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Rave Reviews for Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger

Zonk posted more than 9 years ago | from the widgets-widgets-everywhere dept.

OS X 1088

druid_getafix writes "The first mass market reviews of Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger are trickling in with a big thumbs up for the release. Walt Mossberg of the WSJ says 'Tiger Leaps Out in Front' but complains about slowness of some applications - notably Mail. David Pogue of NYT says 'But with apologies to Mac-bashers everywhere, Spotlight changes everything. Tiger is the classiest version of Mac OS X ever and, by many measures, the most secure, stable and satisfying consumer operating system prowling the earth.' In related news Mossberg also covers the rising incidence of spam/virii in the Windows world and says '...consider dumping Windows altogether and switching to Apple's Macintosh...'. Previous reviews of Tiger were covered on /. earlier."

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Test of the NYT article (1, Redundant)

zeux (129034) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370196)

Text of the NYT article. Mod this one up, no karma whoring here.

From Apple, a Tiger to Put in Your Mac

IF anyone considers tomorrow a special day at all, it's probably because it's Friday, or because "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" movie opens, or because it's Uma Thurman's birthday.

But for one particular group of 25 million computer owners, April 29 is a much bigger deal. It's the day Apple releases Mac OS X 10.4, nicknamed Tiger - the latest version of the software suite that makes up the Macintosh operating system.

Ordinarily, of course, reading about operating systems is about as much fun as a seminar on tax policy. Very few people line up at 5 a.m. to be the first to upgrade the software in their microwaves, cellphones or cars.

But Mac OS X has recently become interesting even to people outside the Cult of Macintosh. The more Microsoft Windows is bogged down by viruses, spyware and disruptive security updates, the more miserable life becomes - and the more the long-suffering Windows majority begins to investigate virus-free, spyware-free alternatives like Mac OS X.

One nice thing about Windows, though, is that Microsoft sics a new version on its customers only once every few years. (Windows XP, for example, made its debut in 2001. The next version is scheduled for 2006.) Apple has asked its faithful followers to upgrade Mac OS X about every year, at $130 a pop (or free with a new Mac). What could Tiger offer that could justify yet another expenditure?

Apple's Tiger Web site lists over 200 new features. Not all of them are, ahem, likely to set off a mass exodus to the Macintosh. Will anyone upgrade to Tiger because, for example, "you can easily find any glyph by typing its Unicode ID"?

Still, there are a few humdingers in that list. The most important is Spotlight, which is like Google for your hard drive. As you type into the Spotlight box in your menu bar, a tidy menu instantly drops down. It lists every file, folder, program, e-mail message, address book or calendar entry, photograph, PDF document and even font that contains what you typed, regardless of its name or folder location. This isn't just a fast Find command. It's an enhancement that's so deep, convenient and powerful, it threatens to reduce the 20-year-old Mac/Windows system of nested folders to irrelevance. Why burrow around in folders when you can open any file or program with a couple of keystrokes?

Out of the box, for example, tapping Command and the space bar highlights the Spotlight box. So if you hit Command-Space and type "Schw," the list shows every message Arnold Schwarzenegger sent to you by e-mail, every appointment you've got with him and, of course, his address book entry. It's all organized neatly by category; a quick click or keystroke opens the item you want.

You can also save a Spotlight search as a "smart folder," a self-updating folder that always contains stuff that matches certain criteria - for example, all documents created in the last week containing the phrase "wombat mating habits."

Unfortunately, Spotlight can't "see inside" many programs other than Apple's, although that will change as software companies upgrade their wares. For example, Spotlight can search the contents of Word, Excel and PowerPoint files, but doesn't yet see the messages in Microsoft's Entourage e-mail program.

The second most heavily hyped Tiger feature is called Dashboard. It's a constellation of gorgeous miniprograms that appear or disappear en masse when you touch a selected key. They include real-time stock tickers, weather forecasts and airline flight information, along with a calculator, dictionary, Yellow Pages and other doodads. They're handy enough, and they appear with a dazzling rippling effect that turns your screen into the surface of a Zen pond. But Dashboard isn't a Tiger exclusive; the shareware program Konfabulator, available for Windows and older Mac OS versions, does pretty much the same thing.

On the other hand, some of the most groundbreaking new Tiger features are barely mentioned in Apple's marketing. For example, the new parental controls let you, the wise authority figure, specify which e-mail correspondents, chat buddies, Web sites and even programs are O.K. for your children. Older children may find the "whitelist" approach overly limiting, but the design is otherwise clean, effective and beautifully integrated.

Then there's security. Why hasn't Apple ever advertised Mac OS X's stellar security record? Maybe the company is worried that if it did, some determined hacker would deliberately spoil the party just to prove Apple wrong.

Even so, Tiger is the most impenetrable Mac system yet, filled with new defenses against the dark arts. Messages alert you - a little annoyingly, actually - every time you download a file that could theoretically contain a virus (because it contains a runnable program, even if it's compressed). And a new "stealth mode" in Tiger's built-in firewall makes your Mac invisible to ping signals from Internet predators who are hunting for computers to infect.

Mac OS X's built-in programs have been upgraded, too. Of these, iChat AV, which permits free audio and video phone calls over the Internet, is the most spectacular. Up to 10 people can join a single audio conversation. And as long as one of the participants has a G5 Macintosh, four Tigered people with fast Internet connections can have a full-screen video chat. Your three partners, wherever they happen to be in the world, appear on three vertical panels, gorgeously reflected on a shiny black table surface. It may remind you of the flat, spinning panels that imprisoned the trio of villains at the end of "Superman II." But it's a jaw-dropping visual stunt that can bring distant collaborators face-to-face without plane tickets.

The rest of the 200 features don't fall into any one visionary category; they're an assortment of tweaks and upgrades that pile up like something out of Gilbert and Sullivan:

The Safari browser now subscribes to R.S.S. news feeds,

And its "private browsing" mode conceals the tracks of online deeds.

There are archives now, and log files, when you send or get a fax;

You can make the pointer bigger on those Jumbotron-screened Macs.

You can start a full-screen slide show from some photos on demand;

And the voice that reads the screen aloud can lend the blind a hand.

There's a password-phrase suggestor meant to make yours more secure,

And the Grapher module draws equations simple and obscure.

Then the Automator program is a geeky software clerk -

You just choose the steps you want performed, and it does all the work.

There's a lot of miscellany, lots of spit-and-polish stuff,

But it works and doesn't slow you down - and these days, that's enough.

Now, if it weren't for that brilliant Spotlight feature, Tiger wouldn't be as important an upgrade as, say, last year's Panther edition. In fact, without Spotlight, you could make the case that Tiger is overpriced at $95. (That's Amazon.com's price, after a rebate that's good through the end of May. A five-Mac license is available for $150 after Amazon rebate, too, although it's worth noting that Mac OS X is not copy-protected and requires no Windows-style activation.)

But with apologies to Mac-bashers everywhere, Spotlight changes everything. Tiger is the classiest version of Mac OS X ever and, by many measures, the most secure, stable and satisfying consumer operating system prowling the earth.

If you're a Mac geek of the sort who'd get a kick out of high-end features like Automator and the advances in the underlying Unix engine, then Tiger is worth getting now. Of course, if you truly are a Mac geek, you didn't need a newspaper columnist to tell you that.

If you're just an everyday creative worker bee, though, consider waiting out the shakedown period before pouncing on Tiger. Apple will surely release a 10.4.1 update that fixes the tiny glitches, like the errors in the onscreen help system (which is, mercifully, infinitely faster than in the last version). And in the coming weeks, the handful of Tiger-incompatible programs (notably the excellent networkable calendar Now Up-to-Date) will be upgraded and made Tiger-ready.

And if you're a Windows refugee or someone who's never owned a computer, you'll find this Tiger remarkably tame and approachable. Who knows? Maybe April 29 will mean something to you after all.

E-mail: Pogue@nytimes.com

Re:Test of the NYT article (5, Interesting)

Karellen !-P (717831) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370217)

I did find it tremendously annoying that the multimedia part of the article requires you to have Real or WMP but not Quicktime.

Which Karma Whore are you? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370229)

Which fanboy are you?
  1. Windows

    You wear wraparound sunglasses, even indoors. You wish your mother would let you ride a motorbike. You tell your friends you're pulling in $50,000 a year and $2,000 a month "playing the stock market" but in reality you're only bringing in half that and your dividends from MSFT havn't been good in years. Your non computing friends all turn to you for help; you only charge $30 an hour. Your collegues talk about you behind your back. Your workplace nickname is likely to be "The Asshole". Unlike the Linux fanboys, you actually try to pick up dates in bars but women laugh at you.
  2. Apple

    You think you're so cool you hurt. You have mirrors on every wall in your "loft apartment", which is really a grimy little apartment next to a guy who plays Guns 'n Roses at 3am. All of your furniture is from Ikea. You sometimes think that changing your name to "Steve" would be "pretty cool". When you go to bars you only drink Miller Lite. No body ever asks you for help with their computers because they know you don't know anything but OS X, even if you do tell them you "run Unix" now. Your friends openly laugh at you.
  3. Linspire

    You regularly give $10 bills to homeless guys because you have too much money. Computers baffle you, but you enjoy looking at pictures of naked women. You don't know what Linux is, but you continually bugged the IT guy at work about your computer so he installed Linspire on your machine.
  4. Umbongo

    You shop at GAP. You probably used to use a Mac. When you saw the multiracial image used as a desktop picture and heard that this operating system came from the same country as Nelson Mandela, you knew it was for you. You meet with your friends in fair-trade coffee houses and talk about the eventual overthrow of evil corporations such as Microsoft and Starbucks. Like the Linspire user, you have very little real knowlege when it comes to computers but you would never use your computer to look at pictures of women degrading themselves.
  5. Gentoy

    You've been "into computers" for ohh, one or two years now and fancy yourself as "a bit of a hacker". Wouldn't know C from C++, or even Perl for that matter. Older Gentoy users may be building their homes from matchsticks. You've explained to all your friends that your matchstick house will have an "optimised floorplan". They've tried to tell you that your house violates every known building code and law in your area, but you've ignored them so far because you can't read those complicated regulatory documents.
  6. Linux From Scratch

    Much like the Gentoy user but you'd also be into sadomasochistic sex if you could get it. You're not just building a house from matchsticks, you're planing to grow the trees to make the matchsticks. You've cleared some land but don't know what to do next because you havn't read the books you've got, so you've posted to alt.arborists.newbie asking for help. It's been three days so far and no one has replied. You remain hopeful.

You forgot one -- VM/370 (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370253)

7. VM/370; you're a genius with many years of experience. You've seen crummy junk like Windows, Unix and Mac and stick to the one proven to work system with a 38 year history of excellence.

Re:Which Karma Whore are you? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370340)

Here's another one:

Fedora/RedCrap

You own a Lada because you despise Ford. When you go to the shops, you buy vanilla flavour ice cream, cheese and tomato pizzas, and lemonade. You laugh at anyone who buys anything else.

Re:Which Karma Whore are you? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370382)

Debian:

Everything you own is at least 20 years old, and you stick with it because "it works". If you need something new, you buy it from an antique shop. Your computer is a 386 with 8MB of RAM. You laugh at anyone who has anything faster, calling them 'lame'. The council are about to demolish your house, but you refuse to move.

Re:Test of the NYT article (4, Informative)

kimba (12893) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370314)

David Pogue should disclose that he is a popular author of Apple books [amazon.com] . I don't disagree with what he says, and I am an Apple fan, but if you have a major interest in Apple you should probably disclose it when writing neutral articles for the NYT.

Re:Test of the NYT article (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370399)

Should he also disclose that Apple recently kicked all of his books (as well as the rest of his publisher's books) out of their stores?
If you're trying to invent a bias, you should mention a negative as well as positive influence too in the sake of 'neutrality'.... meh.

Re:Test of the NYT article (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370339)

Am I the only one who does'nt give a crap about spotlight? Seriously, how often do you actually use the search feature of an OS? I think I use it maybe twice a year and it works fine. I could care less about spotlight.

Re:Test of the NYT article (1)

Feoh (5299) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370432)

The point is that your operating system's search feature doesn't do what Spotlight (or for fans of Quicksilver which has been around for a good while did before it) does.

If it were just a filesystem searcher, it wouldn't be getting hyped nearly so much, but the idea here is that for every program that collects data (It doesn't even have to use the filesystem for storage, either) a Spotlight search will pick it up.

For example current search functions likely wouldn't search MS Office docs, because they're binary, while Spotlight would.

MOD DOWN/ DELETE THIS! (Copyright Infringement) (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370376)

This copyright notice on their site [nytimes.com] makes it clear you have no permission to copy and paste to a site like slashdot without their explicit permission.

Moderators and editors should not condone this copyright infringement. After all, we would be pissed if someone didn't abide by the GPL, right? Right?

Re:Test of the NYT article (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370418)

Still, there are a few humdingers in that list. The most important is Spotlight, which is like Google for your hard drive.

Yeah? While if I stick with Windows I can get something that actually is Google for my hard drive [google.com] . And while it's not as powerful as Spotlight, it has two major advantages:

1. It's free. Spotlight would cost me about $2000 if I wanted to use it on a computer as powerful as my current one. (Don't give me that "Mac Mini" bullshit. The Mac Mini is a kiddy toy.)

2. Did I mention that it's free?

Voice recognition (2, Insightful)

suso (153703) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370198)

I think the whole voice recognition without having to configure it for your voice is pretty slick. I want a Mac.

Re:Voice recognition (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370223)

> I think the whole voice recognition without having to configure
> it for your voice is pretty slick. I want a Mac.

As do I, but I really thing Apple need to do something about getting a cheap machine out. I can build my own for half the price of a Mac mini, and until they can match that they won't be getting any of my money, and I'm sticking with Windows.

(obGeek: I run several debian servers)

Re:Voice recognition (2, Insightful)

zorander (85178) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370258)

Nope. Their CPU sales went up 40% last year without you. They don't need you or your demographic to be successful. Premium price for a premium product. Besides, the mini isn't a real part of their product line (kind of out of place, imo). Start with the iMac and factor out the price of a 20" LCD and you'll find that things make a little bit more sense.

As a geek, you want a beige box that you can plug into your existing system. Apple doesn't want people to be using apples that don't look like apples, ergo it's not going to make as much sense to do it that way.

Re:Voice recognition (2, Interesting)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370269)

Oh Christ, this old chestnut again. Take all the parts you bought for 0.5 a Mini and make it fit in a chassis 2 inches high, 6 inches wide and 6 inches deep. Yes, size counts. A Cappucino PC comes closest and costs much more than a Mini.

Re:Voice recognition (5, Insightful)

Mikey-San (582838) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370309)

As do I, but I really thing Apple need to do something about getting a cheap machine out. I can build my own for half the price of a Mac mini, and until they can match that they won't be getting any of my money, and I'm sticking with Windows.

ROFLCOPTER. "Apple need to sell a cheap [$250] computer."

An upgrade to Windows XP Professional is $200 alone. How much computer can you buy for that last $50? Sorry, but if you're going to complain that a $500 isn't cheap enough, I'm going to say you're a biased troll who thinks pirating an OS makes a computer cheaper for comparison purposes. You can't call something cheaper if you're stealing part of it.

"Man, that $2000 PowerBook is too expensive. If they had a $1000 laptop, I'd buy one, but NOT SOONER NO OMG."

"Man, that $1000 iBook is too expensive, but if they had a $700 Mac, I'd buy it. NOT SOONER, though!"

"Man, that eMac isn't cheap enough for me. I can build my own computer for $10 and a pack of paper clips. Wake me when they sell an AFFORDABLE computer."

"What? They're charging $500 for a computer?! Too bad they don't have a $250 computer, or I'd buy one."

Pattern here?

Re:Voice recognition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370319)

Reminder to microcomputer lamers: you are ASSEMBLING your own system, not building it, unless you build the processor.

Re:Voice recognition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370438)


Remember, people ASSEMBLE houses, they don't build them, unless they grew the trees and forged the nails themselves.

Re:Voice recognition (4, Insightful)

peragrin (659227) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370354)

You can only build a machine cheaper if your time is worthless.

I need someone to do some yard work can I hire you for $1 a day? That is your going computer assembly rate. So it won't be much of a difference.

You do reaize that in order to put even a nano-itx board into a mac mini chassis, you can't have a cd-rom drive right?

Re:Voice recognition (5, Interesting)

boaworm (180781) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370400)

Apple is obviously not interested in competing with all this crap'n'cheap PC storese and hardware floating around. Why can't people figure that out ?

Furthermore, I've actually spent less money on computer hardware since I bought my Power Mac, simply because I was suddenly so happy with it, and felt no need to constantly change stuff.

I threw my last Windows/PC years ago, running Linux/OpenBSD on my servers, and OS X on laptops/workstation. I dont miss this fuzz about crappy drivers, PSUs that goes black, noice, having to install a shitload of free/shareware just to be able to do something.

Simply put, I value my time, so I save money (and adrenaline) on my Mac's. If you dont mind all the crap that goes with cheap PC hardware, Apple is simply not for you, so dont "whine" about not being able to buy a cheap Mac.

Re:Voice recognition (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370343)

1995? called and wants their os/2 warp back...

Re:Voice recognition (1)

Holi (250190) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370372)

They had that in OS 9, I used to say things like "Computer launch browser." and up would pop IE. That is hardly innovation.

Re:Voice recognition (1)

Ford Prefect (8777) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370374)

I think the whole voice recognition without having to configure it for your voice is pretty slick. I want a Mac.

The stuff in MacOS X Panther is great fun too - I've just switched it on for a laugh (System Preferences, Speech, Speech Recognition), and it works quite well.

Although I just asked it to switch to Mail and it started iMovie instead. I'm not sure if it's faulty speech recognition or it's just trying to annoy me.

"Computer, tell me a joke..."

W00t, guess i'll go get it! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370207)


unless there's a torrent..

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370208)

fp

Java 5? (2, Interesting)

Undertaker43017 (586306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370214)

Is Java 5 in the final version of Tiger?

If not when will Apple be releasing it?

Re:Java 5? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370244)

It is not in there and "soon" is the answer.

Re:Java 5? (5, Informative)

qwertphobia (825473) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370250)

Java 5 is not included with the operating system, but 1.4.2 is included.

Java 5 will be provided as a separate installer, so that folks can upgrade when they're ready.

Re:Java 5? (1)

Undertaker43017 (586306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370288)

Well I'm ready now, actually the project I work on moved to Java 5 a month ago, and has started using Java 5 features.

I originally figured no big deal since Tiger is out in a month and Java 5 was in the later previews of Tiger, so surely it will be in the final, but no. Worse there doesn't seem to be a date for release, just soon...

Re:Java 5? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370264)

Java 5? That's Java 1.5.0, yes? No, wait, I mean that's Java2 1.5.0?

Does it run on SunOS 2.10? Sorry, I mean, Solaris 10?

Re:Java 5? (1)

zorander (85178) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370282)

Last I heard, no. They don't want to break existing java apps so AFAIK, they're holding off on the release, doing it separately so the developers have a little time with java and tiger to update their products, then releasing it via automatic update in a few months.

Re:Java 5? (5, Informative)

ABaumann (748617) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370286)

No news as to when Java 1.5 (I refuse to call it Java 5 - see more) will be out. However, Apple has said that Tiger will be required for Java 1.5 (ie they're not gonna make it compatible with Panther) Early reviews of 10.4 Beta have said that a beta version of Java 1.5 is there, but seeing as apple hasn't mentioned anything, I'd be surprised to see it on an actual 10.4 disk. Summary: Java Tiger on Mac Tiger? If not now then soon. More: As for the name Java 5... Java 1.0 was Java 1.0. When they came out with Java 1.2, they called it Java 2 Then they had Java 2 versions 1.3, 1.4, etc. Now they have Java 5. Come on people! I don't care what your versioning conventions are, I just care that you have some.

Re:Java 5? (1)

Undertaker43017 (586306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370302)

You haven't been around Sun's "name games" very long, have you? Try figuring out Solaris versions some time...

Re:Java 5? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370306)

Sorry, I always forget to change it to text mode...

No news as to when Java 1.5 (I refuse to call it Java 5 - see more) will be out. However, Apple has said that Tiger will be required for Java 1.5 (ie they're not gonna make it compatible with Panther)

Early reviews of 10.4 Beta have said that a beta version of Java 1.5 is there, but seeing as apple hasn't mentioned anything, I'd be surprised to see it on an actual 10.4 disk.

Summary: Java Tiger on Mac Tiger? If not now then soon.

More: As for the name Java 5...

Java 1.0 was Java 1.0.
When they came out with Java 1.2, they called it Java 2
Then they had Java 2 versions 1.3, 1.4, etc.
Now they have Java 5.

Come on people! I don't care what your versioning conventions are, I just care that you have some.

Re:Java 5? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370434)

This is coming from Sun, it should be no surprised their version numbers are fucked up. Look at what they did with SunOS/Solaris versioning.

"Sun: We put the "Wtf?" in versioning."

No Tiger in Tiger (4, Interesting)

kherr (602366) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370287)

Java 5 (Tiger) is not included in Mac OS X 10.4 (Tiger). But Apple's got it under development and I'd suspect there'll be a Java update to Java 5 within a short period. Apple's been making test builds available to developers.

Re:No Tiger in Tiger (1)

Gr8Apes (679165) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370396)

Apple should make them available to developers that want to risk the "beta" nature of the 1.5 JDK.

After all, why do I want to pony up $600 for Apple's developer program when I'm really interested in Java development? (Now that 1.5 no longer depends on a beta OS release?)

Apple is doing well, but as Java is a big part of my needs, and having 1.5 available becomes more important, I'd at least like to have the option to start working with it.

Re:No Tiger in Tiger (1)

Undertaker43017 (586306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370427)

Agreed. I like my Mac, but now, until Apple releases Java 5, I will have to move to a Linux machine for development.

Re:Java 5? (1)

SiO2 (124860) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370356)

I don't know whether it is true, but macslash is reporting [macslash.org] that Java 5 is not included in Tiger and that it will be available for download at a later date.

SiO2

How are Mac Minis with Tiger? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370216)

Some people were waiting on Tiger's release to find out. Does AltiVec handle the CoreImage stuff alright?

Re:How are Mac Minis with Tiger? (0)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370348)

I'm pretty sure CoreImage requires a 64 MB video card.

Re:How are Mac Minis with Tiger? (2, Informative)

varmittang (849469) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370440)

I think all those Core stuff will got to what is capable on the Mac in question. If the video card can handle it, it will go to the video card, otherwise it will use the CPU to render. It is something along this line, that the system with choose which one to use when you install Tiger. I'm sure someone else can add or better explain it.

Rising incidence of what now? (0, Offtopic)

wheany (460585) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370218)

Mossberg also covers the rising incidence of what exactly? Spam I understand, but there's some other word there that I do not recognize.

Re:Rising incidence of what now? (1)

FidelCatsro (861135) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370316)

Virii the Laten plural of virus used in scientific english(computer science, bioligy etc). Its actualy present in my dictionary and is acceptable in normal english(UK, i don't know about US english) .

It is fine to use it in this context

I for one... (5, Funny)

earthbound kid (859282) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370231)

welco... AHHH!! *mauled to death by a tiger for using a slashdot cliche*

Re:I for one... (2, Funny)

TrippTDF (513419) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370401)

Using cliches on Slashdot... it's a TRAP!

Pity (4, Interesting)

DenDave (700621) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370235)

Pity, I haven't got my copy yet. Can't wait... Spotlight will definetly change everything.. I wish we had this functionality on our windows network. Usually colleagues have a habit of making emssy files and storing things all over the shop, if we could search on meta data that would really help. From what I can tell so far, spotlight means you no longer care where things are, they simply exist and the context becomes the "path"... Truly innovating and definetly worth my money.

Re:Pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370378)

Truly innovating

Um, no.

Innovating means "making something new".

Desktop search systems, even ones as powerful as Spotlight appears to be, are nothing new.

Therefore, Apple are not innovating. They're writing cool software that does a lot of things better than anyone else. But they're not innovating.

Re:Pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370380)

Spot light will definately change everything. To all the Microsoft fans out there espousing Microsoft's plans to provide the same but better -- remember, when Longhorn comes out in 200x Apple will already had the experience and have one of their continual updates (which not only patch security but increases usability) to make spotlight better still. Apple won the race and will be ahead for a long time. FLAME ON!!!

How do the judge so fast?!? (5, Interesting)

scsirob (246572) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370236)

I'm always amazed how people seem to be able to judge the quality of an operating system within just a couple of hours. I can't imagine that you can really tell if productivity and/or stability have improved within a couple of hours.

So how do they review the OS?

Re:How do the judge so fast?!? (2, Interesting)

kevin_conaway (585204) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370279)

Aesthetics and responsiveness of widgets? Application load times?

Ummmm... (1)

Seoulstriker (748895) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370291)

Tiger still hasn't been released yet, and so we know that these reviewers have advanced copies to review. I'd imaigne that they would have it in their possession at least since golden master was declared.

Re:How do the judge so fast?!? (4, Informative)

Brento (26177) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370303)

I'm always amazed how people seem to be able to judge the quality of an operating system within just a couple of hours.

Journalists, especially high-profile ones like Mossberg, get preview versions of new gear long before the rest of us specifically so they can review it. They sign non-disclosure agreements to make sure the technology doesn't get into The Wrong Hands, and the vendors generally know the journalists will behave because the journalists have their entire career invested in it. If Mossberg tried to distribute pirated versions of Tiger ahead of the release date, Apple would stop giving him advance copies, and he'd lose prestige as a journalist.

Re:How do the judge so fast?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370307)

Err..,well TFA says they had review copies for the last 3 weeks. D'you think that could be it?

Re:How do the judge so fast?!? (1)

ewieling (90662) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370387)

If it looks pretty and doesn't crash then it's "great".

Gloat (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370239)

My god is it a great time to be a Mac user.

Apple Tech
NeXT Tech
Dual G5
iPod/iTunes/iTMS
OpenGL
unix Layer
and my copy of Tiger is riding around in a FedEx van at this very moment.

Everything I've ever wanted in a computer system is a few hours away from becoming reality.

You forgot something (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370284)

Reality Distortion Field.

Re:You forgot something (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370312)

What in that list of items is 'not real?'

Re:You forgot something (0)

databyss (586137) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370317)

I'm sure you meant to say iReality...

It is viruses (-1, Flamebait)

Anarke_Incarnate (733529) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370240)

not virii.

Please, cut the hype... (0, Troll)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370241)

From the NYT guy:

"[...] and, by many measures, the most secure, [...] operating system prowling the earth."

Hum. I like OSX just as much as anybody here does, but please, let's stay with verifiable facts instead of hype, OK? Even if you're working for the NY Times.

Re:Please, cut the hype... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370300)

hyperbole? in the media?
because that would NEVER happen on slashdot...

Re:Please, cut the hype... (1)

millahtime (710421) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370324)

If you don't think tiger is the most secure out of the box them what out of the box is more secure?

.. and openbsd doesn't count.

Re:Please, cut the hype... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370411)


If you don't think tiger is the most secure out of the box them what out of the box is more secure?

The original statement didn't contain any wording indicating "out of the box". That was something that you added. While true that Apple ships OS X secure out of the box that doesn't make it the most secure operating system. Which is what the OP you are responding to had a problem with.

and openbsd doesn't count.

Why not?

Re:Please, cut the hype... (5, Insightful)

Loco3KGT (141999) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370363)

Uh, dude, you can't do that.

you can't take a quote, edit it to death to remove the point of the sentence, and then call it hype. "consumer" was the key freakin point in that sentence and you just said "haha no. I shall rewrite this to mean something else and then call them liars!"

Can you show me another consumer desktop OS that's as stable, secure, and satisfying? It ain't Linux, Linux isn't 'consumer' enough. No more than a Ford F-850 is a 'consumer' truck.

Mine has shipped (1)

rokzy (687636) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370245)

should be here soon. (as a student it cost me less than 60 quid.)

has anyone heard of any issues with doing a simple upgrade instead of clean install or archive and install?

Re:Mine has shipped (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370385)

Excuse me to ask such a stupid question but how do you have this price? I'm in France and see nothing on their web site for the students...

Re:Mine has shipped (1)

nkh (750837) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370421)

That's OK I found it. The price is 88.50 for the students like me, I can buy it now :)

Expose - Slowness (5, Informative)

DJPenguin (17736) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370254)

I've had Tiger on my 17" powerbook for a few days now - it's actually installed on my iPod so I can dual boot.

One thing I have noticed so far is that Expose seems a lot less fluid than in Panther. Has anyone else noticed this, or am I going mad? The difference is noticable even with only a couple of windows on the desktop.

Other than that it seems nice. My Vodafone 3G card works, and most apps that I have tried. The only thing I can't get working yet is OpenVPN - as the TUN/TAP driver isn't ported yet.

Re:Expose - Slowness (2, Informative)

HeelToe (615905) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370295)

I use gvpe with this tun/tap driver and it works quite well:

http://www-user.rhrk.uni-kl.de/~nissler/tuntap/ [uni-kl.de]

Could you just grab the source and build it under Tiger?

Re:Expose - Slowness (1)

DJPenguin (17736) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370328)

That's the driver I'm using. I emailed the authour and he says that he'll be able to release a Tiger version next week when he gets the DVD.

I did try compiling it myself just now, but it failed horribly. I have a feeling it's because the xnu module I used from opendarwin.org is from the wrong branch or something.

Re:Expose - Slowness (5, Funny)

mmkkbb (816035) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370342)

One thing I have noticed so far is that Expose seems a lot less fluid than in Panther.

Well, iPods don't have the best graphics accelerator, so that's probably your difference.

*gets coat*

Re:Expose - Slowness (1)

DJPenguin (17736) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370359)

Walked straight into that one, didn't I!

I actually did wonder if it was something to do with having it running off the iPod - as the machine does feel somewhat slower loading apps. But of course Expose won't be hitting disk (I would hope)

Re:Expose - Slowness (1)

Exitar (809068) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370375)

Its an official version (shipped early) or it's a beta?

Re:Expose - Slowness (1)

Jackdaw Rookery (696327) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370424)

Anicdotal and pointless, but Expose works perfect on my 1GHZ 15 PB with Tiger installed. Perhaps it is due to you running Tiger off your iPod...

RDF Vacuum (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370271)

Remember, outside the vacuum of the RDF no one can hear you cream....

Fantastic (1)

Digital Warfare (746982) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370273)

I honestly can't wait to grab my copy. I genuinly excited !
Never before I have used such an Elegant but powerful OS that just works without much effort
Lets just hope it doesn't get too popular, then we might start seeing Spyware, Viruses etc targeted against Mac, Although, everyone hates Gates so why bother switching platform ?

So what's really new?? (-1, Troll)

rwrife (712064) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370278)

I was looking over the list of new features in this release of MacOS X and didn't see anything that's really new. Sure they've added some flashy graphics and some lame little widget applications, but I don't see anything that has changed in the OS. To me, this should be a free optional download, not an expensive "upgrade".

Excellent. (2, Interesting)

unixbugs (654234) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370285)

I, for one, welcome our new Feline overlords.

As a long time Slackware and FreeBSD user, I'm just waiting for a good check to come in so I can get a Mac. My problem is that I'm afraid I'll find it so cool and so much better that I will drop my beloved OS's and lose interest.

As far as Microsoft is concerned, well, they kissed my ass years ago when I dropped out around Windows 98. If there is ever a chance for Mac's to become more affordable I do not see a future for Microsoft. They can't sue us for NOT using their shit. Heh.

Re:Excellent. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370331)

>They can't sue us for NOT using their shit.
They'll find a way.

Re:Excellent. (1)

millahtime (710421) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370364)

They can't sue us for NOT using their shit.

The the good old US of A they probubally could sue you for not using their stuff. They may not win but could you afford it? They have 50 billion in the bank. That can buy you a lot of lawyers, judges and politicians.

Sounds great, get it out there! (4, Interesting)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370298)

Apple, now raking in profits from its iPod, should seriously consider lowering their prices on their high-end machines to gain market share. Currently APPL is trading at $36.35 +0.40 (1.11%) a share and the stock has gone up consistenty since 2003 when it was around $10 a share. Now is the time for them to make some moves.
If Tiger indeed blows away XP, so they should try to advertise it more, get it out to as many people as possible in order to increase their popularity and inspire more people to use and develop Apple software. If everyone had a better alternative to Windows for say just a fraction more in price, people would start buying it. The iPod has already convinced people Apple is a good brand, all they need is a price incentive to switch to Apple PCs.

Re:Sounds great, get it out there! (3, Insightful)

Dystopian Rebel (714995) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370392)

If Tiger indeed blows away XP

Good G*d, man, in grasping the Tiger's tail let's not lose our grasp of Reality.

OS X may be better than Redmond.*, but 95% of computer users and corporations would rather have a better OS ~that they can install on their current hardware~.

Virii doesn't make you look clever. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370308)

...incidence of spam/virii in the Windows world...

The plural [wikipedia.org] of [reference.com] virus [linuxmafia.com] is viruses.

Writing "virri" doesn't make you look clever, educated people will laugh at you.

Re:Virii doesn't make you look clever. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370367)

Since when does using wikipedia make you educated.

Correcting other people's spelling in an argument is something that you only do when you have no meaningful response.

Re:Virii doesn't make you look clever. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370368)

Writing "virri" doesn't make you look clever, educated people will laugh at you.

And you used a comma instead of a colon. Ha ha ha!

Is there really a reason to switch? (4, Interesting)

sehryan (412731) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370326)

I would love to make the switch, but I am not sure I could justify it. I know it is all subjective, but what is a good reason to switch away from WinXP? Looking for real reasons to switch, not trolls or flames.

For reference, I don't have problems with virii, my system never crashes, and all of my main programs (mainly design programs from Adobe and Macromedia) run very nicely. So what would I gain from switching?

Re:Is there really a reason to switch? (1)

nb caffeine (448698) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370388)

how much effort does it take you to keep your system clean/crash free? Im in the same boat at work (write windows apps, kind of have to run windows for that). I have linux/windows at home. For me, its just "something new" that i want to try. Hopefully i can save 500 bones in the next few months.

slow mail? (1)

_|()|\| (159991) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370337)

I switched from Eudora 5.2 for Windows to Mail.app in 10.3 (thanks, Eudora Mailbox Cleaner [mac.com] ), and I'm generally pleased. However, I'm on a lot of mailing lists at work, and it already takes a few seconds to open some of my mailboxes on a 1.8GHz iMac G5. I was hoping for some improvement in 10.4.

no reg NYT link (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370347)

A link to the NYT article [nytimes.com] that doesn't need registration.

When pointing to the NYT, can you please use the New York Times Link Generator [blogspace.com] ! Links are the whole point of the web! While cutting-and-pasting the text is possible it's a bit of a kludge IMHO.

Why can't they test unix for what it is? (0, Flamebait)

cybrthng (22291) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370349)

Does it run Oracle? Can i run JDeveloper? How stable is JDK 1.5 and Eclipse? Does JDK 1.5 even work?

How much memory can my 64bit system use on a 32bit os?

How stable is the new GCC 4.0?

It seems to me only have one major vendor for most of its hardware lines that is why OSX is able to be stable and clean.. if they STILL have performance problems why do they continue to push outdated hardware and expensive prices?

Here ya go (1)

pastpolls (585509) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370431)

Yes, Yes, it's pretty stable... have had no problems 4-8GB depending on the systen 4.0 has given me no problems. I don't see and performance problems, but it is all in the system you configure.

Slowness (2, Interesting)

Mr_Silver (213637) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370366)

Walt Mossberg of the WSJ says 'Tiger Leaps Out in Front' but complains about slowness of some applications - notably Mail.

In all fairness, I've not used OSX before but back when the Classic and IIc reigned supreme the common complaint about the Mac was that it was too underpowered for the Operating System and the applications. Hell, my 7mhz Amiga felt zippier and responded quicker than the IIc.

Even in the Windows world, iTunes runs rather slow, has limited features (including the annoying "feature" of getting itself and my iPod completely out of sync with "consolidate" being the only, drastic, tool to resolve this) and takes up an inane amount of memory. Hardly a good impression of what to expect from Apple.

Sadly, these two things (including the fact that I'll be effectivily throwing away all the money I've currently invested in my PC) sour my desire to immediately switch to Apple.

However, when we all shift to BTX and I've got no choice but to replace every part of my computer then I have no doubt that I'll make the jump.

This won't be for a couple of years and i think there might be others who will wait until they find that the only way to move forward is replace so much of their PC that switching to Apple entirely isn't so much of a big deal.

port to x86? (1)

NotThatKindOfDoctor (874164) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370369)

Would it be difficult to port Tiger to the amd64 platform, i686, or other architectures? It is based on FreeBSD, correct? It is clear that Apple is able to beat MS on the desktop. I just don't know why they won't compete head on. I would consider buying tiger for my group if I didn't have to buy all new hardware with it.

it like to crash alot (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12370417)

I was at NAB last week and during demos tiger would routinely crash especially when the demo guy would close out final cut 5 and try to open motion. windows xp x64 hasnt crashed once at winhec

Gilbert and Sullivan! (5, Funny)

adavies42 (746183) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370423)

From the NYT article:

The Safari browser now subscribes to R.S.S. news feeds,
And its "private browsing" mode conceals the tracks of online deeds.
There are archives now, and log files, when you send or get a fax;
You can make the pointer bigger on those Jumbotron-screened Macs.
You can start a full-screen slide show from some photos on demand;
And the voice that reads the screen aloud can lend the blind a hand.
There's a password-phrase suggestor meant to make yours more secure,
And the Grapher module draws equations simple and obscure.
Then the Automator program is a geeky software clerk -
You just choose the steps you want performed, and it does all the work.
There's a lot of miscellany, lots of spit-and-polish stuff,
But it works and doesn't slow you down - and these days, that's enough.

Folders (1)

Mr_Silver (213637) | more than 9 years ago | (#12370429)

Why burrow around in folders when you can open any file or program with a couple of keystrokes?

Quite frankly, whilst I like the idea of this, I also like the idea of nicely categorised folders and sub-folders containing all the relevant information on a particular subject.

Searching is only useful if you know what you are looking for. If you want to see the associated documents for a project it's far easier to delve into the project name and then check out the various folders for the plans, test scripts, risks and issues logs and other information.

So yes, search is great, but it isn't going to mean that people can abandon structured storage overnight. Or any time soon.

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