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MPAA Blames BitTorrent for Star Wars Distribution

timothy posted more than 8 years ago | from the what-do-you-burn-apart-from-witches? dept.

Star Wars Prequels 1196

AI Playground writes "Slyck News reports on the MPAA's press release (.doc) blaming the BitTorrent protocol for the leak of Episode III. MPAA President and CEO Dan Glickman: 'There is no better example of how theft dims the magic of the movies for everyone than this report today regarding BitTorrent providing users with illegal copies of Revenge of the Sith. The unfortunate fact is this type of theft happens on a regular basis on peer to peer networks all over the world.'"

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1196 comments

And this is news? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601212)

Look, most people I know who have the ability to download the movie chose not to. They want to see it on a big screen, with big sound, with other fans.

Re:And this is news? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601288)

I, for one, watch only stolen movies. It makes me feel cool, like if I had a big penis.

Of course, BitTorrent is responsible. The author of this un-American software should be arrested immediately and pay a fine of 400 million to the starving author of Star Wars.

You, sir, are most correct! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601315)

Revenge of the Sith only had a record $50 million opening day. This is a travesty! I will personally donate my yearly salary of $40,000 to George Lucas to help keep him from starving.

Re:And this is news? (5, Insightful)

bman08 (239376) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601337)

I believe it was BitTorrent on the Grassy Knoll. BitTorrent also touched those boys at Michael Jackson's pad. This is like blaming Boeing for destroying the World Trade Center.

Re:And this is news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601356)

Look, most people I know who have the ability to download the movie chose not to. They want to see it on a big screen, with big sound, with other fans.

So do what everyone else does: get yourself a decent projector, a big screen, a decent sound system and a bunch of friends.

they need to be stopped (5, Informative)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601213)

from making misleading claims like this. it's already been ruled that copyright infringement is NOT theft

Re:they need to be stopped (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601296)

No, it hasn't.

Re:they need to be stopped (-1, Troll)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601344)

it's already been ruled that copyright infringement is NOT theft

You're splitting hairs to justify doing something that is clearly ethically wrong, that is pirating movies, music, and software.

a protocol (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601217)

It's like saying, "Guns don't kill people, the physics of hurtling bodies does."

It's more like saying (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601228)

Bad analogies don't kill conversations, people making useless ones do.

Should blame Edison and whoever discovered Copper (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601331)

Clearly the caveman who discovered copper and the man who invented electricity are also at fault.

Copyright (5, Insightful)

kdark1701 (791894) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601220)

I'd start taking him seriously if they used proper terminology. It is copyright infringment, not theft.

Re:Copyright (1)

MrAndrews (456547) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601278)

I had a question about that, and being the lazy bastard I am, I'm going to ask here: is the non-commercial distribution of copyrighted works considered copyright infringement? The $1 SVCDs on street corners, sure, but if no money is changing hands, is this technically copyright infringement?

I ask this with absolute sincerity. Does anyone have a link to the actual bit of legalese that nails it down?

Re:Copyright (4, Informative)

masklinn (823351) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601321)

Yes it is, because commercial or not it's still unauthorized distribution of copyrighted work

Re:Copyright (1)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601336)

I suppose if you have never watched a legitimate copy of a movie then it's possible that you have not seen the FBI warnings. FYI, the only mention of dollars is the hundreds of thousands they can legally extract from your anus.

The last 5 star wars movies have sucked anyway.

*sigh* (1)

Eunuch (844280) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601316)

Ok, I was once the rabid type who would say this immediately. English can be an ambiguous language. But we can talk in a nonambiguous way by choosing the correct words. We can also use our capacity to disambiguate. "Drinking" sometimes means "drinking ethanol". "Animal" sometimes means "non-human animal".

This use of animal has religious connetations. This use of theft has political connetations. Get over it. English won't be around forever. We'll get to an unambiguous binary language soon enough (see lojban for a preview).

Re:Copyright (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601320)

Unless we're talking about GPL non-compliance. Slashdot is funny that way.

Once again... (5, Insightful)

Geekenstein (199041) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601221)

A case of blaming the highway for the high speed chase. Nothing new here...move alone.

Re:Once again... (5, Insightful)

Dysfnctnl85 (690109) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601270)

EXACTLY!

BitTorrent maybe the catalyst but it's certainly not the reason the movie got leaked...how about the person who actually ACQUIRED the film in the first place?

Good lord!

Re:Once again... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601358)

This is bull .... first it's a studio copy so it means that someone just smuggled it out of the cut and postprocessing room, and second, BitTorrent was not the only way people got hand of it ... Usenet, DirectConnect, even ftp was used to get it ... should we ban the ftp protocol for it? They'll never stop piracy like this, there's always an alternative whatever they shut down.

Re:Once again... (1)

generalleoff (760847) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601291)

really... BitTorrent is definitly the means of wide spread distribution of episode III but it sure as hell isn't the cause for the leak.

Re:Once again... (0, Redundant)

NetNifty (796376) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601306)

Exactly. If the highway (Bittorrent protocal) wasn't there, the high speed chase (copyright infringement) would have happened on something else instead.

hmm.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601223)

I got in off usenet, not BT....

theft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601224)

this thing is not even worth the effort

Baby with the bathwater... (3, Insightful)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601225)

The MPAA may take the glancing blow approach and blame the whole entire P2P community for spreading just-released movies. But aren't you also blaming those who share legal, non-copyrighted stuff? I mean, BitTorrent is an awsome technology for sharing file in general! You can't blame the technology/community for a single groups actions...

Bittorrent stole Sith? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601226)

"Maybe the Ethernet ate your baby."

Blaming Bittorrent? I blame the Internet! (1, Insightful)

CharonX (522492) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601227)

So Bittorent is the source of all evil for MPAA now?
Because it was used to distribute Episode 3?
Why not blame the internet? Without it there would be MUCH less piracy.
[cynism]Or even better blame the George Lucas - if he hadn't made Episode 3 it could not have been pirated [/cynism]
Reality to MPAA - get a grip!

Re:Blaming Bittorrent? I blame the Internet! (1)

kryptkpr (180196) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601247)

No, blame those pesky telephone and coax cable lines. If we didn't have those, nobody would be pirating anything on the Internet!

Re:Blaming Bittorrent? I blame the Internet! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601263)

No, blame those pesky people. If we didn't have those, there'd be nobody to pirate anything anywhere.

Next on Slashdot: MPAA calls for death of all people

Re:Blaming Bittorrent? I blame the Internet! (1)

Rekrapt (813221) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601271)

Screw blaming the Internet. There would be no piracy what-so-ever were it not for human beings. We should all line up for termination immediately.

Resistance is futile.

Re:Blaming Bittorrent? I blame the Internet! (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601282)

The internet? Nah, I blame humanity's drive to create. Curse the first artist who put brush to paper, chisel to rock, or hand to cave-wall. Look at where we ended up, because of this cursed "creativity." It just leads to theft. Better if we are all humorless lawyers.

Shh! (1)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601319)

Don't give them any ideas or they'll be lobbying Congress to limit the maximum speed home users can have for their Internet connections...

...Instead of, say, developing the technology to distribute all movies any time for a reasonable fee. Which was part of the original promise of the Internet, and which amateur programmers have delivered on and which big corporations have not. They could have taken the lead on this and no one would have complained about spending 2 or 3 bucks to download and watch a movie, but the corporations were too busy trying to suppress what they themselves should have been developing. If the various *AA entities had spent half as much developing technology as they've spent suppressing it, none of this would be an issue right now.

Oh no (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601230)

From what I understand of this "bit torrent" protocol, it cuts the file up into little chunks and sends it out to all sorts of people.

I hope they catch the thief and interrogate him so they can find out who has each little piece. And I hope they can put them together again and return the stolen movie to its rightful owner!

The MPAA must be so sad because even though it owns Star Wars it has been stolen from them by a thief and cut up into little pieces and given out everywhere. This is terrible and heartbreaking. I hope when they catch the thief they fine him someone really huge, like what it costs to see the movie times the number of little pieces it's in, so like a thousand dollars!

A thousand dollars is a lot. I could buy a lot of baseball cards with that.

It's clear the damage that this has caused! (1, Redundant)

stupidfoo (836212) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601232)

For heaven sakes people! Lucas was only able to make $50 million on Thursday! HE HAS CHILDREN TO FEED (I think?)!

Blah (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601234)

I blame TCP/IP for the distribution of this wonderful film.

BitTorrent's fault? (4, Informative)

sik0fewl (561285) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601235)

I could have swore it was leaked by there own employees. But it's BitTorrent's fault, you say?

Bittorrent did it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601248)

Yeah, Bittorrent burgled the studio, encoded a production copy and set up a tracker! Damn software.

Tinfoil hat time! Did the MPAA leak it purposely? (5, Insightful)

GuyMannDude (574364) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601249)

It's interesting to note that the copy making rounds on the p2p networks is a workprint and not a cam-copy, suggesting an inside job. Given that everyone knew how high-profile ROTS was going to be, it doesn't seem too improbable that the MPAA purposely leaked the print just so they could make a big deal about it. I mean, ROTS is pretty much review-proof and p2p-proof; anyone who was interested in the film was going to the theater to see it anyhow. So there really wouldn't be a big loss by leaking this copy and it gives them a perfect opportunity to bang on the drum again. If ever they were going to leak a blockbuster, ROTS would be the one to do it for.

GMD

Re:Tinfoil hat time! Did the MPAA leak it purposel (1)

tritonic (801760) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601307)

It's a stroke of genius. Add a couple of annoying timestamps and screw the aspect ratio up, and it'll give people even more incentive to see it at the cinema as well.

I plead guilty (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601251)

I downloaded a copy from USENET. That makes me a terrorist. A terr-diddily-errorist! AAARGH

P2P and guns (4, Insightful)

CaymanIslandCarpedie (868408) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601252)

Why is it whenever anyone talks about wanting to ban guns because of the "dangers" they pose, they get laughed out of the spotlight and everyone says "guns don't kill people, people kill people". However, when it comes to piracy these idiots seem to be making progress with their message of trying to ban technology.

Repeat after me.

Technology doesn't pirate IP, people pirate IP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Re:P2P and guns (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601347)

Why is it whenever anyone talks about wanting to ban guns because of the "dangers" they pose, they get laughed out of the spotlight

Because the US Constitution includes the Second Amendment, which is claimed to guarantee a right to gun ownership. It's a shame there's no amendment to guarantee free speech.

silly me. (2, Funny)

floron (884050) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601253)

and there was I thinking it was the crummy script and wooden acting that was 'destroying the magic'...damn you bittorrent!!!!

Poor Bittorrent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601255)

If anything Bittorrent is the P2P client with the most legitimate uses. It's becoming a favourite method for distribution of MMORPG patches for one.

MPAA (1)

tourettes (97445) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601260)

I admit, i didn't RTFA, but the MPAA and RIAA are so quick to jump on the P2P 'community' about the illegalties of using those networks, and the press is so quick to report it, but, when it comes to these networks being used for legit purposes like linux distros, movie trailers, etc. there's hardly a peep.

The bottom line is that people will find a way to get these 'illegal' movies wether it's P2P, or some other form.

Prove it's available! Post a .torrent link (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601262)


I really don't want to pay to see it if I don't have to. I'm a student on a budget.

Re:Prove it's available! Post a .torrent link (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601286)

Ask Google [google.com] you stupid fuck.

boo-hoo MPAA (1)

downsize (551098) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601266)

number one at the box office and what NN million by the end of the weekend is just not enough?

if it was a shitty movie (have not seen the theater nor priated version), then I applaud those that p2p'd it, found out it was crap and saved their money for something else, like shinyfeet.com [shinyfeet.com] perhaps (oh wait, that's free)

once again, MPAA just abused the media for some more free advertising for their current blockbuster

Re:boo-hoo MPAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601327)

"MPAA just abused the media for some more free advertising for their current blockbuster."

You mean like you just abused this story for advertising shinyfeet.com ?

Hmmm (2, Insightful)

Crescens (650873) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601268)

"There is no better example of how theft dims the magic of the movies for everyone than this report today regarding BitTorrent providing users with illegal copies of Revenge of the Sith."

So, Bittorrent walked into a theater and recorded it? Or did Bittorrent walk in and steal a master and capture it?

I know that people usually give objects personalities and human qualities, but saying that the protocol is responsible for the piracy is silly.

That could just be me though.

Magic of Movies (5, Insightful)

futurekill (745161) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601269)

I think the $10 price of a ticket is starting to dim the "Magic" of movies more than bootlegs...

$3 movie tickets (1)

CustomDesigned (250089) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601357)

I only pay $3. I wait until it is second run, and see it at the local discount theatre. The popcorn is even reasonable - no reason to sneak in your own.

many thanks for telling me where to get it (5, Funny)

Gunstick (312804) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601273)


Thanks to the MPAA announcing the availibility of Episode III on bittorrent, I know now which client to start and search for it. Great service.

Georges

Re:many thanks for telling me where to get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601283)

Would have helped if they'd included a link to the Torrent but I guess just publicising it is a start.

Re:many thanks for telling me where to get it (1)

01000011011101000111 (868998) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601355)

And to think I'd gotten away from downloading movies :( then they go and encourage it by telling everyone - it's like holding whisky in front of a drunk - JUST NOT FAIR :(
That said, I wasn't going to see it before, and still intend not too... I'll save my £££ for serenity thanks...

Usenet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601275)

the worst part about this is that i didn't first see it on bittorrent i saw it three days before release on Usenet.

Wasn't this an in job? (2, Insightful)

sabernet (751826) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601276)

If the movie came out pre-release, shouldn't the MPAA kick themselves in the balls for distributing their own content?

Oh right...I forgot. That would make sense. And they can't have that.

They got it wrong (0, Offtopic)

tuxlove (316502) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601279)

The reason the magic was dim this time around had nothing to do with piracy. The problem is entirely due to George Lucas' inability to make a movie with magic in it. And the same goes for most of Hollywood. Really excellent movies are rare and hard to come by any more. Piracy isn't to blame for that.

Document text (1)

Joey Patterson (547891) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601280)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 19, 2005

BitTorrent Facilitating Illegal File
Swapping of Star Wars On Day of Opening

Statement by MPAA President Dan Glickman

Washington, D.C. - - Responding to news reports today that BitTorrent is already facilitating the illegal file sharing of the final Star Wars episode, Revenge of the Sith which opens in theaters today, Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) President and CEO Dan Glickman made the following statement:

"There is no better example of how theft dims the magic of the movies for everyone than this report today regarding BitTorrent providing users with illegal copies of Revenge of the Sith. The unfortunate fact is this type of theft happens on a regular basis on peer to peer networks all over the world.

"Fans have been lined up for days to see Revenge of the Sith. To preserve the quality of movies for fans like these and so many others, we must stop these Internet thieves from illegally trading valuable copyrighted materials on-line.

"If piracy and those who profit from it are allowed to flourish, they will erode an engine of economic growth and job creation; undermine legitimate businesses that strive to unite technology and content in innovative and legal ways and limit quality and consumer choice."

Glickman said that the average movie costs $98 million to make and market. Less than one in ten movies re-coup their original investment from the domestic box office and six in ten never recoup their investment . The average BitTorrent network has up to 2.5 million users a day. The movie industry is the only industry with a positive balance of trade in countries with which it does business. Copyrighted industries are responsible for an estimated $626 billion of the total gross domestic product.

"My message to illegal file swappers everywhere is plain and simple: You are stealing, it is wrong and you are not anonymous," said Glickman. "In short, you can click, but you can't hide. There are lots of ways to legally download our products through companies like CinemaNow, Movielink, Ruckus and others."

The Motion Picture Association is engaged in an all out effort to root out Internet movie thieves and make them pay the consequences of illegally downloading and swapping movies on-line. It has hundreds of investigators looking into these kinds of cases worldwide and has already been successful in shutting down several BitTorrent type sites. As part of its anti-piracy effort, the MPAA and its member companies have brought lawsuits against many Internet movie thieves across the United States and plan to continue such action.

About the MPAA: The Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) serves as the voice and advocate of the American motion picture, home video and television industries from its offices in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. These members include: Buena Vista Pictures Distribution; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Paramount Pictures; Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc.; Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation; Universal Studios from Universal City Studios; and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

# # #

MPAA Los Angeles
Kori Bernards
Anne Caliguiri
(818) 995-6600

MPAA Washington, DC
John Feehery
Gayle Osterberg
(202) 293-1966

MPAA following the "Banning P2P for Dummies" book (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601281)

Tactically speaking the MPAA is making the very obvious but pretty sound decision.

Step 1)Watch the release of a popular movie.
Step 2)Watch as movie gets put online.
Step 3)See blame P2P networks instead of individuals

Obvious plan, but well done. This dovetails on the release of a highly anticipated movie, so automatically gets more attention, and if it reaches some ears that haven't heard this tirade before but are gullible enough to believe that P2P is the cause then they have done well (From there point of view)

Now, I personally don't agree that P2P is the blame. I believe people are to blame.

Re:MPAA following the "Banning P2P for Dummies" bo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601310)

Why blame a medium for transfering data? Blame the tranferer. Which..since the release on the internet right now is a VHS Workprint.. it had to have come from the studio.. Blame them.. I don't use P2P's anyway..and I got the movie..

More MPAA HogWash (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601285)

Said an Actor to a Bishop...

I condemn the .doc format (0, Offtopic)

jspoon (585173) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601289)

For requiring me to pirate Microsoft Word. OK, so I didn't do that, I just give .docs a miss on my home computer.

If it (1)

FidelCatsro (861135) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601301)

If it hadn't of been bittorent it would have been blah blah blah all the way back to distributing it via various floppys(a slight hyperbole there but oyu get the picture).
The method of distribution matters not .Perhaps they would better serve their time by finding out the causes as to why people do it ,not how.

Everyone I know (4, Insightful)

mindaktiviti (630001) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601302)

Who's downloaded Episode 3 has gone - or is planning to go - to the theatre to see this movie.

If it was some drama or romantic comedy, then no, they wouldn't go to the theatre, but this is a special efx movie and is best seen either at the theatre, OR on a crazy home system if you have the DVD or DVD-like quality.

Dim the magic? (2, Insightful)

moonbender (547943) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601304)

There is no better example of how theft dims the magic of the movies for everyone than this report today regarding BitTorrent providing users with illegal copies of Revenge of the Sith.

That's the best example for "dimming the magic"? You've got to be kidding me. I don't even know what that's supposed to mean. How does providing users with illegal copies dim their magic, much less anyone else's? When I'm watching the movie tomorrow night, I certainly won't care if somebody downloaded it off the net.

In other news... (4, Funny)

Pedrito (94783) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601305)

Episode 3 is breaking records for how much money it's already made. Boy, I can really see how BitTorrent is just screwing the movie industry. Just how it screwed Battlestar Galactica on Sci-Fi. What a bunch of whining chumps.

a bad example (0, Troll)

j1mmy (43634) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601309)

There is no better example of how theft dims the magic of the movies for everyone than this report today regarding BitTorrent providing users with illegal copies of Revenge of the Sith.


Has Mr. Glickman actually seen the movie? Revenge of the Sith did a good enough job of dimming the magic of the movies on its own. I urge everyone to pirate this movie so Mr. Lucas is unable to make any more films.

Yeah. (3, Funny)

dswensen (252552) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601314)

Yes, Bittorrent was at fault, and the economic impact was so huge, that Star Wars didn't make a single penny this weekend [google.com]. And George Lucas is broke! John Williams is selling pencils on the street corner! Hayden Christensen... well let's not even talk about what he's doing to make ends meet!

Thanks a lot Bittorrent, you killed Star Wars!

Re:Yeah. (4, Funny)

GuyMannDude (574364) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601338)

Yes, Bittorrent was at fault, and the economic impact was so huge, that Star Wars didn't make a single penny this weekend. And George Lucas is broke! John Williams is selling pencils on the street corner! Hayden Christensen... well let's not even talk about what he's doing to make ends meet!

I'd rather talk about what Nathalie Portman is doing to make ends meet! :)

GMD

The phone is P2P, so ban it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601318)

Shock horror, the MPAA is using the same P2P network used by murderers and child abusers to organize their evil deeds worldwide ... the lowly phone.

Clearly telephony should be banned unless it is routed through a central communications vetting service.

torrent? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601322)

I can't get that .doc file. Can somebody post a torrent?

hmm (1)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601326)

Okay so.. How does a film being on P2P network ruin my fun? I plan to see ep 3 in a weeks time when it's all calmed down. I could download it but I'd rather go and see it at the cinema. Sitting infront of my PC for 2-3 hours to watch a film isn't as fun as watching it on the big screen. But how does some kid in another country downloading it make it less fun for me?

Why can't the MPAA/RIAA just fuck off. When the revolution comes they will get premier tickets for being up against the wall

Wrong! (1)

Malawar (674186) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601328)

The work print was floating Usenet _long_ before it hit BT. Not that I'd know. I saw it in the theater yesterday. Almost made up for the first two.

I have a suggestion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601332)

The MPAA should not go after P2P networks, every time you kill of one another will appear. That game of whac-a-mole gets tedious. They should go after the root of all this evil - that is - go after the internet itself. All this piracy is going on on the internet, so no internet no problem!

FTFPR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601333)

It has hundreds of investigators looking into these kinds of cases worldwide and has already been successful in shutting down several BitTorrent type sites.


The more you tighten your grip, the more torrents will slip through your fingers.

Uhm? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601334)

So let me get this straight. The guy who actually uploaded the file to the Internet isn't the person to blame? Isn't blaming BitTorrent sort of like shooting the messenger? Maybe we should blame the whole internet then, because without the internet we wouldn't have bittorrent.. Hell, while we're at it, let's blame the discovery and subsequent harnessing of electricity, the invention of transistors, and just for fun, the element Carbon.

BitTorrent != Theatre (1)

WidescreenFreak (830043) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601335)

How arrogant. Look, I realize that there are many negatives about going to a theatre - the assholes with their cell phones, kids whose parents won't shut them up, etc. - but I still will not settle for a BitTorrent rip if given the option of going to the theatre. A 50+-foot diagonal screen (that's a guess; I'm not sure about their actual dimensions) that dwarfs my 55" Mitsu 16:9 TV, a full sound system that dwarfs my 5.1 system, and popcorn that just doesn't come out that good from a microwave, depending on the theatre since some theatres' popcorn sucks while others' are fantastic - a positive theatrical experience is often far better than a positive home theatre experience.

The MPAA is being absolutely ridiculous with this charge, particularly since the BitTorrent version is a work print, not necessarily the final theatrical version. Quite frankly, I question whether or not anyone who would settle for the BitTorrent version as a replacement really had any desire to see the movie theatrically anyway.

The ethically-holier-than-thou "infringement is infringement is infringement is infringement is infringement" people be damned. This is just another excuse for the **AA to try to shut down what they fear rather than adjust their marketing strategies to take advantage of using the Internet for legitimate distribution.

He's absolutely right (4, Insightful)

Shky (703024) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601340)

As I stood in line at midnight, surrounded by fellow geeks, the only thing I could think of was: "Wow, BitTorrent has dimmed the magic right out of this."

No, wait, it didn't. The simple fact is, those who were going to see it in theatre did, and those who never were (or who were just going to borrow the DVD from a friend when it came out) didn't. Nothing new here.

no sympathy (1)

2TecTom (311314) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601341)

The fact is that George Lucas and company have made billions from Star Wars fans. These same fans are the ones doing the downloading. I fail to see how suing your own customers can be considered to be good business.

In truth, the MPAA is clearly just motivated by greed and is clearly incompetent. The movie and music industries have perverted the law and are simply practicing profiteers. The real crime here is in how the affluent have corrupted the system in order to generate excessive profits in order to fund lavish lifestyles.

Who cares? (1)

Mantus (65568) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601342)

Aside from politicials that they bribe^H^H^H^H^H lobby, does anyone care what the *IAA says? They have been claiming that the sky is falling for years meanwhile they also report recort profits.
The only thing I'de care to hear from them is "We are sorry, we were wrong, free advertising is great."

That's it! (4, Funny)

NoMoreNicksLeft (516230) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601345)

We need a law that makes it a federal felony to "Dim the magic of the movies, with intention or accidentally, through the distribution of any electronic media."

No longer will Ebert be able to safely sit there sending salvo after salvo at the movie industry, safe behind ill-concieved first ammendment rights!

Please, help save the magic of the movies from dimming, think of the children!

BT doesn't work that fast. (1)

baomike (143457) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601346)

My experience with BT tells me that a download of the Sith would be at least a week if not a two week deal. I think he jumped the gun a bit.

Yep (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 8 years ago | (#12601349)

Those damn thieves really put the dimmer on that magic [aljazeera.net]! (great source,eh?). Yep, I just don't know how the industry is going to survive all this thievery. Just how much worse does it have to get before people get off their butts and do something?

TCP/IP is the real problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12601350)

OK a lot of this evil is perpetrated by botterent but all internet piracy uses TCP/IP, this is clearly the real danger.

I call for a per packet blank media tax, and filtering of every packet at every node, and a linking of IP adress to a national DNA database.

In other news the MPAA charges Al Gore with inducing all digital piracy in the first place.
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