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RIAA Cracks Down on Internet2 File Sharing

Zonk posted more than 9 years ago | from the looking-for-love-in-all-the-wrong-places dept.

The Courts 633

Daverd writes "Hundreds of students at 18 universities nation-wide have had lawsuits filed against them by the RIAA for filesharing over Internet2." The official RIAA Press Release and commentary at MSNBC is also available. From the article: "i2Hub has been seen as a safe haven, and what we wanted to do was puncture that misconception," said Cary Sherman, president of the RIAA. "This has been a subversion of the research purposes for which Internet2 was developed."

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Why do people want RIAA licensed music anyway. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216760)

Just like F/OSS, I prefer the stuff I have the rights to use as I please.

who told? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216767)

Who's the coward that squealed?

Re:who told? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216795)

Why would you characterize this person as a coward? Seems a rather brave thing to do to me.

gay (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216772)

nigger seed

Queue "They Have no Right" posts (5, Insightful)

OverlordQ (264228) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216773)

Yes, we all hate the *AA's but they were breaking the law, and bastardizing a research network.

Re:Queue "They Have no Right" posts (3, Insightful)

grub (11606) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216865)

Actually it's a good stress test for the network. If the gateway machines had QoS running to let P2P stuff "mop up" available bandwidth, that is.

this is gay (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216870)

consumers are the only people who I know would make a statement like that. Corporations spend all their time trying to figure how to screw consumers out of their money, ... in the sense ... feed them as much bull$hit as we can before we have to pony up with a product that's worth it's money.

But, oddly consumers like yourself are the only people I've ever found that make statements like ... wow ... shat I did was wrong, good they got caught. You ever here corporations making statements like that?

Dumb a$$.

Queue.insert(this); (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216888)

I believe you meant to say:
"Yes, we all hate the *AA's *AND* they were breaking the law, and bastardizing a research network."

The RIAA is not an academic/research institution, and therefore had no business being on the I2 to monitor file sharing activity in the first place. They were abusing the network and probably breaking laws governing access to restricted computer systems to be on there at all.

But of course we all know it's perfectly all right to break in to other peoples' private networks, as long as you've got plenty of money and lawyers and lobbyists to back you up.

Re:Queue.insert(this); (1)

ajakk (29927) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216961)

Or, they could have just sent subpoena's to the Universities requesting the identities of the users. I highly doubt that the RIAA was on I2. It is much easier for them to subpoena the university (as implied by the RIT letter).

Re:Queue.insert(this); (1)

Sancho (17056) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216977)

But if the files were ONLY shared on I2, how did the RIAA know they were there, or who to sue?

Re:Queue.insert(this); (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216978)


"Yes, we all hate the *AA's *AND* they were breaking the law, and bastardizing a research network."


Doesn't that mean you hate Alcoholic's Anonymous? That's not cool.

Re:Queue.insert(this); (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12217027)

The RIAA is not an academic/research institution, and therefore had no business being on the I2 to monitor file sharing activity in the first place.

Add to that: the RIAA are asking for universities' help in identifying the alleged users. Thus, universities, at this time, are not legally be asked to assist in the discovery process.

So that puts the universities in the middle: spy on their students for the RIAA, or tacitly condone P2P activities by ignoring the RIAA? Seems to me the universities are taking the best approach at this time by forcing the RIAA to legally force them to reveal information. Presumably the RIAA won't sue the unis if they cooperate?

Re:Queue "They Have no Right" posts (4, Funny)

Grym (725290) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216894)

Yes, we all hate the *AA's but they were breaking the law, and bastardizing a research network.

I agree completely... I know I, for one, can now rest easily knowing that the long arm of the RIAA's corporate law enforcement division is patroling Internet2...

-Grym

Re:Queue "They Have no Right" posts (1)

IAmTheDave (746256) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216909)

I don't like the thought of i2 as a "research network." It's our future network, and the sooner it gets rolled into the mainstream the better.

Also, RIAA sucks.

Re:Queue "They Have no Right" posts (2, Funny)

PxM (855264) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216917)

Bastarding a research network? I disagree. All they were doing was ... uhh, stress testing the network by sending random bits of data that just happened to look like movies and porn when viewed with a media player.

On a more serious note, while the file swapping was illegal, it did help network engineers figure out how to prepare for the future when everyone has the same bandwidth to their homes as university dorms. When people can send a full CD of data in
--
Want a free Nintendo DS, GC, PS2, Xbox. [freegamingsystems.com] (you only need 4 referrals)
Wired article as proof [wired.com]

Re:Queue "They Have no Right" posts (2, Insightful)

PxM (855264) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216997)

Ack...damn HTML. The full post was:
Bastarding a research network? I disagree. All they were doing was ... uhh, stress testing the network by sending random bits of data that just happened to look like movies and porn when viewed with a media player.

On a more serious note, while the file swapping was illegal, it did help network engineers figure out how to prepare for the future when everyone has the same bandwidth to their homes as university dorms. When people can send a full CD of data in < 2 minutes (it choked on the 100mbit link to my computer), the modern movie industry will have to adapt just like the modern music industry has with iTunes. This gets worse for the *AA when everyone has a terabyte hard drive and can just ask friends to IM the files rather than search on a P2P network. Legal action just pushes the crimes further underground like banning alcohol with the Prohibition.

--
Want a free Nintendo DS, GC, PS2, Xbox. [freegamingsystems.com] (you only need 4 referrals)
Wired article as proof [wired.com]

Re:Queue "They Have no Right" posts (5, Interesting)

Zutfen (841314) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216938)

Those ~5-8 mb files are like shooting BB's down an aircraft hanger!!

Seriously, if I had "Internet2" at my disposal, I could most certainly find something more productive (6 CD Linux install in a few seconds? Yes please.)or at the very least more illegal to do with it than download a lot of crappy music!

Re:Queue "They Have no Right" posts (4, Interesting)

shadowmatter (734276) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216967)

bastardizing a research network

Yeah right. Aside from using it to test some pretty fancy high speed protocols [home.cern.ch] , the Internet2 in general is really nothing more than a fast pipe for college students to download music on, insulated from the original Internet by BGP. You never see an academic conference requiring "tests on the Internet2" because its geographic concentration is entirely in North America [internet2.edu] and its speed is totally beyond anything you see in the real Internet; that is why everyone wants PlanetLab [planet-lab.org] instead.

- sm

Re:Queue "They Have no Right" posts (5, Interesting)

Ingenium13 (162116) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216985)

I am a student at the University of Pittsburgh, and all traffic from residence halls, no matter what it is, is automatically routed over the Internet2 when it is to another university. We do not have an upload cap for this traffic. For all traffic to the "regular Internet", if a connection is made to us, our upload and download speed over that connection is limited to 500 bytes/second or slower. This makes tasks such as AIM Direct Connect useless, and even useful features such as SSH are almost too slow for use. However, any Internet2 traffic, even as an incoming connection to me, runs at several MB/sec upload and download (essentially the full 100mbps connection).

I2hub is used extensively here, and there has been no issues with bandwidth that I am aware of. If it was an issue, the university has shown they have the capabilities to put restrictions in place. Personally, I use i2hub to get legal files (such as Linux ISO images or the TV show that aired last night that I missed, though this is controversial) because the download speed is so fast.

This is not abusing the research network; rather, it is using a network with extreme amounts of bandwidth that would otherwise go unused.

true (3, Interesting)

MankyD (567984) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216777)

"This has been a subversion of the research purposes for which Internet2 was developed."
Let me know if you disagree, but actually, this is true.

Re:true (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216811)

well screw you, I'm gonna go make an Internet3. With gambling and hookers.

Re:true (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216878)

In fact, forget the Internet3, and the Gambling

oblig futurama ref (3, Funny)

EddieBurkett (614927) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216883)

In fact, forget the Internet3!

Let I2 look out for itself (4, Interesting)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216873)

Since when is it the RIAA's job to enforce the Internet2 terms of service (or spirit or whatever)? Has Internet2 actually complained about all the file sharing?

Re:true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216905)

Good thing they didn't listen to you when the Internet1 was conceived.

You're Probably Right (1)

Alaren (682568) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216906)

I actually agree for the most part, but I'm not sure it's as clear-cut as you seem to think.

The simple fact of transferring music over Internet2 does not automatically mean "subversion of research purposes." Music can be researched, too. It might be argued that in this case Internet2 was serving as a research library.

Something tells me these students were involved in something less honorable than academic research, but this just brings us into a different IP discussion--like, this is a civil infraction, but should it be? (Easy Answer: No! d^_^b)

Not saying you're wrong in principle, just don't be quite so quick to agree that this is a "subversion" of research just because it involved music.

Re:true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216923)

If you like, you may substitute "subversion" for "augmentation" which sounds better and also does not affect the correctness of the statement.

Re:true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216944)

You're just pissed that you don't have access to it.

Re:true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216949)

I think that it's true, that this is a subversion of the research purposes for which Internet2 was developed.

Food for thought: where would we be if people hadn't done the same thing with the original Internet?

Re:true (5, Interesting)

kenthorvath (225950) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216970)

Not necessarily. I don't see any reason why i2 couldn't be used to develop secure, anonymous, and impervious to lawsuit P2P networks, a lá freenet (but maybe with a more "gnutellish" interface). But then, architectural issues aside, I'm sure that no publicly funded research is undertaken for the sole purpose of copyright infringement. Here's hoping that there is other stuff on that hub that (legally) justifies its existence.

On a related note, anyone who hasn't read Lawrence Lessig's "Free Culture" and has strong oppinions on the topic of filesharing and copyrights owes it to themselves to read this wonderful book. It really gives alot of background to the debate, and puts to rest alot of myths that the major copyright owners would have you buy into. More info at Lessig.org [lessig.org] .

Re:true (1)

jkitchel (615599) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216971)


I don't diagree, but wasn't the Internet(1?) used mostly for research purposes at the beginning? Granted, the filesharing was illegal but does this mean that Internet2 cannot be used for anything but reasearch? Will other legal activities be prevented from using Internet2 in the future because it may not be research?

Who didn't see it coming? (5, Informative)

isd_glory (787646) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216783)

Who didn't see it coming? It was bound to happen.

You just cant keep 100 TB of files "hidden" for all that long. Considering all the press [slashdot.org] it got last year, I'm surprised it has even lasted even this long.

Also, don't forget our friends in the MPAA. In a short post [com.com] by the author of the news.com.com article: "According to the RIAA, the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) will be announcing similar action later today."

In case you don't read the article, here are the universities in question: Boston University, Carnegie Mellon University, Columbia University, Drexel University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Michigan State University, New York University, Ohio State University, Princeton University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Rochester Institute of Technology, University of California at Berkeley, University of California at San Diego, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, University of Pittsburgh and the University of Southern California.
Go RIT!

Re:Who didn't see it coming? (-1, Flamebait)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216814)

woohoo Go RIT!! At least they sent us all an Email 2 weeks ago telling us to not get onto the hub.

damnit at least we still have our own hub =)

Re:Who didn't see it coming? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216833)

STFU jackass!
;)

Re:Who didn't see it coming? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216844)

March 28th
TO: RIT Students

The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is sending notices to
RIT of its intention to subpoena the identity of specific RIT computer
users. This intention is a significant ramp up of the RIAA's efforts to
stop illegal file sharing. RIAA has targeted specific computer accounts used
to access and transmit such files, and issued subpoenas to the service
providers in order to obtain the names and contact information of those
responsible for the file-sharing.

The notices RIT receives are associated with students living in RIT
residences or using the wireless network at RIT. Such notices are in
preparation for a lawsuit against the individuals RIAA believes have
violated copyright law by illegally downloading and uploading music via
file-sharing programs.

RIT policy is not to release the names or contact information of our
computer users unless required to do so by law. Should RIAA pursue legal
action, RIT may be compelled to release the identities of these individuals.

To avoid legal action over inappropriate file-sharing, it is important you
understand the proper use of RIT computing resources. While some
file-sharing is lawful, some file-sharing is not. Some programs used to
download files from the Internet often, unbeknownst to the recipient, turn
the individual's computer into a file-sharing (uploading) server. Even
unknowingly uploading copyrighted works may subject you to legal risk.

Re:Who didn't see it coming? (1)

ForestGrump (644805) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216857)

woot! it pays to not be a steller student.

Univ of Calif, Riverside...see? they only go after the big schools, not us "well, yea, all the other UCs told me to go away"

Grump.

Re:Who didn't see it coming? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216871)

You just cant keep 100 TB of files "hidden" for all that long.

You can with some smart encryption.

Can't wait to see some "research projects" on expanding the freenet concept to internet2.

Re:Who didn't see it coming? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216953)

The wonderful thing about i2 is that its still the internet, only faster. Freenet would work on it just like it works on a Chinese dialup (that is to say, not well at all).

Re:Who didn't see it coming? (1)

Karl Tacheron (841799) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216921)

While visiting my sister at UMass Amherst, I got to try out i2hub. It looked like it was just a modded DC++ client. Man, that kicked ass. You could get stuff at actual LAN speeds so you never had to wait (example: 900kbps downloads were "slow").

No Cal-Tech?? (4, Funny)

John Seminal (698722) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216998)

I see MIT listed, but no Cal-Tech. I guess the guys at Cal-Tech are either more honest and only buy music and never share, or they don't get caught.

BTW, I also see Harvard and Princeton. I like that. Those are the guys who are damn good at shit like Law and turning a simple argument into a 5 year long case.

Harvard Student: "But your Honor, we have not examined how this law relates to the 1892 Kapskern case"
Judge: "Kapskern??"
Harvard Student: "Yes, it set a precident about if the tomatoe is a fruit or vegitable, and there are many parallels between that question and the question of sharing music".
Judge: Irrelevent, find something else.
Harvard Student: We motion for a continuance so we can file an appeal to this decision.
Judge: Case postponed for appelate review, we'll recovien in 4 months.

So... (5, Funny)

ayn0r (771846) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216785)

...RIAA was concerned about that Internet2 wasn't used for research only, and 'decided to help'. How kind of them...

Re:So... (1)

lambent (234167) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216836)

Of course they have an agenda. But this was probably the easiest way for them to advance it. And no one should be surprised that they got caught when they leave themselves so wide open for infiltration.

What the hell (0)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216789)

...

Those bastards...

Do they even have a right to sue any of the kids because its not like they where charging for access to this information. Is the RIAA going to sue me for making an mp3 rip of my friend's CD now too? Where do you draw the line? I think they drew it way too low...

Supreme Court Case, where are you!?

Re:What the hell (4, Insightful)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216876)

Uhm, 1999 called and they want their bullshit excuses back. The general concensus on /. for several years has been that individual infringers should be punished and not the technology. Here, you have the RIAA doing just that, instead of trying to get I2 banned or restricted.

Re:What the hell (1)

mc_wilson (619464) | more than 9 years ago | (#12217018)

Is it really possible that the RIAA would get I2 itself banned or restricted? Somehow I can't see that happening...

Re:What the hell (4, Insightful)

ajakk (29927) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216887)

It doesn't matter that they weren't charging for access to the information. Copyright infringement occurs when you copy someone else's protected work.

I remember back during the lawsuit when slashdotters were complaining that the RIAA wasn't suing the actual infringer. Now that they are suing the actual infringers, why is everyone complaining.

And no, the RIAA isn't going to sue you for making and mp3 rip of your friend's CD (although they would be within their rights to do sue). They are going to sue those who are doing the largest amount of copying. That used to be bootleggers, but it is now everyday Joe college students sharing hundreds of gigabytes of copyrighted material to everyone else on the Internet.

Re:What the hell (0)

Captoo (103399) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216893)

Given the chance, I'm sure they would sue you for making an mp3 rip of your friend's CD. As far as they are concerned, if you didn't pay for the CD, you shouldn't be directly benefiting from it.

Re:What the hell (2, Informative)

RatBastard (949) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216990)

  • Do they even have a right to sue any of the kids
    Yes.
  • its [sic] not like they where charging for access to this information.
    That has nothing to do with it. It doesn't matter if you are charging money or not. It is still a violation of the copyright owner's IP.
    Where the hell did this idea that it's okay if you don't charge came from?
  • Is the RIAA going to sue me for making an mp3 rip of my friend's CD now too?
    If they feel it's worth the time and money, yes. Fair Use does not allow copies to be made in order to give to someone else. You may make backup copies of your copies for your own personal use.
  • Where do you draw the line? I think they drew it way too low...
    I think you need to do a little research.

Re:What the hell (2, Funny)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216994)

(italian gangster voice) Bambino, you forgot the #1 rule of illegal file swapping... you must ENCRYPT.

Capisca? (slaps swapper's head)

Translation:
They were idiots. It's their own fault they got caught.

That's too bad... (0, Troll)

lasmith05 (578697) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216798)

And the pr0n was flowing so good too. I wonder who narc'd everyone out?

Simple solution (1, Redundant)

Mr.Dippy (613292) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216809)

Just don't download music and don't buy it. Most of it is crap and you DON'T need it. Seriously, if the RIAA once be a bunch of bitches about then send a message to them saying that you aren't going to help make their Beverly Hills Mansion payments or help them buy another diamond ring for their many hos.

know such cases too (1)

DirtyHarry (162125) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216812)

Friends of mine have been confronted with demandings of some thousand s for sharing songs. No case was taken to court so long, and most of the time a smaller fee was payed to end the story

It is not clear if sueing someone based on illegal evidences (gotta have gotten your Adress over your IP from someone... hm... provider...) is legal...

Well........ (1)

DaFitzMan (872281) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216813)

Can someone point me to Internet3 please?

Official i2hub press release (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216819)

There is also an official press release from the people at i2hub, here: http://press.i2hub.com/i2hubpressrelease-4122005.p df [i2hub.com] .

i2hub doesn't host any files centrally, nor do they keep any indexes of files on the network, so they should be fine. P2P lives on another day.

What I'd like to know is... (5, Insightful)

nebaz (453974) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216824)

How did the RIAA get access to Internet2 to begin with?

Re:What I'd like to know is... (2, Insightful)

isd_glory (787646) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216866)

Aside from the conspiracy theories of student informants or government intervention, they could have simply gone to an I2 campus with open WiFi access. Once you're on the i2hub, its all a matter of logging IPs.

Re:What I'd like to know is... (4, Insightful)

frank_adrian314159 (469671) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216886)

I would assume they cut a deal with one of the uni's that had attachment to it. Maybe they agreed not to sue one of them if they (a) shut down the FS network the found on their campus and (b) allowed them to gateway into I2 for a while. That's probably all it took to get one of the institutions to cave.

Re:What I'd like to know is... (4, Interesting)

Rallion (711805) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216930)

UMass has, by far, the most users on the hub, but isn't listed as one of the schools targetted.

Oh yes, I noticed.

Doubtless from on of the instutions (5, Interesting)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216895)

I'm sure the bribed/threateded/etc one of the I2 instutions to let them snoop traffic. What may be interesting is if someone chooses to fight these lawsuits. It may well be against the university's privacy policy to do what they did. I looked at ours, and letting any thrid party, except law enforcement with a warrant, monitor the network would be a violation.

Re:Doubtless from on of the instutions (2, Funny)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216943)

they wouldn't have to "monitor the network" all they would need is a university connection and they could log on to i2hub from there it's just like any other user except with the evil bit set to True.

Re:What I'd like to know is... (1)

forum__32 (690326) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216916)

Well they have their fingers in everyones business, so i doubt it was very hard for them. A quick phone call to a university president is all it takes.

Re:What I'd like to know is... (2, Interesting)

ajakk (29927) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216987)

From reading the RIT letter posted above, it looks like the sent subpoenas to the different universities and got the universities to provide the names of the students. I doubt that the RIAA actually got onto I2 themselves.

Re:What I'd like to know is... (4, Insightful)

Geoffreyerffoeg (729040) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216991)

What I'd really like to know is how did students running filesharing apps for trading music get authorized to use Internet2? Sure, it's by the universities, but shouldn't we kinda keep it to research projects for the timebeing?

Thank Goodness (3, Funny)

MoonFacedAssassin (539728) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216825)

Oh! Thank goodness! RIAA to the rescue again! I was losing so much sleep over this and cannot fathom people sharing files.

*DING*

Oooh...the Star Wars Episode 3 soundtrack is finished downloading...BRB!

Now I know who to blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216940)

Aren't you a hero - wasting I2 bandwidth on your petty joys.

At least now I know who to blame when I2 becomes too slow for my collider data.

I agree (2, Interesting)

havoc (22870) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216827)

"This has been a subversion of the research purposes for which Internet2 was developed."


I agree that this has been a subversion. What the heck was the RIAA doing on I2 in the first place! Find out how they gained access to it an remove thier hind end! I2 should be the sole domain of students and teachers and not accessable by industry.

Re:I agree (1)

The-Perl-CD-Bookshel (631252) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216860)

They pretended that they were prefrosh [slashdot.org] ?

How? (0, Redundant)

mikepaktinat (609872) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216839)

Im curious as to which university gave them access to sniff internet2 traffic.
I mean how did they get access to this?

Wait a sec... (1, Redundant)

cdrudge (68377) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216840)

How did they gain access to i2 anyways? I thought it was for educational use, and not for commercial use. Those bastards.

How? (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216842)

He declined to give details on how the RIAA gathered the data on the individuals who are being sued.

I thought the I2 network was only accesible from other I2 networks. I also thought these were all at research universities. How would they have legally gathered this data?

What is Internet2? (5, Funny)

John Seminal (698722) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216861)

Is there a second internet, or is it something like bittorrent or some small group that runs on top of the internet? Is it like what the french have?

Re:What is Internet2? (1)

Chmarr (18662) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216945)

This is the internet that is included in Bush's infamous "internets" speech :)

Re:What is Internet2? (5, Informative)

BacOs (33082) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216957)

About Internet2 [internet2.edu]

Re:What is Internet2? (1)

uler (583670) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216968)

It's a university system that guarantees really fast connections. http://www.internet2.edu/ [internet2.edu] (and whoever modded this as "funny" is really weird)

Re:What is Internet2? (1)

Rolan (20257) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216972)

Google [google.com] .

Re:What is Internet2? (4, Informative)

David McBride (183571) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216995)

Fundamentally, it's just like the JANET [ja.net] network here in the UK -- it is a network backbone that links educational establishments to each other and the Internet.

(I'd say that calling the US academic network "Internet2" is misleading -- it's just another network, albeit a fast one.)

It was wrong but still.... (5, Funny)

TsukasaZero (850187) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216862)

"This is Lars Ulrich, drummer of Metallica. Last week, he purchased a gold plated shark table to be installed in his basement club. But because of file sharers, he has to wait another week. This is the home of P. Miller, his wife, and his 4 year old son. All little TImmy wanted was an island in French Polynesia with giraffes and wild horses running free. But this year, he'll have to settle for his own island in the Bahamas with white Siberian tigers." -South Park, changed a bit. The students did do wrong though. 19535^13 megabits per second should not be used to share One Night In Paris.

we need anonymous encrypted filesharing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216874)

check out freenet, tor, etc.

speak out against censorship!

first Pos7 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216896)

Awww heck. (4, Funny)

k4_pacific (736911) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216913)

Time to tear it down and start working on Internet3.

Re:Awww heck. (1)

redcircle (796312) | more than 9 years ago | (#12217017)

The internet where only hackers, criminals and grannies with 32,000 mp3's can access

Invites? (5, Funny)

tektek (829733) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216926)

Does anyone have any invites for Internet 3?

Slashdot Headline, 2010... (4, Funny)

Kethinov (636034) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216927)

Slashdot Headline, 2010: RIAA cracks down on all network protocols.

In their everlasting and Glorious Crusade against music piracy, the RIAA has successfully lobbied congress to make the entire concept of networking illegal, as it has the potential to violate music copyright. Also covered by this broad new bill passed by congress are all forms of LAN protocols such as NFS and Samba. Computers will no longer be allowed to exchange information in any way.

Also covered by the bill is the /bin/cp binary on unix systems, CD and DVD burning devices, pens and pencils, and the freedom to hum and whistle tunes. The RIAA is working hard to enforce a mandatory cutting of vocal cords of all new babies born in the US, and the amputation of their arms so as to make their ability to infringe on Holy Copyrights more difficult.

RIAA expects total victory over the human race within ten years.

Better ROI for the RIAA (0)

Douglas Simmons (628988) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216928)

The nature of Internet2 is such that institutions that managed to gain access are more likely to implement and enforce a policy that restricts their students from doing anything that carries even the slightest chance of liability. In contrast, the regular internet is filled with ISPs that compete for customers and want to keep them as happy as possible by avoiding kazaa port filtering even when a form letter from the RIAA's lawyer comes in the mail.

So, all dollars spent on a campaign that targets this particular network will produce greater (relatively speaking) results in curbing this behavior. Smart, I'll give them that.

Amusing... (1)

sH4RD (749216) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216936)

"This has been a subversion of the research purposes for which Internet2 was developed."

That kinda cracks me up. Wasn't the INTERNET created for military and research purposes? I guess we've already subverted that. Come on RIAA, you can sue, but at least know what you are talking about. Internet2 was created to replace the Internet. For now it's mostly about testing the technologies though, but the same goes from the Internet. It diversified. Oh well. Cool beans if you ask me.

How is the RIAA Doing This? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216942)

From the article it said that they weren't divulging how they got this information.

I don't think that the schools are ratting people out because of liability reasons (if the school is monitoring the network, then they have to report EVERY illegal action they see. If they don't monitor the network, then they don't have to report anything... )

The RIAA is certainly not a research institution, and if they are trying to get access to internet2 to "test" it for content delivery, then I can see an argument, but I think the (obvious) real motivation is just to catch filesharers. And that is morally wrong. Even if the filesharers are breaking a law, two wrongs don't make a right.

I'm not sure who is in charge of internet2, but I sure would like to hear that organization tell the RIAA that they're not welcome on internet2 if they're just going to spy on people. If the RIAA starts spending money on new (open) technologies and provides test services for students and researchers, etc... then that might be something. Until then, the RIAA should stay off internet2.

Re:How is the RIAA Doing This? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12217021)

I can't believe no one has figured this out yet. There is a p2p software program published by a company called i2hub [i2hub.com] . This program is used by students at participating universities to chat and share files over internet2. So all RIAA did was go to the i2hub company with a subpoena and insist they have access to their login/passwords to people sharing whatever music they wanted to track down. It has nothing to do with internet2 itself, other than that i2hub is used there.

RIAA Internet2 access (5, Interesting)

bkissi01 (699085) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216950)

Back in November of '04 the RIAA petitioned to become a member of the Internet2 community. I don't know if they ever got their own network connection, but I remember them asking for one.

Shut it down! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12216951)

Obviously this Internet2 thing is only useful for illegal activities. It should be shut down like all the other P2P related stuff out there.
Think of the starving corporations.
*AA rulez!

makes you wonder... (4, Insightful)

maxpublic (450413) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216973)

...when no matter how hard they try, no matter how many laws they buy, no matter how many sleazy tactics they pull, the amount of music shared over the internet keeps *increasing* rather than decreasing. From 12-year-old girls to 72-year-old grannies, everyone seems to be getting in on the game and no amount of whining/threatening/suing by the RIAA is making so much as a dent in the traffic.

Seems it's time to re-evaluate the situation and see if the law - and perhaps someone's business model - is in need of change.

(cue RIAA apologists)

Max

Hungry and out-of-a-job laywer seeks suit (1)

northwind (308027) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216974)

Based on the latest earnings of the m ovie industry I think we have just seen the opening night of "Laywers In Space"

RIAA controls pr0n too? (1)

edson at lies.cl (652479) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216980)

i think that is an important question.. for phisiologicals matters of course...

inet 2 (1)

deeej (827716) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216982)

shouldn't those behind inet2 have some way to tell the media corporations to "fuck right off" of the technology so it doesn't end up like the media/advertising whore that is internet 1?

The Problem Is Solved (5, Interesting)

kingjosh (792336) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216989)

Ok, there is a way to beat this cartel [riaa.org] at their own game. It's like diamonds, similarly run by cartels. You see, when a person gives their whole life mining nice, beautiful diamonds, they get only pennies . . . the pay for the people actually producing the diamonds is very little. The cartel that runs the industry, and the owners of the diamond companies make all the money.

Music, unlike diamonds, does not rely on a natural resource. I've yet to figure out why the hell people just don't switch to independent music. You'd be amazed at how good this type of music really is. You can go to a show for $0.00 to $10.00, RECORD it if you want, TRADE it at will usually, and the MAJORITY of the money goes to the artists!

The key here is that the MUSIC INDUSTRY is SUING the people IN COLLEGE who should simply REVOLUTIONIZE the industry! Go to your local jam band concerts, frequent the college shows, screw the big labels, use your own mind and broaden it. If the money goes independent, then so will the artists. And the artists who want to keep making sixty cents for every ten bucks their parent company makes can go right ahead. They're done getting my money.

What's going to happen to the students? (1)

tyates (869064) | more than 9 years ago | (#12216993)

Internet2 isn't AOL - it's a research consortium with the government, top universities, and companies like Cisco, Nortel, Global Crossing, Microsoft, Qwest, Sun, etc. I think the students are going to be in *big* trouble on this one, and it could mean AUPs for everybody with stiff pentalties. They might even pull out some anti-hacking laws against these students.

Good luck with the crack down (1)

cloudkj (685320) | more than 9 years ago | (#12217000)

The majority of the bandwith used on Internet2 is probably attributed to games, illegal file sharing, and porn :) While they're cleaning up file sharing, they might as well try to clean up some of the other muck.

Sneaker net? (4, Interesting)

vidarlo (134906) | more than 9 years ago | (#12217007)

If I take a Maxtor [tinyurl.com] 300GB portable usb drive, plugs it into my pc, loads up with movies, and ships of to a friend? Huge capcity, overnight, or in a few days at least. And besides, ??AA has no real chance of uncovering such transfers.

Well, realistically. What about VPN? Having hard [pgp.com] encryption [gnupg.org] easily obtainable, it should be trivial to share files with friends. If a key is signed by a large enough number of friends, trust it. Otherwise, discard. If a p2p net included strong cryptographi, and trust levels and/or ratings to users, it would be far more difficult for ??AA to eavesdrop those connections. At very least, they'd have to build up a trust, which would probably mean sharing...

Dear RIAA, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12217014)

I will stop filesharing when you stop the following actions:

1) Bribing government officials.

2) Screwing over the people who actually produce the media in question.

3) Trying to pass stupid shit like a code of conduct and insane laws that will adversely effect the whole computer industry.

..and maybe you would like to think about producing CDs at $5 each and DRMed tracks at .50c each?

Until then, I'm going to continue pirating your music. You can't sue all of us, fuckheads.

Thanks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12217025)

...for the warning.

I can see it now...hundreds of students at these college's runnin for the border!
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