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Information Overload Overblown, Says Gates

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the warning-warning-does-not-compute-does-not-compute dept.

Microsoft 258

Aarthi writes "Microsoft's annual CEO meet-and-greet kicked off on Thursday with the company's Chairman, Bill Gates, countering the notion that the workers today are not overloaded with information.'We still want a lot of information.' He also outlined plans for Office 12, the next version of its desktop software, which is due to arrive in the second half of next year." From the article: "There is a real temptation that the thing that comes in the latest is the one you shift your attention to, even though that may be the least important...That turns you into a filing clerk."

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258 comments

frist (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588218)

mr frist?

True (1)

UMhydrogen (761047) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588226)

I think Gates has a point -- look at all those slashdot articles that I see posted and just ignore immediatly. Guess that didn't happen with this one though.

file clerk? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588237)

isn't that some sort of dianetics thing?

how long is it gonna take for the rest of the world to catch up with scientology, i wonder ...

Re:file clerk? (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588549)

how long is it gonna take for the rest of the world to catch up with scientology, i wonder ...

That depends on how fast they're falling.

dupe are real problem (-1)

anandpur (303114) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588252)

Think when you have to deal with dupes almost everyday.

Re:dupe are real problem (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588284)

And also CmdrTaco and CowboyNeal. Earth would be such a better place ....

Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588253)

I'm a fairly technical user, not a tech god by any stretch of the imagination, but I know my way around. I know how to forward ports on my router, I do all my own XVID rips from Vdub, I can install most Linux distros without a problem, and I'm damned proficient at packages like Photoshop and Illustrator. In addition, I'm a gamer from back in the DOS days, so concepts like editing text files (config.sys, autoexec.bat, etc) don't necessarily scare me.

That said, as much as I like the concept of Linux, I simply will not try it any longer until I hear that a number of problems have been solved.

A) Having to recompile kernels/worrying that apps will be broken by upgrading that kernel. For that matter, I don't want to have to compile anything, ever. Just to make this clear, never. Come up with either something akin to Windows where I click on a standard installer, or make it like Mac where I just drag and drop the folder.

B) Any time I'm forced to drop to a command line, you as a developer have failed. Back 10 years ago, this may have been acceptable. In this day and age, it isn't. Furthermore, while once in a blue moon I may change a text file in Windows, in Linux it's a constant occurence. Again, you have failed.

C) MAN pages do not cut it. Neither does a message board where half the time I'll be called a clueless n00b, 25% of the time I'll be told to use a different distro, and the other 25% of the time I'll get genuinely helpful people giving me contradictory answers. If I'm expected to jump to an alien computing environment you'd best make sure your documentation is up to snuff. Linux sucks in this regard.

I'm an advanced user who's in favor of open source, but the bizarre, arcane, and technical details I have to jump through to achieve the same things that are comparatively simple in Mac or Windows may Linux a deal breaker. You will never, ever, become successful on the desktop until idiocy like this is exorcised from the OS.

Re:Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588300)

Don't forget being told that "Google is your Friend!" is the solution to your problem. Google is nobody's friend when the information is buried deep in some discussion group and you do not happen to be using the right combination of keywords.

Re:Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (1)

rbanffy (584143) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588357)

It's a joke, right?

I only compile kernels when I want. My Linux distro gives them compiled and tested for me in my upgrade stream.

Command lines are just another way to do stuff. It's a very powerful tool, indeed. Unless I want it, I seldom have to use it (yet, I know how they make life easier and really like to use it)

Its your fault to venture into the undocumented parts. If you are uncomfortable, stick to Fedora Core until you get the hang of it.

What distro are you using, anyway?

Re:Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588378)

You hit it right on the head. Even I'm fairly proficient with computers. My home machine is a dual boot. I use Linux just for the heck of it. By no stretch of imagination is it a desktop replacement.

Admit it, for all its issues Windows is pretty strong when it comes to user interface. Even OSX is too, but not any Linux distros.

Re:Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588884)

Funny, three out of four of my home machines (including my primary workstation) -- and my laptop -- run Linux exclusively, and have for many, many years.

*I've* never found a problem with it as a desktop replacement. Of course, I'm not an idiot, that needs the Windows interface to know where to click, either.

Re:Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588403)

You poor guy!
What you need is a chance to install Mandriva's newest. It answered those questions you listed nicely. You do not need to recompile if you use a Pentium or Amd K6 processor or newer.

Your welcome. :)

Re:Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (2, Interesting)

dfn5 (524972) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588479)

I'm a fairly technical user

From your post it sounds like you can't find your way out of a paper bag without a <right-click><properties> at your disposal.

A) Having to recompile kernels/worrying that apps will be broken by upgrading that kernel.

I recompile the kernel all the time because of either kernel updates or because I need an additional feature without breaking any apps. This statement is crap.

C) MAN pages do not cut it.

Man pages do their job perfectly. They are for reference, not for reading like a manual. You should already be familiar with the program and you use the man pages for remembering what a command line argument does. It is like the dos help program, only much much better. If you are looking for a manual that reads like a book you are looking for info pages.

Re:Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588889)

You should already be familiar with the program and you use the man pages for remembering what a command line argument does.

This is just the same kind of arrogant nincompoopery "Fanboy" means you TR()LL. What is blazes do you mean "you should already be familiar with the program!?!" You could have saved your argument by shilling the O'Reilly books. Without the ubiquitous animal woodcut books, AWK, SED, and PERL (to name three commands) are not intuitive by their precious MAN pages.

Re:Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588524)

Good Work. Mod the parent as a troll and then yell or call him a moron at him to let him know how easy Linux really is. This will definately convince the masses. Good Job everyone.

Re:Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588763)

Well said A/C, even if you are a troll (putting "fanboy" in the title kinda gives it away).

But WHAT THE F*** HAS THIS GOT TO DO WITH THE ARTICLE, YOU OFF-TOPIC TIME-WASTING, FESTERING, PUS-FILLED PILE OF SHIT?

Why don't you go to OS News and join your fanboy buddies bitching and whining about anything you have decided to dislike that particular day. Fuckwit. This type of post is a *PRECISE* example of why Bill G. is talking out of his ivy-league rich-kid spoilt-by-mumsy-and-dadsy lilly-white arse.

Re:Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588816)


B) Any time I'm forced to drop to a command line, you as a developer have failed. Back 10 years ago, this may have been acceptable.

Any time I have to use a GUI to make a particular change, you as a developer have failed. Try to script configuration changes which require a GUI. Try to make those changes while logged in to a headless server using ssh.

Thomas

Re:Linux on the desktop? Just a fanboy fantasy (4, Funny)

daikokatana (845609) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588951)

MAN pages do not cut it.

SO true. Everybody knows that a desktop completely cluttered with retarded paperclips is the way to go!

By the way, if you switch the paperclip for the wizard, the messages become even more helpfull!!

Back to unix now, just to see what MAN remove_troll says...

Gee, what does Mr Gates think about neurology? (5, Insightful)

Cryofan (194126) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588256)

Yeah, well, thanks for giving me the latest scoop on what some plutocrat college dropout thinks about how the brain works. Tell ya what, if I ever need some solid info on "information overload", I think I will consult someone who actually knows something about it, like maybe a neuroscientist, or something.

Who gives a fuck what Bill Gates thinks about every little thing?

Apparently... (5, Insightful)

cnelzie (451984) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588309)

...many people believe that once you are an expert or extremely succesful in one area, you are suddenly an expert or very knowledgeable in many, many areas. From what I read, this belief can be held by both the person making the out of their element claims, as well as by the people that find 'truth' (whether or not it is the truth, remains to be seen) in those claims.

It appears that Bill Gates is not immune to this ego inflating weakness of the human condition.

I only know this, due to having read a bit of study a year or so back. So, my information could be wrong, out of date or otherwise inaccurate.

Re:Apparently... (1)

elrond2003 (675701) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588419)

Perhapas a better way to put is is "once you have enoormous amounts of money and/or power people want to know what you will be screwing around with next so that they can avoid and/or profit from it."

Re:Apparently... (2, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588592)

Anybody who wants to hear a person with a little bit of knowledge and others assuming they know a lot about something they really don't should watch Dr. Death.

Re:Apparently... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588654)

many people believe that once you are an expert or extremely succesful in one area, you are suddenly an expert or very knowledgeable in many, many areas
Scientists have named this affliction EricRaymondism (put that in the jargon file, baldie), although tests are still being carried out to determine whether he was ever that knowledgeable in one area to start with.

[This anti-ESR screed brought to you using information from the Emperor has no clothes [1accesshost.com] ].

Altogether now : "Today I am one of the senior technical cadre that makes the Internet work, and a core Linux and open-source developer"

Re:Apparently... (5, Insightful)

the right sock (160156) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588817)

my information could be wrong, out of date or otherwise inaccurate

...or completely irrelevant. Gates's book from a few years ago (Business @ the Speed of Thought) is all about collecting as much information as possible and leveraging it to your (company's) advantage. To that end, MS's software is built to create, manage and make accessible piles of information. His comments could be nothing more than trumpeting MS's line that the more info the better -- cutting back is not in their best interest after all.

And it's not necessarily that people think he's an expert at neurology or informatics or cognitive science -- he's just a highly successful business man and technologist, and his thoughts on a given topic could prove useful or inspiring to others with similar aspirations.

That book, btw, is terrible.

Don't you get it? (5, Insightful)

tacokill (531275) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588332)

Don't you get it? This is America. Where talking out of your ass is an art form.

We see this everyday. Some call it bullshit. Others call it spin. Regardless of what is actually is, it's destructive.

What is surprising is that more don't call this stuff out like you did. I wish that happened more.

Re:Don't you get it? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588596)

Small correction. This is slashdot.
You might physically be in America whilst i am not.

The words just comes to me :-)

Re:Don't you get it? (0, Offtopic)

tacokill (531275) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588700)

The GP post was referring to Bill Gates. And Bill Gates is in America. It seems to me that the American-centric reference was appropriate.

Wait, you are right. This is slashdot. All American-centric posts should be amended to be more thoughtful of our worldwide audience. Regardless of whether it is appropriate or not.

Re:Gee, what does Mr Gates think about neurology? (1)

Metasquares (555685) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588340)

He's rich. That makes people listen to him, in the hopes that they, too, will become rich.

family connections, genetics, and good education (4, Insightful)

Cryofan (194126) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588397)

Gates mainly got rich because his family connections got him his first big contract. His family was Old Money, and his mom used her connections to get him in with IBM. And his family's old money got him educated at one of the best private schools in the country. And he has genetics on his side. Genetics and family connections aint gonna brush off from reading his latest self-indulgent musings.

Re:Gee, what does Mr Gates think about neurology? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588366)

Gates isn't thinking about neurology, or talking about what he thinks workers want or need.

He is creating hype to sell product.

The problem, Gates said, is that the information exists, but it is not in one place and cannot be easily viewed in a meaningful way using today's software.
And, of course Microsoft will sell you their new improved office suite, MSN search, yada yada, to fill this "perceived" need.

Well... (1)

gina-milano (881201) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588538)

Who gives a fuck what Bill Gates thinks about every little thing?

The old adage "Know thy enemy" applies here. As well was my old favorite adage - "Get close enough to the enemy to piss in their corn flakes while they are not looking"

I used to be one. (-1, Flamebait)

cablepokerface (718716) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588268)

That turns you into a filing clerk

So what the fuck is wrong with that Mr. High Almighty Billionair.

Re:I used to be one. (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588443)

>>That turns you into a filing clerk

>So what the fuck is wrong with that Mr. High Almighty Billionair.

Yeah, I bet he doesn't mind when it's some guy rubber stamping his company's ridiculous patent applications!

Re:I used to be one. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588481)

But you're not a filing clerk any more.
So what the fuck is wrong with that

You tell me.

-- Bill

Re:I used to be one. (1)

MagPulse (316) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588493)

Nothing is wrong with it today, because we need filing clerks. Doing work that can't be done any other way is honorable. But it's one of the goals of technology to lift the burden of less intellectual tasks from humanity so it is free to do more creative things. Bill is just echoing that ideal, he believes in the computing revolution's promise of making life better and more interesting for everyone. Of course, he believes he should be rewarded for helping make that change.

Sorry if that sounds like a troll or something, but seriously, Bill is not driven only by money. Otherwise he wouldn't have given up the CEO position to be Chief Tech Officer.

Re:I used to be one. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588525)

So, you're gonna have that attitude problem of yours get you fired again, you think?

GOATSE GOATSE GOATSE (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588294)

A synopsis of why Linux is a cult religion.

There are four basic steps to establishing a cult religion. They are;

Step 1: Pick a ridiculous icon.
Step 2: Choose a name for your cult.
Step 3: Define yourself.
Step 4: Write down your tenets.

A comprehensive history of how the linux penguin came to be can be found at
http://www.sjbaker.org/tux/ [sjbaker.org] . This is the main reference site for this
article. All quotes have been obtained there, unless otherwise stated.

It is important to note that the opening words of the Holy Bible are "In the
beginning..." Genesis 1:1. The reference site opens with the words, "In the
beginning..." This is no mere coincidence, as will be shown.

Detail
======

Step 1: Pick a ridiculous icon.

Checking out the opposition was an absolute must for Linus. Every Tom, Dick and Harry was out there with a cult. It wasn't going to be easy to find an icon for the linux cult, so the linuxfux had to do some research. They were competing with ancestors, cosmic schemes, cows, rats, the sun, the moon, the earth, stars, snakes, turtles, planets, aliens, crystals, ufo's, light, dark, evil spirits, crying and/or bleeding statues, and goodness knows what else.

The hard part was to pick something that hadn't been used before. Heck, even the atheists have an invisible pink unciorn. They tried trombones, grand pianos, accoustic guitars, commodes, Marilyn Monroe's underwear, and even Linus Torvald's underwear. The last one was not very good good because Linus Torvalds was, at that stage, a pipsqueak of an excuse for a human being, and
most linuxfux are very fat, and very pimply. That last point will not be lost on those familiar with the more recent appearance of Torvlads.

Now, you may think that using Linus' underwear as an icon a bit strange. You may also wonder how people could bring themselves to believe that Linus' underwear is the font of all spiritual knowledge, but just think! Linus wore them, they gave him spiritual enlightenment and, of course, everyone who knows Linus Torvalds has heard the harmonious tunes coming from that
direction.

In the end, the linuxfux chose a paunchy, naked penguin. Yes, the penguin is naked! Just like Didney's fantasy character, Porky Pig. The Linux Penguin has no pants.

So, how was the ridiculous, gormloos looking, naked, pauchy penguin chosen?

Linus Torvalds: "Yes, I was bitten by a penguin, but it wasn't actually very ferocious. It was really just a pigmy penguin about 6 inches tall or something, and it was more of a timid nibble ("is this finger a see before me a small fish, or what?"). Even so, I like penguins a lot."

So, there you have it. A mind-association between "pigmy," "timid nibble" and Linux. All well-balanced people, that is, Windows users, will see the irony in that Freudian association.

Some quotes from Linus on the penguin;

Thu, 9 May 1996 17:48:56 +0300 (EET DST)

"Anyway, this one looks like the poor penguin is not really strong enough to
hold up the world, and it's going to get squashed. Not a good, positive
logo, in that respect.."

As you can plainly see, Linus is attempting to place the penguin on a pedestal. The very same pedestal as the three great religions of Christianity, Islam and Judaism, that "hold up the world."

In the same usenet post, and in the very next paragraph, Linus exhorts is eager new cult recruits thus;

"Now, when you think about penguins, first take a deep calming breath, and then think "cuddly". Take another breath, and think "cute". Go back to "cuddly" for a while (and go on breathing), then think "contented"."

Compare that exhortation with the following quote from
http://www.swami-krishnananda.org/yoga/yoga_06.htm l [swami-krishnananda.org]

"A Yoga student is always happy, and is never worried or vexed. Yoga prescribes Santosha or contentment in whatever condition one is placed. Many of our illnesses are due to discontent. Contentment follows as a result of the acceptance of the wisdom of God."

Additional parallels on Linux cultism and the role of contentment can be
found here;

http://www.aaafengshuiandyoga.com/yoga.php [aaafengshuiandyoga.com]
www.sivananda.org/teachings/lifestyle/20instr.ht m
www.spiritualminds.com/authors.asp?articleid=41 5
www.sivanandadlshq.org/teachings/sadhana.htm

"You will be ever calm, tranquil, and poised; you will be ever cheerful,
fearless, and contented." From www.sivanandadlshq.org/teachings/sadhana.htm

Normal thinking people know that cultism is utter poppycock, designed only
to drug the unthinking masses into believing things that are simply not
true. Again, from sivanandadlshq.org, "Things that used to upset you before
will not upset you now. You will have an unruffled mind." Those well
balanced readers of alt.os.windows-xp who are brave enough to actually read
the deranged posts from comp.os.liux.advocacy loonies will know just how far
fetched the concept of a linuxfuck having an "unruffled mind" actually is.
Indeed, the whole notion of any linuxfuck having a mind at all is ridiculous
to the point of utter absurdity.

As part of this alignment with new age pseudo-religion and attempts to usurp
the world's three great religions, Torvlads tried to overtly insert the free
sex tenets of the the Rajneeshi society, based on the teachings of one now
dead Bagwash Shri Rajneesh;

From: torvalds@klaava.Helsinki.FI (Linus Benedict Torvalds)
Newsgroups: comp.os.minix
Subject: Gcc-1.40 and a posix-question
Message-ID:
Date: 3 Jul 91 10:00:50 GMT

> PS. Could someone please try to finger me from overseas

Step 2: Choose a name for your cult.

This was another tough one for Linus. Already there was Atheism,
Transcendental Meditation, Hare Krishna, Theosophy, New Age, Order of the
Solar Temple, Heaven's Gate, Rajneeshism, Aum Shinrikyo, Sri Chinmoy, Divine
Light Mission, Vedanta Society, Krishnamurti Foundation of America,
Eckankar, Bubba Free John, Hanuman Foundation, Sathya Sai Baba,
Self-Realization Fellowship, Shree Gurudev Siddha, Sahaja Yoga, 3HO
Foundation, Sikh Foundation of Yogi Bhajan, Maitreya, Witchcraft, Santeria,
Voodoo, Camdumble, Palo Mayombe, Macumba, Abacua, Taoism, Totemism,
Divination, Astrology, Fortune Telling, Tarot Cards, Palm Reading, White
Magic, Black Magic, Wicca, Spiritism, Spiritualism... and the list goes on.

He didn't bother with names from the Japanese Pokemon. They'd all been
done already. He tried some esoteric words from the dictionary, like
"philogynist," "ontogenesis," "oneirology," and "philately," but finally
he settled on... Linux. How earth-shatteringly bland.

Step 3: Define yourself.

This one was very easy for Linus. He could be "The Most Wonderful,"
"The Blessed," "The Incarnate," "The Most Magnificent." But he did try to
avoid "Omnipotent." The word is very easily confused with "impotent" and
he thought it may result in prospective believers thinking there's
something wrong with his sex drive. Linus certainly did not want to give
this impression, especially since it was sex he was after... "Could someone
please try to finger me from overseas."

Linus tried to make some sort of attachment to someone important. Elvis was
a very popular name and it had the potential to tip the scales in Linus'
favour because of the obvious sexual connotations. Of course, as most
linuxfux are gay, Liberace was definately seriously considered.

A Silly word was also needed. Linus needed to think of a word that
nobody had ever heard of before. This word was to add mystery to to his
cult. "Zitbotty" was a main contender. So, all Linus' spiritual statements
would come from someone no less than "The Most Magnificent Liberace Zitbotty
Torvalds."

Fortunately for the entire world, Torvalds suffered a short lapse of sanity
and decided to retain his identity as Linus Torvalds on the basis that the
connectcion with the newly coined name of "linux" was obvious to the
converted. Torvalds considered that he did not need to be known as "The Most
Magnificent Liberace Zitbotty Torvalds" since others were more than happy to
place him on the pedestal of demi-godery... Cases in point;

"What this teaches me is that the ones who innovate, yet do not stifle the
market, are truly godlike. I place Seymour Cray on my list of Elite people,
right about where I place the Mentor and Linus Torvalds." Sarah Clarke at
http://www.lornet.com/cray.htm [lornet.com]

"Some coders have attained an almost godlike status in that community.
Linus Torvalds, original programmer of Linux, which he named after
himself. You've probably heard of Linus Torvalds, the Finn who instigated
the whole thing, after whom Linux is named and who still declares new
versions of the kernel fit for release?" Rasputin ("Raspy") at
http://www.metrogirl.com/inception/fall02/ae_opens ource.htm [metrogirl.com]

"The three linked figures of Kevin Mitnick, Bill Gate and Linus Torvalds
exemplify this form of cyberpower because they are all, in different ways,
'powerful' ... This imaginary is structured by opposed obsessions with the
heaven cyberspace may bring, with immortal, godlike life on silicon as it
ultimate goal, and the hell ..." Power in Cyberspace, Tim Jordan,
University of East London; http://www.hull.ac.uk/IEC2000/pages/power.htm [hull.ac.uk]

Step 4: Write down your tenets.

This was also a very easy thing for Linus. His list of tenets are wholly
contradictory, contain absolutely no logic whatsoever and contain lots of
nonsensical words or real words that don't mean anything when put side by
side.

By following this simple four step plan, it wasn't long before hundreds of
loonies, freaks and whackos started flocking to Linus' door to carry out
his every whim (and to finger him from overseas.) And just think, even
though linux is supposed to be "free," they hand out tons and tons of
cash to buy Linus' dirty underwear.

Of course, Linus had to work on his cult once he'd got it going. He could
have tried depriving his brainwashed followers of food, forcing them to work
naked outside in winter, tie them up in chains with the dogs or make them
eat his shit. It really didn't matter what he wanted to do to them. They
would love it and they would come back for more! Just ask any Muslim how
good self-deprivation feels. Linus' deprivation plot was diabolical in the
extreme. As a result of the Linux OS, thousands upon thousands of rabid
Linux followers (linuxfux) are now doomed to a life of trying to keep a
pseudo-GUI running on an almost limitless supply of 486 DX66's... machines
that the sane amongst us would not even consider for use as door stops or
boat anchors. Yes, it's true... the life of the linuxfuck is consumed by
the need to bombar vendors with thousands upon thousands of e-mails
requesting Linux drivers for equipment that went into the dark ages twenty
years ago... "or else we will not buy anything else from you."

Most of all, Linus instilled in his followers an intense paranoia by
creating an imaginary enemy. Good examples that were available included
America, the FBI, blacks, Cubans, Mexicans - anybody. Linus chose Bill
Gates and Microsoft. Linus' followers rabidly believe that the enemy
Bill Gates is responsible for things that are at least half believeable -
listening devices in public toilets, cameras in bathrooms... the list
of possible enemy evils is endless. And don't forget, Bill Gates the
enemy is responsible for absolutely everything that's bad - over-cooked
dinner, a missing dog, a dead cat, the phone and electricity getting
cut off - anything a linuxfuck can think of.

With a bit of work, Linus got himself featured on CNN and ABC, his followers
hussled out the Salvation Army, the Hare Krishnas, the World Wildlife Fund
and local bums from their areas. Linus was and is the centre of everyone's
attention, due in part to linuxfux bombarding vendors with bleating please
for drivers to support arcane hardware. And absolutely everyone, from film
stars to media magnates, from corporate geniuses to vice-presidents, all
want to buy Linus' dirty underwear so they may attain the spiritual
Nirvana invoked by the inhalation of his week old, crusty bumsweat.

countering ... not (5, Informative)

Paul Rose (771894) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588298)

"countering the notion that the workers today are not overloaded with information"
I think he is countering the notion that workers areoverloaded with info

Quadruple back flip negative (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588457)

I nearly sprained my brain trying to read that ugly sentence myself.

It looks like some computer techies avoid English classes the way some liberal arts students avoid science classes.

selling Office (2, Insightful)

kaan (88626) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588566)

I think he is countering the notion that workers are overloaded with info

I think he's trying to get everybody all worried about overloading each other with information so that they'll think it's necessary to upgrade to Office 12. I mean, how many more new features are really necessary by most humans who work in an office environment?

Instead of adding a bunch of complicated features that solve contrived problems for a thin slice of Office users, I'd like to see them put some serious effort into making Word documents fully readable by any other version of Word. Imagine... you could send a document to another person without concern that it would be unreadable on their end... now that would be something to get excited about.

So anyway, yeah, the point of Gates' comments is less about substance and more about manipulating the market. He does this all the time, most recently with the "iPod will go away" comments. Ballmer is now doing it with "Google will be gone in 5 years". These guys know they are getting hammered by Apple and Google in specific market spaces, and rather than respond with better product offerings, they respond with subtle slander.

Re:selling Office (1)

Petersson (636253) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588949)

Right, that's what is it all about: convincing of people that they have a reason to buy new version of Office. Because Bill Gates is not computer geek, visioneer nor philanthropist; he's a moneymaker.

What type of information? (0)

Orion Blastar's Psyc (885504) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588853)

Microsoft overloads people with hype, that is the sort of information that is more noise than content. Stick with the facts, Bill, stick with the facts. Screen out all the BS and hype, and stick with the facts. Then there will not be any information overload.

I tend to screen out noise and hype and BS, and stick with the facts. This avoids information overload.

He is right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588316)

Claims that information overload is taking people's attentions away from what they are doing are

No such thing as too much information (4, Interesting)

akadruid (606405) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588319)

No such thing as too much information, just information which is badly organised.

I am connected to a web with a lot of gigabytes of data - the Internet. It's a lot of data, but with the right tools and knowledge, it's not useless.

It's when you factor in using the wrong tools, lack of knowledge and malicious attempts to attract your attention that you get information overload.

It's an overrated buzzword anyway. It seems to be most used for the same reason the previous generation complained about the pace of life being quicker these days.

If Gates says information overload is overblown.. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588825)

..then I say Windows is overbloated.

He's great at marketing, but sadly a poor engineer (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588321)

Computing is a fast-paced field. What was cutting edge yesterday is as
outdated as a pet rock today. Newer, more efficient technologies are
always being developed. The 8" floppy gave way to the 3.5" floppy
which was later replaced by the CD-R. The acoustic modem eventually
yielded to the DSL/Cable modem. Unix was overtaken by Windows XP. And
so on.

The same technology also applies to programming languages. C yielded
to C++ which gave way to C#. However, the time has come for a complete
paradigm shift in programming. I propose a de facto migration towards
a relatively new, but promising language known as assembly.

Most of you are probably unfamiliar with this langauge. I know I was
until I chanced upon it in my community college while completing my
MCSE. So allow me to give you a little background on this language:
C++ and Java do not allow the programmer to directly access the
hardware. Instead they compile into a "bytecode" which is then
interpretted by a virtual machine. While very portable, this limits
the speed of Java and C++ programs.

Assembly, however, was designed to allow the programmer *direct
access* to the hardware! This makes for *much* faster programs.
Furthermore, assembly is the same language "spoken" by computers.
Because of this, you may sometimes see assembly referred to as
"machine code".

I fear that without the support of a large corporation (the way MS has
pushed Java, or Sun supported C#) assembly will fall by the wayside
like many other interesting languages (Python, I'm looking at you!)
Thus I hope to start a "grass-roots" movement to support assembly. I
would like to see the FSF release a GNU-based assembly compiler
(although they can keep the bugs that have plagued the 3.0 release of
gcc which caused people to switch to Visual Studio for their Linux
programming.)

I would love to expound on the superiority of assembly over C++/Java
but I'm late for my "Intro to TCP/IP" class. Those of you familiar
with assembly, please feel free to educate the many ignorant
C/C++/Java users on the glory of this superior language.

Re:He's great at marketing, but sadly a poor engin (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588440)

Those of you familiar with assembly, please feel free to educate the many ignorant C/C++/Java users on the glory of this superior language.

kee kee kee kee!! ^_^

Easy for him to say... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588330)

IIRC .. He has people to read/screen his email for him

I agree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588337)

Personally, I'd be happy with a car that had an extra 428 knobs, switches, and gauges so I can see exactly how it is operating at all times. And I'm waiting for a toaster oven that shows me all relevant cooking parameters with lights and gauges while it operates. Maybe we could get a couple of extra screens for the TV where we'd have to make realtime decisions while we watch or it'd give us a little shock.

We need a lot more information. This "information overload" nonsense is way overrated.

Re:I agree (4, Funny)

MysteriousPreacher (702266) | more than 8 years ago | (#12589004)

You just don't need all those gauges, information is only useful if you can realistically process it.

Homer Simpson invented the 'everything's fine' alarm. It was a device that played an ear-piercing siren whenever everything was okay.

Wouldn't it be simpler to just have one of these installed in your car. that way, while the siren plays, you'll know that everything is fine.

Hmmmm (4, Interesting)

Philosinfinity (726949) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588345)

One of the things I find interesting about this is that Gates holds the exact opposite paradigm about work that Plato holds in the Republic. But this brings up an interesting question. Do workers need knowledge of the whole system or just what their portion of it is?

In many cases, things fall through the cracks when the right hand has no idea what the left hand is doing. However, is that a causal relationship or a correlative one? I think that a strong corporate heirarchy where managers *gasp* are well trained employees that have moved through the system and proved that they are capable of seeing a picture bigger than "insert part A in slot B," is much more likely to not have the same sort of issues that a less well managed company would (assuming of course that the actual workers have very little clue what is going on outside of their area). Again, to bring up Plato, I think he is correct to say that people are happier when they are able to specialize in a specific task and work toward the perfection of said task. This does not mean that they cannot move up, but that the base job is a platform to the next level.

However, Gates is in an itneresting position. Software problems can be directly attributed to having too many programmers working in too small of a scope. When they lack the information to understand exactly how their code is part of the whole, they make mistakes.

But well coded, well documented, libraries, functions, programs, etc. should provide enough information for those who utilize the code to understand exactly how it will work within their project. Again, I think a well informed management that actually does work is a much better structure than building a staff of well informed workers from the ground up.

Re:Hmmmm (1)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588714)

One of the things I find interesting about this is that Gates holds the exact opposite paradigm about work that Plato holds in the Republic

Is that a real paradigm, a corporate speak paradigm, a metaphysical paradigm or does the sentence create a new paradigm in and of itself by pushing the paradigm envelope?

What is information? (4, Insightful)

Laurentiu (830504) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588399)

From TFA1:
"I'd say in all of these cases, we are really dealing with information underload," Gates said in his talk, which kicked off Microsoft's annual CEO Summit. "We still want a lot of information."

From TFA2:
Raikes noted studies that show that the average worker gets about 10 times as much e-mail now as in 1997. That's projected to increase another fivefold in the next four years, Raikes said.

Either Raikes and Gates don't know each other, or they use different definitions for "information". From Gates' point of view, information is probably what's left after his army of PAs has filtered the e-mail box and the income paper bin, leaving only neat reports and meaningful mails out of the whole damn mess. A typical grunt, however, will have to do the whole thing himself. Even the simple act of recognizing an e-mail as spam is an information gathering and processing system, and you have to do that for each spam that goes through the filter. And then there's the unavoidable corporate and friendly spam (don't tell me you don't have it), in the form of memos you don't care about, rules for using the printer and the latest joke your buddy across the hall has found on the Net.

These ARE harmful to your concentration, to your productivity and to the level of stress that you aquire at the end of the day. Information oveload? You bet. Every context shift you do sets you back at least 15 minutes in concentration (scientifically proven, ask any serious psychologist). More than half the job of a competent PA is to shield you from that. And there's no software out there that can replace a PA.

Re:What is information? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588449)

How 'bout Clippy?

Re:What is information? (1)

cthrall (19889) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588811)

> And there's no software out there that can replace
> a PA.

Not right at this moment, give it one to five years. It's the next killer app.

Re:What is information? (1)

uniqueUser (879166) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588923)

From TFA2: Raikes noted studies that show that the average worker gets about 10 times as much e-mail now as in 1997. That's projected to increase another fivefold in the next four years, Raikes said.

What is more distracting? Your boss sending you a nonsense email asking for the TPS report or you boss coming down to your cube and asking nonsense questions about why the TPS report is not out?

I get and send roughly 100+ emails a day. I only get a handful of calls and rarely have to waste time in group meetings that discuss nothing.

How to minimize Information Overload (5, Insightful)

mindaktiviti (630001) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588400)

- Turn off the TV (download your shows if you must). - Browse with ad / flash blocking tools or with an RSS feed reader. - Don't sign up for "reward programs", don't give away your permanent email to any service. - Don't multitask yourself to uselessness (i.e. watching tv while working on your project with music playing and a game minimized you go into every 15 minutes while your paper's in front of you and you're baking cookies). ...You can sign up for my information overload program for just 3 easy payments of $49.9..just kidding. :P

Microsoft Saves The Dumb (5, Funny)

Nytewynd (829901) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588404)

"There is a real temptation that the thing that comes in the latest is the one you shift your attention to, even though that may be the least important," Gates said. The result, he said, is that people either have to leave everything "in one big bucket" or they have to spend a lot of time creating lots of folders. "That turns you into a filing clerk."

How about hiring people that understand how to prioritize their own work? If someone can't figure out whether to run a report for their boss or send on a chain letter, I don't think a new version of Office is going to fix the problem.

The typical Web search takes 11 minutes these days. Gates acknowledged that that is a big improvement over search times and capabilities of a few years ago, when half of the searches didn't yield the needed information. He added, however, that a Web search is still a "treasure hunt" in which one hopes that the top few links contain the desired information.

Who the hell is taking 11 minutes to find what they want on the web. I timed myself just now, and I was looking at "hot teen lesbians" within 13 seconds. If that doesn't count for what people want on the web, I don't know what does. In 11 minutes, I could build my own website for it.

If I were to file this release into folders, it would probably go into my Marketing/Propaganda one.

Re:Microsoft Saves The Dumb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588587)

I timed myself just now, and I was looking at "hot teen lesbians" within 13 seconds

What the parent forgot to mention is that the actual search time only took 3 seconds ;-)

Re:Microsoft Saves The Dumb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588901)

In 11 minutes, I could build my own website for it.

I'm hoping you didn't plan to use Frontpage :)

What is the future? (1)

spectrokid (660550) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588409)

If you give a user two computers with Office 2003 and Office 2000, then I estimate 98% of the users in my company will never see the difference. Heck, if MS were to drop Office for Mac today, the current version would remain "good enough" for at least 5 years, plenty of time for StarOffice/Openoffice to take over. Now I can see 10 years from now real AI entering Office software, bringing help to users. But I shure like hell can't imagine how they will keep on milking that cow until then. What new feature do YOU want in Office 12?

Perspectives (4, Insightful)

DingerX (847589) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588420)

It's nice to see everyone bashing our rich neighbor in Redmond.

The article, though, is a sales pitch. Uncle Bill is talking to a bunch of CEOs, and he's trying to do two things:
A) Trash Google and Yahoo and anyone else's desktop search program
B) Promote the windows environment and Microsoft's desktop search stuff.

Ultimately, the most annoying part of the whole article is the explicit point that Microsoft is primarily interested in developing software for the corporate world. So the ultimate bottom line for any development is how the new, human power elite accepts it. Sure the slaves in the trenches or in non-corporate fields suffer from information overload, increased stress and lack of concentration -- my life has become an anchorless drift across continents and task panes since Windows XP came out -- where was I? oh yeah -- but as long as the guy making decisions (who, as well all know, is always the worst informed. Hell he's buying microsoft products ain't he?) can yell at some slob and say "give me all my correspondence with Ballmer, except that april-fools yamauchi thing", and that slob can choke it up in the next 15 minutes, nobody suffers .

So they've just caught on? (1)

offline_analogy (884889) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588422)

I mean, if this wasn't true, people wouldn't spend (read "waste") so much of their time browsing the WWW, now, would they?

Whoops - I have work I should be doing. Bye now.

just prep work (1)

justforaday (560408) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588426)

He's just preparing us so we won't be surprised when the next version of Office is loaded up with even more crap all over the place that we don't need.

Just curious (1)

GomezAdams (679726) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588444)

Why does the media keep reporting Microsoft marketing ploys as news? Make 'em buy advertising which is what all this nonsense is. Bill Gates having constipation or Bill Gates having diarrhea isn't news. Bill Gates coming clean and admitting that the direction of Windows(tm) has been wrong all along and that he apoligizes for all the drek they've pushed off on people would be. An apology for releasing service packs that break compatibility forcing upgrades is rather a criminal matter and should be dealt with in the courts. That would be news fit to print.

Re:Just curious (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588693)

Let's face it - if he wiped his arse, they'd publish what's on the toilet paper.

Oh wait, they just did...

my bad.

Re:Just curious (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588741)

Whoa Killer! Slow down, turn off your computer, go outside, take a deep breath and don't be such a retard.

Information Overload (5, Interesting)

TheDawgLives (546565) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588453)

If office doesn't cause information overload, then why does M$ have to hide all the extranious menu options by default. I tire of telling users to click on such and such a menu and they come back with "I don't have that."

Wish list (5, Insightful)

CaroKann (795685) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588495)

1) Make tasks easier to manage. Make it easier to enter task dates and improve the ability to link tasks to email messages. The ability to have super-tasks be made up of sub-tasks would be a great feature.

2) The idea of server-based Excel spreadsheets is intriguing. Unfortunately, the article does not go into any details about this. Excel could benefit from improved multi-user editing. The granularity of locking and editing needs to be increased. When more than one user works on a spreadsheet, instead of locking the whole thing, Excel should only lock smaller pieces. Built in version control, with formalized checkout, check-in, and merging of individual spreadsheet pieces, would make multi-user editing much easier to keep under control.

Re:Wish list (1)

circusboy (580130) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588835)

why build version control into each application, wouldn't it be a better feature of the OS? then the individual applications would get it for free...

or perhaps use a file format that isn't encoded in some weird way, and allow people to use a rational version control system of their choice.

I think this was meant to be funny... it's hard to tell in this subject area...

Hmmm...take Gates seriously? (0, Redundant)

LegendOfLink (574790) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588504)

After listening to Bill Gates forcast the death of one of the most popular electronic devices of all time (the IPOD) and then listen yesterday to Young Frankenstein lookalike, Steve Ballmer, forcast the death of Google, it's hard to take anything seriously that comes from a MS exec's mouth.

way too much free press (-1, Flamebait)

eleitl (251761) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588523)

Why is that chronically clue-deprived, boring
guy getting so much free press on /.?

This forum isn't about running a business, it's
about technology. Nothing interesting, novel
ever comes out of Redmond.

why does bill gates hate file clerks? (0)

ShineyMcShine (799387) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588564)

ewwwwhhh. i use msoft office and i am a glorified file clerk....watch me file this document in the recycle bin...oh, i mean trash.

Can't read his own email? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588567)

This from a guy who doesn't read his own email or mail.

He's right about one thing (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588576)

From tfa "the thing that comes in the latest is the one you shift your attention to" That reduces you to being a filing clerk. Or worse. At least a file clerk can prove that he gets his job done.

The problem with the info glut is how we respond to it. If you let yourself get distracted by every little thing then your performance will suffer.

Recently there was a story that using email decreased your IQ worse than marijuana. That's true if you insist on answering every email the minute it comes in.

www.infoconomy.com/pages/news-and-gossip/group10 60 06.adp

MSN Search not a cure-all (3, Funny)

Jivecat (836356) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588595)

From TFA: "The company's MSN Search already has that for a few areas, he said, demonstrating queries on 'Which country has the second-largest GDP?' and 'How many calories are there in spinach?'"

But if you want to know how many calories there are in sperm, you'll have to ask Uncle Cecil [straightdope.com] .

I can't figure out (5, Interesting)

el_womble (779715) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588605)

...if I have a serious problem. I spend my whole day filtering information, code, tech manuals, slashdot etc. and only taking in the bits that I think are useful/interesting/funny. If I miss something I figure I can always go back and read it again.

The problem is I can't switch it off. I skim everything, and now the problem is spreading: it's affecting my listening too! I have to really focus on someone to take in everything they tell me, especially people I listen too a lot, like my girlfriend. If she is talking to me about something 'really important', like shopping, holidays, TV or hair and my brain doesn't agree how important it is I simply don't hear what she's saying. What worse is that she has a typical female ability to multiplex two or more streams of information, one of which might actually be important. This has lead to all sorts of arguments.

Does this affect anyone else?

He's right, you know (4, Funny)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588628)

We still want a lot of information.

Such as "How do I get Windows to the point where I'm not having to continually force quit stalled applications" or "Why on God's green Earth would Windows go out and waste my time trying to access a server pointed to by a shortcut I am telling it to delete, and then it bogs down because it can't find the server and does not realize that, well, that's why I want to DELETE THE FUCKING SHORTCUT!!!!" or "Why are most Cancel buttons in Windows cruel hoaxes?"

You know... little factoids like that.

In the news today (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588630)

William H Gates III wipes his nose on his sleeve.

Write an article about it!

Heard Yeah... Sure Did! (1)

webzombie (262030) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588660)

Bill Gates speaks for the working man. Now there's an oxymoron if I ever heard one... sure did!

[Bill Gates - Working Man] Fur Sure!

I think if Bill were a little more honest he would realize that much of the problem with information isn't overload but in fact the tools we use to create and manage it. *cough-ffice*

Hey didn't this very same guy say that by 2000 we'd all be talking to our computers like Star Trek.. hell his OS has barely learned to doodle on a tablet let alone talk to us!

Bill... reduce your meds. Get some real fresh air and for god's sake get your head out of Steve's ass because, based on his recent comments, its obviously irrating the hell out of him!

Google did it, Google did it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588679)

""We really want to get to the point where you are getting direct answers," Gates said. The company's MSN Search already has that for a few areas, he said, demonstrating queries on "Which country has the second-largest GDP?" and "How many calories are there in spinach?" (The answers: "Japan" and "7 calories for 1 cup.")"

Too bad Google's already making money off of answering direct questions: http://answers.google.com./ [answers.google.com] (Or, uh, acquiring money, anyway, I don't know whether it's profitable or not.)

Information overload is a very real problem that I've been experiencing at work -- however, I've always found a lot of resistance to change. For example, my software team discusses every little problem through the same mailing list we use for everything else. Never mind that this results in three to four hundred emails on a good week, ninety-nine percent of which I have no interest in or care about. That's the problem with email -- it doesn't know that you don't care about it, and it has no quick way to tell it you don't care about it. (Or about the fifty threaded discussion emails that come after it.)

Ultimately the short-term solution to information overload is those already-designed Web solutions which consolidate and display information in a useful manner, directed by humans -- bulletin boards and Wikis. Yet I find few businesses, even in the leading edge of the tech sector, using these simple and free tools to help manage their business.

I think the long-term solution must be humans dedicated to the task of shaping the information presented to us. A software team of fifty programmers should have one or two managers, and five or ten dedicated "communicators" (not programmers, probably paid less) who would do this direct answering for us, who would go and find the information you need when you need it. That's all that it seems most tech workers do -- find information, whether it be from a co-worker in the same row, a co-worker on another floor, from a company you license software from, from a company you sell software to, from managers, QA testers, etc. etc. etc. But most of the time WE either have to find the information or ask the managers to do it.

As I said in another post, though, this is good -- it's a natural fit for the "library science" degree, and previously there was in fact no job that was a natural fit for that degree, even librarian. :)

He's fallen prey to one of the classic blunders (4, Interesting)

blueZ3 (744446) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588730)

The first is: Never get involved in a land war in Asia. But only slightly less well-known: Never use a non sequitur, when Death is on the line!

"...workers today are not overloaded with information." and "We still want a lot of information."

Hello? Can you say "Unrelated statements"? The fact that we want "a lot" of information does not preclude information overload.

The useful bit of information we want is (usually) a nugget that has to be carefully sifted from the deluge of meaningless noise that constantly flows through our every-day lives. These days, I'm finding that filtering out the noise now takes almost as long as accomplishing the task that I'm looking for information to complete.

How many of us waste a good deal of time each day dealing with spam? I'm not talking about "spam" in the classic sense; I get a lot of what I call "internal spam" where someone thinks it's important to tell me about things that have zero impact on my particular work... Or what about your organization's Intranet? Is it well-organized? Can you find the information you need without sifting through piles of marketing drek?

In any event, this is one of those situations where failing to acknowledge the problem could quite well be one of its symptoms. There's so much noise that the you think you're getting 100% of the signal.

You are absolutely right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588937)

We do all want just the right information at just the right time. Often, the problem is exactly like finding a needle in a hay stack.

How much signal gets through is determined entirely by the signal to noise ratio. The more noise (information glut) we have to cope with, the less real information we can get. Shannon's law applies.

Well, Bill does have a point, sort of... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588826)

"...workers today are not overloaded with information. 'We still want a lot of information.'"

I think he's referring to anybody who tries to use MS software help. After looking for and seeing the obvious being restated, I do find myself looking for a lot more information.

Please do not hate me... (1)

uniqueUser (879166) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588829)

But I agree with this. I think we do want more information, we just need it in managable chunks.

Maybe MS is starting to think that Google will be a real threat soon?

To much proof for him to absorb (1)

amigabill (146897) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588874)

I guess there's just so much proof that overload is a problem that he either didn't bother to read it, or tried but couldn't absorb it well. Since the evidence of overloading was so overwhelming to become unconvincing, he chooses to ignore it.

Information vs Office12? (1)

techwrench (586424) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588891)

What does Office 12 release have to do with prioritizing the massive influx of data that we recieve everyday?

Information is never enough! (3, Funny)

necromcr (836137) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588909)

Yes, please! Hit me with 120x40 start button and with all sorts of [insertname]-bars. It's ok if it decreases readability but that's why I have my 19 inch LCD for, eh?

Oh, oh! Let's not forget the IE4 Channels feature, THAT is what I use regularly!

"Information overload" or SPAM ? (1)

MaGogue (859961) | more than 8 years ago | (#12588942)


I believe we cannot say we are overloaded by information, only maybe with data.

AFAIK, information is that piece of data that is actually useful. Therefore I think we only have SPAM overload. At least I do.

This post is identical in informational content to some 10.000.000 other pieces of English text everywhere on the net; it says nothing new.

This goes to show that people generally like to talk, but don't like to listen. Just go to any elementary school (or Slashdot article..) and you'll see what I mean.

Much more important to MS than their customers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12588956)

MS Office was feature complete 5 years ago. Mr Gates is imagining more is needed, not because his customers are telling him they need more features, but because his financial people are telling him Microsoft needs to project more revenue. Bill man, the glory days of customers regularly justifying the continual re-purchase of your products is past.
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