I'm curious...

I can store an infinite amount of information (1)

DrXym (126579) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869103)

By broadcasting it out into space. The greatest difficulty comes when trying to read it.

So? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869111)

My real hair is even better than these thick metal hairs. I can store unfathomable amounts of quantum data, even though I am unable to read or write to it. I will hear no arguments that the ability to store all this quantum static on my head is any less useful.

Sorry (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869125)

In Soviet Russia, your hard drive backs up YOU.

LK

The Greatest Difficulty (1)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869135)

Researchers say that the greatest difficulty will be with the reading of information.

I would think the greatest difficulty, if you plan to use them to replace DVD's will be mass production. I doubt you can just stamp these out by the millions quickly and cheaply.

I like the thought however that you can increase storage linearly just by increasing the length.

obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869136)

just only 10cm? enlarge your storage now!

Microwaves... (1)

Reignking (832642) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869142)

I was really confused when I saw something about Microwaves and DVD-ROMs...

Sometimes bigger is better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11869146)

With a DVD, you won't lose it in your couch cushion.

Magnetic Recording? (1)

mephisto73 (771616) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869171)

Brilliant! Those Russians - What will they think of next? A worldwide network of computers utilizing a universal language to communicate? Brilliant!

In Soviet Russia (-1, Troll)

Chuckstar (799005) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869178)

Researchers say that the greatest difficulty will be with the reading of information.

In Soviet Russia, information reads you!

Uh... basic mistake. (5, Informative)

ultramk (470198) | more than 9 years ago | (#11869181)

From the article: The researchers calculate that a 10 cm long microwire can carry out 10 million divisions or cells and in each one of these a byte can be stored. In order to store the byte, each one of these cells is magnetised in one orientation or the other.

When they say "byte" here, they seem to mean "bit". (for the script kiddies, there are 8 bits to the byte) Also, they're referring to "10 million divisions" not "10 billion divisions".

So it wouldn't be 10 gigabytes, it would be more like 1.2 megabytes, or roughly 122k/cm. To store 10 gigabytes, it would have to be over 838m long, or over 2750 feet.

Frankly, I'm not horribly impressed.

Not to mention, this is just in theory. It hasn't actually been done yet.

m-
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