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Budweiser Vetos Genetically Modified Rice

timothy posted about 9 years ago | from the squeeze-in-a-cheap-shot dept.

Biotech 142

fishdan writes "Anheuser-Busch the makers of Budweiser and other beers, has stated that they will not buy rice from Missouri if genetically modified crops are allowed in the state. Budweiser is claimed to be the best selling beer in the world Bud Light is the second best selling. I wonder about the stats of Tsing Tao I'm not sure what they're afraid of from genetically modified rice. Do they think their beer could get any worse?"

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142 comments

Rice? (2, Funny)

turtled (845180) | about 9 years ago | (#12225679)

Who cares when you are gettin drunk and watching the race!?

Re:Rice? (1)

True Grit (739797) | about 9 years ago | (#12231689)

Somewhere in the Far East a Sake drinker has heard of this and thought "Hmmm, getting drunk on the alcohol from the fermented rice and then getting stoned on the drugs the rice makes" then .... [ring, ring] ... "Yes, I'm calling about your genetically modified rice, do you accept mail-orders with overseas destinations? These would be *large* orders, definitely worth your while..."

because not only americans drink it (4, Interesting)

feandil (873841) | about 9 years ago | (#12225725)

there are plenty of people in the world who do not want anything to do with biotech food or drinks, so if it was known that budweiser contain GMO their sales would plummet in the world, especially in europe.

To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

benhocking (724439) | about 9 years ago | (#12225820)

I don't drink beer, so I don't have first-hand experience on the matter, but to hear all the jokes about US beer (e.g., "How is American Beer like making love in a canoe?", from Monty Python's Live at the Hollywood Bowl), I'm surprised the overseas market for Budweiser is that large. Is this one of those cases where people complain about how bad a product is, and then they buy it anyway?

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (2, Interesting)

afabbro (33948) | about 9 years ago | (#12226090)

In my experience, 99% of people who say "American beer sucks" or only drink micro- or foreign brews would happily drink Budweiser if it was named something else. Give them a glass of Bud and tell them it's Pete's Wicked Spring Blonde Ale or something and they'll coo about the taste.

Most people are idiots. Pretentious beer drinks are worse.

(I don't drink beer. I'm pretentious about high-end vodkas).

Wikipedia on Budweiser [wikipedia.org]

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | about 9 years ago | (#12226153)


Wow...guess that makes me a one-percenter.

And BTW, not all American beer sucks...Sam Adams is quite passable.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (4, Interesting)

Captain Splendid (673276) | about 9 years ago | (#12226188)

Pretentious beer drinker here...

Simply put, Budweiser tastes like hobo ass. The only lager that tastes worse, IMO is Foster's. They both have the defining characteristic of wickedly nasty aftertaste.

As a Guinness drinker, I'm blond-beer biased anyway, but in those rare instances when that's not available, there's a dozen beers I'd rather have first. Heineken is quite smooth, Castlemaine XXXX has a nice punch to it, for example.

Disclaimer: I have not tried any of the American bargain beers: Pabst, Schlitz, Colt 45, etc., so I could ultimately be wrong.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

shawb (16347) | about 9 years ago | (#12226497)

I personally prefer many of the super bargain beers to Bud: Pabst, Blatz, etc. And I really prefer a good beer. A good nut brown, stout or IPA. On special Occasions Delerium Tremens follwed up by a good Raspberry Lambic. Normally I just go with Vodka, though. The sugars in beer can leave me feeling really bad (I think my body is overly sensitive to sugars and refined starches in general.)

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

nauseaboy (874436) | about 9 years ago | (#12228385)

They still make Blatz? I didn't think they did.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

shawb (16347) | about 9 years ago | (#12229043)

I think it's currently done by Pabst. [pabst.com] Still tastes the same. Wow. Looking at that list: Pabst, Blatz, Schlitz, Stroh's, Old Milwaukee. Oooh... Schaefer Beer. Wow. Pabst is like liquid punk rock. Now if they would pick up Huber...

Oh wow... champale.

And can't forget... Colt 45.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

nauseaboy (874436) | about 9 years ago | (#12229131)

That's amazing. I really want some Blatz now.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

shawb (16347) | about 9 years ago | (#12229270)

Thankfully I'm going to the side bar [landmark-lanes.com] at my favorite bar tonight. Notice the first beer they have on tap.

God bless Milwaukee. And God bless the Landmark. Check the arcade... that's right, five pinball machines. That's not even counting the Playboy pinball in the back bar. And four REAL dart boards (even though the chalkboards for keeping score kinda don't work very well.)

And then there's the regulars who hang out there: inspiration for my favorite toast: "to good friends, and bad influences."

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

nauseaboy (874436) | about 9 years ago | (#12229350)

This [hofbrauhausnewport.com] is my favorite local watering hole. The only other one in existance is in Munich, Gerrmany.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

shufler (262955) | about 9 years ago | (#12226964)

Colt 45 [pabst.com] is malt liquor [bfcgroup.com].

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12231974)

Malt Liquor is not a type of beer. It is a term stupid sate legislatures in the US forced beers with slightly higher alcohol content to put on thier labels. Which beers are "malt liquors" depends entirely on what state you are in.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (2, Funny)

Exocet (3998) | about 9 years ago | (#12229127)

I'm like you - I prefer not to be able to see through my beers. Even better if light appears to bend into the the beer's event horizon.

That being said, I love Red Stripe beer. If you hate most lagers you might like Red Stripe.

PS: For dark beers, Deschutes Brewery makes Black Butte Porter. Their Obsidian Stout sucks, IMO, but the Black Butte is awesome.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

Captain Splendid (673276) | about 9 years ago | (#12229858)

Funny you should mention that, but I have a very negative reaction to Red Stripe. I don't know what it is, but there's something about it that that just makes my skin crawl when I take a sip.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

Exocet (3998) | about 9 years ago | (#12229965)

Oh well. There are lots of beers, as long as you aren't drinking cheap shit ...whatever floats your boat. :)

How do you know? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12230663)

Simply put, Budweiser tastes like hobo ass

That doesn't sound like a taste test I'd take part in, but to each his own.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

obeythefist (719316) | about 9 years ago | (#12231493)

Budweiser is definately one of the worst beers I have ever encountered. As a home brewer and alcoholic, I can safely say even I can make better beer.

Fosters Lager is almost completely unobtainable here in Australia, with perhaps one in every four bottleshops selling it in small quantities, which nobody buys.

A little pointer for even the pretentious to be aware of: Guinness is a stout, specifically a draught stout beer, and should not be confused with a blonde beer. Amusingly, the Guinness brewery actually has a license to produce Budweiser. (source: Wikipedia [wikipedia.org])

Blonde beers and ales are generally lighter in colour, texture and flavour than a stout, although it's likely that a good beer drinker will have a diverse palate that enables enjoyment of a variety of beers not including budweiser, fosters, or any beer produced by the Swan Brewery in WA.

In defense of american beer (yes, I can hear you all laughing from here) there is a strong community of home brewers and microbreweries in the states that produce beer which is around as good as anything you'll find in the world (excluding europe).

This article is revealing however, that the barley prices must be so high in the USA that breweries use rice to bulk their wort. That would be unforgivable in Australia and I believe downright illegal in Germany (feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, IANABL)

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

Mattcelt (454751) | about 9 years ago | (#12226207)

Well there's a difference between people who drink good beer and people who drink "anything but budweiser".

You'll never find me confusing my Guinness or Yuengling with Budweiser. (No matter how many I've already had. :-)

Oh, and the canoe people truly are right - Budweiser really is fucking close to water. And Bud Light? Well, I think they removed the canoe...

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (1)

speculatrix (678524) | about 9 years ago | (#12232527)


"put it back in the horse", said one visitor to the US on drinking American beer!

true, there are many people who only care that their drink is cold & not water, but there are many people who really enjoy beer and discovering new beers. try the Flying Saucer pub in Forth Worth TX for example.

the real tragedy about Budweiser is that the original Czech product, http://www.budvar.cz/ Budweiser Budvar is a really nice beer.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (2, Insightful)

Uber Banker (655221) | about 9 years ago | (#12226142)

I RTFA, and this really isn't so much about GM rice, more about other effects of GM, but no doubt the GPs point is still valid.

To answer your question:
Budweiser is by far the most widely consumed US originated beer here in the UK. That is if you call it beer. Having lived in the US for some time I appreciated most beer sold in bars was very cold (glasses often kept in a fridge), very fizzy (unless the bar was out of CO2/N) and quite tasteless. That wasn't/isn't always a bad thing - if dehydrated I don't know what could be nicer than a watery cold drink - and if going out with the aim of getting drunk I don't think the quality matters after the second pint - but if drinking beer for beer the taste is extremely important and that's what US mass brews lack - taste. If looking for a fizzy somewhat (but not very) tasty beer that will deliver sugars in your blood Bud is a good choice of many (bar excellent German lagers which are not highly available in the US).

This is not to dismiss US beer as a whole, micro-brew is a massively growing industry and has some excellent choices. But to drink beer for being beer ice cold piss isn't always good. If you're not a big beer drinker why not try something like Old Speckeld Hen or whatever local micro-brew markets itself as strong in taste, it could give you a fresh perspective.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (2, Funny)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | about 9 years ago | (#12226182)

Exactly. American beers like Bud and Miller are designed to be drunk ice-cold, so you can't actually taste the rankness.

Re:To hear many foreigners talk about US beer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12229556)

I'm a big fan of Miller largely due to locale and their awesome support of the Brewers, but if you go do the brewery tour, you may be surprised by the free sample you get at the end (the one you get in the chilled glass, not the one in a plastic cup). I still don't care for Ice House, but that was easily the best beer I have ever had.

Ob. Monty Python joke: (1)

fsh (751959) | about 9 years ago | (#12231614)

Why is drinking American beer like making love in a canoe?

They're both fucking close to water!

The Bruces, Live at the Hollywood Bowl

Re:because not only americans drink it (1)

omibus (116064) | about 9 years ago | (#12226241)

What are you talking about? No self respecting European would dring Budwiser! (Bud Spencer aside)

And it is definatly a sorry state to the world where the most drank beer in the world is Budwiser. But if all you want is to get drunk -- I guess it works.

If you want to enjoy the beer...no.

Re:because not only americans drink it (4, Interesting)

sfjoe (470510) | about 9 years ago | (#12226318)


Beer isn't the only thing. California has banned GM rice because the largest consumer of California rice is Japan and they will NOT buy GM rice.
Personally, I haven't made up my mind one way or another. However, having been lied to any number of times by people whose only motivation is profit, the burden of proof beyond reasonable doubt is on the corporations.

Re:because not only americans drink it (1)

thegrassyknowl (762218) | about 9 years ago | (#12228395)

their sales would plummet in the world, especially in europe.

Why would Europeans drink Bud? Got to be the worst beer in the world - something like sex in a canoe. The only people in Europe that would regularly consume Bud would be USians visiting there - same as here in Aust where bugger-all people drink it because the local beers are so much better.

Europe has hundreds of better (and funnily enough, cheaper) beers to choose from and any of them is better than the overpriced Bud.

I can't see Bud sales in Europe dropping except from the USians that visit europe and don't drink it because it's got GM bits in it.

A generation of rice superheros (1)

L. VeGas (580015) | about 9 years ago | (#12225773)

All the nascar fans will acquire the powers of, hmm, rice. Whenever they get drunk, they will become tasty and irresistable to asians.

Re:A generation of rice superheros (1)

SunFan (845761) | about 9 years ago | (#12225872)


There was an e-mail circulating a while back with a photo of a NASCAR fan who shaved Dale Earnhardt's number into his back hair. Irresistable...

Other way around (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12225964)

All the nascar fans will acquire the powers of, hmm, rice. Whenever they get drunk, they will become tasty and irresistable to asians.

You got that the other way around: whenever you get drunk, asians become tasty and irresistable. I dated this incredibly cute Japanese girl last year and she had the best-tasting privates of any girl I've ever been with. I used to love to go down on her (and, needless to say, she was in 7th heaven when I did). Everytime I got drunk, we both knew what was going to happen that night...

Beer? (4, Funny)

Prien715 (251944) | about 9 years ago | (#12225779)

All this time I thought Buddweiser only sold water!

Not water (1)

Safety Cap (253500) | about 9 years ago | (#12225922)

Americans drink beery, watery-tasting piss.
Canadians drink watery, beery-tasting piss.
Aussies drink anything with alcohol in it.

Re:Not water (1)

superpulpsicle (533373) | about 9 years ago | (#12230921)

If you consider budweiser watery-tasting piss, that's the best compliment I have ever heard.

To seriously like budweiser, you'd have to be ULTRA PATRIOTIC with no tongue. And prefer the taste of battery acid + rubbing alcohol.

Budweiser is a Czech beer, not American. (1)

torpor (458) | about 9 years ago | (#12232114)

And Czech Budweiser is among the best in the world.

Seriously.

Budweiser is Tasty.... IF... (2, Informative)

Wandering Wombat (531833) | about 9 years ago | (#12231108)

... you buy it in Canada. Budweiser brewed in Canada is brewed by Molson (I think... or Labatts)... using Molson's techniques. In a recent taste test, 3 out of 5 people couldnt tell Canadian beer from Budweiser brewed in Canada. 5 out of 5 knew EXACTLY when they had tasted the American Bud.



I just think it's funny that Budweiser, knowing that not a single damn Canadian would buy THEIR Beer, just brew Canadian beer and stick it in Bud cans. There's a metaphor there, but I can't quite get a grip on it.

But does it taste different? (1)

karn096 (807073) | about 9 years ago | (#12225781)

All these companies are all up in arms about genetically altered crops. But my question is does it taste any different? I bet that if no one said anything, nobody would even be able to tell the different. If genetically modifying rice allows the rice to grow better, and faster, then so be it, people are thirsty out there, and this can help.
Actually after reading this, I could really go for a beer right now.

Re:But does it taste different? (5, Informative)

tOaOMiB (847361) | about 9 years ago | (#12225969)

If you RTFA, you'd notice that this is not about genetically modifying rice to have to grow better or faster. This is about a drug company that wants to use rice to produce human proteins to be used at drugs--not rice for consumption! The fear here (from Anheuser-Busch) is about cross-pollination with normal rice strains.

Re:But does it taste different? (0)

Doc Ruby (173196) | about 9 years ago | (#12228117)

Budweiser tastes like piss. If all that matters is its flavor, why don't you help yourself to the free stuff you make yourself. Cheers!

Re:But does it taste different? (1)

hohead (772082) | about 9 years ago | (#12230884)

It seems a lot of people make comments about the taste of piss.
With these comments, I can assume that you all have actually tasted piss?
If this is fact, then why should I trust the opinion of a person who has tasted piss?

Obviously, if a person has tasted piss, then they must be damaged somehow.

Re:But does it taste different? (0, Offtopic)

Doc Ruby (173196) | about 9 years ago | (#12230961)

I can say that I have tasted my own piss. It's no big deal, and I am not ashamed. I can also say that if you are so afraid of your own piss that you cannot try it, that you (or your curiosity) must be damaged.

They are afraid... (3, Insightful)

jangobongo (812593) | about 9 years ago | (#12225816)

I'm not sure what they're afraid of from genetically modified rice.

They are afraid that they will lose customers. Since the public has not made up its mind as to whether genetically modified foods are safe to ingest, Budweiser does not want to alienate anyone who purchases their products.

Remember, people are afraid of the unknown. "Will it cause cancer?", "Am I going to turn into a mutant??", etc.

Re:They are afraid... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12225885)

Remember, people are afraid of the unknown. "Will it cause cancer?", "Am I going to turn into a mutant??", etc.

They'd be better off worrying about the damaging health effects of the alcohol in the beer rather than some make-believe scare stories put out by a bunch of granola-chomping hippies who think that anything created by scientists must be evil on principle.

Re:They are afraid... (4, Insightful)

moof1138 (215921) | about 9 years ago | (#12226138)

This has nothing to do with cancer fears or even GM food. The modified rice is genetically enhanced with synthetic human genes to produce lactoferrin and lysozyme, which are intended to be used in medicines so they would be very likely affect someone who consumed them. They are afraid that the modified rice could cross pollinate with standard rice. It is well known that pollen can travel large distances, so the possibility of contamination is very real and could in theory have serious negative consequences. It may be that their concerns are unfounded, but that is really something that only an expert could make the call on.

Re:They are afraid... (1)

bobster45 (816998) | about 9 years ago | (#12226979)

I agree with the stated information and have some other information to include... Even if there is cross pollinization from the GM rice, the resultant rice from this year's crop would contain only the parent's rice plant's attributes rather than that of the pollenizing parent. I would contain the next crop's genetic formulation. I believe the potential (sales) hazard would be in next year's (or next crop depending on the climate and how many crops per year are grown) crop as the new genetic material is expressed in the plants (from those cross polinated from GM rice plants) rice seeds and might contain the potential mutagens that those consumers that are fearful of might be affected by. In fact there may even be a chance that a cross polinated seed could be non-viable. A rice mule equivalent!

Re:They are afraid... (2, Informative)

sagekoala06 (786349) | about 9 years ago | (#12228468)

AFAIK lactoferrin and lysozyme are both in production by every single person who would be able to read this sentence. Lactoferrin and lysozyme are really nothing but enzymes that kill bacteria that are already found in our spit, snot, tears, and just about any other mucus that comes from our bodies. I wonder why they would produce these enzymes in rice for consumption because the instant they would hit the stomach (with a pH ~2) the protiens would denature and be rendered into useless macromolecules. A more likely use would be to prevent some bacterial rice disease caused by a gram positive bacteria.

Not Exactly (1)

Shihar (153932) | about 9 years ago | (#12227682)

The problem is not that Anheuser-Busch is worried about pissing off Europe. The problem is that a drug company wants to produce rice designed to create a drug in open fields. Anheuser-Busch doesn't want that rice to contaminate their rice.

I am all for genetic engineering of pretty much everything, including things I stuff in my mouth. I don't think that genetic engineering is the boogie man. I don't even care if genetic strains blow to the wind and cross pollinate... so long as there is nothing in them that could potentially be harmful. Genetic cross pollination happens today all the time. Throwing in some human cracks at genetic code really doesn't worry me. That said, such genetic cross pollination needs to be treated like pollution.

It is a necessary evil, but it certainly needs some minimal level of oversight. If your genetic material is going to drift in the wind, you need to take responsibility for where it ends up, especially if it is harmful to other products. In the case of using genetic engineering to make crops produce drugs, Anheuser-Busch is right to put their foot down and demand steps be taken to prevent contamination of their own crops. It is one thing to catch a gene that makes your rice whiter down the wind from the farm a mile away, it is very much another thing to get a gene that puts a drug into rice meant for consumption.

IMO, this is just a straight up case of pollution. One guy wants to put something potentially harmful in the area. Either society needs to agree to accept the potential risks associated with the pollution, or steps need to be taken to limit the pollution (green houses come to mind). Whatever the case, the risks need to be understood or precautions taken. The fact that Anheuser-Busch, a company with absolutely zero interest in the debate otherwise is speaking up is a pretty clear indication that either the risks are not properly known, or that the risks are known and have been deemed too high.

Re:Not Exactly (1)

straybullets (646076) | about 9 years ago | (#12229369)

so long as there is nothing in them that could potentially be harmful

IIRC there are already many case of GM plants withdrawn from market after it was found out that the agro tech company lied about the genetic mods and was actually spreading antibiotic resistance that was meant to only select the gm modified breed.

More over, simple resistance against a round up like chemical product, which is already common practice and selled as "weed/chemical" bundle, is obviously a very risky behaviour in the light of cross pollination.

Re:They are afraid... (1)

obeythefist (719316) | about 9 years ago | (#12231499)

What? You think finding out budweiser is made out of rice instead of malted barley, hops, water and yeast isn't a major disincentive? Before we even start thinking about the specifics of the ingredients origin, we should make sure we're actually using ingredients that are supposed to be in beer, not fried up in a wok.

This is beer! Beer is not made from rice. Foolish american brewers.

Business opportunity! (2, Interesting)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | about 9 years ago | (#12225920)

I see a clever new business opportunity here:

GenetiBrau: the Beer made from 100% genetically modified ingredients!

(I'd drink it.)

not any gm rice just drug rice (1)

bmongar (230600) | about 9 years ago | (#12225987)

No. 1 buyer of rice as well as its largest brewer, says it won't buy rice from Missouri if genetically modified, drug-making crops are allowed to be grown in the state.

It isn't that they don't want any gm rice to be grown in Missouri. They are concerned about contamination from rice designed to grow drugs. If drugs got into their beer then they would have some serious problems.

Re:not any gm rice just drug rice (1)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | about 9 years ago | (#12226129)

If drugs got into their beer then they would have some serious problems.



You got your drugs in my beer!

You got your beer on my drugs!

Now you can have both! Two great highs that go great together!

There's no wrong way to drink a Reese's.

Re:not any gm rice just drug rice (1)

Muhammar (659468) | about 9 years ago | (#12226146)

Even though the taste is bad, their beer-soda sells pretty good and they need to maintain the reproducibility of the manufacturing procedure so they do not to want fiddle with the ingredients. Besides, it is a good marketing ploy. (Some time ago, Bud had an large ad campain emphasizing that they never use any preservatives - like benzoate - in their beer. Which is fair enough except that no brewery does that either.)

Re:not any gm rice just drug rice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12228413)

I prefer the term "alcopop" although that is generally reserved for those fruity malt beverage things like hooch.

Real Beer has no rice (4, Informative)

gvc (167165) | about 9 years ago | (#12226048)

Where I come from, beer is made from barley, hops, yeast and water.

Not rice, corn or potatoes.

Re:Real Beer has no rice (1)

DrKyle (818035) | about 9 years ago | (#12228832)

Yeah, and you probably think a Martini only contains Gin, Vermouth and an olive. Damn purists, not letting the rest of us destroy their favorite concoctions by bastardizing the name with any ingredients we wish. Next you'll tell me This stuff [tasteyoulove.com] isn't butter, but there it is, right in the name you fascist!

Re:Real Beer has no rice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12229529)

Where I come from, words have meanings which can evolve over time.

Re:Real Beer has no rice (1)

jericho4.0 (565125) | about 9 years ago | (#12230356)

Correct. That's why the US has things almost, but not entirely unlike "beer", "chocolate", "bread" and "freedom".

Re:Real Beer has no rice (4, Informative)

Guido von Guido (548827) | about 9 years ago | (#12230912)

How did this get modded informative? First, even the Germans make plenty of wheat beer. Last I checked, malted wheat ain't barley.

Second, the quality of the finished product has little to do with whether or not the brewer uses rice, corn or potatoes. Budweiser sucks because they use less malt and hops than in a traditional pilsner, and because they go to extraordinary efforts to remove whatever flavor they do add to the beer.

For that matter, I've had some excellent beers made with all three of your verboten grains (yes, including potatoes), and some of the best beers in the world are made with added sugar.

For an example of a classic beer made with corn, check out the Classic American Pilsner [brewingtechniques.com]. This is a style of beer brewed in America before Prohibition, and which was revived in large part through the efforts of homebrewer Jeff Renner. Unfortunately, it is true that there aren't any good commercial examples.

Another Misleading Story... (5, Informative)

tOaOMiB (847361) | about 9 years ago | (#12226059)

Please do note that this is not a story about Budweiser not using GMO. In fact, there is nothing that says they are even against GM rice--just rice being modified to produce drugs grow outside, where it can potentially crosspollinate with rice meant for consumption. While the summary states that Anheuser-Busch "will not buy rice from Missouri if genetically modified crops are allowed in the state," the article clearly states they "won't buy rice from Missouri if genetically modified, drug-making crops are allowed to be grown in the state."

The trolling summary then continues on with links to the popularity of Bud and the uprising Tsing Tao for no obvious reason.

This decision on GM rice says a lot about.... (4, Interesting)

scupper (687418) | about 9 years ago | (#12226067)

what Anheuser-Busch thinks of it's customers, about who they see as their potential new customers, and how they approach advertising to them.

They are fearful, not of the average white american's reaction to GM rice, but of the reaction from Hispanics, who are coming from agrarian cultures, and are doubly suspicious of any gm agri products, especially corn and rice.

Hispanics also represent the fastest growing group of drinkers of "Bud".

Re:This decision on GM rice says a lot about.... (1)

DaveJay (133437) | about 9 years ago | (#12226465)

Wow. Different people have several different theories about why Budweiser would take this step -- all of them reasonable.

With that many reasons presented by laypeople off the top of their heads, their more informed position should come as no surprise.

genetically modified rice (4, Funny)

wertarbyte (811674) | about 9 years ago | (#12226154)

I don't know which scenario is scarier: modified rice, or rice in a beer!?

Re:genetically modified rice (1)

shawb (16347) | about 9 years ago | (#12226586)

I know of a few people who are fans of tsing tao [tsingtaobeer.com], but I personally think it tastes quite rank.

WW2 (1)

Drunken_Jackass (325938) | about 9 years ago | (#12226780)

Big US breweries switched to using rice in their mash during WW2 to appeal to the predominately female population and because of grain rationing. When the war ended, they found it was cheaper just to continue to use rice.

The microbrew craze a while back has become popular almost soley due to the fact that they're using "traditional" ingredients like malt to make a more robust tasting beer - like we used to drink.

Re:genetically modified rice (1)

ikkonoishi (674762) | about 9 years ago | (#12227181)

The Asians seem to like it.

Its called sake (Sah-kee). Pretty strong stuff for the most part.

http://www.sake-world.com/html/rice.html [sake-world.com]

Re:genetically modified rice (1)

tengwar (600847) | about 9 years ago | (#12227973)

No, that's much more like a wine, and it's served hot.

Re:genetically modified rice (1)

T-Ranger (10520) | about 9 years ago | (#12228401)

It is called "rice wine" but that is incorrect.

Wine is fermented fruit juice. Apple wine, peach wine, grape wine.

Beer is fermented grain.

If you take you beer and distal it, you get whisky.

Rice is a grain. Thus, fermented rice is beer.

Re:genetically modified rice (1)

tengwar (600847) | about 9 years ago | (#12231376)

hokay, if you want to be pedantic - (a) I said it was like wine; (b) beer has hops in it, you're thinking of ale; (c) "wine" comes from a Latin root which only covers grapes, not other fruits.

Now go and compare sake and a rice "beer" and you'll see that they are very different drinks.

Re:genetically modified rice (1)

gotih (167327) | about 9 years ago | (#12231384)

my favorite [gekkeikan-sake.com] sake (because i can find it for $4 a bottle) is best at room temperature. there are many variaties of sake which are best cold. point is, careful with that microwave. you might ruin a sake by warming it.

Re:genetically modified rice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12230595)

I may by wrong on the brand, but I think that one of the reasons that Pabst Blue Ribbon (PBR) lost most of it's market share what that the company was taken over by bean counters. The accountant types decided to reduce the wheat and increase the rice in the beer because it was cheaper and increased their profit margin. It ended up tasting like camel piss, so they went from being a strong brand to an also ran. I didn't know that Bud had rice in it, but I'm not suprised becasue I hate Bud. I have literally had a soft drink rather then a Bud. Ick.

Since when is rice in real beer (1)

mosabua (534503) | about 9 years ago | (#12226723)

Geez ... another reason not to drink Budweiser so called beer. I still prefer real beer brewed following the Reinheitsgebot [wikipedia.org]. No other stuff ... certainly not rice. If you wanna use rice.. call it something else.

Re:Since when is rice in real beer (1)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | about 9 years ago | (#12227192)

Rice is in LOTS of beer, not just Bud. In fact, it's in MOST beer...

Re:Since when is rice in real beer (1)

ianmakesbeer (846785) | about 9 years ago | (#12227303)

Bullpuckey. Rice is not in MOST beer. /grad student, brewing lab.

Re:Since when is rice in real beer (1)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | about 9 years ago | (#12227410)

Bullpuckey. Rice is not in MOST beer. /grad student, brewing lab.

Well, that's your story. But it does not jive with Google on the subject.

Re:Since when is rice in real beer (1)

ianmakesbeer (846785) | about 9 years ago | (#12228694)

... and Google is the penultimate reference for anything and everything?

It all depends on how you ask the question: if you ask "What adjunct is used in the most beer, volumetrically?" Its rice, due to Anheuser Busch, the world's largest brewer.

If, however, you ask "Which adjunct is most commonly used in brewing?" you would get a different answer.

OR, if you ask "Out of all the different beer brands produced in the world, how many use rice as an adjunct?" Answer, not that many. This last phrasing weighs Budweiser the same as Widmer Hef, for example, which I believe is at the heart of the question in hand. In other words, the number of macrobrew brands is less than the number of craft/microbrew brands, which use virtually no adjuncts other than wheat.

Stewart, Graham G. "Adjuncts" Handbook of Brewing, edited by William A. Hardwick. New York, NY. Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1995: "Rice is the second most common adjunct used in brewing..."

The first, you ask? Corn.

Re:Since when is rice in real beer (1)

cswingle (24562) | about 9 years ago | (#12227499)

American beer is traditionally brewed with 6-row barley instead of the 2-row that is used in Britian. 6-row barley has much higher protein content, which makes it very good at converting other grains into sugars that the yeast turn into alcohol and CO2. Protein also contributes to haziness and stability problems. So the traditional American brewer would use adjuncts (non-barley grains) to help lower the protein content of the beer, allowing it to last longer and be clearer. Corn is more typical as an adjunct, especially traditionally, but there's nothing wrong with brewing beer with other grains. In fact, if you're brewing with American 6-row barley, you're probably better off with some adjuncts.

That being said, I can't remember the last time I had a Budweiser. Why bother when I can brew something better on my own, and there are craft breweries all over the world making better beer than Budweiser.

Chris Swingley
Brewer

Chinese vs. American consumption (1)

Noah Adler (627206) | about 9 years ago | (#12227825)

It's true that there are over four times as many Chinese people as Americans; however, please bear in mind that the average American is over five times more massive than the average Chinese (even more if you don't grant them Yao's contribution!), and it logically follows that we consume more beer.

Of course, me being the sympathetic soul that I am, I try to do my part to level the playing field for our Chinese friends by not drinking Budweiser.

Re:Chinese vs. American consumption (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 9 years ago | (#12231452)

As I know, Chinese people are not overweight because of their lifestyle diet. Or more over, they do not over eat.

I'm curious though; as China becomes more modern and western-like in the next few generations, I wonder if we will start seeing a lot more fat and overweight Chinese.

It would seem that all developed nations end up having a health regarding weight problems. I suppose cheap food leads to gluttony. Just a thought...

Budwiser (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | about 9 years ago | (#12228071)

Maybe their ad agency balked at having to rewrite for their new motto:

"We use only the finest barrley mall*t, ryce*, hopps*, yeest*, and water."

Since... (1, Insightful)

Louse (610514) | about 9 years ago | (#12228352)

GMO = sick.sick.sick. natural foods/meats and their cultivation are the keystones to human-thought evolution. Modifying them isnt part of cultivation, it's bastardizing an organism's growth process for profit. Plants/animals function in periods of seasons, and to try and alter that effects the nature of the plants ability to mature - which can deminish the amount of nutrients in the organism, and its consumer.

Re:Since... (2, Insightful)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | about 9 years ago | (#12228583)

natural foods/meats and their cultivation are the keystones to human-thought evolution.
Are they? I've been eating processed foods all my life and I can still think. On the other hand I haven't evolved recently so maybe you have a point.
Modifying them isnt part of cultivation
That's an uninteresting semantic quibble.
it's bastardizing an organism's growth process
Emotional language like this suggests you've retired your ability to actually think.
for profit.
What does that have to do with it? Why do you think people sell organic foods or work on organic farms? For love? Actually, it's for profit.
Plants/animals function in periods of seasons
Eh? Do you know any biology.
and to try and alter
"Try and". That's horrible writing.
that effects
Affects, affects, affects.
the nature of the plants ability to mature - which can deminish the amount of nutrients in the organism,
Do you have a citation to a paper you can post to back up your claims.
and its consumer.
Well, if you're not eating GMO foods I suggest you examine your diet closely to find out what's inhibiting your thought-evolution.

Simple (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12228482)

Real men drink only Real beer, not some suped up, GMO'd, fancy-pants lab engineered, hyper-modern Monsonto @!$#%. PERIOD

Two points. (1)

SA Stevens (862201) | about 9 years ago | (#12228813)

1. Beer should not contain rice.

2. It's debatable wether Budweiser is beer in the first place.

Re:Two points. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12230614)

I live in LA and I happened to drive by the Bud plant in the San Fernando valley this weekend. I couldn't help but think "Where are the camels and where do they put the camel shit?" Clearly Bud is not beer, it's camel piss.

Fear Of a Scare Campaign (1)

John Hasler (414242) | about 9 years ago | (#12229075)

> I'm not sure what they're afraid of from
> genetically modified rice.

They are afraid that the anti-GM loons will launch a scare campaign about how drinking Bud will cause your kids to have three eyes.

who gives a sh!t it has alcohol (1)

schematix (533634) | about 9 years ago | (#12229294)

I can't stand people who say bud/bud light/<insert american beer name here> doesn't taste like beer. Please realize that taste is subjective. Most people that I have met do not like the taste of beer and thus bud/bud light is a great choice for them when they do drink beer. It is also a good beer when you just want to drink a large quantity because it is not nearly as heavy as most "good" beers. Personally I am a fan of some American beers such as Sierra Nevada Pale Ale and Samual Adams Boston Lager. Both of those have significantly more taste than any A/B product but many people find them to taste putrid. Great! More for me!

Budweiser Vetos Genetically Modified Rice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12229554)

beer made from rice ..... YUKKKKKKKK

obviously... (1)

NaturePhotog (317732) | about 9 years ago | (#12230281)

Obviously, AB is worried that cross-pollination will occur in to rice used for Budweiser. Once the cross-pollination occurs, mutations will take place, causing Budweiser drinkers' IQs to double, making them too smart to drink swill like that :-)

Uhm, Rice, Excuse Me?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12231545)

So, what does a beer company need rice for? Hops, yeast, water, barley, that is what I expect in a beer. I do understand that beer is made of rice in regions where there is mostly rice instead of other crops, for practical, historical and cultural reasons.

What can we expect as upcoming news? "Budweiser Vetos Genetically Modified Mice?" Uggh..
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