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Blogging For Paychecks

Zonk posted more than 9 years ago | from the whatever-pays-the-bills dept.

The Almighty Buck 187

prostoalex writes "When you hear about blogging, you're most likely to hear about personal journals, self-expression and youngsters sharing their daily routines online. However, as Wall Street Journal notes, the word blogger can now frequently be seen in corporate job ads. Blogging jobs pay anywhere from $40,000 to $70,000 and frequently require writing copy for corporate Web sites and ability to promote on the Internet. A search for blogger and blogging on one of the job meta search engines yields several hundred open positions."

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Meh. (1, Insightful)

Seumas (6865) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691635)

So, I'm supposed to take a significant paycut _and_ throw away any sense of decenty I have?

Re:Meh. (2, Interesting)

Breakfast Pants (323698) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691698)

Reading this article makes me think we are setting ourselves up for a whole 'nother dot com boom/bust.

Re:Meh. (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691866)

And the only time such stupid corporate ideas come to fruation is when they have extra capitol to spend. In other words, the ecconomy MUST be doing well for these kinda jobs to be handed out at 70k a year.

Re:Meh. (1)

NitsujTPU (19263) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691751)

Apparently you seem to think that most people who have time to write lengthy blogs have jobs or something.

Re:Meh. (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691873)

Apparently you seem to think that most people who have time to write lengthy blogs have jobs or something.


Well, they would if it were their job, now wouldn't they?

Too bad I'm alergic to work there aren't enough showers in the world to wash off, and I rather doubt these jobs come with artistic control and pay or play contracts.

KFG

Re:Meh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691837)

darn that frikkin "t" key for being so damn close to the "c" key.

No, you'll just be "getting the facts out..." (0)

UnapprovedThought (814205) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691988)

It will of course be framed according to the POV of the corporate reality distortion field.

Only a very naïve person could really enter the field to get through the interview stage. Likely their local equivalent of Darth Vader will sense you coming from a distance. He may yet leave you alone and bide his time in the hopes of turning you over to the dark side.

However, if you start to portray their products for what they really are, the Emperor might find out, so be ready to grasp your throat.

blogging=marketing? (4, Interesting)

RayDude (798709) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691642)

I see. So to corporate america, blogging equates to marketing.

Is this a good thing or a bad thing?

Raydude

I never thought that I would ever see the day... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691663)

I never thought that I would ever see the day when being a loudmouth with NO credentials is worth $40,000 or more. Where do I sign up?

Re:I never thought that I would ever see the day.. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691667)

I never thought that I would ever see the day when being a loudmouth with NO credentials is worth $40,000 or more.

Welcome to 1997.

Re:blogging=marketing? (1)

ndansmith (582590) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691693)

Yeah, let's call this what it is. It is clearly not blogging (as in Mark Cuban, Josh Marshall blogging), but rather a strange corporate tactic called "advertising."

Re:blogging=marketing? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691699)

Get with it man. It's called "blogvertising".

How are you going to survive in the computerized e-future if you can't even wrap your head around a simple Xoncept like blogging?

Re:blogging=marketing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691979)

Mmmm. Such a nice word, too - blog. Blogs blogging blogger blogvertising.

So easy to say with a blocked nose, too.

Re:blogging=marketing? (1)

Goldberg's Pants (139800) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691700)

Actually I'm paid to blog. However, I do not earn very much from it. Probably because I'm NOT pimping for someone else. I merely news gather and post the news. Simple as that. Pay is a lot less for that sort of gig unfortunately.

Re:blogging=marketing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691733)

"Thumbnail galleries" are not "news".

Re:blogging=marketing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691737)

Roland is that you??

Blogging is good for society (2, Insightful)

Corpus_Callosum (617295) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691762)

While companies may think they are using blogging as a marketing tool, I think that the reality is somewhat more complicated. Corporate sponsored blogs tend to end up being a focal point for interaction related to specialized (corporate related) topics. And specialization is the crucial attribute that make blogs so interesting.

For the first time in the history of the world, we now have a direct channel for hyper-specialization. Blogs + RSS amount to a revolution; The high availability personal-press.

Each of us tend to seek out and interact on subject matters that we are interested in, believe in and/or know something about. In the past, that generally meant your choice of friends and organizations that you belonged to. But today, we can gather around micro-press engines that allow us to interact (as I am doing now).

The end result is that like-minded people from all over the world end up exchanging ideas and critical thought with one another over subject matter that is important to them rather than what a media outlet wants to be important to them.

This new explosion of specialization will have profound and unforseen results as it evolves, such as a completely new and transcendent awareness in society. The populations that make use of blogs are literally transforming themselves from network/newspaper zombies into their own people with their own refined views that match their own personalities. In a very real sense, the blog is an attractor that is pulling us towards a new form of collective awareness or sentience.

So in summary, I think it is a good thing.

Re:Blogging is good for society (1)

MoralHazard (447833) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691817)

You're only considering one angle on the issue, though... I think you're missing one of the big implications of the GP's post.

Corporate sponsored blogs tend to end up being a focal point for interaction related to specialized (corporate related) topics.

What about astroturfing? We see it on Slashdot from time to time--somebody who's on a company's payroll but trying to look independent will submit links to articles or blog posts that are entirely self-serving. I run across blogs every day that seem to be solely corporate shills.

This isn't a problem of blogging in particular, sure--but the point is that not all bloggers are honest about their motives and sponsorship.

For the first time in the history of the world, we now have a direct channel for hyper-specialization.

No offense, really, but the rest of this is kind of just a screed about how great blogs are, how they'll change the world, and usher in a new era of human consciousness, a distributed Monolith by which we shall advance to a hyperHuman state...

I swear, anybody modding the parent "Interesting" or "Informative" is gonna hear from me.

Re:Blogging is good for society (1)

scottme (584888) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691951)

not all bloggers are honest about their motives and sponsorship

So, welcome to the world. There is no requirement that bloggers, or anyone else for that matter, should be honest. But in the long run, integrity tells, and those who value it find ways to filter out those who don't.

Re:Blogging is good for society (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12692379)

What about astroturfing? We see it on Slashdot from time to time--somebody who's on a company's payroll but trying to look independent will submit links to articles or blog posts that are entirely self-serving. I run across blogs every day that seem to be solely corporate shills.

There is a theory that subtle astroturfing was what popularised Apple and Google.

Re:Blogging is good for society (1)

Frodo Crockett (861942) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691896)

The end result is that like-minded people from all over the world end up exchanging ideas and critical thought with one another over subject matter that is important to them rather than what a media outlet wants to be important to them.

Groupthink, groupthink, groupthink. And no offense, but your whole post reads like those television ads for Dianetics. "Bloganetics will change your life forever!"

Re:Blogging is good for society (1)

scottme (584888) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691941)

An insightful comment to be sure.

While corporates may attempt to jump on the blogging bandwagon as another marketing channel, unless their paid-for bloggers really do deliver the goods and establish themselves as worthwhile net contributors to the communities they seek to engage, they will surely fall by the wayside.

Re:blogging=marketing? (1)

Tyrell Hawthorne (13562) | more than 9 years ago | (#12692027)

I see. So to corporate america, blogging equates to marketing.

Is this a good thing or a bad thing?

It definitely was an expected thing. Marketing has become increasingly import (and disgusting, imho) in our society. Wherever ads can creep in, they do. Cf school books with ads. I'm glad I'm done with school.

For all the whining teenagers (4, Funny)

Saven Marek (739395) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691643)

For all the whining teenagers... your time has finally come. yes, people want to pay you to get all angsty.

No, you have it all wrong! (1)

bennomatic (691188) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691917)

Those would be blah-gers.

Re:For all the whining teenagers (2, Interesting)

Danger Stevens (869074) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691934)

You're completely mistaken. Blogging software, while usually used for personal journals by teens, is actually just an evolution of static websites. A blog enables a writer to produce content quickly without having to worry about editing html.

It's being used to make BOATLOADS of money by such folks as WeblogsInc and others.
For more information about professional blogging, check out the guru himself: Darren Rowse [problogger.net] . Darren makes a 6-figure income simply by providing quality, regular information on a number of websites he owns and operates.

The secret to getting these jobs (5, Insightful)

Dancin_Santa (265275) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691646)

A little thing to realize about want ads is that they are usually filled by the time you read them.

So what is the job seeker supposed to do? Well, according to What Color is Your Parachute [amazon.com] , the key is to use your connections to get in.

If you are a blogger with a dedicated audience, you will already have people knocking on your door to get you to write for them. I know I do, and all I do is write a few words on this site here.

If you want to blog for a company, see if you know anyone working there. They have a better idea about the hiring situation inside their company than any want-ad could ever let you know.

Re:The secret to getting these jobs (2, Insightful)

DenDave (700621) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691778)

Not only that but I think you have to be a bit of a wordsmith too. Being able to quickly redact and react to the world of interest to your company. I am a proponent of companies blogging in the sense that it may mean a reduction in meaningless marketing. Consider it like a good salesman who is passionate about his product and can convey his enthousiasm and highlight the important aspects of the product. For example a good blog for RedHat could track the open source movement in corporate environments, this could help to spread the news and gain general acceptance for the product and the segment as a whole. Apple has a lot of succes with blogging, except it's free and they don't know the blogger.. sometimes they disagree with the blogger but it's attention grabbing marketing nonetheless.. ;)

As with printed media, blogs suffer the fact that quantity does not equal quality and hence the selection of bloggers will now indeed be on a you-know-who-know basis, it's a question of trust I guess. In future these functions may formalize and we may see assesments geared for this kind of redactionary work. Perhaps journalist schools will embrace the medium, maybe they already have. For ommercial schools in the US this would be a good time to get started with a program.

Re:The secret to getting these jobs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691861)

Reading your comment hurt my eyes. Did you mean to omit words and punctuation marks? How about the spelling errors? In otherwords, am I missing sarcasm here?

Help me out here, please.

Re:The secret to getting these jobs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12692022)

Maybe he's not a blogger...

Re:The secret to getting these jobs (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691944)

If you are a blogger with a dedicated audience, you will already have people knocking on your door to get you to write for them. I know I do, and all I do is write a few words on this site here.

Agreed. It's not that hard to make a lot of money just writing on sites like this for different companies. Why, for example, McDonalds recently commissioned me to subtly write about their delicious tasty Quarter Pounder which is served with a generous portion of mouth-watering, delectable fries and a refreshing drink, all for an affordable price. I can tell you that I'm loving it! And they love it too. Many companies will gladly pay for product placement. The secret to landing these gigs is to start off the day right with an Egg McMuffin and rich aromatic coffee brewed fresh, then contact the various companies to see if they would be interested. Take the HR person out to lunch -- McDonalds will get you served and on your way quickly -- then follow up a few days later.

I'm sure Roland would agree (3, Insightful)

dnixon112 (663069) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691648)

I wonder how much he gets payed by Slashdot?

Re:I'm sure Roland would agree (1)

CmdrTaco (troll) (578383) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691703)

He gets all the shitty jizz he can lick up off the men's room floor at OSDN.

Re:I'm sure Roland would agree (1)

Breakfast Pants (323698) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691719)

No you got it wrong, he probably pays slashdot to run his stuff, not the other way around.

PSA #819 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691973)


Okay, one more time. The word is PAID.

I say / I said.
I pay / I paid.
I lay / I got laid.

You're Hired! Until.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691649)

You make a mistake and screw up our pr by saying something wrong and we're unable to take it off the blog in time to prevent a media disaster.

Hopefully they're literate (2, Insightful)

PornMaster (749461) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691651)

At most of the places I've worked, the grammar of a significant percentage of the employees bordered on illiteracy. At least these bloggers are likely to be able to write coherently.

Re:Hopefully they're literate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691688)

At most of the places I've worked, the grammar of a significant percentage of the employees bordered on illiteracy. At least these bloggers are likely to be able to write coherently.

On most of the blogs I've looked at, the grammar of a significant percentage of the bloggers bordered on illiteracy. At least these bloggers are likely to be able to write coherently... ?

Re:Hopefully they're literate (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691816)

At least these bloggers are likely to be able to write coherently.

Takes one to know one. Who's doing the hiring?

KFG

Re:Hopefully they're literate (1)

PornMaster (749461) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691958)

Well, I would assume that the corporate communications department would be involved in the blogger's work. Do most companies still have those?

Re:Hopefully they're literate (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691995)

corporate communications department

And you find those to be great fonts of literacy?

KFG

This is anything new? (2, Insightful)

hoka (880785) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691653)

This is just a marketing extension really, businesses have long since been hiring people to go "put out the good word" for them. It happened for a long time on the Internet without many people noticing, with company rep's using a sock puppet attack to gain support for some company. I've seen them all over tons of forums (usually given away by talking about _any_ company and having less than 5-10 posts, and all those posts being total garbage), onto IRC for certain channels of people counter-pointing some viewpoint, and even in Slashvertising. Seriously folks, nothing to see here, move along.

Re:This is anything new? (1)

nate nice (672391) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691768)

It's the damn truth and some of the best advertising money can buy. Now quiet, we're getting paid here!

So now (0, Troll)

phocutus (670853) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691654)

You can talk shit and get paid for it? Sounds like most Management positions....

Well, look at Kottke (1)

ral315 (741081) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691656)

Jason Kottke [kottke.org] blogs for a living, taking voluntary "micropayments" which, so far, have been enough to support him.

Re:Well, look at Kottke (1)

lendude (620139) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691914)

"...taking voluntary "micropayments" which, so far, have been enough to support him."

What, as opposed to involuntary ones? *scratches head*

Re:Well, look at Kottke (1)

jrockway (229604) | more than 9 years ago | (#12692414)

Yes, as opposed to involuntary (compulsory) ones. When you go to the newsstand and buy a magazine, that's an "involuntary" payment. If you want to read the content, you HAVE to pay for it. Voluntary means if you like it you can pay for it, but you don't have to if you don't want to. Like slashdot.

Nothing new (0, Redundant)

Neil Blender (555885) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691657)

It's now just another word for marketing gopher.

The new dot-com nonsense (3, Insightful)

AEton (654737) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691658)

Gullible hacks are all over this 'blogger' gibberish because somebody somewhere thinks it's a hot new word.

It isn't - it's silly and it rolls off your tongue wrong, like "Pog" - but that hasn't stopped anyone.

In fact, it's gotten so bad that I was reading Time magazine today and saw a totally serious sidebar on this hip new phenomenon, "Blogebrity". This is a nonsense Contagiousmedia hoax [contagiousmedia.org] , and I'm surprised the editors let it slip through. (Or I wonder how much they got paid.) At any rate, Time's sloppy standards there exemplify the cultural phenomenon where anything that says 'blog' and sounds trendy is brilliant and worth supporting.

Yikes.

Re:The new dot-com nonsense (1)

hinkomatik (888502) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691875)

It's an ALF pog, Bart! Remember ALF?!? Well, he's back. . . in pog form.

Re:The new dot-com nonsense (2, Funny)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691895)

It's clear you don't know what you are talking about as you failed to use any words ending in "sphere" (for example blogosphere, papersphere, buzzesphere, etc)

Why not? (1)

Palal (836081) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691661)

They have corporate prostitutes (obviously they're not called that), why not corporate bloggers? And then we wonder why Enron goes bust!

Re:Why not? (1)

firehorsey (867123) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691670)

Please tell me more about these corporate prostitutes.
I dont recall this benefit during my induction program. Thanks

Re:Why not? (2, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691889)

They have corporate prostitutes. . .

Personal Satisfaction Engineers find that term offensive, you insensitive clod.

KFG

Business is business (2, Insightful)

Mattygfunk1 (596840) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691664)

Frequently updated and interesting content like /. can develop a community around it. From there, whether the site chooses to simply offer a service for the goodwill of their readers, or incorporate a more conventional way of monetizing website traffic, provides the business payoff.

Smart business IMO, and we'll probably see more of it.

__
Laugh Daily funny free videos [laughdaily.com]

Rely on the corporate bussiness (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691665)

Rely on the corporate bussiness to take advantage of something new. Im just surprised the pr0n industry wasn't here before :)

But then again, maby they where?

(like I wouldn't know.. because I don't surf pr0n).
*emptying cache* :)

Re:Rely on the corporate bussiness (1)

Farmer Tim (530755) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691901)

"Im just surprised the pr0n industry wasn't here before"

They were there long before the web. It's called the Penthouse letters page, and it's long been a home to illiterate, implausible drivel, so I think it qualifies.

Re:Rely on the corporate bussiness (0)

PornMaster (749461) | more than 9 years ago | (#12692024)

Never been to http://fleshbot.com/ [fleshbot.com] ?

Re:Rely on the corporate bussiness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12692417)

Blogging or marketing -- They are there:

http://www.boobblog.com/index.php [boobblog.com]

Figures... (1)

QQoicu2 (797685) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691668)

First, they took an individualistic form of expression and commercialized it (all the cool kids these days have Xangas... and have the nerve to call them blogs!). Now they turn it around and corporatize it. It's interesting to see how new forms of media evolve in positive ways, as well as get exploited.

Re:Figures... (1)

Kinky Bass Junk (880011) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691878)

Wow, just like "Indie" fashion; corporate blogs make about as much sense as paying for faded jeans. What's next? 'Taggers' (graffiti form for those not in the know) getting registered as artists? This sort of thing makes me wish Communism actually works.

Re:Tagger artists (1)

zmollusc (763634) | more than 9 years ago | (#12692193)

If the taggers can get paid for what they call art, it will be art, and they will be artists.

Cash for ..ah..blogging (3, Interesting)

Kaorimoch (858523) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691672)

As long as they state on the blog who they are paid by, I'm fine with it. It is where they don't tell you that they get paid to do it that I get concerned about where blogging is taking itself.

What a great idea (2, Insightful)

The Angry Artist (877090) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691690)

Wonderful! Now, instead of professional journalists writing shoddy articles on shaky ground for widely circulated publications, we can have complete amateurs do it, too!

Re:What a great idea (1)

zmollusc (763634) | more than 9 years ago | (#12692172)

Hopefully, it will be 'instead' rather than 'too'. Then the 'professional journalists' can get on with something they are more suited to, like drawing welfare checks.

Disclosure (4, Insightful)

Goonie (8651) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691704)

If they disclose that they're being paid by $COMPANY$ to blog, fine. If they don't, that's unethical.Just like advertorial [wikipedia.org] in newspapers or on TV, actually.

Re:Disclosure (0, Offtopic)

Viceice (462967) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691978)

OOO... I get it. It's just like those Slashvertisements we see around here all the time... Except in a newspaper!

When's Trolling Going to be a Paid Job? (4, Funny)

tjstork (137384) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691705)

bloggers, webmasters, when are we trolls going to get some respect!

Re:When's Trolling Going to be a Paid Job? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691712)

You have far too few responses to be considered a troll.

There's only one thing more pathetic than a troll, that's a wanna-be troll.

Re:When's Trolling Going to be a Paid Job? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691714)

bloggers, webmasters, when are we trolls going to get some respect!

When they can turn the crap you post into fertilizer???

Re:When's Trolling Going to be a Paid Job? (0)

JumperCable (673155) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691834)

Sorry. That is seasonal work. You have to wait for election season.

Re:When's Trolling Going to be a Paid Job? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12692222)

What do you mean when's trolling going to be a paid job? Last time I checked, Darl McBride, Maureen O'Gara, et al. got paid for it.

Excellent (1)

NitsujTPU (19263) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691722)

Corporate America is willing to pay to steal the last shred of legitimacy from an already specious source of information.

Not only can we count on unedited accounts from the mouths of non-specialists... we can count on those non-specialists being paid off by corporate interests to spout off opinions that those corporations will not have to take any responsibility for.

This can apparently only be used for good.

This is a good thing (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691742)

I am glad to see companies begin to drive magnetic web-readiness so they can reinvent ubiquitous niches and streamline impactful deliverables. The whole idea of deploying viral infomediaries is the first step in transforming intuitive infrastructures and recontextualizing impactful channels. Good for them!

Spelling error in article (3, Insightful)

BJH (11355) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691753)


%s/blogger/astroturfer/g

Re:Spelling error in article (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691915)

And the difference is... what?

There are bloggers who are not astrotufers, of course. But there are also bloggers who are. And they're still bloggers.

Blogging is a medium pretending to be a movement.

IN OTHER WORDS (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691769)

"Public Relations" now named something else

Wake up (2, Interesting)

dmiller (581) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691772)

Wake up: the emperor has no clothes. Blogging has been owned by vested interests for a while.

Look at all the technology companies who encourage their employees to blog and wax effusive about their products. (picking a couple of easy examples) Sun, Microsoft, Redhat and many more do this.

Witness the co-opting of political blogs of all kinds during the last season of US and Australian elections. Notice the tight coupling between the language used by certain bloggers and spin crafted by political parties?

Observe the abuse of blogs to gain or destroy Google ratings.

If you think that what you are reading in a blog is somehow automatically more "real" than something you would read in an advert, press release or partisan hack's column, then you are deluding yourself. Blogs are another tool in the bag of PR and marketing people and they will continue to be used as such.

Re:Wake up (1)

AntiPasto (168263) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691807)

I think this is very insightful... TPM is a prime example! There are some political blog heros that pointed out the partisan nature of many... but I don't know where they went.

TRUTH (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691777)

It's main stream media trying to get a piece of the action..I wouldn't touch their sites(CNN, DrudgeReport, ABC, CBS, NBC, etc.) even with blogs.

Honesty and integrity means something to me.

Re:TRUTH (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691833)

I trust Fox News more than most blogs I've seen. Blogging is the least trust-worthy news source because the vast majority of them have no accountability. Dan Rather got his ass prematurely fired for jumping the gun on Bush's military record. I don't know of any blog that would fire somebody for publishing that. In fact, I bet Indymedia would give them a raise.

Honesty and integrity? (0, Offtopic)

Colourspace (563895) | more than 9 years ago | (#12692254)

Go Anonymous Coward!

Bobbing for Paychecks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691800)

I was immediately excited when I saw the headline.
Bobbing for paychecks, what an easy way to make money.
Thanks Slashdot, for yet another disappointment.

Re:Bobbing for Paychecks (0)

kfg (145172) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691948)

Bobbing for paychecks, what an easy way to make money.

You haven't seen The Magic Christian, have you?

KFG

at last (1)

sch1sm (669998) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691824)

Wow, so they managed to create a job title lower webmaster?

Re:at last (0, Offtopic)

hinkomatik (888502) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691868)

huzzah, I say.

just another bubble (3, Insightful)

ArbitraryConstant (763964) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691825)

I can remember when blogging was cool.

Now it's just another fashion to coopt for marketting reasons. These people will make lots of money for a months until everyone realizes that anyone can write blogs -- that's the entire point. Then it'll be just another job requirement for employees.

Wait, that's not true. Blogs were never cool.

When I hear... (-1, Flamebait)

JThundley (631154) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691826)

When I hear about blogging, I'm most likely to hear one thing: bullshit.

The Qualificiations... (1)

dj245 (732906) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691828)

Must have method of transferring data into computerized format. Must be able to spout rumor and opinion, and mix with a believable amount of fact to present a digestable blog. Roland Piquepaille need not apply.

Digital Promotion (4, Interesting)

Sundroid (777083) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691840)

If you still think blogging is about teenagers keeping their journals, you're so 2003.

Blogging has entered business in a big way, and people getting paid to blog is a natural progression. A good blogger must be able to crank out topical posts every day, often more than one entry a day. It ain't easy. I try to keep up my graphic blog (at: http://sunandfun.blogspot.com/ [blogspot.com] ) regularly and the best I can do is about one post every two days.

The lady in the Wall Street Journal article blogs for a yogurt company. I'm sure blogging is a more effective way of pulling in business than, say, sending out sample dispensers in supermarkets, which is kind of messy, plus the company has to provide all the samples that always get eaten by people who never buy. Of course, her blog will be even more popular now that she's got a write-up in Wall Street Journal.

Re:Digital Promotion (1)

StarsAreAlsoFire (738726) | more than 9 years ago | (#12692072)

I'm sure it will. I mean, 4 visitors are better then NONE right?

Seriously. Who here entertained even the most transient desire to go look up a blog on yogurt? Popcorn?

It is the middle of the night, and I doubt that even bored slashdotters are *THAT* desperate.

I believe it has its place in the corporate world; interesting jobs and people can make for OCCASIONAL interesting blogs. As a marketing tool for hiring new folks, I imagine that the MS blogs are great -- I've even seen some negative opinions of MS come out of their own blogs, which speaks *very* well of the system (were I job searching, and found only positive blogs, I would be rather skeptical).

As a tool for selling microsoft products? Eh. Not so much. *POSSIBLY* it increases brand recognition among a few individuals with some purchasing clout. But the price of paying someone to update their blog two or three times a week, taking an hour or more to do so each time, is pretty damn significant (rare are interesting 'mind dump' blogs, which require maybe 1/2 hour to produce). Significant to adding the same amount of potential brand recognition with a bit more ad spending. 3 hours a week times how many blogs? And the most interesting blogs (as in most read) are from the higher paid engineers, so we aren't talking 40-70K a year for these peoples salaries. I'm guessing twice that.

3 hours a week * 48 weeks * $75/hr = $10,800 per person blogging.

I say 75 an hour by picking a salary of 100K (~50 an hour) and adding a half for overhead (soc sec, office, chairs, computers, etc) that MS has to pay above the base salary. Should probably double it.

I will go on record as saying that it is a fad: bean counters at all but a few lucky companies will soon* notice that it does little or nothing that couldn't be done better by tossing the same cash to an ad agency. Or astroturfing ;~)

*soon = 2 to 5 years, would be my prediction.

Dear ED, (4, Funny)

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The problems I have .... (3, Insightful)

shri (17709) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691881)

Some random thoughts... no disrespect meant to anyone..

Most corporations have been hiring shills for centuries. Shilling has been done online for years ... bloggers, for unsophisticated marketers, are shills. Corporations should look at other ways of creating buzz if they cannot find a handful of users / customers who cannot say something good about them.

The best bloggers are loyal employees. Use them to show that the company has a soul and a heart. No need to hire outsiders... look within.

I've tried to hire some tech bloggers to help me develop content on a website or two... specially given that my skills are in putting together sites and not blogging or reporting or even writing coherent articles.

To me commerical blogging (from a non corporate but money making perspective) is essentially fairly similar to running or working for a newspaper. It has to be a very controlled equation that manages egos, commercial reality, discipline, ethics and discipline.

Egos: The most dedicated bloggers I've met (and I've met a fair few in person) walk around with their egos in their pants.. (and moan about not making enough money to pay their hosting bills). Sometimes it is this wonderful mix of poverty and passion that produces great blogs... usually it is passion.

Commercial Realities: At some point, people stop caring about the bloggers mundane life and start caring more about the news and information in the blog. In a corporate environment, no one cares about how much salt you put on your fish and chips... deal with it and develop a focus on what the readers want .. not what you want them to read.

Discipline: Can you produce a story or two a day that will keep readers coming back? Most blogs are abandoned, usually because the bloggers loose interest... If you can discipline yourself and produce a good story every day (hard to do in most areas) or week, you will see people return.. this will equate to $$s

Commerical Realities: At some point we all need to accept that anything commercial needs a disiplined approach. Commercial entities do not understand that the best journalists often don't file a story a day... they are good because of the quality and not the quantity. If their PR department cannot find something new about the company every day ... I doubt a blogger will.

Boing's LiveJournal (1)

Helios292 (528182) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691939)

At last, we can know what the Anime Hair Color of the 757 is.

Yolu i8sensitive clod! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12691963)

They started to Don't want to feel

Almost the perfect job... (2, Funny)

Slashcrunch (626325) | more than 9 years ago | (#12691976)

Now, if only they would add "jerking off" and "reading slashdot instead of actually working" to the job descriptions, imagine the flood of applications?

Sorry, I just could not resist :)

peanuts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12692246)

"Blogging jobs pay anywhere from $40,000 to $70,000"

Thats' what... around 10,000 euro's these days? ;-)

but (1)

manojar (875389) | more than 9 years ago | (#12692294)

which company will pay me for dissing them?

i remember a few years ago (1)

Atreide (16473) | more than 9 years ago | (#12692446)

Just around Y2000 everone talked about web developers and web sites.
Where are they now the IT buble has gone ? Nowhere, my web dev friends have a hard time to work now.

Surfing the trend is dangerous for your career...
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