Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×

357 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

The Answer (1)

bryan986 (833912) | more than 9 years ago | (#12337961)

42

Goatseman's wife discovered!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12337976)

Re:Goatseman's wife discovered!!! (1)

birdwax2k (787311) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338015)

...you resemble that image, asshole

He is a MARATHI (from the state of maharashtra) (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12337977)

That's the state which has mumbai/bombay has the capital.

Most of the indian grad students in my dept. are from that state. there's something with these marathis and mathematics and TOO MUCH FUCKING LOUD TALKING.

MOD ABUSE - PARENT ON TOPIC (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338059)

disgusting. the parent is right on topic.

sad sad.

Re:He is a MARATHI (from the state of maharashtra) (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338363)

Marathi is a language. Maharashtra is the state it's spoken in. People hailing from that state are referred to as Maharashtrians. If you must know, the derogatory term for a Maharashtrian is "Ghaati" or "Ghaat".

I would love to tell you why, but given your small brain I'm sure you wouldn't understand.

And being Indian ... (2, Insightful)

ggvaidya (747058) | more than 9 years ago | (#12337985)

is in any way relevant why?

Re:And being Indian ... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338034)

STFU you stupid feminist bitch.
Death To womens's Rights

Re:And being Indian ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338039)

Political correctness is a tool of the man, brother.

Re:And being Indian ... (4, Funny)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338060)

Well, they did practically invent Algebra, so I guess it's of interest from a historical perspective.

Re:And being Indian ... (4, Informative)

lawpoop (604919) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338173)

I thought is was muslims [wikipedia.org] who did the most work on it in the western world.

From the wikipedia article: "The word algebra itself comes from the name of the treatise first written by a Persian mathematician Al-Khwarizmi 700 AD, who wrote a treatise titled: Kitab al-mukhtasar fi Hisab Al-Jabr wa-al-Moghabalah meaning The book of summary concerning calculating by transposition and reduction. The word al-jabr (from which algebra is derived) means "reunion", "connection" or "completion"."

Re:And being Indian ... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338223)

If it's on Wikipedia, it must be true!

Re:And being Indian ... (4, Informative)

tjstork (137384) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338245)

Muslims borrowed heavily from India when they invaded India. The Islamic role in the sciences tended to be more about preserving the best of what they had conquered. As traders, they acted as a point where that knowledge could be disseminated to Europe.

Re:And being Indian ... (5, Funny)

greenplato (23083) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338386)

That may be true, but you'll never truly understand Algebra until you read it in its original Klingon.

Re:And being Indian ... (2, Interesting)

Mantorp (142371) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338197)

not according to Wikipedia. [wikipedia.org] They got Babylonians, Greeks, Egyptians, Persians and Chinese in the summary. Maybe their outsourcing contracts required that the credit goes to those other countries.

Re:And being Indian ... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338335)

Wasn't it the Babylonians who invented it?? [newsfilter.org]

Re:And being Indian ... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338062)

Re:And being Indian ... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338072)

And being an associate professor and at the University of Utah. Why oh why do they flood us with these details? :(

Re:And being Indian ... (2, Interesting)

ggvaidya (747058) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338196)

Okay, point duly noted :).

It does just seemed to me as if the point'd been made gratuitously, though. Associate Prof (his current job status in the field: it would've be much more interesting if the breakthrough had come from a full Prof, or a grad student) and University of Utah (if you were interested in following up on it) seems to be more relevant than the country he was born in.

When was the last time Albert Einstein was refered to as "that German professor", or Isaac Newton as "that English scientist"? It's just not relevant.

Maybe it's just me.

Re:And being Indian ... (1)

lucabrasi999 (585141) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338252)

When was the last time Albert Einstein was refered to as "that German professor", or Isaac Newton as "that English scientist"?

Right after George W Bush was referred to as "That WASP President".

Re:And being Indian ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338280)

Was your job outsourced to a certain country in southern Asia beginning with I ending with ndia?

Re:And being Indian ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338309)

When was the last time Albert Einstein was refered to as "that German professor", or Isaac Newton as "that English scientist"?

Doubt that this was the last time, but:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Newton [wikipedia.org]

I also note that you knew tha nationality of both those gentlemen, so you must have found it mentioned somewhere.

Re:And being Indian ... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338387)

When was the last time Albert Einstein was refered to as "that German professor", or Isaac Newton as "that English scientist"? It's just not relevant.

That happens in Computing Theory classes as well. Every time Alan Turing gets a mention, so does his preference in sexual partners. OK, it's sad that he committed suicide due to persecution by the law, but keep this for a Social Science/Law course, not a Computer Science course.

You don't see every other resesarch paper author listing their preferences in partners (Personally, I like the sporty chics who go to the fitness centre in hotpants and sports bra's with stripes - look out for my research paper listing this information).

Re:And being Indian ... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338237)

Mentioning the institution adds relevant information to the story. This gives the reader a chance to see what other work that particular academic department does, as well as gives people an oppritunity to see this professor's academic history.

If this guy was a professor at the India Institute of Technology, then it would be fine too. If this guy was an Indian at IIT and the headline says "Indian Professor does XYZ", then I would even understand too, but why, as society in America, have to deliniate the work that Americans do and the work that others do? That is racist and demeaning.

Re:And being Indian ... (1)

Lisandro (799651) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338084)

There's a lot of that going arround here [slashdot.org] lately, it seems...

Re:And being Indian ... (-1, Flamebait)

pHatidic (163975) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338103)

Slashdot: News for Racists

Re:And being Indian ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338114)

Yeah, in a story telling us about some guy who's done something, how could telling us anythingabout the guy be relevant? It's bizarre.

Re:And being Indian ... (1)

DjReagan (143826) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338121)

Its relevant in that it helps show that not everything in the world is done by Americans or done in the USA - something a lot of slashdotters seem to forget.

Re:And being Indian ... (-1, Troll)

Surt (22457) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338389)

Except for the fact that he's doing the work in the USA, and was trained in the USA. Not to be racist, but a trained monkey can do this stuff.

Re:And being Indian ... (5, Insightful)

viscount (452242) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338123)

It's extra information about the guy that made the breakthrough. It explains why the article that describes the achievement is The Hindu - an Indian newspaper. Obviously you are trying to make a not-so-subtle 'it's racist' comment. Would you have been quite so quick to jump on your high horse if the mathematician was of a different nationality - say American or British?

Re:And being Indian ... (5, Insightful)

fatmonkeyboy (257833) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338130)

Maybe it's not, but then neither is the fact that he's an associate professor at the Mathematics Department of the University of Utah.

It's pretty common to mention where people are from when giving a news story. It's part of the human interest.

I mean, look at the "Science" page RIGHT NOW:

"First hypothesized to be possible 30 years ago by Russian physicist Victor Veselago, meta-material..."

See? Russian physicist.

Are you trying to imply there's some sort of racial overtone to the article? I don't get it.

Re:And being Indian ... (1)

ggvaidya (747058) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338290)

*concedes the point* :)

No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338315)

Being Indian is totally irrelevant to the story - he is a professor in America! The university he works for is totally relevant, it has nothing to do with racism. If you want to mention his educational or biographical background as an addendum to the story, then sure, but it has ZERO to do with the academic work itself. Racism in society is still prevelant, sadly.

Re:No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338374)

What's sad is how many people, such as yourself, don't understand the difference between nationality and race. In the context of the article, "Indian" is referring to the fact that he is from the country of India. Since when is it racist to simply inform people of the location of someone's birth? Relevant or not, it's certainly not racist.

Don't be so PC (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338378)

Being Indian is totally irrelevant to the story

*sigh*

But the story isn't using "Indian" in a racist way. It's merely an addition, perhaps to shed some "interesting" light on his background outside of his area of research. Not everything that mentions somebody's ethnicity is racist.

You sound like one of those overly-PC people who make things difficult for everyone, just for the sake of trying to live up to some misplaced "holier than thou" moral code.

Person1: "See those kids playing? One of them is my niece."
Person2: "Which one?"
Person1: "The black-haired one."
Person2: "There are six of them."
Person1: "The one in the blue shirt."
Person2: "That leaves four..."
Person1: "Ummm, the one with the sandals..."
Person2: "Three..."
Person1: "...and the red ball."
Person1: "Oh, you mean the black girl? Cute kid."

Re:And being Indian ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338356)

This can easily get out of control. I can picture the cover of SCIENCE ten years from now:

"Silly American proves String Theory!"

And simply mentioning a person's nationality ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338150)

is in any way harmful why?

Re:And being Indian ... (1)

Adams4President (849082) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338160)

It's news. Had it been an American, the article would have said so. Not to mention, the article is hosted on hindu.com

Re:And being Indian ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338316)

It would be relevant for a newspaper to delinate the nationality of a foreign researcher. Its obvious that the newspaper just wants to "show off". If an American newspaper covered an American scientist, he or she being American would not be mentioned beucase it is not relevant. If he or she was Canadian, then it would be mentioned specifically.

Racist Double Standard in Society (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338193)

If we say someone is a "Caucasian" or "White" scientist, there would be (and rightly so) all sorts of crying and screaming.

We are all humans, lets treat each other with some dignity, not as "Oh he's Indian".

I'm White and I have a Chinese wife, yet I do not go parading her around like some object of amusement with my family and friends saying "HEY she's Chinese, isnt that special?".

Re:Racist Double Standard in Society (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338227)

Indian, as in nationality, not race. No, it would never say "white" or "Caucasian"; you would see "American", "British", "German", etc. Heck, you're the one assuming he's not Caucasian just because he's of Indian descent.

Re:Racist Double Standard in Society (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338340)

Indian is an ethnicity, dumbass.

Re:Racist Double Standard in Society (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338367)

Aren't Indians (at least those in the north), generally classified as caucasian?

Re:Racist Double Standard in Society (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338246)

STFU you stupid feminist bitch.
Death To womens's Rights

Re:And being Indian ... (1)

catch23 (97972) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338206)

Srinivasa Ramanujan?

Re:And being Indian ... (1)

mattmentecky (799199) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338214)

If you click on Slashdot's math icon and look at a lot of the article's as well as a lot of other science and math articles from various sources, the nationality is usually given. This in of itself might be odd but it is not being discriminatory in this story, with this Indian fellow.

Re:And being Indian ... (2, Insightful)

jea6 (117959) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338244)

It was relevant in the context of the original article, published for an Indian audience on hindu.com.

Re:And being Indian ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338274)

Chandrashekhar Khare

Well there's one. Mentioning the Indian nationality before the name clears up that question for the reader. It's a common practice--try reading more, you'll see.

Re:And being Indian ... (5, Funny)

zzz1357 (863019) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338303)

Because Indians are naturally better at higher math than other ethnic groups. Which is why, incidentally, that the early settlers in America tried to wipe them out.

Re:And being Indian ... (1)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338320)

I guess I'm the only one who bothered to RTFA.

The article was from "The Hindu" http://www.hindu.com, which bills itself as "India's online newspaper".

Which is probably why they care that the guy is INDIAN.

Another one? (0, Troll)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 9 years ago | (#12337986)

At least this Indian mathematician is still alive. :)

Re:Another one? (2, Insightful)

rdwald (831442) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338023)

At least this Indian mathematician is still alive. :)

Even better, at least this Indian mathematician has a name [slashdot.org] .

Somebody give that man tenure, quick! (2, Insightful)

Dr. Spork (142693) | more than 9 years ago | (#12337996)

I have a feeling a lot of excellent math departments will be looking to hire this guy from Utah.

Pointless (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338098)

No, it's pointless to hire him, because there is a company in Utah which owns the Intellectual Property in his research. The CEO of the company has stated that they have "truckloads of evidence" that the paper is "essentially photocopied" from the source of UNIX SVR5.

Goatseman's Wife discovered!!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12337998)

http://submissions.newsfilter.org/uploads/Miss%20g oatse.jpg

But... (4, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338008)

> An Indian mathematician, Chandrashekhar Khare, is poised to make a significant breakthrough in the field of number theory with his solution of part of a major outstanding problem in algebraic number theory.

503 - Service Unavailable. There is insufficient bandwidth in the server room to supply you with a copy of this paper.

2+2 (-1, Offtopic)

Adult film producer (866485) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338009)

Is not really 4.. The question itself is racist.

Isnt everybody? (5, Funny)

ShaniaTwain (197446) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338013)

I know I'm poised to make a huge breakthrough, unfortunately I can never seem to make it over that last hurdle, which is, you know.. to make the actual breakthrough.

Re:Isnt everybody? (2, Funny)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338035)

I'm the same. The problem with number theory for me is that they just dont add up.

Re:Isnt everybody? (1)

lucabrasi999 (585141) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338189)

The problem with number theory for me is that they just dont add up.

Try using The New Math.

Heh. (0)

ggvaidya (747058) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338055)

Slashdot: News for nerds, stuff thats about to happen.

Re:Isnt everybody? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338077)

Just about every scientist and mathematician out there is "poised" on discovering something... it's just that most have the professionalism to announce it AFTER they've succeeded. Cold Fusion anyone???

Re:Isnt everybody? (2, Insightful)

wfijvvz (878812) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338270)

Is that unproffesionalism on his part? Or on the part of the idiotic journalists picking up a story before it was ready? Science works because scientists communicate. "Hey I plan on attacking this problem using this two part method. I'll let you know how it goes!" "Here is what I've done so far. That's part one. It looks like it's going well, but it might not work. I'll let you know how it goes!"

Re:Isnt everybody? (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338163)

Yeah, it's kind of like patent _pending_. Let me know when you actually _have_ the patent.

Fast Tenure for him (2, Insightful)

afstanton (822402) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338029)

If htis pans out as well as it looks like it will, this guy will be a full professor in no time flat.

What is it about? (5, Interesting)

ghoti (60903) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338031)

Could somebody explain what this is about, and what this would mean? There isn't any concrete information on that in TFA ...

Besides, this is kinda vaporware. Why is this even news? Why not talk about it once it's done?

Re:What is it about? (1)

Cat_Byte (621676) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338116)

Besides, this is kinda vaporware. Why is this even news? Why not talk about it once it's done?

I was thinking the same thing. I'm poised to finish lots of projects myself (mostly linux programs).

Re:What is it about? (5, Funny)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338242)

This proof will be the final step in achieving a 10x performance increase in the DNF rendering engine. We can expect to see DNF released shortly after this guy completes the solution.

Re:What is it about? (1)

mbw234 (876390) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338346)

>> Why not talk about it once it's done?

If he were to present the paper that he feels proves a major conjecture, then it would have to withstand scrutiny from mathematicians for at least one year before it is considered correct. So it makes sense to talk about it now. Same thing happened with Wile's proof, Perelman's, and most major proofs in the past.

Poised? (4, Funny)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338057)

So he's involved with outlining a two-part solution... and he's completed one part of it. That's sort of an actual accomplishment, isn't it?

I mean, I'm poised to win the lottery. He's actually doing things.

Re:Poised? (4, Funny)

lucabrasi999 (585141) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338117)

So he's involved with outlining a two-part solution... and he's completed one part of it.

So, he's involved with outlining the first part of a potential two-part solution to something that is only a theory?

Only (1)

dstone (191334) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338225)

Creating anything, material or philosophical, can be equally impermanent and unlikely to last. Build a bridge, it falls apart. Build a theory, it falls apart. Your "only a theory" implication of inferiority doesn't stand up.

Re:Only (1)

lucabrasi999 (585141) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338304)

Ah, I wasn't implying that the theory was inferior. I was implying that this story is only relevant when the professor actually completes his task. At this point, he isn't even half-way finished.

Actual info (4, Informative)

vossman77 (300689) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338066)

He has proved what is known to specialists in the field as the `level-1 case of the Serre conjecture.' In earlier work done with the French mathematician, J.P. Wintenberger, in December 2004, Dr. Khare outlined a two-part general strategy to prove the Serre conjecture fully. The present result is a first key step.

Wikipedia page [wikipedia.org] for Serre conjecture

Hey mods (1)

p3d0 (42270) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338198)

This is a direct quote from TFA.

Yeah, but.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338307)

Who actually reads the FTA? the fact that it's modded up to +5 just gives more evidence to this fact. Or maybe, the mods think it's good that there's someone here trying to foster some kind of intelligent discussion. All the posts above this one are completely clueless.

you might want to change the URL (3, Informative)

neye_eve (212185) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338067)

the underline appears all the way through " to make a significant breakthrough in the field of number theory with his solution "

even though the word "solution" leads to a different link than all of the preceding words.

Explanation needed (1)

rg3 (858575) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338090)

I thought Fermat's Last Theorem was proved not so long ago by someone else, using some sort of complex geometry concepts. Can any expert confirm this or explain why this is relevant?

Re:Explanation needed (4, Informative)

vossman77 (300689) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338157)

It was proved in 1995 by English mathematician Andrew Wiles.

Wikipedia page [wikipedia.org] of the theorem

I don't follow the field close enough to know its relation to Serre's multiplicity conjectures [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Explanation needed (1)

Kainaw (676073) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338248)

I thought Fermat's Last Theorem was proved not so long ago by someone else, using some sort of complex geometry concepts. Can any expert confirm this or explain why this is relevant?

Like Hollywood - the sequel doesn't have to have anything to do with the original. You just need the name that people know, like Fermat's Last Theorem. I can see it now:

Fermat II: The Serre Conjecture, starring Keanu Reeves as Chandra Khare (he looks Indian enough), a simple mathmetician from Utah. Just when thought it was safe to go into the theoretical waters again... the Serre Conjecture. As the world's nations cry in fear, one man comes up with a two-part solution to... well, this is Hollywood. He blows stuff up and gets the woman in the end.

Re:Explanation needed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338281)

Andrew Wiles, in the kitchen, with the candlestick.

(Actually it was more like elliptic and modular equations, IIRC.)

Re:Explanation needed (1)

scovetta (632629) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338361)

IANAE, but I think this work is to prove the Serre conjecture, which itself implies Fermat's Last Theorem.

GO UTES (1)

Piewalker (777952) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338095)

BCS and Math busters, yeah! (Utah Alum, 2003)

"fuc4?! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338097)

that *bSD 1s

Serre Conjecture (4, Interesting)

00squirrel (772984) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338112)

More info about the Serre Conjecture can be found here [wolfram.com] .

Pretty exciting stuff! (Relatively speaking, of course :-)

encryption (1)

Voidwalker (876958) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338192)

If I remember correctly this can have quite an effect on the area of cryptography. I seem to recall something about one of Fermat's theorms in regards to RSA encryption. It's been awhile since I've studied it though so I'm not sure.

Re:encryption (3, Informative)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338217)

Um ... the only one related to crypto would be the theorem that a^p mod p == a if p is prime and a is co-prime to p.

That's not only not the famous Fermat Last Theorem but it's also trivially provable with basic number theory.

Tom

I thought... (2, Interesting)

Stalyn (662) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338200)

that Serre's Conjecture [wolfram.com] was already proven [wikipedia.org] ?

Every day... (2, Informative)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338203)

...hundreds of new mathemtical theorems are discovered by people around the world. Many of these become peer reviewed and published. So why is this particular one on the front page? It's basically unknown outside of mathematical circles and is posted on a web site where any crackpot can post. Shall we start having stories about JSH on sci.math?

Re:Every day... (1)

Sage Gaspar (688563) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338354)

Oh yes, please. JSH is hillarious.

The Inevitable "What Use" Question (4, Informative)

DumbSwede (521261) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338221)

Just to speculate on a possible "what use" question that might arise, I can't help but notice the line This is one of the central themes of modern research in number theory and is devoted to the study of the relation between the symmetries of number theory and geometry. . If I may be so bold, anything that ties the study of pure math to geometry probably has implications for quantum mechanics. These objects may lie embedded in higher dimensions, and probably settle into stable configurations from near infinite possibilities. But they still have to satisfy some allowable mathematical model. This is just the type of thing that may allow us to better predict what those allowable states could be.

Beyond Fermat (2, Interesting)

amightywind (691887) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338226)

This is the real problem beyond Fermat [claymath.org]

Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (0, Offtopic)

GillBates0 (664202) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338229)

TIFR website [tifr.res.in] here (runs Linux btw):

Via: 1.1 sj-netcache (NetCache NetApp/5.3.1R4D10)
Server: Apache/1.3.29 (Debian GNU/Linux) PHP/4.3.4 mod_perl/1.29
Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
Client-Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2005 17:12:59 GMT
Client-Response-Num: 1
X-Powered-By: PHP/4.3.4

About TIFR:
The Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) was established in 1945 at the initiative of Dr. Homi Jehangir Bhabha. It had a modest beginning at the Kenilworth site on Peddar Road, Bombay in 1945 and later moved to the Royal Yacht Club, Apollo Bunder until the buildings at the Navy Nagar Campus in South Bombay were ready in 1962. The Institute is proud to have produced many of the finest scientists of India who have been involved in seminal research in fields ranging from Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Physics and Science Education as well as some aspects of Public Health.

There are at present about 400 scientists in the Institute working in various disciplines grouped into three major schools: the School of Mathematics, the School of Natural Sciences and the School of Technology and Computer Science. The Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education at Deonar, Bombay; The National Centre for Radio Astrophysics at Pune and The National Centre for Biological Sciences at Bangalore also form a part of TIFR activities.

The School of Mathematics has research interests in areas like Algebra, Algebraic Geometry, Lie Groups, Lie Algebras, Algebraic Groups, Representation Theory and Quantum Groups, Theory of Numbers, Combinatorics, Differential Geometry and Topology, Real and Complex Analysis, Ergodic Theory, Probability Theory on Groups and Mathematical Physics.

The School of Mathematics has a Centre in Bangalore dedicated to the study of Applied Mathematics where mathematicians work in the fields of Differential Equations, Harmonic Analysis, Numerical Analysis and Probability Theory.

Anyone remember Ferma'ts Last Theorem musical? (1)

ShyGuy91284 (701108) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338275)

I remember in HS we once watched a play on DVD on Fermat's Last Theorem. It was called Fermat's Last Tango [claymath.org] . It was a rather interesting thing seeing mathematics portrayed in a musical form, and to this day, I still recall parts of the lyrics.....

If it's Fermat's last theorem.. (3, Funny)

HungSoLow (809760) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338289)

How can you go beyond it? Is it not the last?!

*ducks*

Is there a webcam? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12338292)

Because I love to watch hot math action.

No! no! Introduce a Lemma!
Ya that's it, Proof by Counter-Example, that's the way I like it.

not trolling but (1)

avandesande (143899) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338334)

Why on slashdot?
I dont have a clue what the proof is about, and it doesn't mention if he is going to use a computer to help with the proof.

Incredible!!! (3, Funny)

Aumaden (598628) | more than 9 years ago | (#12338365)

Wow, and to think, Utah's Net Porn [slashdot.org] law has only been in effect for 4.5 weeks.

With this kind of progress, we should have FTL engines by the end of next year.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>