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266 comments

fp to boycott microsoft!!! (1)

ImSoRonery (821613) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463815)

Check this hilarious article, the Freepers are threatening to switch to Apple and Linux because Microsoft supports the gay agenda.

oops url (1)

ImSoRonery (821613) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463827)

Re:oops url (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463968)

those guys are always good for a laugh

Apple is even more leftist than Microsoft.

Ok, so now Microsoft is a "gay" operating system, Apple has been a "gay" operating system for years, Linux is a "socialist/communist" operating system....... Isn't there a conservative operating system out there somewhere?

Laugh all you want, leftie (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463984)

The time is coming... you've better choose your words and side carefully in the future.

Re:oops url (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464032)

Isn't there a conservative operating system out there somewhere?

Why, yes there is. It's called Solaris. Another one is IBM AIX.

Re:oops url (0, Offtopic)

AcidTag (528338) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464046)

OS/2

Nice (5, Funny)

slashalive (853666) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463816)

Now you can seed your secret corporate documents!

Piracy how-tos? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463818)

What's the idea behind Slashdot running piracy how-tos now? Has this site just completely given itself over to the warez kiddiez?

Re:Piracy how-tos? (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463845)

how about protecting legitimate file sharing uses, whether or not the RIAA agrees with them? dont be so quick to criticize, my RIAA stooge friend.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463870)

Legitimate sharing is no excuse.

Most of the filesharing on torrent is illegal. I hope you're not trying to deny that. Either you clean up the torrent yourselves or international legislation of the net (do you really want that?) is eventually going to do it for you.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (5, Insightful)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463904)

Much is illegal and depending on your ethical belifs much more may be immoral. But do not assume one is a superset/subset of the other. Most you can propably say about it is that they intersect.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463915)

Well, filesharing without the consent of the copyright holders is immoral too. What's your point?

Re:Piracy how-tos? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463927)

No it's not, what is your point? When I buy a (C|DV)D, I have the moral right to back it up.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463938)

morality is dead...long live relativism!

Re:Piracy how-tos? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463958)

Yeah. Back it for yourself. Not for the "friends-I-only-know-by-their-nickname-if-at-all" in the internet.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (1)

tomjen (839882) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464238)

You think it is imoral, i may disagree.
You should not equal morality and law.
You should not force your morality upon others.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464276)

Why?? Beacuse the gov't says so?? I say copyright is immoral!

Re:Piracy how-tos? (1, Insightful)

MPHellwig (847067) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463998)

Please repeat after me: The media is not the content en should be judge accordingly.

Don't worry I'll probably will repeat it till we all get it (end of time I guess).

Re:Piracy how-tos? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464042)

What the hell is that supposed to mean?

Yeah, you yourself might not be trading media but most of the people on that system are. Therefore the system is going to go down even if it has legitimate uses.

I don't see why this is such an unthinkable scenario to you.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (1)

MPHellwig (847067) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464154)

That means that you don't get it, the media is the way of transportation of the content. Sharing media is not the bad thing recieving and/or sharing _illegal_ _content_ is.

I can see that this is indeed a difficult topic for you, defining the meaning of words in a sentence.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463873)

He speaks the truth, yet gets modded flamebait...only on/.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (2, Interesting)

LebenOjanen (866955) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463881)

The truth and something we hear over and over and over and over and over again are two different things. :)

Re:Piracy how-tos? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463853)

What's the idea behind trolling and complaining about an article you disagree with? Get over it.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463868)

Pirate away :). FreeBSD 5.3 [freebsd.org] FreeBSD 4.11 [freebsd.org]

Re:Piracy how-tos? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463882)

Yeah? So you can get FreeBSD on torrent. So what?

That doesn't change the fact that most filesharing on torrent is illegal. Eliminate illegal warez on torrent and nobody's going to bother your BSD sharing.

Piracy how-tos?-A "./" Caesar. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463880)

[THe other AC]
"how about protecting legitimate file sharing uses"

You don't need to hide legitimate material.

[The OP]
" Has this site just completely given itself over to the warez kiddiez?"

Someone look up "transitional ethics" for this guy.

Re:Piracy how-tos?-A "./" Caesar. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463895)

You don't need to hide legitimate material.

Cue all the warez-boy screaming about how encrypted P2P is going to help the human rights of Falun Gong people in China... (while it also helps them to get more warez)

Re:Piracy how-tos?-A "./" Caesar. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463905)

there are plenty of reasons for wanting to obfuscate material, none of which necessarily imply illigitimacy. what if you are downloading goat pr0n...or you are a windoze freak embarrassed about wanting to try out linux and you are afraid that someone's sniffing the network you're accessing the torrent from.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463891)

ummm, are you a moron? Just because it says "torrent" does NOT mean piracy. There are many legitimate uses for bittorrent and many legitimate reason to want to encrypt files....put them together and what do you get? RTFA next time you fucking mpaa monkey.

Re:Piracy how-tos? (2)

ninboy (882101) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463935)

hmm , but why would you need to encrypt your torrent downloads of say linux iso images ? oh yeah you probably wouldn't .....

Blizzard (4, Funny)

Alcimedes (398213) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463944)

Shit, you better call up Blizzard quick. They've been using this warez technology to distribute their game patches. Who knew all torrents were illegal!

Douche bag.

why? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463825)

Pertend I'm stupid, why would I want this?

Re:why? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463885)

So you can have an encrypted MP3 collection.

On 2000/XP, you can do this yourself by right clicking on the folder containing your warez/tunez and checking the encryption box. As long as Bittorrent runs with you as the current user, its reads and writes to that folder are automatically encrypted and decrypted by the filesystem.

now that's useful (2, Funny)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463950)

encrypted mp3s sound so much better than regular ones.

Re:now that's useful (2, Funny)

Surt (22457) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464153)

No no no, the point is that they sound so much worse to everyone else. The RIAA browsing your filesystem for example.

Be very, very careful when using EFS!!! (5, Informative)

Futurepower(R) (558542) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464055)


Be very, very careful when using the Windows XP built-in file encryption, called EFS (Encryping File System).

EFS is very poorly documented. The encryption is tied to your user password in a way that is apparently not documented. EFS depends on being part of a Windows 2003 Server domain in a way that is not clearly documented; if you are using Windows XP on a stand alone computer, there are situations in which you will lose your files forever.

Microsoft technical support agrees with what I just said, and provides no help or fixes.

The official Microsoft forums contain the complaints of many people who have lost their files due to problems with EFS. One man said he lost 11 years of research.

People complain about Microsoft every day on Slashdot, but I've never seen a discussion by anyone who seemed to realize how bad Microsoft truly is.

Re:Be very, very careful when using EFS!!! (1)

Stardate (13547) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464101)

Holy crap dude. Thanks for the warning! No mod points right now, but I'd love to find their "official position" on bugs like these in the KnowledgeBase (support.microsoft.com) but that probably won't happen until it's been "fixed".

Re:Be very, very careful when using EFS!!! (3, Informative)

Ph33r th3 g(O)at (592622) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464126)

And don't forget that as a member of a domain, a GPO can cause an EFS key to be escrowed with the admininstrators. So if you're thinking this will hide your MP3z at work from the domain admins or SMS sweeps, no go. (Of course, if the filesystem is mounted during an SMS enumeration/collection sweep, it doesn't matter what encryption you're using.)

Re:Be very, very careful when using EFS!!! (5, Insightful)

Universal Indicator (626874) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464127)

11 years of research without a single backup? Sounds like the person was asking for it!

Re:Be very, very careful when using EFS!!! (5, Insightful)

LnxAddct (679316) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464158)

Perhaps he was encrypting his backups because of the nature of the research.
Regards,
Steve

For Your Eyes Only... (2, Informative)

xtracto (837672) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464165)

from MSDN: Taking Recovery Precautions [microsoft.com]

Recovering Encrypted Files

Any data recovery agent can recover an encrypted file when a user's private key fails to decrypt the file.

To recover an encrypted file
1. Log on to a computer that has access to the user's profile; for example, a computer that has a designated recovery console or a recovery key on removable media such as a floppy disk. You might log on at the user's computer or the user might have a roaming profile.
2. Locate the encrypted file. For example, the user might have made a backup of the file by using Backup or sent the file to a WebDAV Web folder.
3. Decrypt the file by using either the cipher command or My Computer. This will make the file available to the user.

For more information about decrypting files, see "Working with Encryption and Decryption" earlier in this chapter.


As for corrupted encripted files, well, I think it is almost impossible for an encripted file to be restored if it is corrupted, unless it has some kind of recovery record overhead...

Of course, I would better opt out for an standard open cyphering method.

Re:Be very, very careful when using EFS!!! (1)

torokun (148213) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464219)


See? Security through obscurity _can_ be effective.

Re:Be very, very careful when using EFS!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464248)

This is another example of mod-by-agreement.
Anyway, EFS is documented perfectly well [google.com] . Certainly better than cryptfs or encfs.

Workgroup and domain users can designate an EFS Recovery Agent [google.com] should they need to decrpyt EFS files in a pinch. I believe the process can be started with a simple cipher /r. More people have problems with EFS than with OSS alternatives because more people use MS products.

The way EFS works is the way it should work. Maybe you should check out the documentation that actually does exist before you slam MS based on off-topic idealogical disagreements.

Re:Be very, very careful when using EFS!!! (2, Informative)

nolife (233813) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464251)

I use Truecrypt [truecrypt.org] . It is free and open source. Provides much more flexibility and the encrypted source file(s) can be stored on any medium (network, flash, floppy, etc..) Sure it is not durectly integrated into the OS but for me, it strikes the perfect balance between security and piece of mind.

Re:why? (5, Funny)

big_groo (237634) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463889)

Pertend I'm stupid...

No need.

Re:why? (3, Informative)

jurt1235 (834677) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463890)

Simple: You have random users which make backups to your machine but don't want anybody else to be able to read these backups.

why?-Gmail Privacy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463923)

"Simple: You have random users which make backups to your machine but don't want anybody else to be able to read these backups."

So it's safe to say that slashdotters encrypt all their Gmail then?

why?-Ping of death. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463908)

"Pertend I'm stupid, why would I want this?"

Because standing at the street corner, handing out copies is too dangerous.

Re:why? (5, Insightful)

caluml (551744) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463969)

Yeah, I can't work this out either. The problem with torrents is not storing them safely, or downloading them safely. It's that when you start downloading a file using torrents, your IP address is known by the tracker which gives away the fact you're a downloader.
Sure, store them on an AES-256 encrypted filesystem, sure, use SSL for the transfer. But it doesn't help the fact that the downloaders/uploaders are known.

Re:why? (2, Insightful)

theraccoon (592935) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464057)

I don't know. TFA says:

"You at least need to proof the person actually possesses the data and in my case... good luck proofing that."

Actually... Bittorrent shows who's connected to you, who's uploading to you, and who's downloading from you. Those logs, at least in the good 'ole US of A, are proof enough for God the RIAA to file a lawsuit against you (or as the case may be, your IP address). The RIAA has never had to confiscate a file sharer's HD or computer, but I bet if they did, they could find someone or some way to de-crypt the files on that server. A fun experiment, but as far as I can see, it's not very practical in terms of stopping a lawsuit.

even the author doesn't know... (1)

SuperBanana (662181) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464083)

why would I want this?

From the site:

"Use? Actually, I'm not sure"

As others have pointed out- wiretaps, "give us the key or you go to jail just as long", as well as simply not unplugging the box...all make this project pretty pointless.

I also got a kick out of the author bragging, under a screenshot showing links to numerous illegal torrent sites, "that's a legal torrent I'm downloading!" Do these people think they're clever or something?

Re:even the author doesn't know... (1)

holysin (549880) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464131)

To answer your question: They feel no more clever then the people that comment about how unclever they are...

Sure, it's pointless, but it gives great experience for the real (read: business) world, using open (for the most part) software.

even the author doesn't know...What career. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464221)

"Sure, it's pointless, but it gives great experience for the real (read: business) world, using open (for the most part) software."

And lockpicking, and hot-wiring your car will be great training for that locksmith/electronic tech. career I've been eyeballing.

Re:even the author doesn't know... (1)

forlornhope (688722) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464152)

I do believe you are wrong. I don't think the police or anyone can compelle you to give them encryption keys. Since they are not physical, but knowledge based, you "giving" them the keys is actually you testifying. The 5th amendment protects you from them forcing you to testify.

So in the end if they can't keep you in jail till you give them the keys. Also, the RIAA surely can't make you tell them.

Re:why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464220)

Pertend I'm stupid, why would I want this?

Is pertending necessary? :)

slashdotted (4, Funny)

crazyray (776321) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463837)

from the "about" page: Professional co-location was/is out of the question simply because of the costs and I did/do have bigger plans than to be able to host this kind of thing at home. To be honest, if this thing grows any bigger I'll be moving the whole shebang to a datacenter after all... Prices have dropped quite a bit since about two years ago and now. But, until then, all this comes from my server at a friends house where he has an amazing 10mbit up&down.

Well, I guess he USED to be your friend, until you slashdotted his internet connection....

Fantastic! (1)

Segfault666 (662554) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463841)

This is a fantastic piece on our [my] favorite OS. How-to's can be taken both ways, piracy or not - this is a fanstastic tutorial.

Great! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463852)

Yay! Now we can trade movies and music safely without those pesky copyright holders breathing down our necks!

Information wants to be free! (unless it's our identity, of course)

Also encrypted my machine (5, Funny)

jurt1235 (834677) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463867)

It now looks like a toaster.

I would be impressed if.. (1)

Keruo (771880) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463877)

he would've used usb thumb drive to boot that thing and store the encryption key there.

Another pitfall is that samba.. not secure.. again, if he'd install vpn server there that would create secured medium for accessing it, would be another story.

The saddest part probably is that he raped SGI 320 and put AMD in it! just to have cool case for his desktop, seesh, he'd have much more geek respect, by keeping that SGI intact.

Re:I would be impressed if.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464234)

Even though the 320 was unique (not unix, not really winders either--as far as windows goes anyhow), it's just not an SGI to me. It's a bastard SGI, not fully qualified of the bug badge (or their stupid newer logo for that matter).

If he tore apart an O2, Octane, Origin 200, or earlier machines (Crimson, etc), or for that matter any other SGI that actually deserved to be called SGI, then I'd be disappointed. There are people that have done such. They deserved to be kicked. Hard.

As such, I really couldn't care less if he tore apart win32 SGIs. As a matter of fact, if he could magically make the entire concept of a SGI running windows just go away, I'd be all the happier!

Re:I would be impressed if.. (1)

ninboy (882101) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464274)

wasn't the 320 just one of the intel based NT workstations ? who cares if its not a mips/irix machine

Note to law enforcement. Dont reboot. (4, Interesting)

Bazman (4849) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463884)

I'm guessing the encryption password needs to be re-entered on reboot (before mounting the FS, it seems). So if the feds bust in and kick you off your warez box, as long as they dont switch it off, they've got your 0-day filez in the plain. Just dd it all across the network.

And oh yeah, with SMB as your network file system, is the traffic securely encrypted? Weakest link, and all that...

Baz

PS yes, I know you're only doing legal stuff :)

And another thing... (1)

Bazman (4849) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463894)

TFA suggests you use his cryptfs script thus:

cryptfs -m Encryption key: secretstring

dont forget to zap your .bash_history file afterwards. Its the first place we look.

Baz

Re:Note to law enforcement. Dont reboot. (1)

radixvir (659331) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463955)

Even worse HES DOWNLOADING FROM BITTORENT. Why would the feds need to bust in? The **AAs will just catch him like every other bt user since the bt protocol itself isnt encrypted. Like any other P2P network, users connect to other users would have the data. Just start downloading a torrent and log everyones ips that connect to you.

Re:Note to law enforcement. Dont reboot. (1)

comwiz56 (447651) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464203)

He lives in Holland and notes that in the article the **AA (or whoever) must show proof of possesion to make charges.

Big fan... (3, Funny)

creimer (824291) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463907)

Can anyone identify the size of the fan being used on that server? I'm used to seeing 60mm and 80mm fans but not one that big. (Although when I had an AMD K-5 computer back in 1997, I would open up the case during the summer and use a 20" floor fan to keep it cool.) I think have the front end open like defeats the purpose of cooling down that many hard drives.

Re:Big fan... (1)

chowells (166602) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463961)

Looks like a 120mm. They aren't _that_ uncommon.

Re:Big fan... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463965)

Looks like a 120mm

Re:Big fan... (1)

Anti-Trend (857000) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463978)

That's a 120mm fan, which is pretty standard fare. I use them quite a bit in the workstations at work, since they move a lot of BTUs without sounding like a blowdryer in the process.

-AT

Re:Big fan... (1)

richie2000 (159732) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463989)

Looks like a 120 mm fan to me. They're becoming fairly common now, especially among the silent PC crowd. I even come across 90mm fans now and then...

Re:Big fan... (1)

zakezuke (229119) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464103)

Looks like a 120 mm fan to me. They're becoming fairly common now, especially among the silent PC crowd. I even come across 90mm fans now and then...

The 90mm fan size was common on IBM power supplies that fit in their full sized AT case. They were huge, about twice the size of our current standard, and typically the cover had a hole cut into it so you could actually use the big ass switch. It was normal for me to see the hole for the big switch on clone power supplies covered with a plate with wires coming out for the front switch.

90mm was also very common on systems that had no dedicated CPU fan but rather employed the use of a shroud and placed the fan on the lower part of the power supply.

Re:Big fan... (1)

bleckywelcky (518520) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464020)

As everyone else said, 120mm. I've got 2 of them in my case. Why? Because they are bigger, they move more air with less fans (more air/fan), less power, and are typically quieter for the amount of air they move. For my case, I would need to replace my 2 120mm fans with probably 4 80mm fans to get the same CFM. All the while, power and noise will increase (as well as cost).

Re:Big fan... (1)

zakezuke (229119) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464056)

Can anyone identify the size of the fan being used on that server? I'm used to seeing 60mm and 80mm fans but not one that big. (Although when I had an AMD K-5 computer back in 1997, I would open up the case during the summer and use a 20" floor fan to keep it cool.) I think have the front end open like defeats the purpose of cooling down that many hard drives.

As others have pointed out, 120mm (4.72 inches). This is pretty much the perfect size to mount in three 5.25 inch bays. I have one mounted on my system right where the brackets for the extra large cards go at 5v. Both my 120mm fans were pulls. One was from a Compaq 386 server which employed the use backplane and motherboard card. The other is a 120V was from an odd 8086 systems with linear power supply... i.e. not a switching power supply.

The front cover is likely to be off due to there being no room for it as there's a fan in the way. Either that or no vent holes in the front cover.

I did this once... (4, Funny)

k4_pacific (736911) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463934)

I built a fully encrypted system once. Even the source was encrypted. Sadly, I lost the key and it was all for naught...

Re:I did this once... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464017)

I got PGP. Now I don't want nobody knowing that I am using encryption so that is why I am posting anonymously.

Anyway I have a question. Since I don't want nobody knowing that I use encryption I encrypted my PGP.

Well it incrypted just fine but now it won't uncrypt. It says an error message about "command not found" or something.

Am I doing something wrong?

Re:I did this once... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464037)

I want to write a freeware opensource encryption program. I will advertise only that it will encrypt the contents of "My Documents" so that nobody can decrypt it.

After that my program will print a message about the commercial version having support for decryption and where to send $25.00 via Pay Pal.

Defeats the purpose... (4, Insightful)

Doodhwala (13342) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463943)

So, what exactly does this accomplish? When you use Bittorrent, the protocol both downloads and uploads data at the same time (look up the tit-for-tat policy followed by BT to ensure fairness). If you were in the US, all the RIAA needs to do to sue you is download a single chunk of data from you. They don't need to break your door down and cart the computer away. So, the encryption is moot anyway.

Re:Defeats the purpose... (1)

Xarius (691264) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464007)

How would they prove you weren't using it for legitimate purposes if it was encrypted though?

Mirror? (2, Interesting)

Fjornir (516960) | more than 9 years ago | (#12463960)

Site is not responding. Anyone have a mirror? Anyone who happened to read it able to comment on how this compares to Freenet [freenetproject.org] ?

Re:Mirror? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464110)

Well, it shouldn't be too tough. You see, the article says he's using it for BitTorrent and BitTorrent is not that similar to FreeNet since it leaves a very clear record of every user's IP. However, you can proxy the identity of that IP if you are a Linux user running a properly configured TOR, Privoxy and Proxychains configuration. In that case, you could use BitTorrent in a way that it is somewhat similar to FreeNet. But make sure you test your configuration to be sure it's working.
This article isn't really about that though. You can find more information about the difference between FreeNet and TORified applications as well as other privacy solutions, of which there are several, at tor.eff.org.
Then again, even if you don't use any kind of privacy tools it's only the tracker that would have your IP in the case of a torrent and trackers are intentionally configured to have very short lived logs. So, even completely unprotected Bittorrent isn't really that dangerous. For instance, when LokiTorrents went down the MPAA claimed they had hundreds of thousands of IPs and would initiate legal procedings en masse, but that turned out to be bluff after the devlopers of the tracker pointed out that the logs expired in a matter of hours.
However, one way a copyright narc could entrap you would be to set up their own tracker where they could definitely monitor everything and store the logs as long as they wanted. That's tricky too though because then they would have to be contributing the original files and it would end up like the fiasco at PiratBay(sp?) in Sweden.

Obstruction of justice (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12463987)

If the cops bust you, and you have an encrypted hard drive and you don't hand over the password, you will be charged with obstruction of justice. The maximum sentence of obstruction of justice is the same as the crime you are trying to avoid. So it really doesn't help you avoid anything.

http://www.ohiobar.org/pub/lycu/index.asp?articlei d=138 [ohiobar.org]

Re:Obstruction of justice (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464018)

Damn. When did we turn into such a police state?!

Re:Obstruction of justice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464024)

because, at least if it is encrypted, you have time and a bargaining chip. since they cannot prove you are committing a crime without proving that you have illegal files, they cannot bust you for merely maintaining an encrypted volume. if people had to roll over and give up the keys whenever the cops wanted, we'd be living in communist china. thankfully, america is not there (yet).

Re:Obstruction of justice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464053)

Not true. If they download an illegal file from your system (ie. warez or kiddie porn) then that is proof and could arrest/convict you just on that. With warrant in hand, they would get your hard drive so that hopefully they can catch *other* people (ie. with logs, or emails, etc). So the only people you are helping are others... it doesn't help you at all. Maybe if you work for the mafia and you'd take the fall for the rest of your familia, then it might be useful, but for the regular unsophisticated joe, it doesn't do you any good whatsoever.

Re:Obstruction of justice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464038)

Obstruction of justice doesn't kick you off computers for the rest of your life, nor does it give you one of those government trojans.

Re:Obstruction of justice (2, Interesting)

fbjon (692006) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464058)

But if the very long and complex password is stored in a file, which doesn't exist, is that obstruction?

Re:Obstruction of justice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464075)

Yes. You are destroying evidence and you will be charged with obstruction of justice. Just like if you shred documents a la Arthur Anderson/Enron.

Re:Obstruction of justice (2, Insightful)

fbjon (692006) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464139)

Ok, so what if the key is only held in memory, or perhaps some kind of self-destructing key such that the loss of the key is invoked by the authorities, not the accused... is there a line somewhere?

Re:Obstruction of justice (1)

pegr (46683) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464085)

If the cops bust you, and you have an encrypted hard drive and you don't hand over the password, you will be charged with obstruction of justice.

And the link you so thoughtfully provided says nothing about forcing someone to testify against themselves, which is what you're talking about.

Damn, did I just feed a troll?

Re:Obstruction of justice (1)

Felmir (444239) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464090)

What about not giving the password on the grounds that it might incriminate you?

Re:Obstruction of justice (2, Insightful)

galdur (829400) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464106)

I wonder how the data retention^h^h^h^h^h^h^h^h^h deletion policies corporations such as Microsoft have put in place on e-mail would fare in that regard....

Re:Obstruction of justice --misleading wording. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464174)

You use the phrase "don't hand over" but this is an oversimplification of a complicated legal issue.
Let's take two examples.
Example One
You say: "Fuck you dirty rat coppers, I have the key and I spit at your entire justice system which I haven nothing but contempt for. I have the key and I refuse to give it to you. Go to hell."
Well, in that case I think you might be right.
But let's try another instance of "don't hand over" that has different implications.
Example Two
You say: "Key? What key? You mean the key to the house? Oh, the computer. It doesn't need a key. Oh, you mean an encrypted file key? How's that work now? I'm not sure about all that really. Maybe you should ask my lawyer.
I think the second one is hardly going to be grounds for obstruction because by the time you and your lawyer talk it out for a few hours you'll come up with a good one.
Ronald Reagan pulled that crap under oath in front of the Senate for Iran Contra and he was snickering he thought it was so funny that fucking asshole. And they didn't find that old bastard in contempt.

Simple: (1)

Sairret (786685) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464186)

"I don't recall."

Re:Obstruction of justice (5, Interesting)

Albinofrenchy (844079) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464287)

Password? Encrypted? Officer, those files aren't encrypted, they are just randomly generated files I made... On a more serious note, it would be a nice safety feature if that when a certain wrong password was typed in, it would show an unencrypted version of something completely legal.

Already Been Done (2, Informative)

Alien Venom (634222) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464019)

I've already been doing this for quite some time now with Azureus [sourceforge.net] , and the Swing Web Interface [sourceforge.net] plugin alongside RSS Feed Scanner [sourceforge.net] plugin (to download TV shows automatically). There's even an IRC bot [sourceforge.net] plugin to allow control over an IRC network/channel.

Why is my way better? Well, the default BitTorrent client is somewhat lacking feature wise. Azureus is more powerful and gives you more control over what to do with the torrents when they are done downloading. Not to mention the support for trackerless torrents [slashdot.org] in the latest version. As for encryption goes... uh, why? The only people who have access to my "files" are those that are on the network. And the Swing Web Interface plugin has password functionality with HTTP SSL (you need GPG to be installed).

Differentl laws in that country make this useful! (3, Insightful)

orionware (575549) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464059)

At first I thought, "wtf good is that?!". I figured it was for the ultra paranoid. Then I realized. He lives in a country where the law has to actually have physical proof of you breaking the law. Here in the US I don't think they feds need to kick in the door and find your mp3s being fed to the world to actually charge you. They just strongarm your ISP for your info.

The theory in his country being if they can't find anything on your drive, then they can't prove shit.

Must be nice...

I prefer VNC & Azureus (1)

squisher (212661) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464173)

I setup the a similar system but without encryption, just running a vnc server and azureus in it. The setup really is a snap: copying torrent files onto a samba share with the help from a simple batch file and Azureus checks every 1 min to start downloading them. Then setup a vncviewer shortcut that includes the password and you have all the comforts of running a local bt client with all the benefits of a central server!

~Squisher

Slashdotted - Mirrors Here (2, Informative)

Kinetic (3472) | more than 9 years ago | (#12464237)

It looks like the article is down. As usual, MirrorDot [mirrordot.com] has the mirror available.

HOWTO (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12464241)

Step 1: Install Windows XP
Step 2: Install Azureus
Step 3: Enable Azureus Web Interface
Step 4: ???
Step 5: Profit!
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