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Lab-Made Fireball May Be a Black Hole

Zonk posted more than 9 years ago | from the slurp! dept.

Science 699

MoogMan writes "BBC News reports that a lab fireball may be a black hole. From the article: "A fireball created in a US particle accelerator has the characteristics of a black hole, a physicist has said. The Brown researcher thinks the particles are disappearing into the fireball's core and reappearing as thermal radiation, just as matter falls into a black hole and comes out as "Hawking" radiation." More information available from the NewScientist article (subscription required)."

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Yet another milestone in my Earth Destruction Plan (5, Funny)

daniil (775990) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966283)

Thanks to the devotion of my minions, I'm yeat again a step closer to fulfilling my Earth destruction plan (why am I doing this? Just for fun, you know...).

Some time ago, I had one of my minions to compose a list of possible ways of destroying the Earth [ucam.org] . Back then, he rated the "microscopic black hole plan" as follows:

  • You will need: a microscopic black hole having enough mass not to evaporate instantly. Creating a microscopic black hole is tricky, since one needs a reasonable amount of neutronium, but may possibly be achievable by jamming large numbers of atomic nuclei together until they stick. This is left as an exercise to the reader.

  • Method: simply place your black hole on the surface of the Earth and wait. Black holes are of such high density that they pass through ordinary matter like a stone through the air. The black hole will plummet through the ground, eating its way to the centre of the Earth and all the way through to the other side: then, it'll oscillate back, over and over like a matter-absorbing pendulum. Eventually it might come to rest at the core due to the resistance of the matter it passes through, but it'll have riddled the planet full of holes long before then. Then you just need to wait, while it sits and consumes matter until the whole Earth is gone.

  • Earth's final resting place: a singularity of almost zero size, which will then proceed to happily orbit the Sun as normal.

  • Feasibility rating: 2/10. Highly, highly unlikely. But not impossible.

However, now it seems that we're a step closer to accomplishing this, so i might have him revise the list.

Re:Yet another milestone in my Earth Destruction P (3, Funny)

erroneus (253617) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966333)

Look!

I just want sharks with frikken laserbeams attached to their heads!

Re:Yet another milestone in my Earth Destruction P (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966464)

Done. :) [worth1000.com]

Don't wory about it yet... (0, Redundant)

thepotoo (829391) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966350)

However, even if the ball of plasma is a black hole, it is not thought to pose a threat. At these energies and distances, gravity is not the dominant force in a black hole.

Re:Yet another milestone in my Earth Destruction P (1)

kormoc (122955) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966387)

there was a murder mistory story about that happening on mars too, it was a really good story, prehaps someone here remembers the title?

it's been written (1)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966396)

there is a sci-fi book on this,
sorry, can't recall the title,
one of the 3.99 wally world specials..

talks a lot about waldo type robots-- they realize what's going on, (it keeps punching holes thru the planet as it rotates) and stop it by moving an asteroid to precisely pull the black hole thru the top of an arc into the asteroid..

one element you may not have considered-that was in the story- the oscillations taper down and soon it's just sitting in the core- dead gravitic center, sucking everything in, and growing exponentially.

Re:Yet another milestone in my Earth Destruction P (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966426)

I think that time has come for some of us (obviously not all :) to say:
Goodbye and thanks for the fish!

Re:Yet another milestone in my Earth Destruction P (1)

tom17 (659054) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966515)

"So Long"

One flaw (4, Insightful)

gr8_phk (621180) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966458)

The black hole would not behave as a pendulum for long. As it takes in new matter the system must conserve momentum. So if it fell half way to the center of the earth and then gained some mass, it would lose velocity, and hence not have enough speed to make it back to the surface on the next oscillation. The resulting black hole floating around the earths core would be very interesting. Just think of all the earthquakes we'd have as the planet slowly shrank - or not so slowly...

Re:Yet another milestone in my Earth Destruction P (3, Insightful)

Rei (128717) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966505)

I once heard a remark at some long forgotten source of unknown credibility that stated the amount you would have to jam together to consume earth before it radiated itself away in Hawking Radiation was about the size of Mount Everest. Take this with a couple kilograms of salt, mind you, as I don't recall the source.

hmm (5, Funny)

ClintJCL (264898) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966286)

Does anyone else think assassins should be called in to prevent this experiment from creating a real black hole that swallows up the whole planet in minutes?

Re:hmm (5, Funny)

Rosyna (80334) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966312)

I think professors should be called in to teach you about black holes.

Re:hmm (5, Funny)

_Sharp'r_ (649297) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966327)

If so, if we could figure out how many d6 of damage the fireball is doing, that'd give us a good clue as to the level of the caster and thus about how many hit points they have.

Useful information, you know.

Re:hmm (1)

justkarl (775856) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966525)

If so, if we could figure out how many d6 of damage the fireball is doing, that'd give us a good clue as to the level of the caster and thus about how many hit points they have.

So, we don't know how many rolls it gets?

Re:hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966425)

sounnds like a good idea I'd contribute to a fund to pay the assassin.. heard there expensive

Re:hmm (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966438)

no, more like pest control. It looks like we have an infestation of Nibblers.

I on the other hand welcome our new Black Hole excreting, flesh hungry overlords.

Seriously, if there was a doomsday device like that, where I could just make a blackhole and destroy this planet. I would do it in a heart beat, so beware, I am not the only one like that.

Just make sure the Lexx is nearby... (1)

Erioll (229536) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966447)

As long as the Lexx is out there, we can hitch a ride to get off of this planet. As long as Ki doesn't kill us, or Stan accidentally blow up Orlando, or any other extremely weird thing happen to us...

Never thought that a show that was essentially about two people (and a dead assassin, and a robot head) flying through the galaxy in a superweapon, trying to get laid, could be so entertaining...

Re:NINJAS! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966453)

Does anyone else think assassins should be called in...

I definitely vote for Ninjas. They're way cool. And as a side bonus, (1) they can move fast enough to avoid being sucked into the black hole, and (2) they can slow their heartrate to zero if the blackhole starts to pass through their bodies. With those two skills alone, they're clearly best for the job.

Re:hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966507)

Does anyone else think assassins should be called in to prevent this experiment from creating a real black hole that swallows up the whole planet in minutes?

I hear that Robert Blake knows of a few....

Ob. Futurama (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966526)

Fry: Hey! Stephen Hawking! Aren't you that physicist who invented gravity?

Hawking: Sure. Why not?

Fry: Let me ask you something. Has anyone ever discovered a hole in nothing with monsters in it? Cos if I'm the first, I want them to call it: a "Fry Hole."

Is that shit running? :P (2)

Lord Graga (696091) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966287)

It would be good to know if they had destroyed it yet.

Re:Is that shit running? :P (1)

KarmaMB84 (743001) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966332)

If you read the article they say it only lasts 10 million, billion, billionths of a second so it just dies on its own.

Re:Is that shit running? :P (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966351)

Is it just me or someone else thinks that a high bishop will steal this, kill the Pope and plant it inside the Vatican ?

Re:Is that shit running? :P (2, Funny)

NanoGator (522640) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966510)

"Is it just me or someone else thinks that a high bishop will steal this, kill the Pope and plant it inside the Vatican ?"

That would suck!

Re:Is that shit running? :P (1)

pcidevel (207951) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966354)

No, it is not "running":

This fireball, which lasts just 10 million, billion, billionths of a second, can be detected because it absorbs jets of particles produced by the beam collisions.

Re:Is that shit running? :P (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966366)

FTA: This fireball, which lasts just 10 million, billion, billionths of a second...

From the Article.. (5, Funny)

blake213 (575924) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966294)

"This fireball, which lasts just 10 million, billion, billionths of a second"

Euh? Does that make it 10 million seconds?

Re:From the Article.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966436)

LOL.... mod parent up...

Re:From the Article.. (1)

jmcmunn (307798) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966475)


You are correct. Although I am sure they meant:

1 10 million billion billionths of a second

or

1/(10 million billion billion) seconds

Either way, they were not very clear, or correct.

Re:From the Article.. (1)

Kjuib (584451) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966490)

No... It means it last for:
4 Months
0 Weeks
3 Days
17 Hours
46 Minutes
40 Seconds

Your calcuations are a littel off.

i call it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966297)

i call it a hawking fireball

I for one.... (5, Funny)

2.7182 (819680) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966299)

welcome our new Kwisatz Haderach Blackhole overlord!

Re:I for one.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966336)

hiya e.

Hmmm.... (4, Insightful)

gowen (141411) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966302)

Except black holes are gravitational beasts, and this doesn't appear to be. It's just an extremely destructive thing. Alternative headline would be :
Atom smasher smashes atoms
From the BBC article, it sounds like "could be a black hole" is the simile "behaves a bit like a black hole", that's gotten all out of control.

Re:Hmmm.... (4, Informative)

civilizedINTENSITY (45686) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966355)

For Horatiu Nastase's paper in pdf format: Title: The RHIC fireball as a dual black hole [arxiv.org]

Re:Hmmm.... (1)

gowen (141411) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966418)

Thank you for that link. As the author says,
the fireball observed at RHIC is (the analog of) a dual black hole.
(My emphasis).

Re:Hmmm.... (2, Funny)

BaudKarma (868193) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966442)

Well heck, it *could* be an Oreo. Or a vulture. Or an alternator from a '58 Chevy. Or the warm fuzzy feeling you get from doing an anonymous good deed.

Re:Hmmm.... (5, Interesting)

LnxAddct (679316) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966457)

Actually, at scales this small gravity is not the dominating force (thats from the article). A gust of wind would literally blow the black hole apart. Its actually pretty interesting from a research perspective. You can see how black holes work, throw something in, see how it comes out, etc... The only thing though is that in order to have some real fun you really do need massive blackholes because then you can warp spacetime and have well defined event horizons etc...
Regards,
Steve

Hmmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966305)

This is a great start of a doomsday novel!

Goodness, gracious (1)

Joey Patterson (547891) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966307)

Great holes of fire!

Hawking radiation? (0)

Darkman, Walkin Dude (707389) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966310)

Eh I thought they had worked out that hawking radiation was not matter coming out of the hole, but another part of the accretion disc. Did I pick that up wrong?

Re:Hawking radiation? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966422)

Eh I thought they had worked out that hawking radiation was not matter coming out of the hole, but another part of the accretion disc. Did I pick that up wrong?

Yes, you did. Hawking radiation comes from a black hole's ability to turn virtual particles arising from vacuum fluctuations into a pair of real particles, one of which escapes the black hole's reach. Even in the complete absence of an accreation disc, a black hole will emit Hawking radiation.

Re:Hawking radiation? (4, Informative)

khallow (566160) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966486)

No Hawking radiation occurs due to the interaction of the vacuum with the event horizon of the black hole. Particle/anti-particle pairs are apparently created and destroyed, but every once in a while, one of the pair will cross the event horizon into the black hole while the other particle escapes the black hole. Hawking radiation is the total radation of these escaping particles. Under those circumstances a black hole loses mass. Really small ones (on the order of this plasma ball) quickly radiate their mass away.

The usual blackholes with at least a solar mass will last incomprehensible amounts of time since a particle formed near the event horizon has to somehow escape the blackhole's gravitational grasp and you have to somehow move the entire black hole's enormous mass in this way. Don't hold your breath.

Re:Hawking radiation? (1)

Triumph The Insult C (586706) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966496)

Yea. That's what happens when you go outside, away from your computer and physics books, even if for just a few minutes.

By my calculations (5, Funny)

suso (153703) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966318)

we should all know in about 4.2 minutes whether it is really a black hole or not. It was nice knowing all of you. Thanks for all the fish.

Don't panic. (4, Funny)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966528)

nt.

Human a black hole? (2, Funny)

fembots (753724) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966320)

We eat everything we can find, then something else come out from the other end?

Wanna see a black hole? (1)

criscooil (653395) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966428)

Just look at Uranus!

I can see it now (4, Funny)

dtfinch (661405) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966321)

These tiny blackholes will fall into the core of the earth, and slowly grow one quark at a time, but at an accelerating rate. In a 100 million years or so, it'll come back to haunt the descendents of the super dolphins that'll overthrow the advanced alien race that'll conquer the robots that'll destroy us.

Re:I can see it now (4, Funny)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966382)

Dude, the mice are going to be way pissed when that happens!

exponetial rate (1)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966434)

how long do you think it would take? I'm guessing less than a decade before the planet would be unliveable.

it would gain mass at a ?cubed? rate of growth- each doubling in mass would take 1/9th? as long as the previous time-- and that time rapidly approaches infinite, and there isn't that much mass here to consume...

Same as my stomach (5, Funny)

dfn5 (524972) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966324)

the particles are disappearing into the fireball's core and reappearing as thermal radiation

The same thing happens when I eat at Taco Bell, but no one has claimed my stomach is a black hole.

uh oh (5, Funny)

BananaPeel (747003) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966328)

This sounds familiar....Pass me the crowbar

Get the paper here (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966331)

The e-print [arxiv.org] of Nastase's paper.

Man-made Black Hole? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966335)

That sucks...

I wonder... (2, Funny)

gothzilla (676407) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966338)

if John Titor predicted this...

Re:I wonder... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966443)

Why yes, he did [wikipedia.org]

Titor gave technical details about his time machine that involved the use of mini-black holes. He stated that CERN would make an announcement pertaining to this within a year after he discussed it. In the fall of 2001, after John left, CERN issued a press release indicating the possibility of creating mini-black holes was realistic. The work being explored in this area was speculated upon some months prior to that time.

Looks like he was a bit early, though.

uh oh. Do you realize there's a real danger... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966341)

...that dozens of novelists and scriptwriters will scramble to their desks when they hear about this?

Re:uh oh. Do you realize there's a real danger... (4, Funny)

gothzilla (676407) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966499)

They already have. They're scrambling to pull out stuff they've already written. Predicted sequence of events:

First we'll hear about the new black hole movie

Disney will re-release "The Black Hole" on DVD

Scientists will explain that it wasn't really a black hole after all, but the major media will not pick up the story because the movie and tv series have already been started and Hollywood will lose too much money

TV mini-series comes out just before the movie

Movie comes out

Dept. of Homeland Security informs everyone that to keep safe from a black hole, buy duct tape and plastic and cover your windows.

can an expert chime in here? (2, Interesting)

peculiarmethod (301094) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966343)

"When the gold nuclei smash into each other they are broken down into particles called quarks and gluons."

and it also says that at these speeds and energy levels (sorta redundant there), gravity is not a concern for these tiny blackholes. So this is my question: if its not a critical level of mass causing an event horizon, disallowing anything but x-rays and the fore-mentioned radiation to escape.. what exactly is causing these black holes to form? Does it have somethjing to do with the petential energy actualizing on such a large scale? (a sortof critical speed instead of mass)

someone help!

Re:can an expert chime in here? (1)

peculiarmethod (301094) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966378)

wow.. I just woke up.. sorry about all the mistakes.. afore.. something.. and potential. I gave up coffee. Sorry.

Re:can an expert chime in here? (1)

torpor (458) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966437)

what i want to know is, if, gravity is not an issue here, then how do we know our earths gravity is not whisking these fireballs away into the very core (actually), and we're mis-interpreting what we're seeing as 'the fireball went out'.

maybe the fireball went 'down'? very fast. hungrily.

Bad Idea!!! (0, Redundant)

Ssbe (614884) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966349)

I can't be the only one to think that creating black holes on or even near earth is a really bad idea.

Perhaps this is why we SETI finds no intellegentce (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966360)

Perhaps scientists always eventually make gamma-ray-bursts or black holes in particle accelerators that blow us up before we can get off the planet.

Better explanation: (4, Informative)

physicsphairy (720718) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966361)

From Physics News Update [aip.org] :

A puzzling signal in RHIC experiments has now been explained by two researchers as evidence for a primordial state of nuclear matteA puzzling signal in RHIC experiments has now been explained by two researchers as evidence for a primordial state of nuclear matter believed to have accompanied a quark-gluon plasma or similarly exotic matter in the early universe. Colliding two beams of gold nuclei at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in New York, physicists have been striving to make the quark-gluon plasma, a primordial soup of matter in which quarks and gluons circulate freely.

However, the collision fireball has been smaller and shorter-lived than expected, according to two RHIC collaborations (STAR and PHENIX) of pions (the lightest form of quark-antiquark pairs) coming out of the fireball. The collaborations employ the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss method, originally used in astronomy to measure the size of stars. In the subatomic equivalent, spatially separated detectors record pairs of pions emerging from the collision to estimate the size of the fireball.

Now an experimentalist and a theorist, both from the University of Washington, John G. Cramer (206-543-9194, cramer@phys.washington.edu) and Gerald A. Miller (206-543-2995, miller@phys.washington.edu), have teamed up for the first time to propose a solution to this puzzle. Reporting independently of the RHIC collaborations, they take into account the fact that the low-energy pions produced inside the fireball act more like waves than classical, billiard-ball-like particles; the pions' relatively long wavelengths tend to overlap with other particles in the crowded fireball environment.

This new quantum-mechanical analysis leads the researchers to conclude that a primordial phenomenon has taken place inside the hot, dense RHIC fireballs. According to Miller and Cramer, the strong force is so powerful that the pions are overcome by the attractive forces exerted by neighboring quarks and anti-quarks. As a result, the pions act as nearly massless particles inside the medium.

Such a situation is believed to have existed shortly after the big bang, when the universe was extremely hot and dense. As the pions work against the attraction to escape RHIC's primordial fireball, they must convert some of their kinetic energy into mass, restoring their lost weight. But the pions' experience in the hot, dense environment leaves its mark: the strong attractive force (and the absorption of some of the pions in the collision) would make the fireball appear reduced in size to the detectors that record the pions. According to Miller, looking at the fireball using pions is like looking through a distorted lens: the pions see the radius as about 7 fermi (fm), about the radius of an ordinary gold nucleus, while the researchers deduce the true radius of the fireball to be about 11.5 fm (Cramer, Miller, Wu and Yoon, Phys Rev Lett, tent. 18 March 2005).r believed to have accompanied a quark-gluon plasma or similarly exotic matter in the early universe. Colliding two beams of gold nuclei at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in New York, physicists have been striving to make the quark-gluon plasma, a primordial soup of matter in which quarks and gluons circulate freely.

However, the collision fireball has been smaller and shorter-lived than expected, according to two RHIC collaborations (STAR and PHENIX) of pions (the lightest form of quark-antiquark pairs) coming out of the fireball. The collaborations employ the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss method, originally used in astronomy to measure the size of stars. In the subatomic equivalent, spatially separated detectors record pairs of pions emerging from the collision to estimate the size of the fireball.

Now an experimentalist and a theorist, both from the University of Washington, John G. Cramer (206-543-9194, cramer@phys.washington.edu) and Gerald A. Miller (206-543-2995, miller@phys.washington.edu), have teamed up for the first time to propose a solution to this puzzle. Reporting independently of the RHIC collaborations, they take into account the fact that the low-energy pions produced inside the fireball act more like waves than classical, billiard-ball-like particles; the pions' relatively long wavelengths tend to overlap with other particles in the crowded fireball environment.

This new quantum-mechanical analysis leads the researchers to conclude that a primordial phenomenon has taken place inside the hot, dense RHIC fireballs. According to Miller and Cramer, the strong force is so powerful that the pions are overcome by the attractive forces exerted by neighboring quarks and anti-quarks. As a result, the pions act as nearly massless particles inside the medium.

Such a situation is believed to have existed shortly after the big bang, when the universe was extremely hot and dense. As the pions work against the attraction to escape RHIC's primordial fireball, they must convert some of their kinetic energy into mass, restoring their lost weight. But the pions' experience in the hot, dense environment leaves its mark: the strong attractive force (and the absorption of some of the pions in the collision) would make the fireball appear reduced in size to the detectors that record the pions. According to Miller, looking at the fireball using pions is like looking through a distorted lens: the pions see the radius as about 7 fermi (fm), about the radius of an ordinary gold nucleus, while the researchers deduce the true radius of the fireball to be about 11.5 fm (Cramer, Miller, Wu and Yoon, Phys Rev Lett, tent. 18 March 2005).

Sorry about the copy and paste error (1)

physicsphairy (720718) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966410)

This is the last line of the article: "Colliding two beams of gold nuclei at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in New York, physicists have been striving to make the quark-gluon plasma, a primordial soup of matter in which quarks and gluons circulate freely."

When you get there, you can stop reading. :p

Re:Better explanation: (1)

selectspec (74651) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966445)

I liked the dramatic flare of the popular science rendition that said "leading scientist to believe these are in fact tiny black holes, which someday could be used for time travel."

Thank heavens... (0, Troll)

Alpha_Traveller (685367) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966362)

I'm glad this fireball/black-hole thing wasn't THAT much of a success. I'd hate to have to hear that same giant-sucking-sound again that we heard during the 2004 Election...

Hawking Radiation (0, Offtopic)

TheViewFromTheGround (607422) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966363)

Last time I went hawking radiation through my email marketing business, that Mr. Mumma fellow decided to sue me.

DHL? (1)

Dayze!Confused (717774) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966370)

I'm curious if DHL, the delivery company, may be funding this. IIRC they did have talk about using wormholes to delivery packages faster.

Ask wikipedia (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966371)

This is definetly not a first.

Wikipedia has more info [wikipedia.org] on black holes on earth.

No problem - easy fix! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966379)

We all know the only way to get rid of a black hole is to detonate a nuclear device less than 20 feet away from it. This will cause the wormhole to jump to another stargate and the world will be saved.

Oh good God no..... (1)

HungSoLow (809760) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966380)

Is this where the demons and imps come through the black hole, killing everything in sight? Well.. at least it's at Brown...

I already have one of these (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966383)

This sounds very similar to my arse. It is dark. Particles disappear, later to re-emerge through the hole as thermal radiation, which I too have been calling "Hawking Radiation". The other guys in the lab love sending probes to "Uranus" to check it out first hand.

Is it possible (1)

bananahead (829691) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966398)

In all seriousness, is it possible that, in the spirit of science, these guys actually create something that the entire solar system falls into? No, I am not a paranoid shiver-bunny (all rights reserved)but I am curious, as we get 'smarter' about physics and all the other stuff that StevenH would say if he could actually talk, that we just don't know what the fuck we are fucking with and it all gets sucked into the new hole Bob just created? And why not? Where did the other black holes we seem to be able to detect come from? They came from somewhere, because they do exist, which means they CAN be created.

I For One... (3, Funny)

ferrellcat (691126) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966400)

I for one welcome our new singularity overlooooooooooooooooooooooooooooorrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.....................

Last words... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966408)

From the article:
"However, even if the ball of plasma is a black hole, it is not thought to pose a threat. At these energies and distances, gravity is not the dominant force in a black hole."

Those were the last words we've heard from New York now..

We'd just like to offer our hopes and prayers to anyone in the area..

We have no idea how fast this is spreading, but at the current rate, it should hit..

what..

that can't be right.. .....................

y'know .. really .. what is the freakin' point? (1)

torpor (458) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966413)

/

a black hole. yeah, thats gonna be handy in the coming apocalypse.

not. //irony

Jack Bauer is the only one (2, Funny)

hsmith (818216) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966420)

who can save us from these "scientists" that are bent on terrorizing the world with black holes

AAAAAAAHHHHHH! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966429)

Run for your lives it's Black-hole-zilla.

Actually I remember reading about this project last year, the end of that article said "there is a very slim chance that this could result in the complete destruction of all matter in the universe"

VERY SLIM! That is way too big a chnace for me!

great... (2, Funny)

MattW (97290) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966432)

I'll sleep soundly tonight knowing the black hole formed in NY is "not thought to pose a threat". Very comforting.

URGENT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966435)

The President needs to be informed of this... someone transport it to the oval office so he can inspect this frst hand!

Proof of Time Travel (4, Funny)

Linuxthess (529239) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966444)

Here is the proof that time travel is possible; an article posted on April 1st, 2005 has taken a trip thru a blackhole and found itself on posted on March 17, 2005. If my theory holds true, expect April 5th's dupe on tomorrow's Slashdot queue.

Titor is real! (1)

MouseR (3264) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966446)

Or maybe not" [wikipedia.org]

But he did say a thing or two about blackhole being lab-created in 2005.

We've got ourselves a second Nostradamus!

Re:Titor is real! (1)

MouseR (3264) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966514)

Before I get flames to death, he didn't specifically say 2005.

My bad.

But Nostradamus was vague too.

Yawn (2, Funny)

howlin_walleye (801303) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966450)

Better not get your necktie caught in one of those!

Re: Joe Haldeman (1)

Josuah (26407) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966452)

Forever Peace [amazon.com] : "the high-profile Jupiter Project is about to re-create the Big Bang". The Jupiter Project referred to a super collider of immense size.

Coincidence? I think not!

Here it comes... (2, Funny)

dauthur (828910) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966455)

Well great. We've got in our hands the most destructive force in the universe, and we're playing with it. I hope we survive long enough so I can buy a "Anti-wrinkle black hole" for my wife some day. Or maybe a "Tonka Wormhole" toy for my kid. I don't even want to know what Barbie and barbie toys they come out with.

This technology is not a toy. May cause suffocation, asphyxiation, paralysis and may crunch you into a singulatity if you stand to close when in "action" mode.

Way off topic (4, Funny)

Holi (250190) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966524)

---You can't mend a broken heart by pretending it's not broken.

No that takes beer.

It's funny until... (3, Funny)

eno2001 (527078) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966459)

...cacodaemons and imps start crawling out of your rift in the space time continuum.

Only one way to find out... (1)

WaR.KiN (805785) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966462)

Just put your hand in it and see what happens. On the other hand, humans now have a new place to dump their garbage.

There goes the planet, Sucked into a Black Hole (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966465)

USA, USA, USA, USA...

Problem solved! (1)

Verminator (559609) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966470)

Who needs Yucca Mountain?

Quick, re-route the trucks!

Reminds me (4, Informative)

anvilmark (259376) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966472)

of the sub-plot in Thrice Upon A Time [amazon.com]

Obligatory Futurama reference (4, Funny)

Winterblink (575267) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966480)

Hawking: I call it a "Hawking Hole."
Fry: No fair! I saw it first!
Hawking: Who is The Journal Of Quantum Physics going to believe?

John Titor (1)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966488)

Didn't John Titor predict we would discover how to make mini black holes in the near future? Maybe he was right...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Titor/ [wikipedia.org]

What I'd like to know is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11966492)

how long before "aliens" show up and tell us to stop playing with "fire" because it is causing a huge disturbance in the "force."

Implications (3, Funny)

Lord_Dweomer (648696) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966500)

So.....I was wondering if there are any particle physicists around that can explain what the implications of this for us wizards and sorcerors are. Is this cheaper than making a wand of fireballs? Will this enable us to cast fireball before 5th level? Will the damage dice we get to roll?

This is a test of the emergency broadcast system (1)

Esion Modnar (632431) | more than 9 years ago | (#11966517)

if this had been a REAL black hole, you would have heard: "OH FUCK! Turn it off! Turn it off! Dear God what HAVE WE DONE?!?!?!", soon followed by gloom, despair, and agony on you.

Fortunately, you wouldn't have had much time for the deep dark depression.

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