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432 comments

So... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573587)

Will this eventually leave the BSA and others with no BT tracker sites to shut down, so that their only option will be to go after end users or to DOS the P2P networks themselves?

Re:So... (4, Informative)

TrevorB (57780) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573607)

It sounds as if the .torrent files still need to be downloaded or stored somewhere. It's just the middle step of the tracker that can (optionally) be eliminated.

Re:So... (5, Informative)

saskboy (600063) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573885)

Essentially, the client is now also a simple tracker. You still need a torrent file, you just don't have to set up a tracker now, just open your client, like you'd normally do for Kazaa or other file sharing programs.

Here is the bittorrent.com explanation:

***
BitTorrent Goes Trackerless: Publishing with BitTorrent gets easier!

As part of our ongoing efforts to make publishing files on the Web painless and disruptively cheap, BitTorrent has released a 'trackerless' version of BitTorrent in a new release.

Suppose you bought a television station, you could broadcast your progamming to everyone in a 50 mile radius. Now suppose the population of your town tripled. How much more does it cost you to broadcast to 3 times as many people? Nothing. The same is not true of the Web. If you own a website and you publish your latest video on it, as popularity increases, so does your bandwidth bill! Sometimes by a lot! However, thanks to BitTorrent the website owner gets almost near-broadcast economics on the web by harnessing the unused upstream bandwidth of his/her users.

In prior versions of BitTorrent, publishing was a 3 step process. You would:

1. Create a ".torrent" file -- a summary of your file which you can put on your blog or website
2. Create a "tracker" for that file on your webserver so that your downloaders can find each other
3. Create a "seed" copy of your download so that your first downloader has a place to download from

Many of you have blogs and websites, but dont have the resources to set up a tracker. In the new version, we've created an optional 'trackerless' method of publication. Anyone with a website and an Internet connection can host a BitTorrent download!

While it is called trackerless, in practice it makes every client a lightweight tracker. A clever protocol, based on a Kademlia distributed hash table or "DHT", allows clients to efficiently store and retrieve contact information for peers in a torrent.

When generating a torrent, you can choose to utilize the trackerless system or a traditional dedicated tracker. A dedicated tracker allows you to collect statistics about downloads and gives you a measure of control over the reliability of downloads. The trackerless system makes no guarantees to reliability but requires no resources of the publisher. The trackerless system is not consulted when downloading a traditionally tracked torrent.

Although still in Beta release, the trackerless version of BitTorrent, and the latest production version are available at http://www.bittorrent.com/ [bittorrent.com]

So...Idle Hands are... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573778)

*sigh*

All this work for a less than honorable cause. Just think what could be if all this human effort had been channeled through a charity, say Habitat for Humanity, your local food bank, or teaching someone to read. Then people could be well on there way to having a life and a job. Then able to buy not only the necessities, but all those optional things, like movies, music, and games, as well as books.

Re:So...Idle Hands are... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573847)

This work will hopefully cause anonymous p2p filesharing to become widespread. This will, in turn, render music companies obsolete.
Less lobbying, less facist laws and less greed notwithstanding, this also helps in the big picture by promoting and strengthing open source software development in general. This has many benefits, some we've seen, and some we have yet to realize.
These people may not be working in the front lines, they're still contributing.

A lot of coders I know never had a college education, nor any friends with similiar mindsets. Projects like this help adolecents chose a path for the first part of their lives. It can be argued that potential coders who _don't_ find projects like these never get into programming. Some of these people may work themselves back into blue collar status, where some can start the cycle of not being able to read/eat/work all over again.

I'm curious (2, Interesting)

Quickfry (799118) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573591)

What, exactly, does this mean for the state of legal and illegal torrents? How long would this take to fully implement?

How (1)

MankyD (567984) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573594)

Can someone explain the gist of how this works?

Re:How (0, Redundant)

dzo (810034) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573616)

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/bittorrent.htm [howstuffworks.com] google for the rest

Re:How (2, Insightful)

MankyD (567984) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573635)

I know how bit torrent works - how does trackerless bit torrent work? Don't you still need a starting point?

Easy, it's the same, but different (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573724)

Instead of posting to a tracker, you post your .torrent to a forum via free webspace.

It's the same basic method, just now the actually torrent mechanicans are now on the peer instead of the server.

Re:Easy, it's the same, but different (1)

tyagiUK (625047) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573748)

So the initial seed of a torrent is still named in the .torrent file? (be it hashed or obfuscated)

Re:How (4, Interesting)

MankyD (567984) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573617)

More specifically, how can you connect to a torrent download if you don't know where to start? Isn't the starting point the same as a tracker?

Re:How (5, Funny)

blixel (158224) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573685)

how can you connect to a torrent download if you don't know where to start? Isn't the starting point the same as a tracker?

There's an A-end and a B-end seperated by some amount of time. Say 1 minute. At the A-end, you start your search for the torrent. The search continues for 60 seconds until the torrent is found at the B-end. The torrent data is then loaded at the B-end which is picked back up at the A-end 60 seconds prior. From your perspective, it happens instantly.

The searches are also modular in design. So you can actually include a second search at the B-end. So at the A-end, you might actually get back a second result for something you didn't even know you searched for.

Don't worry about the noise in the attic. It's just birds.

Re:How (1)

MankyD (567984) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573707)

That still doesn't explain what the A-end is connected to. Another peer one would assume (C, D, E, whoever,) but how did A find this peer in the first place?

Re:How (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573738)

Hook, line, and sinker.

Re:How (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573865)

It's a parabolic thing, and the bath of mercury is just for showing off.

Re:How (1)

dzo (810034) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573725)

First you need to download a program (bittornado) They can be found for most operating systems. Then you must go to a site to download a torrent file open it with the bittorrent program and thats basically it, read the programs manual.

Re:How (1)

MankyD (567984) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573764)

I KNOW how bit torrent works - but what good is a trackerless torrent if you still need a host somewhere who's up and running to connect to, as specified by the .torrent file.

I'm talking about a protocol level. This doesn't seem to accomplish much in the way of providing anonymity if everyone in the swarm still had to go through the same starting node somewhere. I don't see how else it could work though.

Re:How (5, Insightful)

Skynyrd (25155) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573799)

This doesn't seem to accomplish much in the way of providing anonymity if everyone in the swarm still had to go through the same starting node somewhere.

I don't think the idea was to make an anonymous torrent; I think it was to make it easier for bloggers and websire owners to post a .torrent file without having to connect to a tracker (which you may not hae access to).

Joe Six Pack wih webhosting can now post a .torrent without needing a tracker.

Re:How (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573642)

Well you click on the link in the article and read the stroy to find out.

1st (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573596)

1st

cool (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573597)

very cool. take that dmca!

Damn it! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573610)

I hate it when I squeeze harder and things start to slip through my fingers.

Re:Damn it! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573788)

Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed. The ability to subpoena a teenager is insignificant next to the power of the MPAA.

Damn it! K-Why? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573797)

"I hate it when I squeeze harder and things start to slip through my fingers."

Let's leave your sex life out of this.

Diluting its strengths? (5, Interesting)

Neoncow (802085) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573615)

I thought the advantage of BT was the strength in large numbers approach? As more people join the swarm, there is more excess bandwidth. And the overall speed increases, right?

If you lower the cost of entry to producing a BT release, won't that mean more .torrent file swimming around? With the increase of different torrents everywhere, won't that dilute the power of BT?

Is it legal to post only in questions?

Re:Diluting its strengths? (1)

NineNine (235196) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573648)

What cost of entry to producing a torrent? There's zero now. And no, the point of .torrents is that each has to match based on hash files. You can't have people like the RIAA introducing bogus files.

That's about all I could understand of your post... sorry!

Re:Diluting its strengths? (4, Interesting)

lakeland (218447) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573813)

The cost before was that you had to have (access to) a torrent server. The requirement that you had to run a torrent server (or use sharereactor, etc.) was a barrier to entry -- especially if you weren't sharing linux, anime or wares (all of which have easy-to-use torrent servers available to the public).

As for the second point, imagine a scenario where I have a big file (perhaps an iso) and I create and upload a .torrent for it. Then I lend the ISO to a friend who also creates an uploads a .torrent for it.

Now, in the old model there are only a few places you could have uploaded your .torrent to, and so chances are you and your friend wouldn't both have bothered, and even if you both did, your friend would see that you'd already uploaded it.

However, in the new model you won't notice, and the internet will have some people downloading via your torrent and others downloading via your friend's even though the data being shared is identical. At least, that was the grandparen'ts concern, and I suspect they are right.

Re:Diluting its strengths? (4, Interesting)

TheVoice900 (467327) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573869)

Many bittorrent clients such as Azureus have built in trackers that only take a couple of button presses to start up and track any files you want. Hardly rocket science.

Re:Diluting its strengths? (1)

drakethegreat (832715) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573666)

What you said is most likely the case and unfortunate but still a benefit of trackerless BitTorrent is still there. People still will be uploading what they have completed while downloading so the overall banwidth will still be higher then other P2P networks and the main advantage is not lost.

Re:Diluting its strengths? (4, Funny)

F13 (9091) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573733)

Is it legal to post only in questions?

Yes, Yes it is. The Independent Thought Police have been dispatched.

Have a nice day.

Re:Diluting its strengths? (2, Interesting)

LFS.Morpheus (596173) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573863)

While this makes it easier to create a .torrent, most users don't know how to do so in the first place, and even if know how, they would still need to put the .torrent somewhere, and its the torrent's popularity that determines if it lives or dies. If there is a better, more popular torrent, then it is unlikely that many people would go for the second one.

I guess what I"m saying is -- torrents are a popularity contest. You can't win by being a poser.

Re:Diluting its strengths? (5, Informative)

Jeremi (14640) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573905)

If you lower the cost of entry to producing a BT release, won't that mean more .torrent file swimming around?


Hopefully... allowing more people to post more content is one of the project's goals.


With the increase of different torrents everywhere, won't that dilute the power of BT?


No, because the uploaders for a given file consist only of the people who have previously downloaded that file. So no matter how many files are "out there", the total bandwidth available to distribute any particular file is always proportional to the number of people interested in that file.


File-A's popularity won't leech bandwidth from File-B's swarm, because File-B's swarm wasn't providing any bandwidth for File-A in the first place.

There still is a target (4, Interesting)

Fruny (194844) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573641)

I wonder what's going to stop **AA from shutting down the login servers. Sure, there might not be trackers to shut down, but a network is no good if nobody can join it. How do you expect to find out who your "peers" are otherwise?

Re:There still is a target (1)

qbwiz (87077) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573692)

I'm sure that the torrent will include the address of the person who's seeding the file. Once he goes offline it will be impossible to join in, but there are many more torrents/seeds than trackers, which makes it harder to shut the same fraction down as before.

Re:There still is a target (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573912)

The 'login server' doesn't have to do anything illegal. It may only need to tell you about other users, knowing nothing about what files they have.

How does it work? (4, Insightful)

logik3x (872368) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573644)

How does this work... how do you find peers to download from? Are they included in the .torrent file? IF so ain't that a big risk... if MPAA start collection peers informations? I guess it's encrypted but it can always be broken.. anyways if anyone have more info on how it actually works please inform me :P

Re:How does it work? (1)

sharkman67 (548107) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573732)

If the MPAA decrypts the peer info are they not in violation of the DMCA? Boy wouldn't it be fun to sue them!

Great, further adoption (4, Insightful)

Sv-Manowar (772313) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573645)

I'm really glad to see this coming in the mainstream BitTorrent client. At the moment it can be hard to use the distributed tracking system because of its dependence on Azureus as a client. A lot of people have been making noise about this, and hopefully now that its in the main client, the developers of the other BitTorrent clients will make implementing support for this more of a priority.

Does this really change... (3, Interesting)

banuk (148382) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573650)

...what happened to btefnet et al? I mean the MPAA could still shut the site down b/c they were hosting the torrent file right?

Re:Does this really change... (4, Interesting)

42forty-two42 (532340) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573683)

The azureus implementation has support for 'magnet' links, which allow you to simply exchange a small link and download the .torrent file from the other peers directly. Search on keywords 'magnet btih' for examples, though they're not commonly used yet.

If this technology takes off (5, Interesting)

KarmaOverDogma (681451) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573656)

I think we'll see two things:

1) **AA will squirm for a while
2) **AA will work harder than before to moniyor and restrict user rights on the internet, via congressional purchasesing, er, I mean lobbying.

I think #2 will ultimately be futile in that it will not slow their loss of control over media content distribution (and copyright violation) but it will make life unpleasant for many...

If this technology takes off-Godless ISO. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573823)

To paraphrase a Star Trek Movie: What does a Linux ISO need with a 'trackerless torrent'?

From TFA (2, Insightful)

killa62 (828317) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573659)

Go Ahead, mod me redundunt.
"This distributed tracker is an Azureus only feature."
So if other clients are working on other ways of distributed tracking, wouldn't this mean bittorrent would be different for every client and there would not be one "bittorrent" that worked with everything?

Re:From TFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573854)

Actually... From TFA.... The official client has it as well...

http://www.bittorrent.com/trackerless.html [bittorrent.com]

clipping for you so you can save your fingers from that harsh clicking..

BitTorrent Goes Trackerless: Publishing with BitTorrent gets easier!

As part of our ongoing efforts to make publishing files on the Web painless and disruptively cheap, BitTorrent has released a 'trackerless' version of BitTorrent in a new release.

Re:From TFA (1)

SMS_Design (879582) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573873)

At the time, it was Azureus only. Keep in mind, Azureus is an open source project on sourceforge. Anyone can implement their strategy into their bittorrent client.

Performance (2)

mauriatm (531406) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573661)

"While it is called trackerless, in practice it makes every client a lightweight tracker. A clever protocol, based on a Kademlia distributed hash table or "DHT", allows clients to efficiently store and retrieve contact information for peers in a torrent."

The only thing I'm interested in is: what performance increase or benefit will this bring for the average legitimate user of BT (ie. Linux distro's etc)?

Not linux but CC licensed movies (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573695)

Plenty of geeks with big pipes to host trackers for linux releases...

But lets say your band releases an album online, or your movie club makes a film... You've only got a geocities website and the desktops of your members.. With tracker-based BT you had to talk someone into running a tracker for you... With tracker-less that limitation has been removed.

Re:Performance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573701)

legitimate user of BT

I don't understand.

wryy (0, Flamebait)

Clay Pigeon -TPF-VS- (624050) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573662)

yay. Now we can get our linux isos without trackers! Everyone knows that legitimate bt needs to be trackerless. Current tracker-based bt doesn't work at all for legitimate file sharing. (The preceding was sarcasm). The only good reason for trackerless torrents is to prevent the **AA from shutting down infringing filesharing. I am a fair-use advocate, but I don't see the legitimate purpose to trackerless torrents that cannot be fulfilled by trackered torrents.

Re:wryy (1)

speeDDemon (nw) (643987) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573737)

I think all of you are missing the point of 'trackerless' bittorrent...

Trackerless BT will not stop the **IA from closing down the websites that allow you to download the torrent files.

Trackerless BT just takes it from a 3 step to 2 step procedure.

Re:wryy (5, Insightful)

black mariah (654971) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573752)

The entire point of BT is to make it so that you can (as long as there are seeders) download something without the server getting swamped. Since all torrents have to have a tracker, everyone downloading has to contact that tracker. If you get a popular enough torrent you can easily kill a tracker just like any other server. Going to a trackerless setup eliminates one of the few bottlenecks in the BT setup.

Re:wryy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573760)

You do not need a process(a tracker) running on a server somewhere anymore.

This means it is cheaper, and easier to send content to the masses. One less configuration step, and one less requirement on use.

The more points of distribution of thought the better. Restricting the flow of information in one direction allows for abuse by the media empires. Anything which helps in the bidirectional flow of information the better.

Re:wryy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573766)

I don't think legal action is the only plausible reason for a tracker going down, if this makes the process more redundant, it's not just going to be of benefit to pirates (aarr me hearties!).

Re:wryy (4, Insightful)

Cylix (55374) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573792)

Actually,

It's kinda handy if the tracker goes down. Additionally, if you don't want your torrent to operate in this distributed fashion you flag the torrent to not operate in distributed mode.

It's more like a hydra in this fashion...

Re:wryy (4, Insightful)

MyHair (589485) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573796)

The only good reason for trackerless torrents is to prevent the **AA from shutting down infringing filesharing. I am a fair-use advocate, but I don't see the legitimate purpose to trackerless torrents that cannot be fulfilled by trackered torrents.

Um, now people with shared hosting, blog sites, and free or included web space with their ISP or Yahoo Geocities / Angelfire / etc. (or otherwise are unable to set up a tracker) can now publish videos and other large files with bittorrent without trashing their TOS limits. Sounds legitimate to me. How many of these types of sites has Slashdot shut down by pointing to them?

Re:wryy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573848)

I don't see the legitimate purpose to trackerless torrents that cannot be fulfilled by trackered torrents.

You're right, in theory. In reality, innocent users are being sued by zealous plantiffs like the one you alluded to.

wryy-Think of the children. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573856)

Here. Let me invoke another "Think of the children" excuse. "Think of the dissidents."

Re:wryy (2, Insightful)

cpghost (719344) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573877)

I am a fair-use advocate, but I don't see the legitimate purpose to trackerless torrents that cannot be fulfilled by trackered torrents.

**AA are not the only enemies of free filesharing. That's a very US-centric view of the 'net. What about propagating samizdat literature und news within dictatorships? A trackerless torrent could help save some lifes. Even if it saves only one life, would be well worth it!

Re:wryy (4, Insightful)

aliebrah (135162) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573886)

I am a fair-use advocate, but I don't see the legitimate purpose to trackerless torrents that cannot be fulfilled by trackered torrents.

Then rather shortsighted you are. If I take a home video and want to share it with my friends and family, previously I would have had to upload it somewhere and spend money on web hosting. Now, with trackerless BT I can easily share this file without having to worry about web hosting or running a tracker. I just have to email the torrent file to people and run a BT client on my machine.

Legitimate file sharing doesn't only include large organisations "sharing" files with their customers/users. There's a whole other side to it as well that you've most conveniently forgotten about in your rush to share your misplaced sarcasm with the world.

Re:wryy (1)

SMS_Design (879582) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573890)

Person A releases a new DVD ISO of their distro, and puts it on a tracker server. The tracker server kicks the bucket, as systems tend to do. Downloaders AA-ZZ who have not completed the file are screwed. Hmm, funny that we need a tracker to get data that's already out there and waiting for us.

So... (2, Insightful)

Spad (470073) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573663)

Bittorrent is now another step closer to becoming just another eMule clone.

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573743)

Yea. All we need now are long queues and having to wait 24 to 48 hours for a download to start.

Re:So... (1)

Toveling (834894) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573758)

I completely agree. They are just reinventing the wheel, this trackless nonesence just results in slower downloads on non-regulated torrents, and forces private sites to change the ways they handle their torrents to check that it is indeed a private torrent. I seriously hope that trackerless torrenting doesn't get a foothold, I never liked eMule or others much.

Re:So... (2, Insightful)

SMS_Design (879582) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573909)

I completely fail to realize what it is you have against a fail-safe put in place in case a tracker site goes down. There is no REASON for you to need a tracker!! The data is available to you!

PLEASE explain the to me, I want to know.

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573880)

How was this modded insightful? As far as I know, emule uses a completely different topography.

Nice idea but... (1)

D14BL0 (880565) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573684)

I see this failing. I don't think it's going to work very well. Though, if it does, it won't likely be any better than previous BT usage.

Cat and mouse at it's best (5, Interesting)

btk667 (722104) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573719)

This is realy the cat and mouse game at it's best. BitTorrent is getting better each day. While the RIAA and MPAA is closing the hosting website, Attacking ISP from around the globe, etc.

Is this a combat to the death ?

I guess nothing will beat private exchange ? (DRM)

no bittorrent download upgrade option? (2, Interesting)

Richard Allen (213475) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573729)

Went to download an upgrade bittorrent.

I was a bit surprised that the download for the upgrade didn't have a bittorrent option. Isn't that ironic? or did I miss the link on bittorrent.com?

Yet another miscellaneous question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573730)

So does this mean that existing torrents would now be distributed, or does this feature require people to create new .torrents?

Won't stop the RIAA/MPAA (5, Insightful)

Saeger (456549) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573780)

Simply because the torrent websites no longer have to host the .torrent files, or run the tracker, doesn't mean that the RIAA/MPAA can't still sue the domain owner(s) for technically offering pointers to pointers (unless you're untouchable [piratebay.org] in, say, the netherlands). So BT is now a little more distributed, like eDonkey, but that didn't stop ShareReactor, ShareConnector, or FileNexus from being shutdown either.

What's needed is some kind of distributed HTTP overnet that works; that can handle dynamic content semi-intelligently, and MUCH faster than freenet/frost sites.

Re:Won't stop the RIAA/MPAA (5, Interesting)

gricholson75 (563000) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573809)

What's needed is some kind of distributed HTTP overnet that works; that can handle dynamic content semi-intelligently, and MUCH faster than freenet/frost sites.

Something like i2p? [i2p.net]

so quick question... (3, Interesting)

william_w_bush (817571) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573782)

is the publisher traceable? like is the ip address in the .torrent, cause that might be a bit of a giveaway.

not sure how it'd work otherwise, but this gives each torrent a single responsible party for its uploading. on the plus side they could limit who has access to the download client tables to people who need it and upload valid.

curious, and no im not just using it for legitimate torrents, but i pay for my cable and id rather keep stuff on my file server than a tivo with a crappy interface.

BitTornado. The difference? (0, Offtopic)

Volvogga (867092) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573783)

I appologize in advance.
Before this gets modded down into oblivion for being offtopic, can anyone tell me what the differences are between BitTorrent and BitTornado?
I keep seeing that BitTornado and offshot clients like ABC are an improvement on BitTorrent. Is this true, and if so, are the benifits worth it (such as is there an increased performance)? Also, does this new implimentation of the 'trackerless' BitTorrent obsolete BitTornado anyway?
Again, sorry about being offtopic, but I just can't seem to find a decent answer to my question anywhere else. So I grovel before my fellow /.-ians, and ask for their wisdom.

Since TFA is a bit short on details... (5, Informative)

42forty-two42 (532340) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573789)

... here's some more info on this, assuming it's compatible with Azureus:
  • Peers are located with an overlay network based on the Kademlia [google.com] algorithm, with small tweaks.
  • You can enter the overlay network either by a central seed node (which is needed only one per install) or by asking some of your peers on some other torrent for their DHT addresses.
  • Azureus has a magnet link system, where given a 'magnet link' containing the infohash of the torrent, it will use the DHT to find a peer and download the .torrent file from them. Hopefully the official client will get this as well.
  • Yes, this really does work. Grab a copy of Azureus 2.3.0.0 and enter magnet:?xt=urn:btih:MC2ZPC2TCW2TJTY5DSSOMDX533EPXV FU [magnet] (no spaces!) into the open location box to try it out. Be sure to wait for the dot on the bottom to change from yellow/"Initializing..." to green, and open your UDP port (same as torrent data port by default)
  • Check out the Azureus wiki [aelitis.com] for more info.

Re:Since TFA is a bit short on details... (1)

42forty-two42 (532340) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573805)

Note: don't copy link location with the magnet link, slashdot killed the href. Just copy the text and remove the space.

Re:Since TFA is a bit short on details... (5, Interesting)

42forty-two42 (532340) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573902)

Update: it seems bt mainline uses khashmir [sourceforge.net] instead of the azureus protocol. This is a bad thing. If this reaches a release, we'll have a case where two bittorrent clients are truly incompatible, and the result may cause difficulties for the technology itself.

Is this REALLY Bram's site? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573798)

I get the impression the linked site is in no way associated with Bram Cohen. Who (or what entity) is actually is responsible for these extensions? I'd feel a lot better about trying it if indeed these extensions were "Bram Approved" :-)

Am I hearing something? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573808)

I believe I'm hearing Jack Valenti crying.

How about encryption (3, Insightful)

pyite69 (463042) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573827)

That would be much more useful... if each socket connection does a key exchange. Much harder for your ISP to snoop.

Firefox bit torrent support (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12573855)

Someone should write an extention for Firefox that gives the download manager bit torrent support. Combined with trackerless torrents, it's likely a lot more sites will start using torrents.

Application of DHTs (0, Redundant)

Spezzer (101371) | more than 8 years ago | (#12573911)

I just learned about Distributed Hash Tables this past semester and thought they were really cool. On the page it mentions the use of aDHT in order to do the join/lookup required for locating peers.

If you are interested in how it works, you can check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distributed_hash_tabl e/ [wikipedia.org] for more info on them and links to example DHT implementations (such as CAN, Chord, and Kademlia).
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