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Global DNA Project to Study Human Ancestry

CowboyNeal posted more than 9 years ago | from the search-for-eden dept.

Biotech 325

Steve writes "The National Geographic Society and IBM are teaming up to map the history of human migration using DNA. The Genographic Project aims to collect 100,000 genetic samples which will be used trace the movements of humans out of Africa and around the globe. While the most useful samples will come from indiginous populations, members of the general public will be able to mail in their own DNA on special cheek swabs."

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325 comments

Polishing the tin foil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223288)

Otherwise known as the beginning of Global Big Brother.

Re:Polishing the tin foil (3, Funny)

WhatAmIDoingHere (742870) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223324)

Because we all know how EVIL National Geographic is!

Re:Polishing the tin foil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223410)

Yeah right, have you seen the size of the army of chimps they've organised?

Bloody huge.

If they can somehow get them co-ordinated with their giant turtle and albatross divisions, there will be no stopping the buggers.

So yes, I consider National Geographic very potentially evil.

Huge DNA repository... (0)

RandoX (828285) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223293)

Hmmm. No thanks.

Re:Huge DNA repository... (3, Funny)

avandesande (143899) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223317)

What's the matter, you dont like Jenna Jamison?

Great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223297)

I'de like the job of receiving DNA samples in the mail. That sounds healthy.

Re:Great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223326)

Excuse me, but can I interest you in this flu testing kit? It only contains a little bit of lethal flu strain, I promise.

Re:Great (3, Funny)

SUB7IME (604466) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223330)

Every time someone uses their hands to touch an envelope or their tongue to seal it, they are probably leaving trace amounts of *gasp* DNA on the envelope. OH NO! There's probably DNA floating around EVERYWHERE by now!

And what if they sneezed a little virus particle onto the letter that they wrote to you!?

Re:Great (2, Interesting)

rewinn (647614) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223583)

>There's probably DNA floating around EVERYWHERE by now!

Human skin flakes, a.k.a. dander, is everywhere that humans are. It just flakes off and floats away.

It's kinda creepy to think that every breathe we take may include a little bit of the person in the next cubicle. Remind me to hand out loofas at the next staff meeting.

How many years.... (4, Insightful)

DeathFlame (839265) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223305)

...till we make the Kwisatz Haderach?

Re:How many years.... (1, Insightful)

DeathFlame (839265) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223340)

But on a serious note, this sort of thing could happen. Goverments (not nessacarily the US one) could start forcing certain people to breed together based on their DNA and possible genetic combinations that would happen... sort of like 'natural' genetic modifications.

Re:How many years.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223361)

The Nazi's actualy DID that!

Re:How many years.... (4, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223681)

Yes, they could.

They could also ... hmmm, I don't know, let's see ... on the basis of no actual science whatsoever, based on loony racial theories centered on things like hair color and head shape, decide that some groups are superior and others inferior, and start trying to breed the superior ones to create a race of supermen for world conquest, while putting the inferior ones in death camps. Or they could, based on loony economic theories centered on the writings of long-dead philosophers, decide that all property must be owned and distributed by the state, and kill anyone who disagrees with them. Or ... well, you get the idea. Honestly, on the list of Bad Things To Be Scared Of Governments Doing, abuse of genetic data gathered for an anthropology project is way down on the list.

Re:How many years.... (1)

metlin (258108) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223385)

To quote Teal'C:

"Many, many years, O'Neill".

DNA sample (3, Funny)

super_ogg (620337) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223311)

I can see it now, spit in an envelope and sending it to DNA department.
PS. No horking big lugies.

ogg

Of the Devil (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223313)

And people wonder why Christians such as myself as looking towards the future with skepticism. Nothing good will come of this, all IBM is doing is spitting in God's face, I fully expect Him to punish IBM's executives for this.

Re:Of the Devil (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223391)

Haha, you're an idiot.

Re:Of the Devil (-1, Offtopic)

metlin (258108) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223411)

> Haha, you're an idiot.

No, just a Christian =)

(laugh, it's a joke)

Re:Of the Devil (0, Flamebait)

metlin (258108) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223648)

Fucking religious nutheads.

Re:Of the Devil (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223413)

I see Christian persecution is still all the rage. Does it give you that warm glow inside when you rate down Christians just because we are Christian? I truly do not understand it, can somebody explain?

Re:Of the Devil (1)

hesiod (111176) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223454)

> I truly do not understand it, can somebody explain?

So you are trying to keep all of us ignorant because you wish to remain ignorant and you don't understand??? The guy (you?) said that looking at the way God created the world is "spitting in his face." That's promoting ignorance.

Re:Of the Devil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223468)

I think that you will find it's just persecution of religion in general.

Call it the mocking of a now unpopular theory due to a significant lack of evidence towards its validation.

Christians are the worst of the religions. (1)

FatSean (18753) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223568)

Their holy book orders them to convert people! That's goddamn offensive to me...some goon who thinks there is an invisible man in the sky is going to tell ME that I'm WRONG?

Any religion that claims to be the 'only religion' is obviously false. You'd have to be a half-wit to miss that logical fallacy.

Re:Christians are the worst of the religions. (3, Insightful)

eratosthene (605331) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223662)

> Any religion that claims to be the 'only religion' is obviously false. You'd have to be a half-wit to miss that logical fallacy.

This doesn't make sense to me. It seems that if a religion did not claim to be the 'only religion', then why would any of its members cling to it at all? After all, if Christianity was just 'one of many' ways to God, why would people have any incentive to remain Christian? It makes more sense to infer (at least if you believe in a certain religion) that your religion must be the 'only religion', otherwise the central tenets of what 'religion' is fail.

Re:Of the Devil (1)

Le Marteau (206396) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223614)

That's probably because Christianity has mythology as part of it's foundation, which tends to offend the sensibilities of many people of an uncompromising scientific mindset.

Re:Of the Devil (1)

Zebadias (861722) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223513)

What punishment would suffice to appease?

Hmm (-1, Troll)

pHatidic (163975) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223315)

The National Geographic Society and IBM are teaming up to map the history of human migration using DNA.

Does it worry anyone that IBM, the company doing this, was one of the biggest supporters of Germany in World War II?

"We've gotten the results of the study back, and it turns out that IBM employees are the master race and the rest of your are being sent to the gas chambers. National Geographic will be taking pictures."

Re:Hmm (0, Offtopic)

WhatAmIDoingHere (742870) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223350)

That's one of the dumbest things I've ever heard.

That would be like saying "Ford did buisness with Germany, how long until Fords start killing jews?"

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223482)

*That would be like saying "Ford did buisness with Germany, how long until Fords start killing jews?"*

if he(Ford) had gotten away with it.. probably 1920's.

Re:Hmm (0, Offtopic)

jcr (53032) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223519)

How many Jews bought Ford Pintos or SUVs with exploding tires?

-jcr

Re:Hmm (1)

dcsmith (137996) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223555)

Whjile I agree that the parent poster is wearing a 7 3/8 tinfoil hat, he didn't just pull the IBM-Nazi connection out of his ass. Among other sources, the Washington Post reported on this [washingtonpost.com] in 2001.

No, I don't think this means that they were an evil company in the late 30s - early 40s, but I do think it indicates that they were a big business. Global market, don't really care how you use our products - just buy them.

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223353)

Oh, PUHLEEEZE. Want to cite some actual _facts_ here? Given the number of products IBM produced during WWII that were directly involved in aiding the war effort, exactly _how_ were they "one of hte biggest supporters of Germany"????

"IBM and the Holocaust" (0, Offtopic)

Merdalors (677723) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223476)

Apparently you have never heard of the book "IBM and the Holocaust" (http://www.ibmandtheholocaust.com/) [slashdot.org]

Re:"IBM and the Holocaust" (0, Offtopic)

Merdalors (677723) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223538)

Apparently you can't put parens around a URL: http://www.ibmandtheholocaust.com/ [ibmandtheholocaust.com]

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223414)

That must explain all the US Army rifles that were made by the International Business Machines Company.

Security (1)

MoebiusPT (741925) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223321)

I assume that IBM will have a droll-prof mail box....

Re:Security (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223421)

I assume you mean drool proof -- most of what arrives at IBM is no doubt rather droll. :)

Preparing its defense (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223322)

This is really just an attempt by IBM to prepare a defense against SCO that shows that Wookiees do not, in fact, come from Endor.

I wonder... (3, Funny)

hcob$ (766699) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223327)

if they accecpt other swabbing techniques? The "other" dna sources would probably get a huge male bias to the data though.

Educational Television (0, Flamebait)

TheBrownShow (454945) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223332)

members of the general public will be able to mail in their own DNA on special cheek swabs.

You want me to voluntarily contribute my DNA so you can keep it on file somewhere? Not a chance! I watch CSI, you know!

Re:Educational Television (2, Funny)

hesiod (111176) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223481)

> I watch CSI, you know!

I've never heard this on CSI: "We searched CODIS and the National Geographic DNA Database."

Re:Educational Television (2, Funny)

TheBrownShow (454945) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223593)

>> I watch CSI, you know!

>I've never heard this on CSI: "We searched CODIS and the National Geographic DNA Database."


No? It was the same episode where they searched Slashdot for people who could take a joke. They didn't find anything.

Re:Educational Television (1)

xbsd (814561) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223495)

You want me to voluntarily contribute my DNA so you can keep it on file somewhere? Not a chance! I watch CSI, you know!

You haven't seen anything, there are people willing to pay up to $290 for a DNA test that measure customers' racial ancestry and their ancestral proportions if they are of mixed race.

Check it out: http://www.racesci.org/in_media/raceanddna/dna_tes t_nyt_Oct2002.htm [racesci.org]

Re:Educational Television (1)

jacksonj04 (800021) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223698)

Hey, I agree with the guy! After finding the address of the person I wrote a letter to by the digitally zoomed image in a mirror, they could look on the envelope gum for DNA and track me down in seconds.

Interesting (5, Funny)

dfn5 (524972) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223333)

I can't wait for them to discover that humans started their migration 5,000 years ago when they were chased out of eden by the dinosaurs.

Re:Interesting (0)

Cyclotron_Boy (708254) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223367)

This was modded up as Interesting, but I like to think the author was intending Funny

Re:Interesting (1)

DeathFlame (839265) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223458)

You need to be modded +0 read again (read the title of his post, then check his score...)

Re: Interesting (3, Funny)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223515)


> I can't wait for them to discover that humans started their migration 5,000 years ago when they were chased out of eden by the dinosaurs.

You're on to them! They were going to use the DNA to backtrace the migration and find the flaming sword, which they will sell on ebay for a pretty penny.

Re:Interesting (4, Funny)

HrothgarReborn (740385) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223517)

Quit being silly. We left Eden almost 6,000 years ago. Uneducated clod.

What would be interesting... (5, Interesting)

jd (1658) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223334)

Is to compare the results with Oxford Ancestors [oxfordancestors.com] , who perform a very similar service and have done for some years now. OA claim to be able to pinpoint a region from which you are ultimately descended on the female line, and to make a good guess of the same on the male line.


If OA's regions flat-out contradict NG's, then one or both sets of data must be wrong. A fatal flaw exists in an assumption that has been made. Which would be valuable to know, from a scientific standpoint, even if it would hurt sales.


If the two agree, it isn't proof that they are accurate, but provided the work was independently carried out, it raises the chances that they really are onto something.

Re:What would be interesting... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223453)

Actually there are a lot of organizations out there that do similar testing (familytreedna.com for one (who NG has teamed up with))... what sets NG's project apart is their ambitions of the amount of samples they expect to get with such a visible call for samples.

The more samples = better the data.

Man.... (1)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223345)

when they finish all their research, and everything is all said and done, I shall be deeply disappointed if they don't at least consider Atlantis as a possible origin of man.

Is it worth $100.00? (5, Informative)

unk1911 (250141) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223351)

While the most useful samples will come from indiginous populations, members of the general public will be able to mail in their own DNA on special cheek swabs. for only $100.00 plus ship/handling"

--
http://unk1911.blogspot.com [blogspot.com]

Re:Is it worth $100.00? (3, Insightful)

twiddlingbits (707452) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223483)

$100 bucks? You gotta be kidding. I can have my dog DNA typed (same process) for only about $60 and if it is a rarer breed for FREE. And the same kind of historical genetic analysis is going on with the Canine Genome. The process of DNA typing is the same for any animal, so why do hoo-mans cost more than K-9s? Sounds like a nice revenue source for someone. With some research and some dicussion with your relatives you can trace your roots back pretty darn far. I mean who cares that your 1,000 times great grandparents were from some part of Africa? What value does this information add to society?

Re:Is it worth $100.00? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223499)

Well, nobody is making YOU pay, so why would you ask the general population if its worth it? If someone thinks it is, they'll do it.....

Cool. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223360)

Adam and Eve will spew out lots of kids. The ancestors die out in the flood years later as Noah and his family have to restart the human race and repopulate the planet with the pair of every 10 Million species he had on the Ark.

Yay!

Sounds great (1)

brontus3927 (865730) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223364)

This sounds like a really good idea. People who volunteer even get an anonymous password to the website to see how their ancestors migrated to their current location. Too bad they will be testing only indigenous peoples. European-based mutts such as myself don't get to participate.

Warning! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223365)

These cheek swabs are not oral! You have been warned.

Interesting stuff (4, Interesting)

ites (600337) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223371)

Forget all the "big brother" comments.

There have been some studies of human DNA and these have often produced very interesting results, showing accurately how people migrated across the globe.

The problem up to now is that these have been relatively small studies confined to specific issues - such as the colonisation of the Pacific islands, which happened from Indonesia, not South America (sorry, Thor).

A large-scale analysis of human DNA that includes Africa - the richest mix of DNA by far - will be very, very interesting.

For example, there are theories that modern Africans are largely descended from relatively recent immigrants from the Indian Ocean basin who recolonised from the East coast and mixed with aboriginal Africans - such as the Khoi and San - eventually pushing these into the margins.

Good stuff.

Re:Interesting stuff (-1, Troll)

KillerDeathRobot (818062) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223521)

There have been some studies of human DNA and these have often produced very interesting results, showing accurately how people migrated across the globe.

Well now, how do we know they're accurate? A study can't prove itself accurate. A study can certainly be interesting and can give results which we believe to be accurate, but it would take more than a few to make a conscientious person comfortable with the label accurate. In the end, unless we invent time-travel, we'll probably never know for sure if something like this is truly accurate.

Re:Interesting stuff (1)

jotok (728554) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223677)

I think assessments of accuracy (vice precision) are made after taking on faith certain philosophical pillars of empirical science...assuming you accept how science is done, then you can perform an analysis of your experiment and its results to determine how likely you are to have made some humongous error, or if in fact it is "sound" (meaning it plays by the rules we already all agree upon).

Incremental Knowledge (5, Interesting)

4of12 (97621) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223381)

The African exodus I think is pretty well understood. Although, there seems to have been multiple exodi (?) of hominid species that did not survive in the long term (such as the Neanderthal in Europe).

From what I understand, the story gets harder to piece together in the last part of the European migrations from Central Asia.

A couple of interesting TV shows on this were The Real Eve [discovery.com] (which does the mitochondrial trace through maternal ancestral lines), and Journey of Man [nationalgeographic.com] , which relates to the more difficult task of tracing mutations in the Y chromosome handed done through paternal lines.

One of the earlier pioneers in the field, Brian Sykes of Oxford, started up a side business [google.com] where you can send swabs to obtain information about maternal and paternal markers in your genetic makeup (IIRC, about US$225).

A few years ago I got the analysis done and sent the results back to Ma 'n Pa for Mother's Day and Father's Day gifts.

How'd that work... (2, Funny)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223449)

A few years ago I got the analysis done and sent the results back to Ma 'n Pa for Mother's Day and Father's Day gifts.

...when it turned out your paternal line came from the mailman? ;)

We all have one parents (Adame and Eve) (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223400)

The outcome will show that we all have one parents, Adam and Eve, as the bible says.

Re:We all have one parents (Adame and Eve) (1)

RagingChipmunk (646664) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223611)

Better check your bible. my bible clearly shows that Adam and Eve werent the first/only couple on earth.

Day 6 Genesis Chapter 1:27 - says God made people - lots of them (specifically plural) and then told them to go make babies. God took the next day off.

Later on, in chapter TWO, we learn about a special deal, Adam and Eve. (If you read through Talmudic/Kabbalah sources you come across the idea that Eve wasnt the first woman either...) So, theologically speaking, Adam was the first man to receive revelation from God, but, not necessarily the 1st man created.

Anyway, thought I'd clear that up.

Conspiracy Senses tingling... (0, Flamebait)

Filmwatcher888 (595369) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223408)

So IBM, a HUGE world-wide conglomerate, wants a DNA sample from everyone ion the planet?

I can see now that all the puzzle pieces fit: their involment with the Nazis, Building large supercomputers, Backing the communist "open-source" movement, and now a DNA database.

Next we'll discover that IBM has discovered Thule and wants to open "new" corporate offices there.

Re:Conspiracy Senses tingling... (0, Flamebait)

monkeyserver.com (311067) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223540)

This is a little more scary than you think. I'm being serious, IBM played a HUGE part in the holocaust. Using their card sorters they helped to map out who was racially jewish (as well as other 'undesireables'). Check out this book [amazon.com] and the corresponding website [ibmandtheholocaust.com] . a little more than just scary.

Obviously I don't have too many fears about national geographic, but it's better to know about IBM's past, even if they won't own up to it. BTW, the book is great, I recommend the audio version, the author has an endearing lisp :).

Re:Conspiracy Senses tingling... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223634)

Oh, sure - like IBM is *one guy*. So their German offices cooperated with the Nazis. Can't the same be said of the ENTIRE FUCKING GERMAN POPULATION?

Geezuz freaking crimimey.

Their IBM offices were making, among other things, machine guns to KILL the Nazis. This is cooperation?

Re:Conspiracy Senses tingling... (1)

City Wok (875763) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223579)

Perhaps this will advance their research into effective biometric security systems.

Fun with DNA samples (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223409)

I'd like too see their reaction if someone sent them the DNA of a chimpanzee... Given the similarity between the two DNAs, it might take them them a while to figure that one out...

I wonder what it will cost? (1)

vrimj (750402) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223422)

It looks like non-native populations can contribute only thorugh buying an testing kit and the samples will be sent in ananomously.
Kits sold to the public contain cheek swabs used to scrape the inside of the mouth for a DNA sample. The swabs can then be mailed to a central laboratory for analysis. After four to six weeks, the results of the analysis will appear on the website behind an anonymous password contained in the kit.
I would do this, but their is a low limit to how much I would pay for it. It seems like the use is going to be pure population biology
we are very clear about not trying to exploit their genetic diversity for medical uses
and I happen to like population biology.

What?!?!?! (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223434)

"While the most useful samples will come from indiginous populations, members of the general public will be able to mail in their own DNA on special cheek swabs."

So, they want people who immigrated a long time ago, and are not really interested in newer immigration? Because ancestrial migration doesn't count unless your the first to get there? This makes absolutly no sense what so ever.

Re:What?!?!?! (1)

rewinn (647614) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223623)

Perhaps it's because migrations in historical times are somewhat documented via, uh, historical records

Re:What?!?!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223644)

So, they want people who immigrated a long time ago, and are not really interested in newer immigration? Because ancestrial migration doesn't count unless your the first to get there? This makes absolutly no sense what so ever.

Sure it makes sense. We already know a ton about migrations that have happened recently (last few thousand years). That's all part of recorded history. DNA analysis doesn't add that much information to recorded history. DNA analysis does tell you about what happened in the thousands if years *before* recorded history. If we want to learn about migrations of human populations 10 or 100 thousand years ago, it makes sense to look at aboriginal populations, rather than people who just got off the boat yesterday, relatively speaking.

Is this really science??? (0, Flamebait)

woodsrunner (746751) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223438)

Firstly, the contention that human's originated from Africa is highly debatable.

Secondly, according to their map, the first man was Adam!? This sounds more like Sunday School rather than science.

Lastly, if they are trying to trace migrations, and they already have their map made up will they be fitting their data to their preconceived notions?

Re:Is this really science??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223660)

"the contention that humans originated from Africa is highly debatable.". is it? I've never heard that challenged or questioned (not by serious scientists anyway). do you have any more info on that?

Re:Is this really science??? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223673)

Africa as a starting point is relatively unquestioned. Even theories which point to reverse migration back into Africa still acknowledge it as the point of origin.

The first man being "Adam" is a geneticist convention. Given that the Y-chromosome remains unaltered during reproduction aside from mutation and retrovirus based alterations, and the differences in modern day Y-chromosomes are extremely small within humanity, but (relatively speaking) extremely large with other primates, there have been several theories pointing to either one, or a very small number of males that acted as the progenitors for modern day humans.

For the last, those maps already exist, based on years of study, they are probably using them as a basis for study to confirm or refute specific branches. It's known as a hypothesis, scientists use them occasionally. ;-)

-ShadowRanger

Re:Is this really science??? (4, Informative)

kebes (861706) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223683)

For the recrod, this isn't the first study of human migratory patterns. Many migration routes are now well established, whereas others are in debate and should be studied further. This study will help establish better timelines, settle controversies, and maybe even provide fresh theories to be tested. They are not "fitting data to preconceived notions" just because they are using the current body of knowledge as a starting point for their study.

AFAIK the African origins of humankind are fairly well established. The fact that genetic anthropologists decided to call the oldest known common male ancestor "adam" and the oldest female one "eve" just shows that they have a sense of humour and history, not that what they do is quackery.

So, yes, it is science.

I think this would be a VERY difficult study (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223452)

Let's cast asside the paranoia for a moment and glance at the liklihood that they will be able to build some amount of evidence to prove what they are setting out to prove. The world has become much smaller in the last couple of hundred years. People are less often living in their ancestoral regions and it's becoming more and more obfustated by the second.

And I suppose we should pretty much exclude all but "native americans" from any studies related to the new world. (The Americas) I think this study will just turn out to be a colossal waste of time and money. Who is paying for this?

Re:I think this would be a VERY difficult study (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223508)

You are (with your $100 sample)

Our Complex History (5, Interesting)

J05H (5625) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223455)

This is an interesting project, it will help to fill in the holes in the knowledge of our origins. Most cultures have legends of the journeys that led to settling a new home, with this research we will see much more clearly who went where,

Here is the map I want to see more fully realized:

http://www.mitomap.org/WorldMigrations.pdf

There are interesting legends and recent research that Genographic project might help: were there Austronesian ("aborigine") migrations across the Pacific 40,000 years ago? Are modern Tibetans and Athapaskan speakers (Navaho) related through the so-called Amur River Culture? When and how often have the "X" haplogroups travelled to America, and were these only Neolithic migrations or did they occur throughout the Bronze and Iron ages? Finally, how much back-migration occured from the Americas to the Old World continents? I'm not the one to research it, but a correlation between Am-Indian oral lore and this geno-map could make for an interesting thesis.

My guess is that the project will show far more migration than previously expected - humans are nothing if not mobile.

josh

Cheeky Web Developers use DNA to migrate ... (2, Funny)

rewinn (647614) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223469)

... from platform to platform.

But I can't see why the National Geographic cares.

historical linguistics (3, Interesting)

lovebyte (81275) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223473)

Just a thought: Linking this DNA study to studies in historical linguistics could give interesting results. There must be some correlation between people's DNA and the language they use.

North and South America (3, Interesting)

sellin'papes (875203) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223505)

I think some of the most interesting data will come out of studying migration of peoples into the americas.

It is generally agreed that the first humans arrived in the americas around 25-30,000 years ago but their migration from that point on is a mystery.

One belief is that they migrated south through a northern passage as the polar ice-caps melted. Another is that they migrated down the west coast from the north pole to south America befoer the ice-caps melted. There is a third (more controversial) theory that they migrated by boat from africa and then moved north up the continent.

It will be interesting to see what conclusions are drawn.

/. editor glitch (2, Informative)

Chris Kamel (813292) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223518)

will come from indigenous populations

It has to be said. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223520)

public will be able to mail in their own DNA on special cheek swabs.

If crumpled up tissues count as these cheeked swabs then I can meet their 100,000 quota by tonight.

Don't worry, I wont have to change any of my usual plans.

DNA Study (1)

Starraisin1 (560241) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223537)

Maybe they could use this study to help cure diseases or maybe better yet help the masses of over a billion people in poverty.

Other research (4, Informative)

kbahey (102895) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223543)

Some research on this was done before.

There was also this fellow, British I think, who did a documentary about early human migration using genetics, he was on TV (PBS?) a few years back. Nice work. He showed that there were two waves out of Africa. One hugged the coastline reaching India then all the way to Australia, and another going to central Asia, then staying there for a while, and then a branch going west to Europe, and another going east to Siberia, Beringia, and eventually to the Americans. Can't remember his name. Rats!

Some other resources:

Scientists trace human migration using DNA [sciencedaily.com] .

Wikipedia article on Human migration [wikipedia.org] .

Stephen Oppenheimer [bradshawfoundation.com] did a genetic map [bradshawfoundation.com] .

Kurgan Genetics [wikipedia.org] .

Neanderthaals and mtDNA [pbs.org]

What's indigenous? (3, Insightful)

Silver Sloth (770927) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223565)

At the end of the day, unless you live in central Africa, and possibly not then, no one is truly indegenous. We're all immigrants at some point or another.

OK, I know I'm nitpicking. As far as the spread of mankind etc. then the first arrivals are the indigenous population. Here in the west of Europe peoples have been coming ad going for several thousend years. Exactly who's indigenous is very complex.

DNA is the ANTI CHRIST (4, Interesting)

daperdan (446613) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223571)

Isn't it amazing that we can convict a suspect of murder with a 99.99% certainty using DNA evidence but the religious reject it if it goes against their beliefs.

The best case of DNA invalidating a religion is Mormonism. The founder of Mormonism claimed to have translated a book that was written by a people that migrated from the Middle East to the American continent. He claimed that these immigrants were the "priciple ancestors" of the modern day American Indian.

Well it turns out that DNA proves what science has been saying for years. The American Indian is of Asiatic decent. Any other examples of DNA destroying a religion?

Tin Foil cheek coverings (2, Funny)

ChaosCube (862389) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223572)

So, how many out there think this is a government funded plot to genetically tag everyone on the planet, starting with a very innocent looking 100k?

Prepare to superglue foil inside you entire mouth. You know, just in case of some forced swab penetration.

dangerous (2, Flamebait)

thomasa (17495) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223577)

This dangerous research is bad. We all came from Eve and Adam 5000 years ago. Why do we need to do this?

On a more serious note (in case you did not guess the above was a joke), I always thought that historical
linguistics could provide the same answers.

Re:dangerous (1)

Starraisin1 (560241) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223638)

Dangerous because it might effect your faith? There is no where in the bible that says for a fact Adam is five thousand years old but there is evidence that "Adam" (First modern Human we all descend fom) is at least 100,000 years old.

Re:dangerous (1)

vortigern00 (443602) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223696)

You are talking about the mitochondrial DNA research that traced everyone's mitochondrial DNA back to a single "Eve"

That research has been debunked.

Taco Stand is Dying (-1, Offtopic)

djcdplaya (220461) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223584)

IT IS OFFICIAL; WIRED NEWS CONFIRMS: Achims IS SUPERIOR TO Taco Stand

Taco Stand is Dying, Says Athens Banner Herald

Achim advocates have long insisted that open-source development results in better and more secure tacos. Now they have statistics to back up their claims.

According to a four-year analysis of the 5.7 million pounds of Achims fries conducted by five UGA computer science researchers, the Achims kernel programming code is better and more secure than the programming code of Taco Stand.

The report, set to be released on Tuesday, states that the 2.6 Achims production kernel, shipped with software from Red Hat, Novell and other major Achims vendors, contains 985 bugs in 5.7 million lines of code, well below the average for Taco Stand software. Taco Stand, by comparison, contains about 40 million lines of code, with new bugs found on a frequent basis.

Taco Stand software typically has 20 to 30 bugs for every 1,000 lines of code, according to Carnegie Mellon University's CyLab Sustainable Computing Consortium. This would be equivalent to 114,000 to 171,000 bugs in 5.7 million lines of code.

The study identified 0.17 bugs per 1,000 lines of code in the Achims kernel. Of the 985 bugs identified, 627 were in critical parts of the kernel.

"Our findings show that Achims contains an extremely low defect rate and is evidence of the strong security of Achims," said Hallem. "Many security holes in software are the result of software bugs that can be eliminated with good programming processes. Unfortunately, we don't find a lot of good practices in Taco Stand. Mostly we just find in-fighting and security holes. I can conclusively say that Taco Stand is dying."

The Achims fries analysis project started in 2000 at the Stanford University Computer Science Research Center as part of a large research initiative to improve core software engineering processes in the software industry.

The initiative now continues at UGA, said it intends to start providing Achims bug analysis reports on a regular basis and will make a summary of the results freely available to the Achims development community.

"This is a benefit to the Achims development community, and we appreciate UGA's efforts to help us improve the security and stability of Achims," said Andrew Morton, lead Achims kernel maintainer. Morton said developers have already addressed the top-priority bugs uncovered in the study.

Don't waste all that time and money! (1)

Luscious868 (679143) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223609)

We all came from Africa, it's just a matter of when .....

ok (1)

Exter-C (310390) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223612)

And then there was the subpoena that forced the project to hand over all records because of a "thread to national security" all of a sudden we are back to 1939 because my 448th cousin has decided to go and blow himself up in a shopping centre.

Sounds really good!.. cant wait to join.. just like i cant wait to join some mercenary force in africa run by a bunch of stupid british people!.

That's "indigenous"... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12223650)

Look it up when not sure.

Hey idiots. (0, Troll)

AssHatAnonymous (869725) | more than 9 years ago | (#12223661)

You all bitch and moan about corporations collecting your private information. Now why the fuck would you be voluntarily sending them your DNA? Putzes.
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