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Minority Report UI For The Military

Zonk posted more than 9 years ago | from the at-least-some-good-will-come-from-that-movie dept.

Input Devices 227

merryprankster writes "New Scientist is reporting that a 'Minority Report' style interface is being developed by defense company Raytheon. Users don a pair of reflective gloves and manipulate images projected on a panoramic screen. A mounted camera keeps track of hand movements and a computer interprets gestures. Raytheon has even employed John Underkoffler, the researcher who proposed the interface to the makers of the film. Now just wait till Billboards start scanning your iris."

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First POST First POST First POST First POST First (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252052)

Always wanted to do that,,,,

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252053)

yayyayayayayayayay
yay

FIRST POST (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252056)

FIRST POST

pr0n (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252058)

i wonder what viewing porn will be like with these new gloves.

Re:pr0n (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252105)

well you now have some 'gestures' to work with when using lavalife...

Re:pr0n (3, Funny)

John Seminal (698722) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252146)

i wonder what viewing porn will be like with these new gloves

You would not view porn. It would become more interactive. You would hump a wall.

I just hope sex does not turn into "Demolition Man".

Lenina: "Would you like to have sex?"
John Spartan: "Oh yes!"
Lenina: "Put this on"
John Spartan: "What's that? And where does it go?"

BTW, anyone ever figure out how the three shells work?

Re:pr0n (5, Funny)

mboverload (657893) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252230)

Hard to watch porn when it keeps going up and down in the playlist.

Re:pr0n (3, Funny)

slittle (4150) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252367)

That's one hell of a "boss button" - just like real life.. when you're about to get caught, grab the pr0n and throw it as far away as possible/under something else.

Or.. *waves hand* this isn't teh pr0n you're looking for. err, I mean.. *waves* Hi boss! Yep, just checking these figures here, see? No problem.

Yes, but (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252061)

When will it carve wooden balls?

Re:Yes, but (5, Funny)

IronChefMorimoto (691038) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252306)

I'd be more interested in whose names will be on the balls...

[soldier at facility] "Alert the president. We have a black ball. It's the Ayatollah. He'll want to handle this one personally. Get the spider hole team ready. We leave in 5. We'll stay for 5 too."

[2nd solider] "Sir! We have another ball -- red. It appears that North Korea is tipping on its Axis of Evil."

[1st soldier] "You can ignore that one. We always do. A nutjob with nukes isn't nearly as scary as these dictatorial types with oil."

IronChefMorimoto

Re:Yes, but (2, Informative)

LionKimbro (200000) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252372)

When it get's attached to this. [epiloglaser.com]

BORING (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252064)

I thought it was going to be an interface consisting of three psychic kids in tanks making all your decisions before you. That would be much more useful.

Re:BORING (5, Funny)

John Seminal (698722) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252104)

I thought it was going to be an interface consisting of three psychic kids in tanks making all your decisions before you. That would be much more useful.

They would do a better job than Bush. Hell, three not-so-psychic kids would do a better job than Bush.

Re:BORING (2, Funny)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252141)

somebody call a fucking WAAAAAAAmbulance

Re:BORING (1)

FredThompson (183335) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252148)

BORING is right. How original. At least you could have worked in a comment about "a Beowulf cluster of these"...

BORING-Keyboard Katastrophy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252177)

"I thought it was going to be an interface consisting of three psychic kids in tanks making all your decisions before you. That would be much more useful."

I predict you will have a terrible typing accident, that'll leave us scared for life.

Wow - this technology is so new.... (4, Informative)

tonsofpcs (687961) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252067)

It has been being done for years by the film and video industry, albeit mainly not in realtime, but such places as the Liberty Science Center [lsc.org] had interactive games that used contrasting colors to determine what the player was doing [they had basketball for sometime where you wore either a chroma-blue or chroma-green glove]

Re:Wow - this technology is so new.... (3, Interesting)

LnxAddct (679316) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252142)

Wouldn't it be easier to just put 5 little transmitters on the tips of the fingers and triangulate all fingers. It'd be much more accurate and have much less noise in the data. Some may argue that itd be too battery intensive, but there could be two solutions. A) The transmitters would be very low power because the distance needed wouldn't be very much and no intense processing would be needed on their part, they just have to send out some unique signal with time data. I know bluetooth devices now (PDAs and CellPhones) use bluetooth for hours without recharging in addition to full color screens and running a processor. This would just need the transmitter so a battery could last a very long time in addition to the distance being very short. B) Just use some kind of highly sensitive rfid technology so the gloves are "self powering" (not sure if the tech is at that stage yet).
Regards,
Steve

Mod Parent Up (1)

RGTAsheron (844946) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252171)

Seems like a good idea. I'd like to see a response from someone whom works with mo. cap. :)

Re:Wow - this technology is so new.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252282)

why not.. \booming-voice{ RFID! }

Re:Wow - this technology is so new.... (2, Insightful)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252369)

The shape of your hand and, thus, how it interacts with things, can't be determined with just the positions of your finger tips.

For example, notice you can independently bend your second and third knuckes. (Counting from the fingertip, that is.) Each possibility leads to a unique shape.

I suspect the least uncomfortable system would be to have latex gloves with unqiuely-colored spots on key areas. Use a binary system with paints that only reflect at specific wavelengths, and create custom CCDs that detect on each of these channels. Reserve one wavelength for "invalid", to increase contrast between valid sensor spots and the rest of the glove.

Re:Wow - this technology is so new.... (1)

tonsofpcs (687961) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252403)

That seems to be similar what this thing [in the article] does, but it uses sets of coded white spots on a black background (glove) [like some 3d image acquisition programs/packages use].

Re:Wow - this technology is so new.... (1)

CSMastermind (847625) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252167)

I played a game like that at the Pittsburgh Science Center in 5th grade (7 1/2 years ago), it was kinda neat you had a green screen behing you and looked at the monitor and you could use you gloves to play realistic basket ball. It was fun then, sounds like the technology is really picking up though, can't wait until I have a better home version of it.

Re:Wow - this technology is so new.... (1)

tonsofpcs (687961) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252185)

Yea, I think thats the same game, I remember you played against someone in some other Science Center somewhere [probably Pittsburgh] to try and get a better score.

Re:Wow - this technology is so new.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252307)


I remember you played
wow you were stalking him way back then too?

Johnny Mnemonic (3, Interesting)

headkase (533448) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252069)

Finally, a good explanation for the data-gloves Reeves used in the movie.

This looks like a great recipe for an accident :/ (3, Funny)

Paris The Pirate (799954) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252073)

I am way too clumsy to be trusted with one of these things. I have visions of my self slipping and dragging everything where it is not supposed to be dragged. Or something. Maybe I just fear change.

Re:This looks like a great recipe for an accident (5, Funny)

michaeldot (751590) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252139)

Then you better try the Apple solution: it will only come with one glove.

Re:This looks like a great recipe for an accident (5, Funny)

AJWM (19027) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252236)

the Apple solution: it will only come with one glove.

Correction: a mitten.

Re:This looks like a great recipe for an accident (2, Funny)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252328)

Specially if you sneeze in the most inappropriate moment.

Thank God (-1, Redundant)

lildogie (54998) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252084)

I thought the 'Minority Report' interface was three psychics in flotation chambers.

Pseudo-VR gloves are SO 21st century.

Re:Thank God (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252107)

Dude, the psychics weren't an INTERFACE, they were the BACK END.

It's a Beowulf cluster of retarded psychic babies. Duh.

Big deal... (-1, Flamebait)

erich.keane (823495) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252085)

Big whoop... a crappy interface based off of an even worse movie staring Tom Cruise. Now, when they get the computer interface from swordfish (yay for writing virus' in CAD!) let me know.

Re:Big deal... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252214)

As much as I like Swordfish, I really dislike the horribly fake computer stuff in it...especially how Hugh Jackman types in code without ever having a prompt......

"virus'" (3, Insightful)

mnemonic_ (164550) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252224)

I've seen a lot of stupid ways of writing the plural form of "virus." A single apostrophe is probably the stupidest.

Re:Big deal... (4, Funny)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252319)

when they get the computer interface from swordfish...

The one that gives you a blowjob while you code?

I hope so. (1)

game kid (805301) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252387)

Now that's one nice, robust computing platform I'd like to leverage.

Of course, one who uses words like robust, platform and leverage will never use that sort of interface. *sigh*

Where do the $5,000 toilet seats go? (2, Interesting)

John Seminal (698722) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252088)

This appears to be wasteful spending. I wonder what congressional district the defense company is located in?

The system under development at Raytheon lets users don a pair of reflective gloves and manipulate images projected on a panoramic screen. A mounted camera keeps track of hand movements and a computer interprets gestures

"Hand gestures, unlike a mouse or pointer, work really well when data is represented on wall-sized displays, for example."

And where in the field will this be used?

Am I the only one who gets scared when I imagine what a room in the pentagon might look like, with Generals wearing special glasses, and moving projected data off walls?

Re:Where do the $5,000 toilet seats go? (2, Insightful)

FredThompson (183335) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252132)

The U.S. military has operated in 3 dimensions since the Civil War.

This might be useful in air combat control. There's got to be a limit to what can be conveyed on a flat computer screen or edge-lit piece of glass.

It might also be useful for detecting patterns in huge amounts of data. You've probably seen images where data is represented by a 3D projection. If you could manipulate the interpretation from inside, maybe you could see patterns more readily than from a fixed viewing point outside the system.

Besides, think of how fun it would be to play Populous with one of these and really "shoot" lightning bolts out of your fingers.

Pretty dangerous if you pick your nose or scratch your crotch, though, don't you think?

Re:Where do the $5,000 toilet seats go? (2, Funny)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252346)

Pretty dangerous if you pick your nose or scratch your crotch, though, don't you think?

So it's an interface for third base coaches?

the government hides spending better than that (4, Funny)

mnemonic_ (164550) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252218)

I wonder what congressional district the defense company is located in?

Raytheon has facilities in almost every state. They merged with Hughes a while back, and manufacture a wide variety of defense equipment, especially in the aerospace sector.

And where in the field will this be used?

The article says, in the field of satellite reconnaissance imagery. It'd be like using a mouse, except you can move more than one screen object at once with the fluidity of every day hand motions. Far more efficient.

Am I the only one who gets scared when I imagine what a room in the pentagon might look like, with Generals wearing special glasses, and moving projected data off walls?

Probably. Most men are made of sterner stuff.

Re:Where do the $5,000 toilet seats go? (5, Insightful)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252226)

This appears to be wasteful spending.

Someone probably said the same thing about ARPANET.

I wonder what congressional district the defense company is located in?

Edward J. Markey [house.gov] (Ranking Democrat on the Telecommunications and Internet subcommittee)

Raytheon is based in Waltham, Massachussetts, but they have offices everywhere. Canada, Japan, Oz...
And they are Linux friendly. [prnewswire.com]

And where in the field will this be used?
One use might be a virtual sand table. Not everything the military does is 'in the field'.

Am I the only one who gets scared when I imagine what a room in the pentagon might look like, with Generals wearing special glasses, and moving projected data off walls?

Probably.
Generals don't move data. They direct Col's and Majors to do that.

More than a defence contractor (5, Informative)

9mm Censor (705379) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252097)

Raytheon is more than a defence contractor. They make alot of commercial electronics, including alot of marine equipment such as radar and radios.

Re:More than a defence contractor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252111)

ok the article says Raytheon is a defense company. Whats your point ?

Re:More than a defence contractor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252363)

so people don't yell out "OMG TEH WASTE OF MONIES!"

p.s. dont use caps, lameness filter blah blah

imagine the "training aid" (3, Funny)

FredThompson (183335) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252098)

A buddy of mine used to defend Windows Solitaire while in the Navy by claiming it was a clever interface training aid. That worked on every senior officer who complained about "playing games."

What "training aid" will ship with these gloves? Virtual handball?

Ooohhh...VirtualBoy on steroids!!

Re:imagine the "training aid" (1)

Soko (17987) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252233)

What "training aid" will ship with these gloves? Virtual handball?

Well, since the 'net runs on pr0n...

Soko

Re:imagine the "training aid" (1)

Mahou (873114) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252383)

hopefully some kind of jedi academy game.
finally a possible interface to use the force!

Don't worry... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252102)

... personalised billboards will also be here soon, thanks to RFID in practically everything.

pure satisfaction (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252113)

few things can describe the feeling I get when an adblock line goes from:

http://ilinks.industrybrains.com/Search/GetResults _Html.asp?AffiliateID=107&Adult=0&Business=1&Consu mer=1&Results=5&Layout=1&Search=107IBIndustryTarge t=Slashdot_Games

to:
http://*industrybrains.com*

/shivers

Has potential (that's being wasted) (4, Insightful)

menace3society (768451) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252115)

The advantage of using gloves is not to get a more intuitive, 3-D version of the mouse. The advantage to gloves is that you can have more than one (or two) pointers on a screen. Imagine using photoshop or some other editing software, and, instead of having to mouse around or hit keys to change tools, you just contracted a different finger. Touch typing is much faster than hunt-and-peck; why shouldn't the same be the case for graphical interfaces?

Because it is exhausting (5, Insightful)

brunes69 (86786) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252145)

There is a reason none of these VR interfaces never go anywhere. The human body is not designed to hold it's arms suspended in mid-air for extende dperiods of time.

Try it yourself - stick your hands in front of the monitor, a bit below level with your shoulders. Feel free to move them around as if you are "manipulating".

Now, see how long you can hold them up there before your shoulders give out.

Now compare that to how long you can use a keyboard and mouse in one session.

It is not even in the same ballpark.

Re:Because it is exhausting (2, Interesting)

AJWM (19027) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252265)

I'd mod you up insightful but I've already commented here.

That was exactly my first thought -- waving your arms around is bloody tiring. Heck, I like to have my mouse tracking set so I can pretty much move the cursor from one side of the screen to the other by just flexing my fingers, the heel of my palm pretty much rests in one spot (and in a different spot when using the keyboard).

Re:Because it is exhausting (2, Insightful)

Xzzy (111297) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252289)

Given the sedentry lifestyles we live today, I'd think getting tired using a computer is good, both in the sense it burns a few more calories, and discourages extended periods of usage.

Re:Because it is exhausting (3, Insightful)

Tlosk (761023) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252311)

It is and it isn't. Anytime you try doing some physical activity you are unaccustomed to there will be an adaptation period where you experience fatigue and soreness. Once your muscles have adapted though you hardly notice it at all.

If you never take the stairs, try walking down 8 or 10 flights of stairs, the next day your calves will be thrashed, but if you do it every day you won't even notice it a bit.

Or try mixing concrete by hand, uber hard labor if it's not something you're used to, but run of the mill for people that do it regularly.

Holding your hands in the air isn't exactly hard labor lol, although I suspect we'd also do it standing just like they did in the movies, the kinematics of moving your arms and hands is very different standing than it is sitting.

Re:Because it is exhausting (1)

rpresser (610529) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252371)

Ideally, not everything you do with a computer needs to be directed by your hands or gestures. Give the computer a decent head-direciton and eyeball-direction-watching ability, and some decent voice recognition. 90% of my interaction with people is through voice; I only resort to my hands when words are insufficient or too slow. Why shouldn't I direct a computer the same way?

Re:Because it is exhausting (1)

Tlosk (761023) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252384)

Oh don't get me wrong, I also think this control method stinks and will never go anywhere, but it will be for the reasons you just mentioned, not because it's too tiring. I could see it maybe in some highly specialized settings with a custom UI for the job, but it will never gain any traction as a general interface.

Re:Because it is exhausting (3, Interesting)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252407)

In each of your examples, the muscles involved get a chance at rest.

Holding your arms out continually puts some muscles under constant tension. No muscle in the human body was designed for that kind of punishment; Even the heart muscles, composed of the only muscle tissue that doesn't get tired, get rest periods every beat.

Do they also replicate the part of the interface.. (4, Funny)

brunes69 (86786) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252117)

.. where to copy a file from one side of the room to the other, they essentially use a ***giant floppy disk***? Sure, it was a cool floppy disk, with live action video playing on it, but still... its a floppy disk.

You'd have thunk that by the time they had perfected 3D holography and VR manipulation, they could at least have kept up with some high-capacity networking. I guess not - floppys are the future!

Re:Do they also replicate the part of the interfac (3, Insightful)

flonker (526111) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252247)

Perhaps it was a security measure. An air gap, if you will. (Not to be confused with the "air gap firewall" marketing BS. [whalecommunications.com] )

Jim Allchin: "That'll be in Longhorn too." (4, Funny)

michaeldot (751590) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252118)

Tomorrow's news today: Microsoft invites bloggers with high readership to dinner. Shows them previews of Minority Report style interface. Bloggers write gushing reports about it.

Gorilla arms. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252122)

This will not be a technology with mass appeal, for the same reason as the light pen fad of the 1980s went nowhere: Humans just don't like holding their arms extended in front of them for long periods, it is very uncomfortable.

I have a (cool) Wacom Cintiq tablet, and, in contrast, it is completely bearable and even comfortable because it is (almost) horizontal when I use it. If I had to use it vertically like a 1980s home light-pen system for a C64 (which I am old enough to have used briefly...), my arms would be in constant pain by now.

Re:Gorilla arms. (1)

FredThompson (183335) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252182)

Girly-man! Pump iron!!! ...and eat your spinach.

Popeye wouldn't have a problem with this.

Re:Gorilla arms. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252397)

popeye had huge forearms... so if he shouldn't have a problem neither should slashdotters
ba dum psh

Coming up next (1, Funny)

secolactico (519805) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252123)

Good. Now that they have that resolved, they can focus on the really important tech: "Sick Sticks".

Re:Coming up next (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252181)

No need for fancy tech for those. Just wrap a pic of goatse or tubgirl around a baton and have a button that instantly unfurls it. Same effect for a lot less money.

I'm Impressed (4, Interesting)

Effugas (2378) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252129)

In tech, we often find ourselves referring to the Hollywood Operating System. You know, the one where every key press makes a "click" sound, and passwords are cracked one character at a time (admittedly, something that actually worked against Windows 9x file shares).

I was actually impressed with the UI in Minority Report. I'm not saying it was necessarily perfect, but it wasn't obviously ridiculous either. There is a need to monitor information flows across many different sources, to simultaneously sense them, and to have the ability to integrate on demand. A large display with linkable data nodes is one approach that deserves further analysis.

Re:I'm Impressed (1)

porp (24384) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252249)

From my understanding, watching interviews and the special features on the _Minority Report_ DVD, Spielberg and Co really sat down with a group of pretty smart individuals to realistically futurize a not to distant world.

I really found that the images/technology the filmmakers collaborated on and, ultimately, created seems feasible, eventual, and very futuristic--granted, it's one of my favorite movies from the past 5 years.

porp

I'm Impressed-Graphical Grease. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252322)

http://www.crg.cs.nott.ac.uk/research/applications /pits/ [nott.ac.uk]

"We refer to the generated visualizations as Populated Information Terrains (PITS) to reflect the the fact that a key feature of this work is that these visualizations are intended to be multi-user applications in which the users are explicity embodied in the virtual environment and are thus visible to each other."

http://www.aalab.net/projects/maps/ [aalab.net]

"

The Map Is The Territory

visualizing on-line communities "

Re:I'm Impressed (2, Insightful)

WhatsAProGingrass (726851) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252347)

Yeah, but if you watch carefully, they still need to transfer data onto a disk to get information from one computer 5ft away from the other computer. Blows my mind why they just can't do it wirelessly, or even have the computer's hard wired, they are so close.

Re:I'm Impressed (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252404)

In tech, we often find ourselves referring to the Hollywood Operating System. You know, the one where every key press makes a "click" sound

I use a Model M you insensitive clod!

Interesting, but misguided (3, Interesting)

MyIS (834233) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252140)

I see this as being pretty exhausting after prolonged use. Perhaps if minute hand movements were translated into large gestures on the big screen... but that's what a conventional mouse does. I think the most revolutionary part would be to make "drag-drop" thing a lot more physical, i.e. add small amounts of inertia to dragged objects. Also, Google for the copy-paste pen device - really nifty stuff.

Re:Interesting, but misguided (1)

michaeldot (751590) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252161)

True. But it is for the military, so maybe it could be part of a fitness regime as well.

Are you crazy? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252152)

I get so lazy sometimes, that instead of leaning all the way up to the keyboard, I copy and paste letters to spell out words with the mouse, and you want me to USE MY ARMS!?!?!!?!!?

I'll need to down a bottle of water just to get my computer out of sleep mode.

Gestures are a gateway interface :)

Re:Are you crazy? (1)

sbillard (568017) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252293)

Is this a joke?
I'm not sure becasue I recently met someone like you, or the person you claim to be.
He would drag out a word and paste it somewhere else instead of typing.
Made me tear my hair out.

There are 101+ keys on the board. Why do you need two more that roll around?

Just tap it out. tappa tappa tappa

getting there... (1, Interesting)

x_codingmonkey_x (839141) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252160)

...but I believe that in Minority Report they were using OLEDs [wikipedia.org] ie no projector. Wake me up when they have OLEDs in mass production, that is a lot more interesting.

for the curious (3, Informative)

same_old_story (833424) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252166)

John Underkoffler came from MIT's tangible media group [mit.edu]

Yeah, but... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252209)

It's all wonderfully productive until some bozo offers to shake your hand while you're busy working, and you brush all your work off the screen.

I thought they called this (1)

Daedalus_ (38808) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252211)

the Nintendo Power Glove?

The UI wasn't invented in Minority Report (1)

evilmeow (839786) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252220)

The original credit belongs to TV series "Earth Final Conflict". The UI was used to pilot Taelon shuttles.

Interface (4, Interesting)

sbillard (568017) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252222)

Push/Pull
Slide/Spin/Twist
Grab/Grip/Grok/Associate
Wipe/Toss
...So many more distinct gestures/commands are possilbe.
I read a lot of Phillip K Dick and the interface portrayed in Minority Report was wonderfull.... not the goop-pool..... I'm refering to the the big screen Tom Cruise manipulated.... the goop-pool interface is the opposite extreme.
Nice story...original author highly recommended.

it makes me wonder. Which side are you on?

Hoppy Harrington says "Hi"gher

The Gumby Interface (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252396)

"Push/Pull
Slide/Spin/Twist
Grab/Grip/Grok/Assoc iate
Wipe/Toss"

Also known as the chiropractor's best friend.

Seems like an awfully inefficient UI (1)

sector (5159) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252238)

I didn't RTFA but...

The UI was one of the things I disliked most about 'Minority Report'. Seems to me it's a very inefficient interface...requiring large arm-waving motions to do menial tasks like moving windows. It makes for good Hollywood visuals but I can't imagine myself using something like this in a daily computing environment. On the other hand, maybe this is one way to make lazy programmers exercise.

On the surface, one of the apparent benefits of the Minority Report UI is it seems somewhat faster than today's mouse-driven interfaces. But given that the M.R. world has advanced retina scanning technology, why not design a UI around pupil-tracking? I can glance at a window much faster than I can point to it.

Re:Seems like an awfully inefficient UI (2, Insightful)

Planesdragon (210349) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252301)

Seems to me it's a very inefficient interface...requiring large arm-waving motions to do menial tasks like moving windows

it is. But it wasn't designed to be a computer UI. It was designed to work with the thought-process of the user.

Have you ever stood up and walked to think? Ever wanted to guesture and put something on the wall?

It's a useful technology. Not one that you'd use next to your keyboard, but one that you'd use to direct a media stream or command a hundred distinct fire-teams.

Re:Seems like an awfully inefficient UI (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252318)

your computer doesn't also have a 70+" monitor that requires you to stand up in front of it.

retina scanning is nice. but how will you tell it that you would like to drag a window into main focus? maybe the user wants to use a small subscreen as a guide for the main screen. or if the user wants to highlight a screen but apply some type of filter on it (whereas a user can apply a type of filter on it by tapping with a pinking while moving a window).

Re:Seems like an awfully inefficient UI (3, Insightful)

Frumious Wombat (845680) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252364)

It has the advantage of scale. Moving macroscopic windows about on a desktop-sized screen, with many of them located in your peripheral vision, helps with your thought process. The movements, while not ideal for typing, are also normal, daily, real-world-sized motions, which don't requires as much of a mental shift. Since you're not trying to adapt to the unnatural one hand, 1-2 finger (depending on how many buttons your mouse has) interface, and can move freely, you're spending less energy adapting yourself to the environment, and have more mental power available for thinking.

We were just playing around years ago with a stereo wall, and I found that data was easier to visualize, and the gyromouse interface was more natural than a puck on a desk. On the other hand, this was still only one handed, and there are times that you wanted to be able to use the other hand for more operations.

The average office-drone isn't going to have this technology, but architects, doctors, scientists, etc, will take to it once the space/price issues for the screens get solved.

Accuracy? (2, Interesting)

LordoftheFrings (570171) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252241)

I wonder how accurate this would be. Would it even be really useful for first person shooters that require pinpoint precision? I would say no, but then again, I'm somehow fairly accurate with a mouse, so my hands can be accurate with training. I'm not sure about the whole arm bit though.

Also.. (2, Interesting)

pherthyl (445706) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252242)

Have a look at HandVu [ucsb.edu] for something that works right now.

I was planning on writing something similar to this (actually, very similar, same libraries and everything) but now may just build on top of the HandVu libraries instead.

To Quote Mr. Cranky... (2, Funny)

Knnniggit (800801) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252257)

After reading this, Mr. Cranky's review [mrcranky.com] of Minority Report stands out in my mind. "After the balls roll out of the ramp, Anderton stands in front of a huge screen with his hands up in the air and attempts to masturbate imaginary pigeons. (Okay, I get what he's doing, but the idea that operating a computer 52 years from now will be something akin to air Kung Fu seems excessively stupid.)" ^^^^^ What he said.

Cool now my carpal tunnel will move to my shoulder (3, Funny)

bxbaser (252102) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252291)

eom

So what happens when... (1)

Crash McBang (551190) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252305)

...the NCO waving his arms (no general in his right mind is gonna use this, he's gonna sit in a chair and use a laser pointer to tell the NCO what to do) has to scratch his butt?

Learn Your Eye Parts (1)

skeg (661847) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252310)

I think it's retna scan, not iris scan.

weehooooooo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252330)

Beiderbecke78@aol.com

this is an awesome website

where do i sign up?

blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah zxcv!

Re:weehooooooo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252357)

Beiderbecke78@aol.com [mailto] heheheh xcvb

OS on the screen (1)

MacTaranis (792055) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252335)

Am I the only one to notice that they are using Mac OS X? I if look in the picture, the window containing the satellite photo, is defiantly from Mac OS X.

Scarily, the pre-cogs could go several ways... (-1, Offtopic)

IronChefMorimoto (691038) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252338)

...depending on who's in the White House.

In one scenario, Condoleeza Rice, Dick Cheney, and Don Rumsfeld lie in the pool predicting dictatorial takedowns for "freedom."

If Dems win in 2008, then it could be a whole other affair, with Joe Lieberman and 2 Hollywood actors predicting and preventing right wing conspiracies for 4 years.

Until Jeb Bush manages to drown the Hillary Clinton staffer in the Everglades and confuse the pre-cogs into thinking it was Bill Clinton in a fit of horny misbehavior.

IronChefMorimoto

The one gesture that is going to be important... (1)

madscience (157828) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252362)

I'm all for this as a means of data manipulation, as long as they map the middle finger to ctrl-alt-del.

Several different uses (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12252370)

pr0n, of course. But submarine simulators and fighter jet simulators will be awesome. Memorizing keyboard mappings will be a thing of the past. There's a thousand different uses for this, above and beyone what Nintendo tried to do with the Powerglove (more lik powerflop, am i rite?).

Organic chemistry isomers and you'll have people with their own portable mini projectors to flip molecules around and stuff.

I can see where medical school students could use it for anatomy and pathology.

Pretty cool once it starts working well.

But the irises are already obsolete (1)

isdnip (49656) | more than 9 years ago | (#12252402)

I agree with many other commenters that the hand-wavey interface makes better cinema than UI. I'd find it tiring too, and besides, if I want to scratch an itch on my body or something, I wouldn't want the computer to delete files or something. Being able to lose contact with the computer is handy.

But the comment about iris-reading billboards reminds me of what really scares me. That was a clever fictional technique in its day, but who needs it when there's RFID? You have a chip in your clothes, wallet, sneakers, EasyPass, SpeedPass, passport, or under your skin, and anybody can read who you are without the relatiavely tricky effort of reading irises. Big Brother's then able to find you, even if it turns out to be the same "personalized advertising" provider that reads the web cookies. (And has a feed into federal, state and local police.)

And remembert to turn the aGPS in their cellphone to "911 only"....
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