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Canada Says No To DMCA

Hemos posted more than 9 years ago | from the praise-canada dept.

The Courts 590

P Starrson writes " The Canadian government has reportedly said no to the DMCA. It released its plans for copyright reform today with a limited anti-circumvention provision that would not cover the likes of DeCSS. It even avoided the U.S. "notice and takedown system" that has caused a big headache for U.S. ISPs. A good summary is available from Canadian law professor Michael Geist. "

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Good step? (5, Insightful)

LegendOfLink (574790) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040828)

Seriously, why can't the US government learn to keep their noses out of every aspect in our lives?!

I AM (-1, Offtopic)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040853)

And you're not... nah nah nah nah nah!

Re:I AM (4, Funny)

LegendOfLink (574790) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040946)

Oh, you're the government?

Could you kinda like, um, stop sucking? I'll wave a flag or whatever, maybe even say something nice about the President, but please, stop sucking.

Re:I AM (0, Flamebait)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041037)

Sorry, only those who ARE would understand, and you clearly aren't :D

Re:I AM (1)

LegendOfLink (574790) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041082)

Oh, I see, it's one of THOSE things.

Yep, I guess I'll just go order me a glass of "You Got Served" juice, and enjoy it miserably ;)

Re:I AM (5, Funny)

nacturation (646836) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041178)


Hey. I'm not a lumberjack, or a fur trader.

And I don't live in an igloo, or eat blubber, or own a dogsled.

And I don't know Jimmy, Sally or Suzy from Canada, although I'm certain they're really, really nice.

I have a Prime Minister, not a President.

I speak English and French, NOT American. and I pronounce it 'ABOUT', NOT 'A BOOT'.

I can proudly sew my country's flag on my backpack. I believe in peace keeping, NOT policing. DIVERSITY, NOT assimilation, AND THAT THE BEAVER IS A TRULY PROUD AND NOBLE ANIMAL.

A TOQUE IS A HAT, A CHESTERFIELD IS A COUCH, AND IT IS PRONOUCED 'ZED' NOT 'ZEE', 'ZED'!!!

CANADA IS THE SECOND LARGEST LANDMASS! THE FIRST NATION OF HOCKEY! AND THE BEST PART OF NORTH AMERICA!

MY NAME IS JOE!! AND I AM CANADIAN!!!!!!!!

Thank you.

Stop sending us mad cattle. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040900)

Re:Stop sending us mad cattle. (2, Funny)

Wandering Wombat (531833) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041039)

No kidding. Next time we get some American beef with mad cow in it, we're SO invading.

Re:Stop sending us mad cattle. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041121)

Go ahead, invade. We'll just give you the affected cows (or their meat) back.

Of course, this is just the history of it. The two cows that have been detected were brought into the US from Canada.

What is funny is how asymetric the trade reactions to this are. US has two cows show up (which were born/raised in Canada...), and the world has a shit fit about importing US beef. The only problems Canada seems to have is with R-CALF keeping the pressure on the USDA and the US courts to keep the borders closed because it's not entirely clear how well Canada is controlling its bovine feed supplies with regards to bovine by-product supplimentation.

Of course, in the US, there is a lot of pressure from the BIG Agribusiness companies to reopen the border. Gotta keep those American feedlots full of cheap Canadian cattle!

Re:Good step? (1, Flamebait)

theJerk242 (778433) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040931)

Because no no in the United States wants to be responsible for their own actions. That and they are lazy. So, they'll just let the government do everything for them. Even raise their own kids.

Re:Good step? (1)

bird603568 (808629) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040942)

I'm perty sure its because of the North America trade thing. I guess its trade.

Re:Good step? (3, Insightful)

wankledot (712148) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040963)

OK, I'll bite.

The DMCA was not designed to put the government's nose into every aspect of your life. I was designed by content providers/creators to help them enforce their perceived rights as copyright owners in the face of what they saw as an attack.

It's not The Big Bad Government trying to nose its way into our lives, it's one group of people (content providers/owners) trying to make sure that what they perceive as their best interests are protected through the law.

That doesn't make it right of course, but you should really direct your ire at the right people, it's much more constructive.

Not really (4, Insightful)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041034)

Plain and simple, while these ppl are trying to change the law to their advantage, it is politicians who are doing so. ppl like Utah's senator, Hatch. Many do it not because it is good for America, but because they are gaining personally. That is bad politics.

In other cases, Politicians will do something as a cause and try to make it look like they are doing the right thing, when in reality they know it is wrong, but simply wish to have something for the election.

Re:Good step? (5, Insightful)

LegendOfLink (574790) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041043)

True, but that one group of people used their money and influence to persuade legislators to make a law to benefit them.

Last time I checked, I thought the government was supposed to preserve fundamental Constitutional rights, not pass a new law when some lawmaker has to take care of those who donated to their campaigns.

Simply put, people will try to do things to put themselves at the top, but it's the governments fault for allowing itself to be manipulated.

I think Thomas Jefferson would be crying right now ;)

Re:Good step? (5, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041171)

It's not The Big Bad Government trying to nose its way into our lives, it's one group of people (content providers/owners) trying to make sure that what they perceive as their best interests are protected through the law.
Huh? I doubt you could name any policy of any government, ever, that wasn't about "somebody" who wanted "something." That in itself isn't a justification.

If you assume somebody is being evil just for the sake of being evil, it's more likely their motive is selfish and you just don't know yet what they're trying to get. That doesn't mean they're not evil.

Money (1, Insightful)

PxM (855264) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040978)

Because certain corporations who will remain nameless pay them not to. The courts have shot down certain laws that are intrusive under the Substantive Due Proccess requirement because the government couldn't show that the laws helped people rather than hurt them. It's much harder for them to do this when the rights being violated are more subtle (fixed term copyrights vs unlimited extensions) so it's easier for the corporations to control copyright.

--
Want a free iPod? [freeipods.com]
Or try a free Nintendo DS, GC, PS2, Xbox. [freegamingsystems.com] (you only need 4 referrals)
Wired article as proof [wired.com]

Re:Money (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041026)

This, coming from someone whose entire sig is an attempt to scam people. Nice.

Re:Good step? (5, Funny)

Hachey (809077) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040982)

Because they are the government. Asking the government not to be nosey is like asking a dog not to pee on the rug. Even after so many times saying 'no', when your back is turned **look!** they've gone and done it again! Bad dog!

Repeat. Ad nausem.


-----
Check out the Uncyclopedia.org [uncyclopedia.org] [uncyclopedia.org] , the only wiki source for not-semi-kinda-untruth about things like Kitten Huffing [uncyclopedia.org] [uncyclopedia.org] and Pong! the Movie [uncyclopedia.org] [uncyclopedia.org]!

Re:Good step? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041060)

Good step? Yes, very good step, but remember, it's still just a step in the right direction. Let's hope they take the next...and the next...Another good step would be to tell WIPO to go to hell. Too much conformity there. All it takes is a push from the voters, eh?

FTA:The rapid evolution of digital network technology, notably the Internet, has compelled a re-examination of the operation of the Act.

I hope it compells re-examination of copyright and all IP law...everywhere! It's perfectly ok for creators to benefit from their perfomance of their creative works...control is not ok.

Re:Good step? (1)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041063)

> Seriously, why can't the US government learn to keep their noses out of every aspect in our lives?!

Look at it from the point of view of a US politician (Because, after all, that's who gets to make the decision as to whether or not to continue doing so.)

From that perspective, the moment it ceases to do so, it also ceases to be the US government.

Because (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041064)

The US government naturally grows like bacteria in a dish. It does not realize that its the growth itself that keeps it alive. They think they can just assimilate everything, but once that is acheived it won't survive. Just speculation of course, and I didn't liken it to virus, just a lichen.

Re:Good step? (1)

packrat0x (798359) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041149)

America passes a law. Years later, Canada passes a similar yet different law. Canada hopes to have a "better" law, based on America's experience with its earlier law.

Is this why America was supposed to have State and National governments? So that one State could learn from the mistakes of another State? So that law could be crafted for the benefit of all (or most)?

Re:Good step? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041162)

Because Republicans must control every aspect of your life. It's the only thing that makes people with a tiny penis feel better.

I love to be Canadian! (4, Funny)

FiReaNGeL (312636) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040832)

1-0 for me being Canadian.

Emigrate. It`s not too late!

It's never too late... (0, Troll)

PyWiz (865118) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040884)

...to be a freedom hating communist. =P

Re:It's never too late... (3, Funny)

PyWiz (865118) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040949)

You modded down my anti-Canadian comment? Terrorist.

Immigration... (5, Informative)

alexandreracine (859693) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040906)

Here is the website... :)

http://www.cic.gc.ca/ [cic.gc.ca]

OMG! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040833)

The terrorists have won!!! Time to invade.

So When Piracy Causes The End Of Freedom.... (-1, Offtopic)

Wandering Wombat (531833) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040834)

... you can Blame Canada! Blame Canada!

Gotta love Canada... a psycho guns down four cops, and we say it was because of a nonexistent grow-op. The Americans gun down freedom, and we say "Not ours!"

Re:So When Piracy Causes The End Of Freedom.... (3, Insightful)

incom (570967) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040935)

"...a psycho guns down four cops, and we say it was because of a nonexistent grow-op."
It's sickening how the RCMP tried to leverage this event to their financial benefit. Sort of like how GWB had those 9/11 election ads, /vomits...

Re:So When Piracy Causes The End Of Freedom.... (4, Insightful)

Wandering Wombat (531833) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040966)

"They were gunned down in cold blood while investigating a grow op..."

Yeah, a grow op of 20 plants on the property of a man with nearly a dozen charges of assault, uttering threats, threatening a police officer, firing a gun within city limits, driving infractions, and who was known to be less than stable. He'd sworn, on several occaisions, to kill people who angered him. The guy was a nut job, and in spite of all this, he had no problems buying all the guns he wanted from the government. Blaming this on weed is like blaming World War II on the German sausages causing indigestion.

Re:So When Piracy Causes The End Of Freedom.... (4, Informative)

DeathFlame (839265) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041044)

Plus they were there because of a stolen vehicle, not because of the grow op.

Re:So When Piracy Causes The End Of Freedom.... (4, Funny)

Wandering Wombat (531833) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041096)

Sorry, I missed that. I forgot why they had been called out there. The guy investigating about the vehicle had been told by the psycho that "if he came back with cops, he'd kill them." The guy came back with cops. He killed them. He was an honest psycho.

Re:So When Piracy Causes The End Of Freedom.... (1)

DeathFlame (839265) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041175)

Offtopic, not informative.

Freedom! (5, Insightful)

Janitha (817744) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040836)

Good to see the Canada being more realistic and more free about stuff like this.

Re:Freedom! (4, Funny)

Wandering Wombat (531833) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040918)

It's the free weed. We just wanna chill, mon, and be getting on with the groovin, and you can't be chillin and groovin if you can't download stuff for free.

one more reason (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040840)

to move to Canada ...

Re:one more reason (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040916)

to move to Canada ...

Best reason would probably still be Toronto...

Please... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040975)

hurry up.

ha (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040841)

No DMCA, Kraft Dinner, and Tim Horton's...

What's the immigration process like?

Don't forget.. no selective service either! (1)

Travoltus (110240) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041070)

Plus you don't get bankrupt over there because you got really sick.

(Ps: this isn't intended as flamebait or a troll post)

Re:ha (1)

oxnyx (653869) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041083)

Agree to learn 125 triva *cough* historical fact about Canada and don't mind about 3 out 5 line of the Canada Oath being to the Queen of England...

*cough*EXPATRIATION*cough* (5, Funny)

Khakionion (544166) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040842)

Sorry, I had a little something in my throat.

Re:*cough*EXPATRIATION*cough* (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041099)

What are you trying to do, slashdot Dictionary.com?

Re:*cough*EXPATRIATION*cough* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041140)

Unfortunately moving to Canada will invalidate you from recieving your free Mac Mini...

A user must have a valid email address and a valid shipping address in the United States or a U.S. Territory.

Slightly OT, but realize there are some benefits to staying in America. (As the link below suggests)

---
Help a poor high-schooler? [freeminimacs.com]

Redeem us from bad press (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040846)

Hopefully that'll redeem Canada from all the recent bad press it got on Slashdot!

Re:Redeem us from bad press (3, Funny)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040932)

Hopefully that'll redeem Canada from all the recent bad press it got on Slashdot!

What are you talking about? Slashdot and its readership are primarally American. As far as I'm concerned, if they don't like how we're running things up here, that's a sign that we're doing things right :P

Give it time... between this, the marijuana-reform legislation and the gay and lesbian marriges we'll be part of the Axis of Evil in no time, and they'll start contemplating dropping nuclear-waste-I-mean-bunker-buster-bombs on us too.

w00t! (4, Insightful)

deadhammer (576762) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040876)

Go us! Now the question on everybody's mind up here is: with our refusal to put our official support behind the missile defense program and now this, how long before the border closes up completely?

Re:w00t! (1)

Vash_066 (816757) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040909)

lol if we see missles comming, don't think for a second because Canada said no that we won't shot down any thing flying over canada's airspace.

Walk this way... (4, Funny)

Hogwash McFly (678207) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040883)

Canada says no to DMC, eh?

Is hip-hop not popular over there or something?

Re:Walk this way... (1)

PyWiz (865118) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040925)

Dude it's DMCA, not DMC. It's the Canadian version of the YMCA. DMCA = Dirty Men's Christian Association.

As for the popularity of hip-hop in Canada, it is actually very popular with the African Canadian community...all 1 of them.

Re:Walk this way... (3, Funny)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041003)

As for the popularity of hip-hop in Canada, it is actually very popular with the African Canadian community...all 1 of them.

What are you talking about? There are TONS of African-Canadians up here. Most of them are decended from ppl who escaped slavery in the US on the underground railway, as a matter of fact.

And Hip-Hop is also very popular amongst bored white upper-middle-class teenaged preppy gangster-wannabes.

Re:Walk this way... (1)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040934)

Since Canada seems to be a sane nation, probably not :)

Re:Walk this way... (2, Informative)

wankledot (712148) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041000)

Tom Green (the comedian) was nominated for a Juno (.ca Grammy) for best hiphop album.

That should answer your question.

War With Canada, Pictures at 11 (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040885)

The Canadian government has reportedly said no to the DMCA. It released its plans for copyright reform today with a limited anti-circumvention provision that would not cover the likes of DeCSS. It even avoided the U.S. "notice and takedown system"

Yeah, warm up your vocal chords for a round of "Blame Canada", because the bombs will be dropping any moment now.

Why? Because sites will host this stuff all over Canada with impunity, that's why. What're we going to do, block sites at the border?

Re:War With Canada, Pictures at 11 (1)

DeathFlame (839265) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040912)

Why will Canadians be able to host all this stuff?

The legal copyright owners can still sue the people distributing their copywrited material.

NAFTA (4, Interesting)

ikegami (793066) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040886)

Does NAFTA allow us to say no?

Re:NAFTA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040901)

Who is "us"?

Re:NAFTA (1)

DeathFlame (839265) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040940)

What does NAFTA have to do with copyright?

Re:NAFTA (1)

jumpingfred (244629) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040989)

What does NAFTA have to do with copyright?

As a trade treaty I would imagine it has a huge amout to do with standardization of commerce laws in Canada, US and Mexico.

Re:NAFTA (1)

DeathFlame (839265) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041005)

I'm pretty sure it deals with trade laws (as it is a trade treaty) however, let's assume your right.

So...

What do commerce laws have to do with copyright?

Re:NAFTA (2, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041032)

Does NAFTA allow us to say no?

I ran the NAFTA agreement through a GOP Decoder Ring(TM) and found it boiled down to: "Make sure the rich stay rich" So it's anyone's guess how they'll translate that.

There's only one option left (3, Interesting)

PsychicX (866028) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040890)

We need to rebalance the US and Canadian populations. All the evangelicals, racists, and conservatives go to the US. And all the sane people go to canada. Then, when the Revolution comes, they'll be the first ones up against the wall, and we'll be happy Canadians.

Re:There's only one option left (2, Insightful)

climb_no_fear (572210) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041010)

Except that the sane people don't always fare well when the loonies revolt ...

Re:There's only one option left (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041074)

We need to rebalance the US and Canadian populations. All the evangelicals, racists, and conservatives go to the US. And all the sane people go to canada.

Sounds to me like all we need to accomplish this is get Ralph Klein to head south.

Re:There's only one option left (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041174)

Every one who consumes US stuff while hating US and badmouthing them move to Canada, oh and if your a druggie or member of the Junkie Generation move there also

Nice (2, Funny)

nate nice (672391) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040893)

Canada reminds me of the videogame company that releases their product later so they don't make the mistakes of their competition and ends up with a superior result! Way to go! Now if you could only get that health care thing worked out.

Lesson from Europe (4, Insightful)

Sanity (1431) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040894)

After following the EU software patent debate very closely all I can say is that getting politicians to verbally agree with you is only the first step. When powerful interests are involved, a politicians vote can often differ quite substantially from their stated intentions...

Eternal vigilance is the price of freedom (and its a PITA).

Huh... (1, Insightful)

Infinityis (807294) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040896)

So they're saying that other countries don't have to follow US legislation? Who'd have guessed...

Seems a bit risky, considering their close proximity to the US and the tendency for US to invade other countries.

Re:Huh... (1)

mooingyak (720677) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040967)

Yeah, but it's been about 200 years since we last invaded Canada. If we were going to do it again, we'd have tried already.

Personally I would welcome adding the Canadian territories to the US. It be a nice adjustment to the voting blocs.

Re:Huh... (2, Insightful)

Arysh (707395) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040987)

They tried that once, in 1812. Guess who won? ;)

But back on topic, since I'm Canadian myself, it's always nice to see my country not mimic our southern neighbour. Canada and the US are too similar already.

Re:Huh... (1)

DarkMantle (784415) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041042)

Seems a bit risky, considering their close proximity to the US and the tendency for US to invade other countries.

The already tried that [imdb.com] and failed.

Seriously though. They'll just close the border to everything but our beer. [execulink.com] I found a review of the differences between Canadian beer and other beers. Done by two resident experts.

Canadian Bacon (3, Funny)

theantix (466036) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041130)

That movie was *way* to far fetched. I mean, what are the odds that a US President would invade some foreign country they know next-to-nothing about on completely made up "evidence", just to increase the popularity of the President? Seriously people, get a grip on reality.

Some of the text (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040898)

Here's the bulk of the article text, before the poor guy gets taken down by the hordes. (Typical Internet copyright violation, eh?)

Government of Canada Unveils Plans for Copyright Reform

Industry Canada and Canadian Heritage, the two departments responsible for copyright policy in Canada, this morning released a joint statement on plans for copyright reform. There is an additional FAQ that fleshes out the issues. A bill is expected this spring and the statement spells out where Canada is headed. The key points include:

1. The government will implement the WIPO Internet treaties. Note that the government now speaks of implementing, rather than formally ratifying, the treaties. They indicate that they will consider ratification after this bill is passed.

2. The package will include an anti-circumvention provision applied to copyright material. There is no mention of extending the provision to devices (as is the case in the U.S.) and the specific reference to applying the provision to copyright material suggests that the provision will limit its applicability to circumvention to commit copyright infringement. The rights management information is similarly limited to instances to "further or conceal copyright infringement." While no anti-circumvention provision would be better, this suggests that the Canadian provision will feature some real balance.

Moreover, the FAQ makes clear that "the circumvention of a TPM applied to copyright material will only be illegal if it is carried out with the objective of infringing copyright. Legitimate access, as authorized by the Copyright Act, will not be altered." This is very different from anti-circumvention provisions found in the U.S. However, the FAQ also notes that circumvention for the purposes of private copying will not be permitted, meaning people may find themselves paying for a CD and paying a levy on blank CD yet unable to make the copy of the underlying CD.

3. The recording industry gets some of their package - a making available right and a full reproduction right for performers.

4. A "notice and notice" system for ISPs rather than notice and takedown. Canadian ISPs will only be required to notify their subscriber of an infringement claim, not take the content down as is found in the U.S. The ISP will be required to retain subscriber information, however to ensure that it is available should litigation later arise.

This is a major development as it implements a much fairer system than that found in the U.S. (or even the more draconian notice and termination system that CRIA raised last spring). The FAQ argues that this system is better suited to a P2P world, since notice and takedown simply doesn't work for P2P.

5. The photographers' copyright issue will also be addressed. It is not entirely clear how the reform will address the commissioning of photographs issue - an exception for private or domestic commissions is contemplated, but this one that really requires the legislative language. No word either on what will happen with the stalled Senate bill on this issue.

6. As previously reported, the extended license for Internet materials has been shelved for now with a consultation on the issue planned for this year.

7. The Act will include new provisions to facilitate electronic delivery of materials within schools and libraries. This is viewed as addressing the user side of the equation. It's a start but obviously user rights don't command the same attention as the rights holder groups.

8. Other major issues for immediate consultation include private copying and broadcasters rights.

The devil will be in the details but this represents a major shift away from the embarrassingly one-sided Canadian Heritage Standing Committee recommendations issued last May. While that report clearly pushed the agenda forward, the government's response has certainly recognized the need for some balance. Lots more on these issues to come...

Re:Some of the text (4, Insightful)

NorthDude (560769) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041152)

However, the FAQ also notes that circumvention for the purposes of private copying will not be permitted, meaning people may find themselves paying for a CD and paying a levy on blank CD yet unable to make the copy of the underlying CD.

This is kind of sad. Ok, it may not be a DMCA-like reform we are heading toward, but it still eats away a chunck of my fair-use rights. I mean, now I won't have the right to circumvent DRM-protected files so I can play them on linux? In the future, if they begin to sell DRM-crippled CD's and CD player, I won't have the right to circumvent it's DRM scheme so I can put the music on my iPod (as an example only)? The rest seems to have reach a good balance, but this one I do not like how it sounds.

So ok, things like DeCSS won't be illegal in itself, but using it to rip my DVDs to my harddrive will so I should rejoice why exactly? Because it is not has bad as in the US? It's not as bad so it is ok? Way to go...

Sorry for the rant, this just frustrates me a lot.

Why do countries (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040904)

with the best governments always have the lousiest weather??

Re:Why do countries (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040939)

I'd hardly consider socialist Canadia to be 'the best government.'

Broad Language... (2, Insightful)

yuriismaster (776296) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040905)

In this context, ISP refers to any entity, commercial or otherwise, that provides digital network services to subscribers or clients.


I think we'll see many mp3z.ca type sites popping up. When canada opens up decent-sized hosting, someone's going to abuse it from afar (outside of Canada's jurisdiction). A Japanese pirater will use Canada's hosting (which will probably grow due to the lax liability laws) to serve to American consumers. The pirate network will never die, it seems...

Hey Olaf! (0, Offtopic)

heauxmeaux (869966) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040911)

JAY:
He's got his own band in Toronto.
It's called "Fuck Your Yankee Blue Jeans" or something like that.
GIRL 1:
That doesn't sound metal.
JAY:
You gotta hear him sing.

Canada ... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040920)

... The *new* Land of the Free. :-)

Re:Canada ... (1)

heauxmeaux (869966) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040937)

You mean The *original* Land of the Free ;-)

Re:Canada ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041146)

Hey, I'm only going by what I've been spoonfed by the American propaganda machine. Don't blame me because I'm American and clueless. :-(

Mod chips (3, Informative)

PxM (855264) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040923)

"the circumvention of a TPM applied to copyright material will only be illegal if it is carried out with the objective of infringing copyright. Legitimate access, as authorized by the Copyright Act, will not be altered."

That sounds like it will allow the creation and sale of mod chips as long as they are used legally. Though, it doesn't allow private copying which means that cracking iTunes for personal use is still not legal.

--
Want a free iPod? [freeipods.com]
Or try a free Nintendo DS, GC, PS2, Xbox. [freegamingsystems.com] (you only need 4 referrals)
Wired article as proof [wired.com]

Re:Mod chips (2, Informative)

Ahnteis (746045) | more than 9 years ago | (#12040976)

Howso? From what you posted, cracking iTunes would only be illegal if you distributed the files after cracking them.

If you cracked them for your own use, how are you infringing COPYRIGHT?

Re:Mod chips (1)

PxM (855264) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041028)

Because their law still prevents private copies. And since you can't crack the DRM without making a private copy using PyMusique, you end up violating the law. As soon as you make a copy of the downloaded file that doesn't have DRM, you've violated this law.

--
Want a free iPod? [freeipods.com]
Or try a free Nintendo DS, GC, PS2, Xbox. [freegamingsystems.com] (you only need 4 referrals)
Wired article as proof [wired.com]

Re:Mod chips (1)

iCEBaLM (34905) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041132)

In this case, private copying refers to copying for your friend, not for yourself, which is personal copying.

Now we don't want to throw this in the face of the (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12040980)

American /. readers. You still have that 60 minutes report that says were the land of terrorists.

Moronic poster: (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041013)

How about learning proper punctuation and sentence structure.

I don't believe it! (5, Funny)

Safety Cap (253500) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041022)

First "USA - North" say they won't participate [elitestv.com] in our beloved Star Wars, and now they refuse to embrace our holy copyright law?!

I hope they know what the price of defiance is, and I think I speak for the rest of Jebusland when I say, "Let's roll!"

I expect your people will greet us with Flowers and Candies, too.

Re:I don't believe it! (3, Funny)

Infinityis (807294) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041172)

A reading of the Holy Act of Digital Millenium Copyrights

Then did he raise on high the Holy Act of Digital Millenium Copyrights, saying, "Bless this, O Lord, that with it thou mayst oppress thine constituents to tiny mindless peoples, in thy mercy." And the people did rejoice and did feast upon the .mp3s and .wavs and .wmvs and iTunes... Now did the Lord say, "First thou download the Holy DMCA encrypted media. Then thou must count to three. Three shall be the number of the counting and the number of the counting shall be three. Four shalt thou not count, neither shalt thou count two, excepting that thou then proceedeth to three. Five is right out. Once the number three, being the number of the counting, be reached, then playest thou the Holy DMCA protected media in the direction of thine purchaser, who, being mindless in my sight, shall enjoy it."

So I pay a levy to make a copy, but I can't... (1)

broken.data (603253) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041029)

Moreover, the FAQ makes clear that "the circumvention of a TPM applied to copyright material will only be illegal if it is carried out with the objective of infringing copyright. Legitimate access, as authorized by the Copyright Act, will not be altered." This is very different from anti-circumvention provisions found in the U.S. However, the FAQ also notes that circumvention for the purposes of private copying will not be permitted, meaning people may find themselves paying for a CD and paying a levy on blank CD yet unable to make the copy of the underlying CD.

So does this mean that all the protected CD's we get from the US we can now be sued for ripping? How does this make sense? We pay a high levy on every blank CD/DVD so that we can make copies, but if they are "protected", then we now legally cannot. According to this, even the Sharpie trick or Disabling Auto-Play is illegal now.

Canada Sucks! (0, Insightful)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041036)


Cue all the posts from USers wanting to emigrate.

Don't move here!

Re:Canada Sucks! (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041107)

Sorry, but it won't work. Here in Oregon, we've been claiming it's miserable and rains all the time for years, and we still get massive amounts of immigrants from "sunny" califonia...

wow (5, Interesting)

Jailbrekr (73837) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041057)

However, the FAQ also notes that circumvention for the purposes of private copying will not be permitted, meaning people may find themselves paying for a CD and paying a levy on blank CD yet unable to make the copy of the underlying CD.

If I buy a CD, I have every right to make a backup copy of that. Its called fair use. If I have to circumvent security to exercise my rights as a citizen and consumer, then I am circumventing a system which is trying to PREVENT me from exercising my rights. So what takes precendence? Fair use or DRM, which will take a higher precedence in a Canadian Court of law?

Re:wow (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041127)

I think this should be dealt with in the same way any other product is dealt with. If it doesn't comply with the law then it can't be sold in Canada. So Canadian stuff should come without crippling copy protection.

I want to be a Canadian... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12041078)

...but my english is awful and my french is even worse...

Brain Drain Reversal? (1)

DaveJay (133437) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041104)

Does this help in any way to keep IT talent in Canada, versus the current draining of much of that talent to the US? Mind you, I was told of this draining by a co-worker who himself "drained" from Canada, so that's just one person's opinion...

Sad... (1)

sploxx (622853) | more than 9 years ago | (#12041109)

I think it is very sad that the poster tries to describe this somewhat as a positive event!

That there is really a sequence of 'compatible copyright laws' for major/economically important parts of the world (first the DMCA, then the EU version (which applies for me), now Canada's 'reform') shows very well WHO is in control.

This comes together with a brainwashing campaign in cinemas etc. to mold the citizens back into consumer sheep.

Why can't one hear better news regarding IP laws? The only 'good news' in this area are some of the court decisions where a few enlightened judges with common sense try to bring these laws back on track.
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