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New Phone Service Promises to ID Songs

samzenpus posted more than 9 years ago | from the name-that-tune dept.

Music 354

Coolnat2004 writes "Ever get a song stuck in your head, but you missed the DJ announcement of the song name? That's the idea powering a new cell phone-based service called 411-SONG. Just call 866-411-SONG, and hold your phone up to the speaker. 15 seconds later the call ends and the information on your song is displayed on your phone's screen. This comes at a price, though. 99 cents for your first 5 songs, and then 99 cents a song after that. However, nbc4.com reports that a subscription model may be coming soon. Wouldn't this technology be great for fixing up all those ID3 tags?"

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Uh (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619025)

So... now it costs as much to figure out what a song is as to buy it? No thanks.

Re:Uh (0, Offtopic)

CommunistTroll (544327) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619114)

Is it just me or is Slashdot's comment database royally fucked up?

I'm getting comments randomly mixed into random threads...

Re:Uh (5, Funny)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619135)

Nope; that's just normal slashdot user conversation. You must be new here.

No, I'm New Here (4, Funny)

New Here (701369) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619196)

No, I'm New Here

Re:Uh (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619147)

It is a bourgeoisie troll campaign. Notice they are anonymous postings of comments made by even registered users from previous threads.

Re:Uh (3, Funny)

ag0ny (59629) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619288)

So... now it costs as much to figure out what a song is as to buy it?

How could you buy it if you knew what song it was?

Re:Uh (4, Funny)

ag0ny (59629) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619301)

Ooops...

How could you buy it if you didn't know what song it was?

(Note to self: first coffee, then Slashdot)

Re:Uh (4, Insightful)

AstroDrabb (534369) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619348)

Hmm. Most major online music "stores" out in the wild allow you to do a very cool thing called search. So if you knew even a small part of the lyrics, you should be OK. Also, most of the major online music stores are taking a hint from Amazon. They are looking at your past purchases and recommending content. IMO, Amazon, has been on-the-money. Every book that Amazon has recommended to me, has been somthing I have wanted and as such, have purchased.

Re:Uh (1)

justdweezil (821601) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619297)

You fail to take into consideration how infrequently this happens. I would definitely pay a simple dollar to find out what some mystery song is.

Re:Uh (1)

AstroDrabb (534369) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619305)

I agree. How many people are going to be willing to pay $1.00 USD to find out just the name of a song? This looks like a "company" that just wants to spend some venture capital. I would like to know what venture firm invested in this crap. I have some great land opportunities in the Florida Everglades (Disclosure: I live in Orlando). The Everglades are becoming "the" place to live in Florida. If you have some venture capital to spend, please contact me at your@an.id10t.com for further details.

UK has Shazam Already (5, Informative)

dan_polt (692266) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619027)

This type of service been available in the uk for a few years now with shazam [shazam.com] , it works reasonably well for currently popular songs, fairs a bit oddly with some older stuff though.

I have actually used it for mp3 tagging too :)

Re:UK has Shazam Already (1)

cyklo (795952) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619086)

The last few times I've used it I've received no reply back, not even a failiure message. I've even tried it in front of my hifi as a test. I've given up on it now.

Re:UK has Shazam Already (3, Informative)

Mwongozi (176765) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619089)

I've found it to be quite accurate even with old/obscure stuff.

The web site is really horrible, but you don't need to use it. Just dial 2580 (UK networks only) and hold the phone up to the music for 30 seconds.

Re:UK has Shazam Already (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619200)

Let me guess...The Fall is your definition of obscure. And The Doors is your definition of old.

Re:UK has Shazam Already (2, Informative)

indicavia (838065) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619109)

This kind of service has been available here in the small country of Norway for a while too! Trough the largest phone provider, Telenor [telenor.no] .

Re:UK has Shazam Already (5, Funny)

pete6677 (681676) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619252)

Yep, its pretty accurate. I called them up, farted into the phone, and it gave the name of some Backstreet Boys song.

Re:UK has Shazam Already (1)

Phantasmo (586700) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619265)

Fido and Rogers in Toronto have had this for some time, too.
I'm guessing it's just MusicBrainz hooked up to the cell network.

Nyygbtrgure abj (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619031)

gb gur ghar bs "abobql tvirf n shpx"

Re:Nyygbtrgure abj (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619093)

Bssgbcvp? Fghcvq zbqrengbef, vg'f zber yvxr synzronvg.

Old news (2, Insightful)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619032)

There have been services like this around for years. When I got a new cell phone a few months ago it came with advertising for just such a service, and I had heard about such services ages before that.

FTS (1)

FLAGGR (800770) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619033)

Wouldn't this technology be great for fixing up all those ID3 tags?"

Not at .99$ a pop. I'm surprised google hasn't done something like this, though.

Been there, done that .... (5, Informative)

Paul Lamere (21149) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619035)

Wouldn't this technology be great for fixing up all those ID3 tags? MusicBrainz [musicbrainz.org]

Re:Been there, done that .... (2, Interesting)

yakhan451 (841816) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619150)

Am I the only one that doesn't have good luck with MusicBrainz? I've tried it many times and it rarely gets it right. Maybe it only works with really common stuff, but my tastes aren't too off the wall.

I've seen people asking for bulk retagging using MusicBrainz for my favorite music player, but boyhowdy, if I sent my collection through it, I'd never be able to find anything again. =]

In short... if this service is anything like MusicBrainz I hope they offer refunds.

Re:Been there, done that .... (0)

mister_tim (653773) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619216)

I think the difference is that MusicBrainz works by looking at the overall length of the song and it also checks any pre-existing ID3 tags. This service would work by actual audio matching - comparing what it 'hears' with the audio 'fingerprint' of songs in its database. Theoretically, it should be more accurate than MusicBrainz.

Re:Been there, done that .... (1)

MankyD (567984) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619261)

Music Brainz first checks the audio fingerprint before checking ID3 tags. It only uses the ID3 tags if it can't find a matching fingerprint. If anything, I would assume this would be less accurate, as sound quality over phones is less than that of even low-encoded mp3's.

Re:Been there, done that .... (1)

mister_tim (653773) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619380)

No, Music Brainz looks mainly at the length of the track in milliseconds - at least, that is my understanding.

I imagine this service would compare the actual wave form of the sound played to it through the phone with the waveform of sounds in it's database. I don't believe that Music Brainz does that, as it would essentially require a copy of every matched song to be present in its database.

I may have some of my terminology wrong, but I hope it's clear what I'm getting at.

Moodlogic (1)

mikis (53466) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619340)

I used MoodLogic [moodlogic.com] , and it was really good. Only thing is, you either have to pay for using it, or gain "points" by helping create "profiles" for music you have. But it works really, really well.

Well (5, Interesting)

pHatidic (163975) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619038)

Wouldn't this technology be great for fixing up all those ID3 tags?

Well with google you can already do this for free. However, the catch is that you need good enough pitch to know what the notes are. But if you can get them (or close enough), then you can type them in to get the song.

Re:Well (1)

fredistheking (464407) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619120)

Or you can simply type some of the lyrics.

Re:Well (1)

Infinityis (807294) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619140)

Really? How do you tell Google what the notes are?

I've been considering setting up a audio search website where you actually just hum, sing, or do whatever into a microphone and it'll match up the closest audio file. To support such a service, I'd set up an affiliate account with Amazon or iTunes or something, if the match can be made with a commercial record, and the person wants to buy it, there's a small, steady stream of income from that.

Then, when Google says "Hey! That's cool!", they buy it up for a few million, and I get to spend the rest of my days coding big things instead of writing something to pay the bills from month to month.

-David

P.S. Google, I'm still a student, so if you want to hire me and/or buy the idea from me, I'd love to work there!

P.S.S. If Google and/or Amazon isn't interested (yet), anyone else interested in forming a start-up?

Re:Well (5, Funny)

dnixon112 (663069) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619214)

Thanks for the idea!

Sincerely,
Google

Re:Well (1)

RedCard (302122) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619245)

P.S.S. If Google and/or Amazon isn't interested (yet), anyone else interested in forming a start-up?

Everyone is always interested in forming a startup. I'm interested, you're interested, half the people here are interested. If you're interested in keeping your idea, though, broadcasting it to a million programmers may not be the best way to go about it.

Do you really have the time to devote to it... or at least something, though? If so, I'm right here.

redcard411@XgXmXaXiXlX.XcXoXm ...remove X to reply

Re:Well (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619260)

fbhaqf yvxr sha, tvir zr n fubhg: zbp(gbq)yvnzt[gn]avgfhnt -ganet

Re:Well (3, Informative)

Dominic_Mazzoni (125164) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619276)

People have been working on this problem for a long time. Check out papers published at ISMIR (International Symposium/Conference on Music Information Retrieval) for the academic work. The algorithms and technology are there, no question - the problem is the business model and the licensing. It seems simple, until you try to talk to record executives who don't want to license you access to their music catalog. It seems counterintuitive, since in theory it would make them more money, but they apparently don't see it that way.

Also, while it's technically feasible, it does get significantly more difficult computationally when you want to search an entire library of songs.

Here's an example [musipedia.org] of a free site that has the technology implemented, just without the database of popular songs (it works great for classical melodies).

Not trying to discourage you - the point being, either go into this because you think the tech is cool but don't expect to make money, or if your goal is to get rich, become a business major and be prepared to spend all of your time meeting with VC execs and recording industry leaders, rather than building cool tech.

Re:Well (1)

bluegreenone (526698) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619223)

Can you please give an example of how this is done?

Old Hat (3, Informative)

civman2 (773494) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619046)

I believe that ATT Wireless has been offering a service like this for over a year [mobilemag.com] . The only difference is that their service is only a three digit number and you don't need to pay out of the nose for it.

"The new "#ID" music service is provided by San Francisco-based Musicphone in cooperation UK-based Shazam Entertainment, which operates a propriety recognition database of more than one million recorded songs. AT&T Wireless customers can trial the music recognition service at no charge beyond standard airtime charges when they first dial "#ID." Afterwards, the service costs $.99 cents, plus standard airtime charges, each time they use it." -mobilemag.com


unless this is a year old news story...

Re:Old Hat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619243)

you don't need to pay out of the nose for it.

Did you read your own quote? The price is the same, 99 cents per song. The only difference is the intro, AT&T gives you the first one free and this one gives you 5 for 1 with your first buy.

Already in Cananda (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619049)

I think its #DJ on Fido and Roger's Networks. Don't know if Telus or Bell have it yet...

Think of the marketing possiblities (2, Insightful)

davidwr (791652) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619055)

Think of the *insertevilnesslevelhere* possibities.

They know your phone #, they know what song you are listening to, the probably know what radio station is playing the song, and they can find out your address and probably your name.

If they don't have a good privacy policy, I won't be using their service.

Re:Think of the marketing possiblities (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619132)

So THIS is where the tin hats are being handed out at in this discussion, great! I've been looking for one.

Re:Think of the marketing possiblities (2, Funny)

jam3s (857730) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619185)

Yes .. we have been foiled again!

Re:Think of the marketing possiblities (1)

niteice (793961) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619201)

My God. That is the worst worst worst WORST WORST pun I have ever seen.

Great? (1)

saskboy (600063) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619056)

"This comes at a price, though. 99 cents for your first 5 songs, and then 99 cents a song after that. However, Wouldn't this technology be great for fixing up all those ID3 tags?""

Ahh, yeah? Brilliant if you own stock in AT&T maybe...

Re:Great? (1)

saskboy (600063) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619081)

There's also The Hum Line. You phone a weekend radio show on CBC [Basic Black] and hum or sing a few lines of the song, and the pannel of 3 people has a week to come up with the name of the song, and some details about it, and they review the answers the next weekend.

Re:Great? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619343)

Wow, that's about the most useless thing ever. It takes them a week? I would expect someone who's knowledgeable about music to either know it instantly, or not know it at all, assuming humming. If they know a few lines of the song, that's even worse, a few seconds with a search engine would solve that problem. What the hell does it take them a week to do? Go hum it to everyone they know?

99 (1)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619110)

Then again, you could take that 99 and use it to buy the song on iTunes and own it legally.

But you have to figure out what the song is first!

Old news? (1)

balamw (552275) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619057)

AT&T Wireless has had its own version of this for a while now, #ID. http://www.wirelessweek.com/article/CA521810.html [wirelessweek.com] . Looks like this offering is from MusiKube as mentioned in the linked article.

Note that from a PC you could always use http://www.musicbrainz.org/ [musicbrainz.org] if you're trying to fix those ID3 tags.

B

XM Radio (4, Insightful)

taped2thedesk (614051) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619063)

For $13 a month, I'll just stick to XM Radio... it shows me the title and artist of the song I'm listening to. It can even record that info so that I can go back to it later and buy the song or album when I get home. Sure, it won't identify arbitrary music (just the song currently playing on the tuned station), but it seems like the only time I try to figure out the name of a song is when I'm listening to it on the radio.

Re:XM Radio (1)

mvdde_xh (677698) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619232)

I think I will stick with regular free radio that displays the artist and title. Almost all the stations in the US are sending this info. You just need a radio that can display it. Just look for the RDS logo.

And after they charge you $.99 for IDing the song, (2, Funny)

Stephen Samuel (106962) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619066)

The RIAA will send you a writ of suit asking $30,000 for violating their copyright.

Fixing ID3 Tags (2, Insightful)

Gamzarme (799219) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619074)

Wouldn't this technology be great for fixing up all those ID3 tags?"

Well, another great way to accomplish this is to just have one piece of information, such as the artists name or song name, or even album and type it into Google. But if you are really desperate, you can just Google the lyrics or a catch phrase in the lyrics. It's simple, really.

YlES! FP? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619078)

Re:YlES! FP? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619281)

Time to Update your link, fool [goatse.ca] ! By the way, the random text auto goatse-link troll is pretty cool. It makes me want to drool. All the way to school. OK, I think I'm done now.

Service for slashdot (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619082)

I am waiting for the service that allows you to hold your camera phone up to your computer screen and it tells you if the slashdot article is a dupe. (which this one is)

Only for popular songs. Bah-Humbug! (4, Insightful)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619087)

While a service like this is truly incredible, as people from the UK (who have had it for a few years) have pointed out, these services usually only work on "popular" songs. Songs that probably get played twenty times a day on U.S. top-40 radio, with oppertunities to find out the name quite often.

The branches of music this would be most useful for (Indie Rock, Electronic, Jazz and Classical) are unfortunately the ones the system will rarely recognize.

cheap solution (2, Insightful)

jeffy124 (453342) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619088)

easy and free: figure out a few words in sequence, enter them into google using quotes, add the word lyrics outside teh quotes, and you can usually get the full song info quite easily.

if the song is stuck in your head, lyrics should be little trouble

Re:cheap solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619142)

I listen to glitch you insensitive clod!

certainly cheaper, probably better, not perfect (1)

Xtifr (1323) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619370)

That assumes A) the song has lyrics, and B) the lyrics are at all comprehensible (i.e. doesn't work for a lot of rock).

> if the song is stuck in your head [...]

If the song is stuck in your head (as opposed to, say, playing on the radio), this service isn't going to do much good, unless it's able to figure out the song when you hum a few bars, which seems pretty unlikely. :)

Google is pretty good at finding song lyrics for you, but not 100% reliable. Especially if you're mishearing the lyrics - for example, I was trying to find what turned out to be Leadbelly's Linin' Track a while ago, and the closest match I could find was Aerosmith's Hangman Jury, because what I heard as "lie on the track" was, actually, "line 'em track".

But in general, yeah, Google's pretty good at identifying songs if you have some lyrics. Whereas this new service is likely to be next-to-useless for most purposes. Especially for my main need - identifying tracks on concert recordings I get through Etree.

I wonder if you get your money back if the service can't identify the song? I could probably stump it over and over and over again with random songs from the Internet Archive's Live Music Archive [archive.org] . :)

This has been around for a while (3, Informative)

apoKalypse (568147) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619091)

Up here in Canada, both Rogers Wireless and Fido have been offering #DJ (#35) from your cell phone to look up songs. It will text message you the song, and also allow ringtone downloads if they are found.

Slashvertisement. (1)

winkydink (650484) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619095)

nothing more.

Also, I didn't see where the cost was free if it mis-identified your song, or how to request a refund, for that matter.

Huh... (2, Insightful)

Teja (826685) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619103)

I know this may sound redundant but wouldn't it be much easier to just GOOGLE the lyrics of the song and wait for results? While you may not always be near a computer with internet access (well with more and more cell phones offering internet access, it is much easier) that maybe the time where that service come useful for one.

Re:Huh... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619163)

> I know this may sound redundant but wouldn't it be much easier to just GOOGLE the lyrics of the song and wait for results?

Doesn't seem to work with my Dave Brubeck CD's, strangely enough...

Re:Huh... (1)

wyldeone (785673) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619299)

I know this may sound redundant but wouldn't it be much easier to just GOOGLE the lyrics of the song and wait for results?

That's great if your songs have lyrics. But what about instrumental pieces? I listen to a lot of celtic, swedish, old-timey, etc. fiddle tunes which do not have those handy indentifiers.

Re:Huh... (1)

mikis (53466) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619356)

How do you "Google" for songs with no lyrics?

But you can always try... Like one guy who asked on the forum: what is the name of that French song with accordeon which goes, "Tur-lu-tu-tu-tu"?

(A: In Grid - Tu es foutu :))

Who needs this service? (1)

lcnxw (743741) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619105)

Sure, there have been times when I've wanted to know the name of the song I was listening to. Usually I just jot down some of the lyrics and if I really cared I google for the song later. For free. and in the rare case that the song isn't online (indie band) then I highly doubt 411SONG will know it either.

I can only see this as a bad thing. How many people will end up in car accidents because they pull out their phone while driving and reach to hold the phone to the speaker, then look at the phone and read what it is. Its likely that most people won't care that much and will hear it again on the radio. I doubt this service will be able to ID songs that aren't in the top of their respective charts.

Unless the advertise this on MTV or another popular TV station, I can't see this service really taking off. I have a feeling most people would rather buy the song off iTunes than find out who performs it for the same price.

ridiculous (1)

bluegreenone (526698) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619125)

They will never be able to build a big enough user base charging $0.99 just to identify a song. If they were smart/could get the rights they should set it up so that the service IDs the song and *sells you a copy* for something like $1.50. That makes the transaction way more useful and fun for the user, and the service gets to keep the 50 cents convenience fee. Doing this way in my opinion is a recipe for failure and probably isn't financially viable.

Tommy Twotone (1)

Laebshade (643478) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619137)

It would've been more appropriate for them to buy 8675309...

Stewie: Ok now home number... oh yes. 8675309.. *ring ring* Wait that's not it. DAMN YOU TOMMY TWO TONE!

a couple of things.... (4, Insightful)

yagu (721525) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619144)

A couple of things: (I actually had been thinking about this service the other day -- I had seen it demo'ed on TV quite a while ago. I thought it was interesting and had just been wondering what had happened to the concept. I never missed it, just thought it was interesting, for a couple of reasons:

  • I tried to think how many times I've encountered just that need to identify a song -- turns out, at least for me, not that many. I do have a good ear and memory for music, but I can only think of once or twice in my life where I really felt the NEED to have this kind of service. I wouldn't pay anything for it regardless.
  • Do we really need yet another distraction from driving? While I can sympathize with most cellphone users it becomes almost (almost!) a necessary evil to occasionally talk on a cellphone while driving (though I do think it a bit over used and abused and probably has contributed to an accident or two), I cringe at the thought of people fumbling for their phone not only to dial up and "use" this service, but to do it under the auspices of a deadline, i.e., before the song ends on the radio. I think this just asks for trouble!
  • How accurate can this really be? The demo I saw was impressive, but for the songs I need ID'ed, they are much more obscure and the stats and performance of the demo I saw (let me emphasize I'm not totally positive it was one and the same as referenced here, but how many of these can there be?) the accuracy was good for most, but fell a bit for the less mainstream stuff -- which is the stuff I need ID's for.
  • How good is it for: Jazz; Classical; ID'ing specific rendition of a song (cover vs. original recording)?

Bottom line for me -- I don't need it.... Sometimes I feel like we're turning into a world that's a microwave oven with 100 power level settings! And just how many power level settings do we really need to live healthy, productive, and fulfilling lives?

Ear worms (1)

lheal (86013) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619155)

Apparently "ear worms" [sketchblogs.com] is the scientific term for a musical cognitive itch. An ear worm comes from knowing a little bit of a song, causing your brain to demand to know the rest.

There are two known ways to get rid of them:

  1. Google the lyrics, buy or download the tune, and learn the whole song well enough for your brain to be satisfied.
  2. (My personal favorite is to) sing or hum just enough of the song to give them to someone else.

musicbrainz (0, Redundant)

qda (678333) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619168)

there is a program called MusicBrainz tagger, and you can download it and run it agains all your mp3s to tag them properly http://www.musicbrainz.org/ [musicbrainz.org] it uses each mp3's digital signature to do this, and works fairly well, though if most of your songs are off p2p and not ripped cds, it has more trouble due to crappy variations..

Re:musicbrainz (1)

szyzyg (7313) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619367)

Surely this is kind of pointless - if you haven't downloaded the tracks then you've most likely ripped them, which means you probably know what the track is ;-)

Perhaps I should ask /. (1)

Senor_Programmer (876714) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619187)

How the hell can I get funding for my dumnbass ideas???

"idea powering"?
this idea couldn't power a mouse to lick his ass.

The idjits obviously never bother to listen to the radio. The DJ doesn't say, "and now feast your ears on this latest from Captain Beefheart"
No, he waits until the end of play or maybe a few plays and then announces, "you've just heard Blind Willy McFee singing 'Short Irish Girl Blues'. which was preceeded by Roy Rogers and Dale Evans singing that old favorite 'Trigger Braunsweiger, It Be da Best' and preceeding that the Opossum Brothers instrumental version of 'Wild Wood Weed'".

But if you can't waut for the DeeJay, pray tell, how the hell is the service gonna distinguish between the 103 different covers of Ring of Fire or 88 covers of Ghost Riders in The Sky???

I can name that tune in 3 notes! (2, Funny)

stinkpad (810024) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619203)

Gee... they could have made a game show of that.
Oh... wait...

id3 tags? (1)

E IS mC(Square) (721736) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619209)

Well, Media Tagger works wonderfully well with freedb.org. But yeah, for those rest 10%, this may be helpful.

Another great Slashdot advertisement! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619211)

Well, this 411 service for music has been around since January, and suddenly NOW slashdot picks up on it?

C'mon guys.

Go ahead, feebly apply the -1 to my message, condem it to hell, and continue to preach to the choir that you really even care about such a stupid service.

Neuros II (0)

Rostin (691447) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619222)

The Neuros II [neurosaudio.com] player has a feature called (I think) HiSi which does this for free. And it plays oggs. And it's entirely open source, firmware and hardware included. (except I think they are having some troubles with TI at the moment, and the firmware source is temporarily unavailable for download.)

Don't know whether HiSi actually works, because I never use my player to listen to the radio, but it's still kind of cool if you want it.

And no, I don't work for them. I'm just a pleased owner.

It's just powered by Shazam (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619225)

Have a look at their partner's page and you'll see a powered by Shazam logo http://www.411song.com/Partners.aspx [411song.com] . Shazam (not shazam.co.uk ;) ) was in the UK over 3 years ago. Although the techies that came up with it were from the US.

It was pretty cool when we used to go to the bars before it was launched and test it out and see people's reaction.

I remember a few times in the office we had different music playing at people's desks and the system itself could identify about 4 songs that were overlaid. I can't remember the CD that was always giving false positives, it was basically 50 minutes of silence and background noise on a CD!

There was some pretty cool stuff going on like being able to RIP 4 CD's at a time on a single box to build their library and clusters of servers to create fingerprints of the music and perform the recongition.

An alternate approach (1)

3770 (560838) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619228)

I believe that they are using some type of sound recognition system.

An alternative approach would be to have your central server tuned in on all the radio stations.

And then when a caller calls in all the server has to do is find the channel that matches the song that comes through the phone. That can probably be done with very good precision.

I'm not sure, but I believe that most radio stations have lists of all the songs they play and when they played it. So then you can find the song.

Some radio stations also send out the song title for display on special radios. I forget what that technology is called (sorry).

This is possibly so simple that it could be set up by a private person without a lot of financial means.

Re:An alternate approach (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619325)

Assuming you're trying to ID a song on commercial boardcast radio, sure. But that's probably the least likely time you'll want this service, considering how hyped most current popular songs are.

Get a device that will do it for you (1)

cureless (35682) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619246)

The Neuros [neurosaudio.com] (audio computer) will do it for you. When you listen to radio on it, hit the record button. When you sync it'll id the song for you (using MusicBrainz or something similar).

cl

They're confident! (1)

Bifurcati (699683) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619254)

While I'm inclined to believe it will probably work just as well as the image recognition [slashdot.org] software posted a few weeks ago (i.e., not very well), if they're getting you to pay for it (and as much as a song on iTunes, no less!) then they're obviously confident!

I wonder if you get your money back if it can't identify the song, or if it identifies it incorrectly? I can see it being a bit of a minefield for customer satisfaction unless they really do have a top class product...

A song I can't find anything about... (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619277)

The song title is "Sexual", by a band called "Goddess".

I've never found the lyrics for it. All I can find is GnR's "Buick Mackane", neopagan/tantra/whatever stuff, and pr0n.

UK have had this for a while! (1)

SilentSheep (705509) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619283)

We have had this in th UK for at least a year now. Dial 2580 hold it up near a speaker, it automatically disconnects after 20 seconds. A minute or so later u recieve an SMS with the name of the song and the artist.

Its great when u want to cheat in a pub quiz.

I've always wondered how it works, pretty damn clever if you ask me!

ATT wireless had this... (1)

chevybowtie (96127) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619290)

...over a year ago. Worked everytime; surprised me. I don't know if they still have it since being swallowed by Cingular.

Just and idea... (2, Insightful)

krin (519611) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619300)

Instead of paying a buck to figure out the name of the song you just heard on the radio.. you could try calling the station and asking. I have called a local station a few times in the past and they've been more then happy to tell me the name of a song they just played.

You could try their website as well, a lot of stations are putting their playlists up on their sites now; as long as you have a good idea of when the song was played it should not be to hard to figure it out.

And of course as others have mentioned, the almighty Google.
I just can not see anyone paying a buck to figure out a song title.

A nice audio story, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619302)

too bad the blind are no longer allowed to post.

E-mail pater@slashdot.org to express your displeasure at his hatred of the visually impaired.

Release the hounds! (1)

Slavinski (713970) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619304)


Oh no! Preparing for the rush of Giligan's Island jokes...

There was a San Franciusco company... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619311)

...doing this too. In the Bay Area and Japan. The company is no longer around. And Sony used to sell a gadget that could help you ID a song you heard in your car (but only once you were home and online).

Flawed (1)

bryan8m (863211) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619314)

What if I'm not quick enough to get my phone up to the speaker? It would be more convenient for me to hum/sing a few notes from the song and then get the title/author.

I submitted this as a story over a year ago. (1)

AugstWest (79042) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619315)

Suddenly it's news. Huh. Too bad it wasn't accepted then.

Slow news day? :]

Lazy. (1)

P0ldy (848358) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619317)

I guess I'm just oldfashioned to type a few of the lyrics into google with "lyrics" attached to the string and figure it out that way. And Metadata is a quicker and more efficient way for tagging mp3s anyway (considering the 15 seconds of each track that would have to be played for each song).

bizn4Ltch (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619320)

of pr0gress. progrEss. Any

Audio watermarking? (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619324)

Is this using the same technology that is supposed to ID a song 'out on the net' and autogenerate a take down letter/suit?

In addition to everything else suggested, (1)

olegm (233286) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619363)

try typing a line into google in quotes with the word lyrics and you can find just [google.com] about [google.com] any [google.com] song [google.com] .

4'33" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12619366)

Suppose it'll correctly identify that John Cage song?

yesnet! (2, Funny)

DonniKatz (623845) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619378)

there is a company called yesnet www.yes.net that has been doing this for radio stations for a few years now. It's what radio station such as Providence's WBRU www.wbru.com (look at the very top) have been using on their websites and such. The only problem is when we (the djs) deviate from the playlist and the program director finds out by looking at the yesnet printouts.... DAMN YOU YESNET!

Already available (1)

ccharles (799761) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619379)

This type of service has been available in Canada from Fido [www.fido.ca] for some time now.

Married with children (1)

isny (681711) | more than 9 years ago | (#12619384)

Does anyone else remember the episode of 'Married with Children' where Al gets a song stuck in his head? I was thinking that this would be useful for that. I tried the google trick, but I couldn't remember the lyrics, either.
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