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419 comments

Worst. Acronym. Ever. (5, Funny)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | about 9 years ago | (#12269817)


From the article:


Military leaders from U.S. Strategic Command, or Stratcom, disclosed the existence of a unit called the Joint Functional Component Command for Network Warfare, or JFCCNW.


"JFCCNW"??? That's a terrible acronym! That's the worst thing I've heard since PCMCIA!

How about something a bit more catchy, like the League of Enduring Electronic Technicians? Or perhaps the Paramilitary Worldwide Network of Electronic Defenders?

Let's help out our country...please post your suggestions for acronyms below.

Re:Worst. Acronym. Ever. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12269898)

How about Worldwide Online Operations Team ?

Re:Worst. Acronym. Ever. (-1, Troll)

Gob Blesh It (847837) | about 9 years ago | (#12269996)

I know what JFC is. What's CNW?
--
perl -e '$??s:;s:s;;$?::s;;=]=>%-{<-|}<&|`{;;y; -/:-@[-`{-};`-{~" -;;s;;$_;see'

Re:Worst. Acronym. Ever. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270080)

I like your sig! :)

JFCCNW (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12269833)

I am involved with this group. Unfortunately, there isn't much else that can be said (or that I can tell you) about it other than it has been around for quite a long time (under different names and acronyms of course) and that I can finally tell people who I work for and what I do.

Re:JFCCNW (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12269962)

loser

Re:JFCCNW (1)

circusboy (580130) | about 9 years ago | (#12269966)

like all those people who couldn't say that they worked for the NSA while they were buying and giving away stuff from the NSA gift shop with a big NSA logo on the side?

Re:JFCCNW (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270183)

That's strange - I just checked the bottom of my "CIA/NRO" coffe mug and it says "Made in China"...

Re:JFCCNW (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12269978)

I seriously doubt that you can tell people who you work for and what you do.

I work for some government agencies in the UK that are well known around the world, and I still can't say who I work for, where I go to work, or what I do here.

To quote from the UK Official Secrets Act:
"you may not disclose details of any protectively marked task on which you have worked, nor identify the project or government department involved".

I can mention that I work on a government project covered by the Official Secrets Act, but that is about the sum of it.

The reason is simply to avoid giving any enemy a "collated order of battle of our scientific manpower".

I would be very surprised to hear that the USofA in the current climate would be less stringent than the UK's old OSA.

Re:JFCCNW (1)

bcmm (768152) | about 9 years ago | (#12270126)

WEll, he probably doesn't really work for them. Besides, he's an AC. They can't tell who he is.

Lets see... Agents from $SOMEWHERE_EVIL discover that at least one member of this team reads Slashdot! Information they could have guessed has leaked into their hands! Some sort of terrorist incident will happen because of it!

Re:JFCCNW (1)

jester22c (613967) | about 9 years ago | (#12270069)

High Five. ...time to brush up my resume Which branch would hire someone interested in this kind of work?

Re:JFCCNW (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270182)

I, too, am involved in JFCCNW. But if I told you more than this, I would have to kill you. Have a nive day.

Another AC chiming in... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270201)

I was involved with this group in the late 90's and I can tell you that without a doubt, this group is far from the uber-elite team of unstoppable intruders that the article makes it out to be. It's pretty much just a group of smart geeks who have legal permission to use tactics that are otherwise considered illegal. Nothing to see here...move along.

Restrictions? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12269844)

I wonder if there will be restrictions on security patches during war-time?

Re:Restrictions? (-1, Flamebait)

rovingeyes (575063) | about 9 years ago | (#12270039)

Ok did you just post that because you had to? Or were you really thinking on a Monday morning? War-time or peace, security holes have to be fixed, of course as long as that company/individual/group is around. You don't just call in sick and not patch it just because its war-time. Heck its war-time right now and I am seeing Microsoft release patches left and right.

On the other hand if you are imaginging an situation like world war, and you are worried about your stupid windows having no patches, then here is a tip - get a life, find a bunker.

Re:Restrictions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270079)

What do you mean by 'will be' ?

Where do i apply? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12269850)

I'm sure they know how to get in contact with me.

Revealing (and scary) line from TFA (4, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about 9 years ago | (#12269852)

"I've got to tell you we spend more time on the computer network attack business than we do on computer network defense because so many people at very high levels are interested," said former CNA commander, Air Force Maj. Gen. John Bradley ...

IOW, folks in the Echelons Beyond Reality love the idea of Matrix-style hacking of an enemy network because it's sexy and cool (even though they probably have no idea what real hacking entails) and aren't interested in the boring old-fashioned business of securing our own networks from attack. Okay, guys, here's a quick quiz: of the following possible combatants, which one has the most to lose in the event of an enemy hacker penetrating its computer security?

a) al-Qaeda
b) China
c) the United States
d) North Korea

Think fast!

Re:Revealing (and scary) line from TFA (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12269895)

Okay, guys, here's a quick quiz: of the following possible combatants, which one has the most to lose in the event of an enemy hacker penetrating its computer security?
a) al-Qaeda


Are you kidding? The Bush administration's attention to details like computer security is EXACTLY why we caught Bin Laden!

Oh, wait.

Re:Revealing (and scary) line from TFA (2, Insightful)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 9 years ago | (#12269911)

Okay, guys, here's a quick quiz: of the following possible combatants, which one has the most to lose in the event of an enemy hacker penetrating its computer security?

a) al-Qaeda
b) China
c) the United States
d) North Korea


Um, I'm going to guess it's not A) al-Qaeda - because they have a truly distributed net and could care less.

Re:Revealing (and scary) line from TFA (1)

Sprotch (832431) | about 9 years ago | (#12269918)

I seriously doubt Al-Quaeda has any IT network as such. Which very possibly explains why they are so deadly: little trace. The other three are probably sufficiently bright enough not to grant access to anything moderately important over the internet. The Pentagone's web servers won't actually allow you to unleash nuclear fire upon Canada, no matter how much we wished it was possible or have seen it in movies. You're far more likely to encounter the sysadmin's porn there.

Re:Revealing (and scary) line from TFA (2, Insightful)

Staplerh (806722) | about 9 years ago | (#12269925)

My exact thoughts on reading the article. This quotation spells out the beliefs of the project leadership:

Verton said the unit's capabilities are highly classified, but he believes they can destroy networks and penetrate enemy computers to steal or manipulate data. He said they may also be able to set loose a worm to take down command-and-control systems so the enemy is unable to communicate and direct ground forces, or fire surface-to-air missiles, for example.

Pure poppycock, IMHO. Most armies infrastructures are old enough that they have backup programs. The idea that a hacker could shut down an entire air-defence grid raises eyebrows, as most likely that air-defence grid was designed before the advent of computer networks - and military leaders are wary of trusting so much equipment.

The best defense (4, Insightful)

wiredog (43288) | about 9 years ago | (#12269963)

is a good offense. Also, if you know how to attack, you also know how to defend.

Re:The best defense (3, Insightful)

gnuman99 (746007) | about 9 years ago | (#12270112)

Yes, it seems this works so well for things like ICBs, cruise missles, bioweapons, etc... I mean, if you know how to attach, you know how to defend?

Ummm, yes (4, Insightful)

wiredog (43288) | about 9 years ago | (#12270250)

If you don't know the characteristics of those things, and how they are use in an attack, then you don't know how to defend against them. And how do gain that knowledge? By building and testing icbm's, cruise missiles, bioweapons, etc.

BTW, the best defense against a cruise missile is a net, placed in the flight path. Of course, first you've got to know the flight path.

Re:Revealing (and scary) line from TFA (2, Insightful)

hkb (777908) | about 9 years ago | (#12269984)

Uhm, all of them do, but al Qaeda to a lesser extent.

I take it you haven't audited any chinese or north korean infrastructure lately, instead opting for the "America is everything" approach.

If you want to play games -- China, arguably, has the most to lose, in terms of both military and industrial attacks.

Re:Revealing (and scary) line from TFA (5, Interesting)

LnxAddct (679316) | about 9 years ago | (#12270051)

Well considering the levels of encryption that al-Qaeda and North Korea use and the number of laptops that are found in many terrorist hiding areas or even in the place where the terrorists responsible for 9/11 resided, I wouldn't scoff at the value of having access to their networks. It is a known fact that terrorists use PGP encryption and it's creator has written a few times about his feelings on this and distributing it for free. In the end he has always, thankfully, decided that freedom for our privacy outweighs any evil intentions that others may have. (That is an extremely rough paraphrase)
Regards,
Steve

Re:Revealing (and scary) line from TFA (4, Insightful)

mestreBimba (449437) | about 9 years ago | (#12270107)

You miss the real threat. The real threat is not in taking down an enemy military's command structure, but in disabling the whole country's infastructure and subsequently crashing the whole economy.

What is the economic impact of hacking a nations power grid and bringing it down? Crashing the process control on oil and other chemical refineries. With the correct techniques you can bring down the power grid, the phone system, cause toxic chemical releases.... the list goes on and on.

In economies where most process control is now digital and the in place protection for such SCADA networks rely on security through obscurity, the ability to bring a nations economy to ruins is not far fetched.....

Think bigger!

Re:Revealing (and scary) line from TFA (1)

Quixote (154172) | about 9 years ago | (#12270140)

I've got to tell you we spend more time on the computer network attack business

How do you attack an adversary that relies on donkeys and handwritten notes for communication?

Re:Revealing (and scary) line from TFA (0)

bcmm (768152) | about 9 years ago | (#12270205)

Al-Qaeda is not an organisation; it's much more likely a loose group of people who have similar beliefs. And if you find a terrorist computer to break into, well, maybe you could do a traceroute and physically confiscate the computer first?

This is probably either propaganda, or aimed at governments or <hat material="tinfoil"> it will be used in some kind of huge conspiracy to damage companies that compete with US interests</hat>.

Script Kiddies in Uniform (3, Informative)

Flywheels of Fire (836557) | about 9 years ago | (#12269864)

From TFA:"There are some tremendous questions being raised about this," said Dietz. "On whether they (JFCCNW) have the legal mandate or the authority to shut these sites down with a defacement or a denial-of-service attack."

According to TFA, the main task of JFCCNW is to bring down websites [mithuro.com] that don't portray America in good light.

It is going to be more of a PR-damage limitation excercise than anything else. And a good way to spend millions of taxpayer money.

Re:Script Kiddies in Uniform (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12269933)

They say truth is the casualty of war. JFetc. is going to ensure that.

Re:Script Kiddies in Uniform (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12269948)

Yeah, that'll show the world how "free speech" works here. Great.

Re:Script Kiddies in Uniform (5, Insightful)

ScentCone (795499) | about 9 years ago | (#12269969)

Script Kiddies in Uniform

I don't think you'd want these people using all of their resources to attack your network. Script kiddies, they're not.

And a good way to spend millions of taxpayer money.

Yup, because the bad guys are doing exactly the same thing. And you'll never have a better bunch of people to work on countering that sort of stuff than the people who have done a stint entirely focused on causing damage elsewhere. Who would you want taking a new job working on infrastructure protection: the kid right out of IT school, or the guy who's been working without any distraction or budget tightwaddedness who's just spent the last two years thinking up every way he can to crack and damage networks, content, databases, and more?

Re:Script Kiddies in Uniform (1)

shreevatsa (845645) | about 9 years ago | (#12269980)

According to TFA, the main task of JFCCNW is to bring down websites that don't portray America in good light.
They could do it more easily, and save some money -- just post it on slashdot, and it gets slashdotted.
Well, maybe the site wasn't any News for Nerds, but you can be sure /. will accept it anyway :)

Re:Script Kiddies in Uniform (1, Informative)

Guano_Jim (157555) | about 9 years ago | (#12270006)

According to TFA, the main task of JFCCNW is to bring down websites that don't portray America in good light.

It is going to be more of a PR-damage limitation excercise than anything else. And a good way to spend millions of taxpayer money.


Until they start going after opposition sites like Daily Kos [dailykos.com] or Eschaton [blogspot.com] because they're critical of the current administration. Collateral damage in the War on Terror, you know.

Don't think it could happen here? GOP Denial of Service attack on New Hampshire Democratic Phone Bank [newsmax.com]

Re:Script Kiddies in Uniform (1)

xiaomonkey (872442) | about 9 years ago | (#12270022)

I'm not sure if this will make problems with script kiddies better or worse (script kiddies being one of the major subpopulations out there that would be attracted to a unit like this).

On the one hand, while in the military, they will be temporarily distracted from trying to "0wn" every Windows 98 box on the net.

However, afterwards, after their service to the military is completed, they might be better trained to cause more substantial damage.

Re:Script Kiddies in Uniform (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270057)

And a good way to spend millions of taxpayer money.

You're damn right it is. In this current world where Al-Jezeera and and mainstream media so openly hostile to the United States and in some cases even rooting for those who would do us harm, this is one good tool in fighting the good fight.

The insurgents are using websites to promoting their jihad, it's our duty to stop their communications and bring down their network.

Slashdot should be cheering this on, as these are hackers and geeks fighting for the US. God Bless them. They are doing their patriotic duty to their country.

Re:Script Kiddies in Uniform (5, Funny)

Quixote (154172) | about 9 years ago | (#12270092)

the main task of JFCCNW is to bring down websites....

... just like Slashdot ;-)

article correction (5, Funny)

Triumph The Insult C (586706) | about 9 years ago | (#12269877)

the article refers to the JFCCNW as being the "... most formibidable hacker posse. Ever."

looks like www.jfccnw.mil is offline ... so maybe the editors need to take anothNO CARRIER

Re:article correction (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270143)

Dang if I can figure out how people hit the "Submit" button after they lose carrier. Must be one of them there elite JFCCNW fellers.

Bring down your enemy (5, Funny)

rob_levine (460241) | about 9 years ago | (#12269887)

Don't tell me - they are going to remotely deploy WinXP Service Pack 2 on the enemy's network?

Masterful...

Let's be honest (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12269891)

They probably just grabbed some kids out of MIT and had them bring down a Anti-Republican site.

I mean God Bless America. That one.

Not anymore... (2, Funny)

zappepcs (820751) | about 9 years ago | (#12269900)

...a super-secret, multimillion-dollar weapons program that may be ready to launch bloodless cyberwar against enemy networks -- from electric grids to telephone nets.

Not anymore

Re:Not anymore... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270091)

you mean slashdot?

wait....

SAMs? (5, Interesting)

lachlan76 (770870) | about 9 years ago | (#12269902)

He said they may also be able to set loose a worm to take down command-and-control systems so the enemy is unable to communicate and direct ground forces, or fire surface-to-air missiles, for example.

These things are connected to the internet?

Re:SAMs? (2, Funny)

Kipsaysso (828105) | about 9 years ago | (#12269973)

Yeah. But they are protected by the Windows Firewall so you can forget getting to them. Those extra security features will stop the terrorists every time.

SAMs? or Coke machines and printers oh my ... (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 9 years ago | (#12269994)

These things are connected to the internet?

No, but their printers are.

You'd be surprised how useful online resources in unexpected places are. Even Coke machines have processors ...

Re:SAMs? or Coke machines and printers oh my ... (4, Funny)

mrseigen (518390) | about 9 years ago | (#12270055)

TERRIST A: "This coke is warm"
TERRIST B: "My morale lies in tatters on the open road, for without the crisp cool taste of Coca Cola I cannot plot these evil acts."

Re:SAMs? or Coke machines and printers oh my ... (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about 9 years ago | (#12270113)

TERRIST B: "My morale lies in tatters on the open road, for without the crisp cool taste of Coca Cola I cannot plot these evil acts."

Ah, but just wait until Intelligent Machines pilot the WMD ...

Missile One: "I was chatting with the Coke machine, and he agreed with the Laser Printer that flying can cause sunburn, and I should consider swimming instead."

Missile Two: "Swimming? Hmm, let's go Swimming to Cambodia!"

Re:SAMs? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270012)

These things are connected to the internet?

Let me see....

Welcome

You've got arms.


Yep!

Re:SAMs? (1)

xv4n (639231) | about 9 years ago | (#12270016)

He said they may also be able to set loose a worm to take down command-and-control systems so the enemy is unable to communicate and direct ground forces, or fire surface-to-air missiles, for example
These things are connected to the internet?

What's wrong man? You sound a little worried? :)

Re:SAMs? (5, Insightful)

Der Krazy Kraut (650544) | about 9 years ago | (#12270036)

All that stuff don't neccesarily have to be connected to the internet. They could always bring some specialists behind the front lines who hack it on site or set up a relay of some kind so it can be accessed from behind the front lines.

Re:SAMs? (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about 9 years ago | (#12270134)

er, if you have specialist on site at an enemy SAM launch facility wouldn't it be somewhat more sensible easier to say, maybe, destroy the missiles or launch control or tracking system?

Re:SAMs? (2, Funny)

peragrin (659227) | about 9 years ago | (#12270054)


These things are connected to the internet?


isn't everything? I know I connect our bluegene supercomputer to the regular net. of course beta testing Windows for High performace computing, I got a virus which turned it into a massive spam relay.

Do yo know how much spam you can send with a pair a t-3's the world's fastest supercomputer?

Really? (1, Insightful)

delta_avi_delta (813412) | about 9 years ago | (#12269939)

From the article
take down command-and-control systems so the enemy is unable to communicate and direct ground forces, or fire surface-to-air missiles, for example.

I find it incredible that systems like this would be on the internet. Surely something like a surface-to-air missile system is isolated from the web?

Re:Really? (1)

Iphtashu Fitz (263795) | about 9 years ago | (#12270082)

Well TFA also said that there's an unconfirmed report that members of this group infiltrated Serbia and hacked into a radar system there to generate phony signals during the NATO attacks back in the 1990's. So it sounds like these are script kiddies on steroids - US Army Rangers with notebooks loaded with all the latest hax0r t00lz.

Slashdot them... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12269946)

Couldn't we just /. them into submission?

We gotta protect you from IDEAS! (5, Interesting)

disposable60 (735022) | about 9 years ago | (#12269950)

From TFA: Rita Katz, an expert on Islamic terror sites and director of the Washington, D.C.-based Search for International Terrorist Entities [siteinstitute.org], believes a website that posts an execution should be taken out immediately. No matter what the implications are for free speech or other nation's laws, she said. (emphasis mine)

Coming soon - non-Evangelical-Republican == Terrorist.

National insecurity & militarization of the ne (3, Interesting)

G4from128k (686170) | about 9 years ago | (#12269958)

This looks like a scary, but inevitable, development. The internet is becoming too important to this country's economy. Perhaps the private sector can keep the Internet safe, but they need more vigilance and more tools to handle fast-evolving threats. The minute the government feels that the net has become a national security vulnerability, they will take steps to become the defender of that infrastructure.

Perhaps the day will come when the government deploys .mil computers to DDoS offending servers of phisher, spammers, etc.

US Military hackers... (3, Insightful)

northcat (827059) | about 9 years ago | (#12269972)

And everyone keeps complaining about chinese or russian militaries using hackers.

Re:US Military hackers... (1)

halivar (535827) | about 9 years ago | (#12270044)

And everyone keeps complaining about chinese or russian militaries using hackers.

Well, at least we won't be training future spammers.

I hope.

CDX (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270011)

You may also want to check out NSA's annual Computer Defense Exercise (CDX). Story here [recordonline.com].

Jeez, that's easy (1, Flamebait)

thewils (463314) | about 9 years ago | (#12270031)

Just sell them Windows.

Re:Jeez, that's easy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270159)

Ah, to be an unfunny troll. It is a life that I yearn for, but alas it can never be, because my mother made me attend medical school...

Joint...? that sounds bound for failure (4, Insightful)

ajnsue (773317) | about 9 years ago | (#12270059)

Ah - any government effort that starts with "Joint" is destined to produce nothing but paperwork and studies. Just as Private industy folks recognize the term "Cross-Functional" as a death sentence. I have no doubts that the leadership of any J**** project has a general idea of what they need to say to continue to justify funding. But the likelihood of them actually producing something worthy of said funding is slim to nothing.

aybabtu (2, Insightful)

Fox_1 (128616) | about 9 years ago | (#12270073)

Joint Functional Component Command for Network Warfare, JFCCNW
Man what a painful acronym, however it's being disregarded for most of the article and replaced with :
Computer Network Attack, or as some military personnel refer to it, CNA. "I've got to tell you we spend more time on the computer network attack business than we do on computer network defence because so many people at very high levels are interested," said former CNA commander, Air Force Maj. Gen. John Bradley
Which is funny since the DoD was targeted:
last year nearly 75,000 times with intrusion attempts.
So what do they really have as a mission for this group?
Verton said the unit's capabilities are highly classified, but he believes they can destroy networks and penetrate enemy computers to steal or manipulate data.
Nice, a govt funded agency with little regard for the institutions it's supposed to protect (free speech and due process) or other nations sovereignty and the apparent mission plan of 13 year old script kiddies everywhere. Where's the story?

The Hearing (2, Informative)

markmcb (855750) | about 9 years ago | (#12270084)

For anyone interested, here's a link to a hearing [apc.org] (not sure if it's the one referenced), that gives some insight into the broader goals of the the strategic command that this hacking force falls under.

Neuromancer.. (1)

Sandbox Conspiracy (836255) | about 9 years ago | (#12270093)

I guess the day is fast approaching when I can plug in my Ono Sendai deck and really get iced. Here's to hoping they don't "ice" me for being a liberal agnostic atheist/ideological terrorist.

This group uses PowerBooks (4, Interesting)

riversky (732353) | about 9 years ago | (#12270100)

A US military directive recently recomended all computer based intelligence personel run UNIX via the MAC OS for security reasons. I have a friend who is a low level Army guy and they all use Apple Mac PowerBooks in the tanks.

Re:This group uses PowerBooks (3, Funny)

Salo2112 (628590) | about 9 years ago | (#12270212)

Because using Windows on the internet is like riding a bicycle into a firefight.

Re:This group uses PowerBooks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270227)

Care to provide proof of this statement? Perhaps a link citing your statment about there being a military directive.

Really that good? (-1, Troll)

Zodiacbw (876952) | about 9 years ago | (#12270189)

Friend of mine went to Defcon a year or so ago, said the "Elite" military team came in last place.(His team won by the way)

Real Genius meets Full Metal Jacket (2, Funny)

bitswapper (805265) | about 9 years ago | (#12270219)


"In simple terms and sans any military jargon, the unit could best be described as the world's most formidable hacker posse. Ever.

I've got a picture of R. Lee Ermey giving somebody shit for going into army 'hacking'...

"Hacker core?! You gotta be shitting me private! You're not a geek, you're a killer!! "

As for "most formidable", I wonder how often it comes down to "join us, or be labeled a terrorist

The virtue of simplicity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#12270220)

Always assume that the enemy can, somehow, compromise any of your systems. The trick is to get those systems to fail gracefully into a safe condition. Usually, it is easier to get such a system if it is basically simple. The more complicated a system is, the more exploits it probably has.

In the 1980s my group used to spend a lot of time worrying about airport security. What would happen if someone, who knew the right stuff, did just the right thing? We came to the conclusion that the attacks we had to worry about would be 'way simpler but just as devastating. They would, of course, work only once but that's all that would be necessary.

It is obvious that someone should be figuring out these measures and counter measures. Just remember that the enemy isn't stupid and is probably thinking the same thing.

Linux (1, Insightful)

gnuman99 (746007) | about 9 years ago | (#12270228)

For once, at least I'm happy I'm using an open source OS like Linux. At least no single company can put keyloggers and backdoors in and everyone can detect the malware.

Anyway, if people wanted peace, why do we have (need?) a military?

DDOS (1)

bcmm (768152) | about 9 years ago | (#12270243)

My theory: they are script kiddies, and they get given IP addresses by the CIA and from Echelon which they DDOS with a botnet, blocking terrorist's communications....

The real threat.... (4, Informative)

mestreBimba (449437) | about 9 years ago | (#12270255)

The real threat from hackers of this nature lies not in their ability to hack the command and control grid of the enemy, but in their ability to crash the opossitions economy. Every major war of the last century has been won by economic might, more than by brillant stategies.

What is the impact of crashing an enemy's powersytem? A catastrophic crash of a power grid with actual physical damage to the grid is not beyond the realm of possibility. How many billions of $$$$ a day could be lost by such an attack on the US? If an enemy brings down even a small part of the grid it can cascade and bring down the whole shooting match.

Other scary possibilities..... hack the SCADA control system of a nasty chemical plant. Release a toxic gas cloud and kill thousands to hundreds of thousands of people. Hack a number of oil refineries and knock them out of production. Watch what that does to the price of doing business.

Most of the admins on such systems will tell you that the systems have no external links.... but when you ask them if there is a DB from the SCADA LAN that communicates with the coprporate LAN, well every admin and security guru that I have asked that question of, has admitted that such a DB exists. And where such a communication path exists then it can be exploited.

The next globalr war, if it ever happens, will start with a wave of pre-emptive infastructure hacks.
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