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Consumers Data Stolen from LexisNexis

samzenpus posted more than 9 years ago | from the todays-info-stolen-from dept.

Security 298

LE UI Guy writes "Reuters is currently running a story regarding LexisNexis being tapped into by identity thieves who accessed up to 32,000 customer profiles. Information hit included names, addresses, Social Security and driver's license numbers. This comes on the heels of rival ChoicePoint being breached for 145,000 profiles last month in a similar case. Better check yourself." Update: 03/10 02:40 GMT by J : ChoicePoint's name corrected (and, it may be more than 145,000, they don't know).

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298 comments

Well... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895704)

Anyone got a torrent of it?

Tale of woe (0)

Neo-Rio-101 (700494) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895716)

Woe to the sysadmins at these places!

Re:Tale of woe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895863)

I access Lexus Nexus thorugh my school login. Should I be worried?

Re:Tale of woe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895929)

I'd be more worried about the English classes at the school you're attending.

Re:Tale of woe (2, Funny)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896052)

I access Lexus Nexus thorugh my school login. Should I be worried?

Very definitely. You need to immediately report to the Credit Correct Center nearest you. Please advise a family member to pick up the ashes in 9-10 business days.

Re:Tale of woe (2, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895984)

Woe to the sysadmins at these places!

Sysadmins? Screw that, most of this shit happens with social engineering.

This is getting to be like the Enron/WorldCom type of scandal. Company X coughs up a few thousand files, Company Y coughs up a couple hundred thousand files, Company Z has the fucking barn door wide open and the theives have a battered pickup truck parked on the lawn and they're so damn surprised that it takes place.

So... where's the law that can be leveraged, saying these companies are responsible for keeping this information under lock and key, to hit them with the civil suits they so richly deserve for their laxis maxis business controls?

ChoicePoint =! CheckPoint (4, Informative)

DA-MAN (17442) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895721)

Jesus! I've seen this mistake on the national news and now on slashdot. I thought the geeks would realize there is a difference.

Let me make it clear, CheckPoint makes security software, rfid badges and firewalls. They are not the ones who sell all of your information to credit card companies. CheckPoint has no info that you didn't give them. ChoicePoint is the one that fucked up!!!

Re:ChoicePoint =! CheckPoint (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895756)

Relax, this is free advertising for CheckPoint :)

Re:ChoicePoint =! CheckPoint (2, Informative)

reality-bytes (119275) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895833)



I'd bet this is the sort of advertising they'd rather not have.

Surely this would (rightly) file under "false allegation"?

Clearly the links haven't been followed by the editors.

Re:ChoicePoint =! CheckPoint (1)

XMyth (266414) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895922)

Guess that disproves the old adage "any publicity is good publicity

Re:ChoicePoint =! CheckPoint (1)

shird (566377) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896032)

Except the first comment is "its not checkpoint, its choicepoint", and discussion about how they are a security company and havent been 'haxored' due to their 'great' products.

Re:ChoicePoint =! CheckPoint (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895838)

Checkpoint was protecting Choicepoint's systems, I guess the management did a bad choice going with a weak firewall protection like checkpoint after all, now they pay the price. Rumors are going on in our company that we're going to move away from Checkpoint for the same reasons.

Re:ChoicePoint =! CheckPoint (5, Informative)

Flendon (857337) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895963)

Checkpoint was protecting Choicepoint's systems, I guess the management did a bad choice going with a weak firewall protection like checkpoint after all, now they pay the price. Rumors are going on in our company that we're going to move away from Checkpoint for the same reasons.

ChoicePoint was not hacked. It was purely social engineering. The criminals were granted access because ChoicePoint didn't bother checking if the real estate license (or the name on it) they were shown was real. At least in this case it wouldn't have mattered if they had no firewall.

Re:ChoicePoint =! CheckPoint (1)

akalat (303029) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895973)

And how exactly should a firewall system stop social engineering attacks that worked exactly like a valid customer?

This incident had nothing at all to do with the IT security of ChoicePoint, and everything to do with not verifying the intentions of the crooks who posed as a fake customer.

Understand what you're talking about before you spread FUD.

Re:ChoicePoint =! CheckPoint (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895920)

GNU's Who

[image of a Typing GNU Hacker] [ Czech | English | Portuguese ]

Here is an alphabetical list of some GNU contributors. Contributors are also noted on our webmasters and translators of www.gnu.org pages.

If you have developed a major GNU package or have done a lot of work for the GNU Project in another way, we would like to list you also. Please ask webmasters@gnu.org to add you.

Note that our policy is not to make links to pages or sites whose subject is proprietary software, and we also avoid making links to pages or sites that are sales-oriented in their tone or focus. Please keep this in mind when writing your entry.

If you are looking in particular for someone to give a speech or participate in an event to represent the GNU Project or the Free Software Movement, please see our speaker page.

(-:-------------:-)
This place is reserved for your name, when you have written free software for the GNU Project.

Henrik Abelsson
tries to do his part in bringing Free Software to the world by being a maintainer of GNU Messenger. Lives in Linköping, Sweden.

Mark Adler
is a co-author on gzip and wrote the decompression part.

Musawir Ali
is the maintainer of GNU Leg (Libraries and Engines for Games). Currently pursuing a doctoral degree and brainstorming prospective free software projects.

Chris Allegretta
is the author and maintainer of the GNU nano text editor.

Marcos Serrou do Amaral
is maintainer of GNU UnRTF.

Tom Cato Amundsen
is the author of GNU Solfege, a ear training program for GNOME, and he has also done a little work with fonts and mudela-book for GNU Lilypond.
He recently got his Master of Education in Music, but spends far too much time programming Solfege and using free software.

Luis M. Arteaga
As the GNU Translations Manager, Luis coordinates the efforts of the several teams working on the translation of the GNU website, also being listed as Webmaster. He volunteers since 1999 and lives currently in Germany. Occasionally gives speeches about Free Software.

Anand Babu
is the author and maintainer of FreeIPMI. He is a member of the FSF-India working group, currently leads the Free Software division of California Digital as CTO and built the world's second fastest Super Computer, code named "Thunder", entirely out of Free Software. Occasionally, he gives speeches about Free Software.

Susan Bassein
is the initial author and the maintainer of the Dap statistics and graphics package.
Karl Berry
has been involved with GNU since 1989. He co-authored the GNU font utilities, and currently works with the FSF as the volunteer maintainer of Texinfo. He also does a number of volunteer tasks relating to TeX distributions, especially Web2c.

Lorenzo Bettini
is the author of GNU Source-highlight: a collection of programs that given a source file produces a document with syntax highlighting (including java2html and cpp2html). He is also a developer and the maintainer of gengetopt.

Jeff Binder
is a co-author and co-maintainer of GNU Leg (Libraries and Engines for Games).

Jim Blandy
has worked for the Free Software Foundation on and off for nine years. He currently maintains Guile, as a volunteer. Along with Richard Stallman, he was responsible for the release of version 19 of GNU Emacs. Jim lives in Bloomington, Indiana.

Paolo Bonzini
was converted from the Windows world to the GNU/Linux world after he took over maintaining and developing GNU Smalltalk. He develops free software in time left free from studying and advocating the benefits of free software to his the-source-is-mine friends.

Stephen F. Booth
is the author and maintainer of GNU Cgicc.

Maurizio Boriani
Author of guile-dbi (and postgres, myslq db driver), contributor to GNU/Hurd and other various contributions.

Lars Brinkhoff
is the author and maintainer of httptunnel, and is porting GCC to PDP-10 and TOPS-20.

Daniel Bump
is a comaintainer of GNU Go.

James Craig Burley
wrote and maintains GNU Fortran (g77) as a volunteer for the Free Software Foundation for most of 1988 through the present. Craig lives in Ashland, Massachusetts.

Thomas Bushnell, BSG
is the principal architect of the GNU Hurd, which is the kernel for the GNU system. He previously maintained GNU tar, and even wrote a BASIC interpreter. He has done many other things too, some of them having nothing to do with computers.

Thomas was renamed from Michael Bushnell in 1996.

Robert J. Chassell
is speaking on free software topics and working to bring better documentation to free software.

Ales Cepek
is the co-author and maintainer of the C++ package GNU GaMa for adjustment of geodetic networks.

Igor Támara Patiño
is translator to Spanish of GNU web pages, he is co-maintainer of GNU Typist.

Antonio Cisternino
is the author of GNU SXML, the easiest way to implement a markup language. He is active in the development of many Open Source programs.

Dennis Clarke
is the sponsor and director of BlastWave project which allows users to freely package GNU software for free access by anyone. Currently, they only build packages for Solaris, but they will offer the same service for GNU/Linux once Sun makes it available to them.

Allin Cottrell
is the author and maintainer of gretl. He is Professor of Economics at Wake Forest University, North Carolina

Rick Crelia
is a free software advocate and has worked in the past with the GNU software evaluation group. He currently works as a system administrator for the Valley Library at Oregon State University in Corvallis, OR, USA.

Loic Dachary
is the author and maintainer of GNU mifluz. He created and is a maintainer of Savannah, the hosting facility for the GNU project. He is a founding member of FSF Europe and FSFE France.

Al Davis
is the principal author and maintainer of GnuCap, the Gnu Circuit Analysis Package. He is a professor of electrical engineering at Idaho State University (http://www.isu.edu/) with research in analog and mixed signal design and simulation.

DJ Delorie
has been porting GNU software to MS-DOS since around 1989, culminating in DJGPP. Also wrote doschk, and maintains his own GNU web site with online doc and package listings. Currently works for Cygnus porting GNU software to Windows NT.

Akim Demaille
is a teacher at EPITA (École pour l'Informatique et les Techniques Advancées http://www.epita.fr). He maintains GNU a2ps and Autoconf, participates in Automake and Bison.

L. Peter Deutsch
is the principal author of GNU Ghostscript, which he continues to maintain and enhance.

Antonio Diaz
is the author and maintainer of the Ocrad project.

Mikael Djurfeldt
is one of the maintainers for Guile and has ported and worked on development of GOOPS, Guile's object system. He is currently working on his PhD in Graybiel Lab at the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT and is a graduate student in SANS (Studied of Artificial Neural Systems) at KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), Stockholm.

John W. Eaton
is the author and maintainer of GNU Octave.

Ben Elliston
is the maintainer of Autoconf. Ben lives in Canberra, Australia.

Ralf S. Engelschall
contributes to the free software community since many years. His most popular contributions are WML, ePerl, iSelect, MM, and NPS. He is also is a core team member of the Apache Group and has contributed some popular things to the Apache community, including mod_rewrite, mod_ssl, the DSO facility, the Apache Autoconf-style Interface (APACI), etc. He's also one of the founders of the OpenSSL project. Finally to the GNU Project he has contributed shtool, and Pth.

Adam Fedor
is the maintainer of the GNUstep project. He's written and debugged many of the classes in GNUstep as well as a simple DPS emulator for X. Adam's hoping more people will volunteer so he will have more time for his real job.

Jason M. Felice
is the author and maintainer of GNU Patchwork.

Jean-Dominique Frattini
is a co-author and co-maintainer of GNU Leg (Libraries and Engines for Games).

Hilaire L. S. Fernandes
is the author of DrGeo and DrGenius geometry GNU software. He is also a volunteer at the OFSET organization, promoting free software development for education.

Laurence Finston
is the author and maintainer of 3DLDF, a package for three-dimensional drawing with MetaPost output.

Brian J. Fox
has been involved with the FSF since 1986. He is the author of the GNU shell BASH, the GNU Texinfo compiler Makeinfo and the viewer Info, the GNU Readline Library, GNU Finger, parts of GDB and GNU Emacs, and other lesser projects.

Noah Friedman
is a former system administrator and release coordinator for the FSF. He still volunteers as time permits, maintaining a few Lisp programs for GNU Emacs and working with others to maintain various GNU packages.

Jean-loup Gailly
is the principal author of gzip which he continues to maintain.

Hugo Gayosso
Software evaluator for the GNU Project and coordinator of the Spanish translation team for the GNU webpages.

Peter Gerwinski
maintains the GNU Pascal Compiler (GPC).

Lezz Giles
is the author and maintainer of GNU Trueprint.

Bob Glickstein
is a long-time intermittent contributor to GNU Emacs and other GNU software. He's the author of GNU Stow and the `sregex' Emacs Lisp package. He's also written other free software, notably Latte, and a handful of other packages available from his website at http://www.zanshin.com/~bobg/

Lisa M. Opus Goldstein
joined the FSF as a volunteer in February 1986, half a year after the FSF was founded, and was our second full-time employee. She stayed for eight years until departing to see the world and continue her education, returning in May of 2001 to be our new Business Manager until September 2004.

Georg C. F. Greve
Physicist and Free Software advocate. Author of the Brave GNU World, speaker for the GNU Project, name-giver of the GNU Lesser General Public License and principal author and maintainer of The Xlogmaster and some other software projects. Also initiator and president of the Free Software Foundation Europe.

Christopher Gutteridge
is the main author of GNU EPrints (well, version 2, anyway). He can be found working as a System Programmer, Webmaster, UNIX Admin, Teaching Support and EPrints developer and support (often all at once) at the Department of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. Chris denies that the motivation behind GNU EPrints was that otherwise his greatest contribution to Free Software would be the GIMP coffee stain script-fu effect.

Michael Haardt
is currently working on GNU diction.

Kathryn Ann Hargreaves
made the original regex code POSIX compliant. Update the manual to such. Coauthored the initial phases of the GNU font utilities with Karl Berry.

Masayuki Hatta
is currently maintaining Japanese translation of GNU Web pages.

Karl Heuer
once worked for the FSF, but has nothing else to say about himself.

David R. Hill
is principal and co-author for the GnuSpeech text-speech-system based on an articulatory tube-model synthesiser, and a speech-event form of parameter generation. His interests include speech recognition and synthesis (phonology, rhythm, intonation and models), speech animation, and AI.

Matthew Hiller
is the author and maintainer of Denemo, a graphical musical score editor that serves as a frontend to GNU Lilypond. He is presently a senior (fourth-year) undergraduate computer science major at Yale and has accepted a job with Cygnus as a gcc engineer; he will start working there (at Cygnus's Sunnyvale office) shortly after graduating.

Joris van der Hoeven
is the author and maintainer of GNU TeXmacs. Joris is a researcher in mathematics and computer science at the french CNRS institute. Besides GNU TeXmacs, Joris likes computer algebra and guitar playing.

Prof. Masayuki Ida
is our Vice President for Japan. He organizes Japanese events and works with GNU's friends in Japan.

Lars Magne Ingebrigtsen
is the maintainer of Gnus, the Emacs newsreader. Lars lives in Oslo, Norway.

Aubrey Jaffer
wrote or organized (and maintains) the JACAL Symbolic Mathematics System, the SLIB Portable Scheme Library, the TeXinfo and HTML versions of the Revised Reports on the Algorithmic Language Scheme, the SCM Scheme Implementation, the SIMSYNCH Digital Logic Simulation System, the INFOBAR change-bar annotater for INFO files, and the HITCH change annotater for HTML files.

Norbert de Jonge
is the author and maintainer of Ggradebook, the fully-featured GNU gradebook, and of several other programs that are freely available in the spirit of GNU. He also advocates the GNU philosophy in the Netherlands.

Sverre Hvammen Johansen
Author and maintainer of the GNU Simula Compiler, Cim.

Franklin R. Jones
(since late 1997) webmaster for gnu.org. A long time advocate of GNU things and a general unix sysadmin haque.

Steve Kemp
currently maintains the NTEmacs FAQ, and advocates the use of GNU software on the Windows platform.

Jason Kitcat,
Jason is the designer, author and current mainter for GNU.FREE, a heavy duty internet voting system. He currently lives in Brighton, UK and works on various projects including his story-telling site the couch.

He is active in the environmental, human rights and Free Software movements and enjoys speaking & writing about the issues they encompass. In his spare time he is a keen fencer, his preferred weapon being the sabre.

Les Kopari
has prepared some web pages, and wrote the awk script that produces the html for our Program-Package Cross Reference.

Werner Koch
is the principal author of GNU Privacy Guard, which he continues to develop and maintain.

Henning Köster
is the author of GNU POC.

W. G. Krebs
was the original author of GNU Queue.

Stein Krogdahl
Author of Class Simulation included in the GNU Simula Compiler, Cim.

Bradley M. Kuhn (aka bkuhn)
began working with the Free Software Foundation and the GNU project as a volunteer in the mid-1990s. In February 2001, he was hired full-time, and now serves as Executive Director of the FSF. When not putting in overtime for his official duties, Mr. Kuhn contributes to GNU as a volunteer by hacking on various Free Software programs and Free Documentation.

Frank de Lange
is a software evaluator for the GNU Project and develops a Gnome/GTK port of the LyX document processor.

Mats Lidell
maintainer of GNU Hyperbole.

Jim Lowe
has been a user and advocate of GNU/Linux systems since 1992. His current interest relating to GNU/Linux systems is software administration. He's author and maintainer of GNU swbis, an implementation of the POSIX packaging standard with features and extensions to promote the use of strong authentication in the distribution and installation of free software packages. Jim lives and works in Richmond, Virginia USA.

David MacKenzie
wrote or polished many of the GNU utilities and their documentation. He was the principal designer and author of Autoconf, and prototyped Automake. He has worked for the FSF and Cygnus in the past. Lately he has been creating scalable web server infrastructure for UUNET.

Robert Maier
is the primary author of the GNU plotting utilities, and the designer of the libxmi scan-conversion library. He professes mathematics at the University of Arizona.

Phil Maker
is the author of the GNU Nana library and is also one of the founders of Quoll Systems.

Andrew Makhorin
is the author and maintainer of GLPK (GNU Linear Programming Kit), Russia.

Leonard Manzara
is co-author for the GnuSpeech text-speech-system based on an articulatory tube-model synthesiser, and a speech-event form of parameter generation. His interests include digital audio signal processing and physical-modelling sound synthesis.

José E. Marchesi
Known as 'jemarch' on free software forums, Jose E. Marchesi serves the GNU Project coordinating GNU Spain, attending tasks@gnu.org and updating the GNU User Groups list. He is also a member of the GNU software evaluation team. He maintain and develop GNU ACM, and co-maintain the Free Mach Documentation project and the PowerPC port of the Hurd kernel. Occasionally gives speeches about Free Software on Spain.

Lalo Martins
is a Brazilian young man who has, since his first contact with computers in the '80s, found it hard to understand that some people claim you're not supposed to share and modify software. When he came across with Free Software and GNU in 1996 (thanks to DJ Delorie), he immediatly became been a supporter and advocate. His job consists in Zope development and everything he does is strictly Free Software. In late 2002 joined the Webmasters and Evaluators teams, and is striving to set aside some time to do some coding.

Gordon Matzigkeit
was the principal author of GNU Libtool. He is currently working on GNU system integration, with a focus on the GNU Hurd.

Nikos Mavroyanopoulos
is the author of the gnutls library.

Roland McGrath
worked on the GNU Project from 1987 to 1996. He is the principal author of the GNU C Library, co-author of the GNU Hurd, co-author of GNU Make, and a major contributor to GNU Autoconf. He has also hacked on many other GNU programs over the years.

Emmanuel Medernach
is the author and maintainer of SpeedX.

Dale Mellor
is the author and maintainer of GNU mcron, a traditional cron replacement which also accepts job specifications in Guile (Scheme).

Jim Meyering
Maintains the GNU fileutils, sh-utils, and textutils.

Peter Miller
Has contributed to the GNU Gettext project, and also produce a range of GPLed software. He has over 20 years experience in software engineering including graphics, languages and compiler, networking and security, web tools, software process tools, and system administration and sysadmin tools.

Terje Mjøs
Author of the GNU Simula Compiler, Cim.

Aymeric Moizard
He is a GNU/Linux fan since the early days and he is the author of the GNU oSIP library. He is working in the IP telecom area in the hope that one day everybody will unplug their 50 years old traditional phone for ever.

Guillaume Morin
is the current GNU Stow maintainer. He is a Savannah contributor and administrator. He is also a Debian developer.

Jose M. Moya
is currently working on the GNU Hurd.

Ian Murdock
led the development of Debian GNU/Linux from its inception in 1993 until 1996.

Ramakrishnan Muthukrishnan
was one of the GNU webmasters. He is a strong supporter and advocate of Free Software and is also one of the Debian Developers.

Neelakanth Nadgir
Works as a webmaster for www.gnu.org

Raif S. Naffah
is the maintainer, and one of the authors, of GNU Crypto.

Phil Nelson
has worked on several GNU programs over the past few years. He wrote the initial version of GNU cpio. He also wrote GNU dbm and GNU bc. He is the maintainer of GNU bc.

David C. Niemi
has a BS in Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois. He maintains Unixbench and helps maintain Mtools. He has also contributed patches to the Linux kernel and various GNU utilities. He is the lead system administrator for the tux.org domain and writes papers on related topics.

Han-Wen Nienhuys
is one of the main authors of LilyPond, the music typesetter of the GNU Project. He currently is a PhD. student at the Computer Science Department of Utrecht University.

Jan Nieuwenhuizen
is one of the main authors of LilyPond, the music typesetter of the GNU Project. He is currently looking for a PhD. position, has a part-time job, and is hacking too much at Lily.

Jonas Öberg
is a GNU webmaster and system administrator. He also advocates the GNU philosophy in Sweden.

Alexandre Oliva
is one of the maintainers of GNU libtool, GNU Autoconf, and the creator of GNU Ad HoC and GNU CVS Utilities. He regularly contributes to many other GNU and non-GNU Free Software projects such as Kaffe, Amanda and Samba. As a researcher, he has created Guarana, a reflective architecture implemented as an extension of Kaffe.

Michael Opdenacker
is the new GNU Typist maintainer and translator to French of GNU web pages.

Steve Oualline
is a software engineer working in Southern California. He contributed the proto program to the GNU Project.

Krishna Padmasola
converted GNU Emacs CC mode documentation to Texinfo format, which is now included with the Emacs distribution.

William M. Perry
is the author of Emacs/W3, the Emacs web browser.

Ben Pfaff
is the author of GNU libavl, which he continues to develop and maintain. He is also the author of GNU PSPP.

Gerald Pfeifer
is a member of the GCC steering committee and maintains the web pages (and documentation) for GCC. In addition, between 2000 and 2003 he maintained gnatsweb, a web-based front-end for the GNATS bug tracking system.

Wojciech Polak
is the author and maintainer of the GNU Anubis. He is also a developer of GNU Mailutils.

Francesco Potortì
is the maintainer of etags, which is part of Emacs. He contributed the 68020 assembler code of gzip, ported Emacs to the Motorola Delta 68k architecture, wrote some Emacs packages, and did various minor things.

Sergey Poznyakoff
is the author and maintainer of GNU Radius. He is also a developer and co-maintainer of several other GNU projects, among them Mailutils and Tar.

Chet Ramey
is the Bash maintainer and is a networks engineer who works for Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio USA.

Anuradha Ratnaweera
is an engineering undergraduate student living in Sri Lanka. He is the author and maintainer of the GNU Font Editor (GFE).

Eric S. Raymond
wrote the VC (version control), GUD (Grand Unified Debugger) and asm (assembler) modes in GNU Emacs. He's also responsible for a lot of the header comments in the Emacs Lisp library. He wrote the pic documentation released with groff-1.11.

Arnold Robbins
maintains GNU awk (gawk) and is the author of its manual, The GNU Awk User's Guide. He has written a series of articles on GNU for Linux Journal.

He has a wife and three children, and, among other things, is an amateur Talmudist, both Babylonian and Jerusalem. He is now living happily in Israel, although he still has the Georgia license plate GNUAWK.

Bernhard "Bero" Rosenkränzer bero AT arklinux DOT org
is the present maintainer of GNU grep, and a contributor to many Free Software projects.

Steven M. Rubin
is the author of Electric, the GNU CAD system for IC and Schematic design, which he continues to maintain and enhance. He is also the singer in Severe Tire Damage, the first band to play live on the Internet.

Alessandro Rubini
is the author of GNU barcode. He develops free software for a living and advocates free (``libero'') software for a mission.

Phillip Rulon
can't tell the difference between programming and system hacking. Does physics in his spare time.

Jose Antonio Ortega Ruiz (aka jao)
is a Physicist and author of the GNU MDK package, an emulator of Donald Knuth's MIX mythical computer.

Filippo Rusconi
is the author and maintainer of GNU polyxmass. This software suite allows users to perform mass spectrometric data simulations and analyses for whatever polymer chemistry type and polymer sequence.

Luca Saiu
has been a user of GNU/Linux systems and a proud Free Software advocate since 1995. His current main interests are programming languages and their implementation. He's author and maintainer of GNU epsilon, a purely functional language implementation. Luca lives, studies and works in Tuscany, Italy.

Aleksandar B. Samardzic
is the author and maintainer of the GNU libmatheval library.

Henrik Sandklef
is the author and maintainer of Xnee. He also advocates the GNU philosophy in Sweden.

Rob Savoye
is the author of DejaGnu, the GNU regression testing framework, and libgloss, a BSP library for the GNU tools for embedded systems.

Craig Schock
is system architect and co-author for the GnuSpeech text-speech-system based on an articulatory tube-model synthesiser, and a speech-event form of parameter generation. His interests include computer generated speech intonation, distributed object systems,computer security and web applications.

Charles Henry Schoonover
is the author and maintainer of WebPublish (http://www.gnu.org/software/webpublish). He is also a libertarian political activist who has demonstrated for legalizing marijuana by smoking a joint at a Harlingen, Texas city coucil meeting and also by running for Congress.

Jeffrey B. Siegal
has been involved with GNU since 1985, when he helped Richard Stallman design GCC. He has contributed to many free software packages including Emacs, the GNU C Library, the X Window System and others. Jeff did the original port of many GNU packages to Windows NT.

Claude Simon
Author and maintainer of the mll2html program. Also author of the Epeios project.

Brett Smith
was GNU chief webmaster. He also spent time intern at the FSF Distribution Office.

Paul D. Smith
took over maintenance of GNU make from Roland McGrath. A long-time beta tester for GNU Emacs and author of snmp-mode.el and various other ELisp tidbits. User/tester of various GNU packages for over 10 years!

Prashant Srinivasan
is a webmaster for the GNU website, he also does other miscellaneous things around the site :-)

Richard Stallman
founded the GNU Project in 1984. He is the principal or initial author of GNU Emacs, the GNU C Compiler, the GNU Debugger GDB and parts of other packages. He is the President of the Free Software Foundation (FSF).

Sam Steingold
is the co-maintainer of GNU CLISP - an ANSI Common Lisp implementation. He also contributes to GNU Emacs.

Roland Stigge
is the maintainer of GNU GTick.

David Sugar
is one of the authors and principle maintainer of GNU Common C++, which is a portable general purpose C++ framework for application development. David Sugar also founded the GNU Bayonne project and is one of the principle founder of OST, a commercial entity that develops and promotes free GPL licensed telephony solutions.

Yngve Svendsen
is the maintainer of Gnatsweb, a web interface for the Gnats bug tracking system.

Marc Tardif
is the author and maintainer of GNU Bool, a utility for finding files that match a boolean expression.

Ian Lance Taylor
wrote GNU/Taylor UUCP.He has contributed to GNU binutils and many other packages.

Kresten Krab Thorup
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Updated: $Date: 2005/02/20 21:25:21 $ $Author: jlpence $

Re:ChoicePoint =! CheckPoint (5, Funny)

jchernia (590097) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895980)

Well of course they are not equal, you made the assignment that way.

You made the common rookie programmer error of assigning what you wanted to test.

What I think you meant to say was

ChoicePoint != CheckPoint

Though if you are communicating to us in Java you want

!ChoicePoint.equals(CheckPoint)

Hope that helps.

Re:ChoicePoint =! CheckPoint (3, Informative)

akalat (303029) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896081)

For the record, they don't make rfid tags, that's a different company found at www.checkpointsystems.com. They are often confused with Check Point Software though.

...before you wreck yo'self. (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895722)

boy.

eh (0, Flamebait)

KingOfTheNerds (706852) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895724)

This is a huge deal, but it's bound to happen. I should be bitter because I've had my identity stolen (somehow, may not be similar). What is this going to do to LexisNexis? They keep track of they keep track of government, law, and company data? I see some stock going down...

Easy solution to this problem (5, Insightful)

ip_freely_2000 (577249) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895725)

Make the CEO, CTO and Customer Support manager provide their own personal information in their own databases.

Re:Easy solution to this problem (2, Interesting)

jxyama (821091) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895862)

why? i understand your sentiment, but it will do nothing in practical terms.

microsoft employees use windows. need i say more?

Re:Easy solution to this problem (1)

yuriismaster (776296) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896000)

Microsoft employees use windows. need i say more?

Yes, because, although many /.'ers may disagree, choosing a secure operating system is not quite as vital as putting up your money, credit, and other personal information on the internet.

Where's all the personal data? (5, Funny)

Nuclear Elephant (700938) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895728)

This comes on the heals of rival Check Point being breached for 145,000 profiles last month in a similar case. Better check yourself.

Can someone post the list?

Checkpoint? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895735)

Checkpoint ( www.checkpoint.com ) makes firewall software. THEY HAD NO CUSTOMER INFROMATION STOLEN. please update the story and make sure the facts are correct - its pretty freaking rude to say a company lost data, especially an innocent company.

Choicepoint lost the data. not Checkpoint.

Obligatory Lawyer Joke (2, Funny)

KennyP (724304) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895739)

Here come the lawyers!!!

Visualize Whirled P.'s

THAT IS A JOKE? THAT IS FUNNY?!?!?!?! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895933)

holy crap the mods are on crack today.

Information Wants to Be Free :P (5, Insightful)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895740)

Check yourself? What does that mean? Check that you haven't been stolen? What if you haven't - what can you do to stop it from happening after you check?

These corporations are destroying the value of our essential property: our identities. They demand we give our personal info, without enforcing our copyrights to prevent its being disseminated, then let it get stolen by people who will use it to damage us. When someone rips me off with some personal info they stole from some negligent data warehouse, the warehouse should be liable for my damages, including the work to recover my losses, and the defamation that will inevitably ripple through the endlessly interlinked online infosystems forever. And when compromised, they should pay my identity theft insurance premiums. This free value we deliver to them has a cost when it's abused, and such insecurity abuse is now obviously standard practice.

Re:Information Wants to Be Free :P (5, Interesting)

laughingcoyote (762272) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895788)

No...remember, copyright is only for the benefit of corporations too. You don't have the right to prevent the distribution of data that pertains to you, that right only extends to the latest pop song, that they've already chosen to release publicly, and then expect to tell said public what they may or may not do with it.

But that brings up an interesting point...isn't someone currently getting sued by Apple for collecting data on them without their authorization and distributing it? Are only corporations allowed to protect sensitive data, and punish those who distribute it without authorization? If "trade secrets" exist, surely "personal secrets" do too?

Re:Information Wants to Be Free :P (4, Interesting)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895925)

We might be entering a time when the only chance of protecting one's rights is to incorporate, and assign all assets (IP and real) to it. Incorporation might become the modern blessing once expected of christening.

Re:Information Wants to Be Free :P (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895997)


These corporations are destroying the value of our essential property: our identities. They demand we give our personal info, without enforcing our copyrights to prevent its being disseminated, then let it get stolen by people who will use it to damage us. When someone rips me off with some personal info they stole from some negligent data warehouse,


Your personal data, which are considered "facts", have no copyright and are not eligible for such. Collections of facts, however, are copyrightable. In one of the classic cases, Harper & Row, Publishers, Inc. v. Nation Enterprises, 471 U.S. 539, 556 (1985), the courts ruled that "No author may copyright facts or ideas. The copyright is limited to those aspects of the work -- termed 'expression' -- that display the stamp of the author's originality". However, compilations of facts, such as databases, were expressly mentioned in the Copyright Act of 1909, and again in the Copyright Act of 1976, and as such were copyrightable, even though they are nothing more than collections of facts, due to the "sweat of the brow" theory that the work sustained in creating the compilation justified its copyright.

However, this changed when the US Supreme Court clarified the matter, in FEIST PUBLICATIONS, INC. v. RURAL TELEPHONE SERVICE CO., 499 U.S. 340 (1991), that copyright requires originality, that facts are never original, that the copyright in a compilation does not extend to the facts it contains, and that a compilation is copyrightable only to the extent that it features an original selection, coordination, or arrangement.

However, IANAL, so take this with a pound of salt.

Re:Information Wants to Be Free :P (1)

nokilli (759129) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896007)

I think they mean, check your credit record to see if the bandits are making whoopie with your checking account.

What's troubling about this of course is that the very same people who lost your personal data are the very same people who you'll be paying to access it again to see if your identity has been hacked.

Re:Information Wants to Be Free :P (2, Interesting)

gregmac (629064) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896056)

These corporations are destroying the value of our essential property: our identities. They demand we give our personal info, without enforcing our copyrights to prevent its being disseminated

There's an idea (not sure if this is what you were implying): copyright your personal data. When you have to give info to someone, make them agree to a licence to use your info. "You are hereby granted a limited, non-exclusive right to this information. You may use this information internally within your company for the use of identifing and billing my account. you may not distribute this information to other parties or use it for any other purpose than stated above without my express written consent."

Then if they abuse it, you can sue them for copyright infringement.

Would this work?

How long before ANYONE'S info hasn't been stolen? (4, Interesting)

loggia (309962) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895742)

With phishing, spyware, database theft... people picking thru your trash...

How long before ANYONE'S identity has not been stolen?

Seriously.

Why not just put a fraud alert on everyone's credit reports and let's get it over with. You want to apply for credit? You'll have to jump through a few more hoops...

The system as it is now is painfully broken.

Re:How long before ANYONE'S info hasn't been stole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895778)


How long before ANYONE'S identity has not been stolen?


Not too long, but keep in mind that having everyones' identity stolen would help with the census.

Re:How long before ANYONE'S info hasn't been stole (1)

winterdrake (823887) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895891)

Seeing as the government has abused census data before (probably the biggest example being its exploitation to help round up citizens of Japanese ancestry to put them in concentration camps during WW2...) I would say that the census constitutes a government sponsored attempt to steal everyone's identities.

these are the same folks ... (1)

jephthah (681398) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895745)

who sell ID Data to Law Enforcement, including one certain Federal Domestic Intelligence service, codenamed "Matrix"

whats really funny is, i aint makin this up.

Why is it, that Windows based companies... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895747)

are the worse at security on everything? Not just the OS, but everything about it. They spend 5x as much money and STILL they do not get it right.

Re:Why is it, that Windows based companies... (2, Insightful)

SunFan (845761) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895813)


Microsoft isn't just a software company, they are a culture. The people that are attracted to Microsoft value the appearance of convenience to real utility, and they value the appearance of convenience over real security. In the end they don't get utility, security, or convenience.

Re:Why is it, that Windows based companies... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895977)

Where in the article did it mention anything about operating systems, maybe you have some esoteric knowledge of this hack, if so please fill us in. Otherwise lets blame Microsoft when its actually their fault.

"better check yourself"? Great, how do I do that?! (1)

Mr Ambersand (862402) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895749)

Check bank statements, obviously, but what else?

Re:"better check yourself"? Great, how do I do tha (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895940)

# Stand in front of a mirror. Check for any swelling on the scrotal skin.

# Examine each testicle with both hands. Place the index and middle fingers under the testicle with the thumbs placed on top. Roll the testicle gently between the thumbs and fingers -- you shouldn't feel any pain when doing the exam. Don't be alarmed if one testicle seems slightly larger than the other, that's normal.

# Find the epididymis, the soft, tubelike structure behind the testicle that collects and carries sperm. If you are familiar with this structure, you won't mistake it for a suspicious lump. Cancerous lumps usually are found on the sides of the testicle but can also show up on the front. Lumps on the epididymis are not cancerous.

# If you find a lump on your testicle, see a doctor, preferably a urologist, right away. The abnormality may not be cancer, it may just be an infection. But if it is testicular cancer, it will spread if it is not stopped by treatment. Waiting and hoping will not fix anything. Please note that free floating lumps in the scrotum that are not attached in any way to a testicle are not testicular cancer. When in doubt, get it checked out - if only for peace of mind!

How long it will take .. (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895753)

How long it will take someone to build a complete (may be 90%)databese of all americans thet will include SSN, DL#, Home address & Phone # etc. If this is the rate of privacy the thefts.

How much it will be worth it and to whome it will worth it.

Re:How long it will take .. (1, Informative)

WhatAmIDoingHere (742870) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896101)

"No entry found for whome."

from dictionary.com

"whom
pron.

The objective case of who."

Also, the word "whom" is pretty much only used by people who want to sound smarter.

Windows Servers (2, Funny)

zymano (581466) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895757)

Looks like Windows 2000/NT servers. [netcraft.com]

Unpatched ?

Re:Windows Servers (4, Informative)

odin53 (207172) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895881)

The article says that the data stolen was collected by Seisent, which is a company that LexisNexis/Reed Elsevier acquired recently. Because of this, I doubt that looking up the netcraft report for www.lexisnexis.com will tell you much about where that data is stored.

If you look up Seisint [netcraft.com], you'll see Linux/Solaris servers.

Is it really stolen? (5, Funny)

Sheetrock (152993) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895759)

It can't be theft if the data is still there, right?

Re:Is it really stolen? (1)

Sinner (3398) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896051)

Secret data can be stolen, since its value is inversely proportional to the number of people who know it. Personal data is a strange subcase of this, as it is used to verify our identity, and thus is "a secret", but we are expected to give it out to anyone who asks, and they may take no care to protect it.

Since it's not really practical to get an NDA any time you give someone your address, I think privacy laws are the only practical way forward. Europe has it right here.

I am a man, not a number (5, Funny)

chiph (523845) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895769)

I am a man, not a number!

Signed, #6

Re:I am a man, not a number (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895826)

How about you and I get together for a good time?

Signed, #9

Re:I am a man, not a number (1)

gkuz (706134) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896021)

This crowd is too young. Nobody appears to have caught the 'Prisoner' reference.

Washington Post article (4, Interesting)

CRepetski (824321) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895770)

The Washington Post has another article about this:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A199 82-2005Mar9.html [washingtonpost.com]

Most organizations have some sort of regulatory body. Does the data harvesting industry have this?

Perhaps this should turn some heads in Congress now that we've got multiple cases of this insecurity. The question is, is Congress going to be able to do anything about it or will it be the same situation as with government computer security: Right now they just say "your security is bad" but that doesn't always fix the problem.

Re:Washington Post article (1)

cplusplus (782679) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895934)

Congress should pass a law that would impose a fine of $100 per stolen identity. I'm not sure who would enforce the fines, but if something like this were in place we might be able to expect a little tighter security. Right?

How can we really know who is affected? (5, Insightful)

SunFan (845761) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895772)


I know only the name of my phone company, for example, but I have no clue who they contract with for data processing or billing or marketing. How can we ever really find out if a security problem at one company affects us? These back-end companies are generally companies that serve niche markets and practically no one has heard of them.

Re:How can we really know who is affected? (1)

t_allardyce (48447) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895831)

I know the name of my phone company, what data they hold about me, where they got it from, who they give it to (if i say they can give it to anyone), that its safe by law and correct and that i can see it any time i want. But i don't live in the US, you guys need data protection.

hmmm... 1, 2?, 3:profit tinfoil hat scheme (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895774)

so let me see, a great way to make money and scare the bejebiz out of peopel: 1.)pay a bunch of hackers to grab personal info form so called secure places 2.)??? 3.)run a website to let peopel check their credit scores so they can make sure they are not victims of credit fraud. and then use that money to setup a new business selling and even more secure way of holding data, rinse, repeat.

er... (0, Redundant)

kagelump (812908) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895780)

Check Point being breached for 145,000 profiles last month in a similar case. Better check yourself."

The link:
ATLANTA - Data warehouser ChoicePoint Inc.'s....

heals? (1)

Sabaki (531686) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895810)

This comes on the heals of rival Check Point being breached for 145,000 profiles last month in a similar case. Better check yourself.

I somehow doubt there's been a lot of healing from the ChoicePoint affair.

Checkpoint (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895823)

Checkpoint has been hacked several times, they products are absolutely weak in the matter of security.

Social Security numbers? (2, Interesting)

mithras the prophet (579978) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895825)

Did anybody else think -- what the hell is LexisNexis doing with peoples' Social Security numbers? But it turns out that this is a subsidiary that gathers up consumer data. So it's not that you have to key in your SSN before doing a Lexis search these days.

Though I'm sure Ashcroft^H^H^H^H^H Gonzales would like that idea...

Re:Social Security numbers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895907)

Though I'm sure Ashcroft^H^H^H^H^H Gonzales would like that idea...

If you're that paranoid, walk down to your local law library and look at the information 1) for free, and 2) without anyone knowing what you're looking at.

Anyway, most small firms can't afford LexisNexis or Westlaw services and have to do it all by the books.

Basic Database Security? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895832)

OK, I don't get it. Why are these companies not practicing basic database security? I'm just a lowly programmer but even I realize that sensitive information should be encrypted in the database. Most databases support one way hashes so things like social security numbers can be used to verify identities but stored in non-reversable encryption in the database.

I realize this isn't a complete if your webserver is hacked but at least only thos users who validate their identity then are affected.

For example: Using One-Way Functions to Protect Sensitive Information in SQL Server Databases [sql-server...rmance.com]

The solution: Opt In (4, Interesting)

sulli (195030) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895853)

Of course the bastards will do everything in their power to prevent it, but the answer is federal regulations requiring the explicit permission of the affected parties before any data on any individual is sold to anyone.

I don't want a bunch of strangers reading my dossiers (and I have had exactly this - I was affected by the ChoicePoint scam). If I had to approve every offering or sale of my data, I would have easily been able to block said scam.

Ephemeral data (3, Interesting)

1davo (692334) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895868)

Perhaps we need to keep our identity data offline.

Our data should only live for the time it takes to make an online transaction; and not a femto-second longer.

I want a "Mission Impossible" ID that self-destructs!

How hard would this be to imple%$^? pfffttt __end_smoke_fx;

Re:Ephemeral data (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11896006)

But Lexis-Nexis is for lawyers. Wouldn't getting rid of lawyers be better?

Legal comeback? (2, Interesting)

danbond_98 (761308) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895874)

What kind of comeback do people have if their data is misused as a result of this? I know in the UK the Data Protection Act would cover this kind of thing, but are there powers in the US to prosecute LexusNexus should their failure to protect your data cause you loss?

Typo in story: (1)

JRHelgeson (576325) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895875)

This comes on the heals of rival Check Point being breached...

The company that was breached was Choice Point, not Check Point. Big difference as Check Point is a computer security company best known for their firewalls.

Re:Typo in story: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895915)

They also meant "heels", not "heals". Can't these fuckwad editors even glance over stories before they post them?

the facts (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895893)

Choice Point SOLD information to people that turned out to be ID thieves, Is this the same story with L/N ?

The story only says ID thieves got a hold of data, it doesn't say how. (The use of ID Thieves naturaly leads you to asume they stole the data, BUT!)

Westlaw (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895900)

I have always felt that Westlaw was a far superior service. This just pushes them that much further ahead in my opinion.

Re:Westlaw (1)

brjndr (313083) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895939)

I prefer Westlaw too, but Lexis's Shepardize is better that West's cite check, and Lexis's tax tools are much better.

Re:Westlaw (1)

TheGuano (851573) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895964)

Yeah, but West's site looks like it was put together by a two-year-old. If you have to pay up the nose per-search and per-print for nearly identical information, you might as well use up more of their bandwidth with UI niceties.

Re:Westlaw (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11896062)

Funny you mention them. In our firm, the two compete equally. Every time one of the two upgrade our site, the other follows shortly after. We are now up to a dedicated T1 each for both of them. They do everything, supply the router, install the lines, and pay for them including service. They have even installed dedicated printers in our library facility. All we do is provide a port on the PIX and modify the routes to direct the traffic to each of them. When they notice the router or the pipe going down, they call us within minutes. We have more bandwidth available to each of Westlaw and Lexis for our ~300 users then we have for overall internet access.

Hmmm... (1)

SamMichaels (213605) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895919)

> select @thekey:=sha(sha(sha('thekey')));

> select des_decrypt(socialsecurity,@thekey) from thetable where something='id';

> '123-45-678'
Or...

SQL injection to dump the entire DB and see it all in plaintext.

Is having plaintext data stolen worth not paying for an extra quad Xeon DB server to handle the additional encryption load?

*Not* Customer Profiles (4, Insightful)

cfulmer (3166) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895930)

It was information on 32,000 (anybody want to bet it was 32,768?) members of the public, not customers. To bad, in a way -- Lexis is used most by lawyers, judges, congresspeople and so on -- had the Lexis customer data been hacked and say all the judges on the 5th Circuit or the Ohio congressional delegation had their identities stolen as a result, you'd probably see reform a whole lot faster.

Rivals? (2, Informative)

psaindon (786791) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895935)

I'm not sure how the two are really comparable as rivals. LexisNexis (along with their rival in the legal profession, http://www.westlaw.com/ [westlaw.com] ) Provide excellent (as well as very expensive with searches running at over $70 per minute) coverage of court cases, codes, laws, public records, etc, which are all immensely helpful to legal types. Sure they have public records containing some personal information, but very little that isn't already available as public information (so things such as deeds, criminal records, voter registrations, etc), and it's definately not their primary focus in life.

Re:Rivals? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11896098)

but very little that isn't already available as public information (so things such as deeds, criminal records, voter registrations, etc), and it's definately not their primary focus in life.

None of which contain your SSN.

Competition Is Good (1)

nate nice (672391) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895936)

It's good to see they were not to be outdone by their rivals.

Ever the entrepreneur I figure I can start my own identity company by making a certain purchase with cash.

it's Choice point, not CHECKPOINT!!!! (1)

0xdeaddead (797696) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895951)

checkpoint makes firewalls (that suck), and choice point gathers information that governemnts can't becuase it would be illegal. (that sucks even more)

Instead of bitching about it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895956)

... why doesn't someone DO something about it?! Sue the shit out of these companies and when they start losing millions of dollars in an endless list of suits, maybe other companies will think harder about the security of their data.

The problem with the USA is that the punishments handed out by the court systems is far too lenient. If you screw up, you should pay for it.

Newsflash! Spelling bad in Slashdot story! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11895974)

No such thing as "heals" buddy. It's a verb, not a noun. You meant "heels".

Chalk up another one for the "Slashdot editors don't edit Jack" conspiracy theory.

Big deal (1)

chadwbennett (808873) | more than 9 years ago | (#11895975)

Big deal, this stuff happens everyday in the IT world and the truth is there is pretty much nothing we can do about it because there will always be a new avulnerabilities in every OS that leaves us all with our pants down and eyes closed.


Get your FREE MAC MINI! CLICK HERE! [freeminimacs.com] I will send $20 via paypal to anyone that signs up and completes an offer.

Hey ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11896005)

This comes on the heals of rival Check Point being breached for 145,000 profiles last month in a similar case.

Hey dumbass, it is ChoicePoint not Check Point that released 145,000 profiles. Let's not confuse the two..Check Point makes (in)secure VPN/FireWall software where as ChoicePoint, well, you know, *cough*.

DSW Shoe Warehouse - Stolen CC Data (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11896016)

DSW's parent company, Retail Ventures, just issued the warning that thieves may have stolen credit card information for thousands of customers by hacking into the company's corporate database.

It only affects credit card customers who used their cards the past three months at more than 100 stores nationwide. There are at least eight locations in North Texas.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7137966/ [msn.com]

data mining (1)

eight08 (866492) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896017)

This site: http://www.turbulence.org/Works/swipe/request [turbulence.org].html was the first to bring Choice Point and data mining to my attention. Acxiom has an opt out clause though Choice Point and LocatePlus.com do not. Most still charge for personal reports which is interesting since the major credit bureaus now have to provide a free copy once a year.

LexisNexis must die anyhow. (2, Insightful)

Caspian (99221) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896040)

They're flippin' evil. I'm sure I'm not the only one out there who's revolted by the fact that private corporations are the only effective sources of legal (read: public domain) data and other such public information. Shouldn't the government offer a LexisNexis-type service for free?

From the Wikipedia entry [wikipedia.org] on Lexis-Nexis; all emphasis mine:

"LexisNexis is a popular searchable archive of content from newspapers, magazines, legal documents and other printed sources. Primary customers are lawyers and journalists.

Besides all current statutes, Lexis contains nearly all published case opinions in the United States back to the 1770s, and all unpublished (but publicly available) case opinions from 1980 onward. It also has full libraries of statutes and case opinions for many other common law jurisdictions like Australia and the United Kingdom.

News stories from the majority of English-language periodicals worldwide are available back to 1986, and there are a few articles available as far back as 1980.

Lexis has a library of public records, which includes current mailing addresses for nearly every living person in the United States. It has real property deeds and mortgages for most states.

A fee is charged for using the service. The fee was formerly hourly (at $300/hour or higher) but LexisNexis now prefers to negotiate monthly flat fees based on the user's ability to pay."


("Based on the user's ability to pay"? I wonder how they'd respond if I said "I barely can afford to pay my bills, much less offer you money for access to public domain data...")

That's it!!! (2, Funny)

toupsie (88295) | more than 9 years ago | (#11896044)

I'm changing my name to Holden McGroin. Let's see you try using that name in your ripoffs!

As long as Bush is president... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11896055)

things like this are just going to continue to happen. The Bush Crime Family cares nothing about the average person. They want us unemployeed, starving, homeless, and more importantly in their minds, powerless. When they allow companies to do these things, it takes time, money, and power from us. Never forget how much they hate the US, and what they're willing to do to destroy it. They've already shown in the past that they're willing to do anything.

Skinner

32,000 customers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11896099)

32,000 customers had their data stolen from Lexis-Nexis.
R 31,989 of them were lawyers.

See, doesn't sound that bad now, does it?
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