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483 comments

no surprise... (5, Insightful)

professorhojo (686761) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711898)

Anyone using morse code on an even occasional basis should have guessed that it would cream the text messagers! There are three simple reasons: (1) A single character of Morse can be keyed in less time than a single character can be entered on the cell phone with the "TAP" method. (2) With the bug, there is no delay created by moving the finger from button to button. (3) Most importantly, however, the text message is time-shifted, whereas morse transmission is real-time. When the sender is done, the recipient is done also.

Re:no surprise... (1)

inaeldi (623679) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711909)

Not to mention that the Morse coders were professionals and the SMSers were teens.

Re:no surprise... (2, Interesting)

dougmc (70836) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711955)

... and the SMSers were teens.
To be fair, the sending teen (the receiving teen needed no special skills beyond being able to read) had some sort of record at SMS sending speed or something. I seem to recall doing the math and finding that he sent at 30 wpm -- which is pretty impressive, considering! (Of course, the world record for morse code sending and receiving by humans is around 75 wpm.)

Though he also had the crappy cell phone keyboard (which was probably the point), and the sending ham had a high quality paddle that by itself was bigger than the guy's phone ...

AD5RH

Re:no surprise... (1)

m4dm4n (888871) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711979)

I wonder how fast these teens can send out sms's with a phone that has a mini qwerty keyboard?

Re:no surprise... (2, Informative)

Kippesoep (712796) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711959)

I get the distinct impression that teens might as well be considered professional SMSers. The volume of messages they put out is staggering. They're the right choice for the job.

Re:no surprise... (1)

NemosomeN (670035) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711919)

Plus, on any phone I've used, even with a qwerty keyboard, there's going to be a lag of at least 100ms between keypresses, even if you were to type them at the speed of light (In the absence of oxygen, to prevent fires, of course). Besides, wasn't this posted (in non-late-night-talkshow form) a few weeks ago? Is this a reminder (aka dupe)?

Didn't we have this story some time before? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711931)

Didn't we already have this story posted on /. some time before?

Re:no surprise... (4, Informative)

nacturation (646836) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711981)

Granted, but let's see them repeat the experiment with a device that has a full keyboard on it. I've known people who can type on QWERTY at 120 WPM sustained, let's see any morse guy keep up. Or get one of those closed caption keyers to compete as well -- they apparently go up to 250 WPM. [robson.org]

Re:no surprise... (1)

tka (548076) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712054)

Yeah, sure. Attach a full keyboard to a tiny a mobile phone, that's a great idea. Trust me, you can't be as quick with those mini keyboards as you are with full sized keyboards.

Re:no surprise... (1)

tom17 (659054) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712087)

Are you implying then that attatching a huge professional morse key to a phone *is* a great idea??

Re:no surprise... (1)

wpd (856313) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712094)

How about connecting a sms modem to your computer with a full size keyboard? This is the setup I have and it's quite fast for sending sms messages.

Re:no surprise... (5, Funny)

wallitron (308146) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712060)

Granted, but let's see them repeat the experiment with a device that has a full keyboard on it.

Or what about get the guy holding the SMS device (phone) to type in a specially crafted 10 digit number allowing a two way audio connection between two devices.

Every person on the planet has a wife, sister or mother than can talk faster than 250+ WPM.

Re:no surprise... (2, Insightful)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712152)

Who needs a phone? With the experiment they used, all they had to do was shout the message across the room. That technology is hundreds of millions of years old, and predates the human race.

But anyway, the experiment was designed to entertain and maybe (hopefully!) to educate. Every teenage whippersnapper is out there sending text messages to their friends, but just like they are ignorant of things like who the third U.S. president was or when World War II happened, they are also ignorant about the history of modern communications even though they have made themselves practically dependent upon it.

Re:no surprise... (1)

Erik Hensema (12898) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712093)

Most importantly, however, the text message is time-shifted, whereas morse transmission is real-time. When the sender is done, the recipient is done also.

And that's exactly why the comparison is flawed. You should compare morse to speech, since they've got similar uses: direct person-to-person communication. Texting is delayed one-way communication used for wholly different purposes (though I admid I also occasionally have a conversation over SMS ;-)).

Why were we serious, again? :-P

What you say??? (1)

Dancin_Santa (265275) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711908)

If Morse code is so much better than using text messaging, why doesn't everyone do it?

Rhetorical question. The answer, obviously, is that it is a pain in the ass to learn and gain any serious encoding/decoding speed.

It's a lot like typing (which most of us take for granted). Objectively, it is the fastest way to transcribe data. However, it requires quite a bit of practice to get up to a level fast enough to make it better and more useful than normal writing.

Free falling from 15,000 feet is faster than landing in a plane from the same height. Doesn't mean you want to go ahead with it.

Re:What you say??? (1)

Kinky Bass Junk (880011) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711942)

Free falling from 15,000 feet is faster than landing in a plane from the same height. Doesn't mean you want to go ahead with it.

However, learning another language (i.e. morse code) does not usually result in death. Think of learning morse code like changing over to the metric system - after a few generations they get it. All that's needed is publicity and a public education campaign. Yes, I know that's going far, but you never know.

Re:What you say??? (1)

kingofalaska (885947) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711976)

"If Morse code is so much better than using text messaging, why doesn't everyone do it?"

That's why it's called Morse Code, to keep the uninitiated out of the loop. Shhhh!

"Free falling from 15,000 feet is faster than landing in a plane from the same height. Doesn't mean you want to go ahead with it." But some of us do, actually.

The King

President Bush to Liberate Alaska! [blogspot.com]

Re:What you say??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712004)

If you're posting on Slashdot, you're obviously not doing it right.

Re:What you say??? (1)

NuShrike (561140) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712005)

SMS on a phone keypad is already a morse code. It just happens to involve somewhere around 10 different keys instead of 2.

You would think it's easier to memorize coding that involves 2 buttons rather than one that involves 10 buttons.

Like what's L? Well, that's button 5 tap 3 times on the phone. With Morse, it's dot-dash-dot-dot with two keys. Both require quite a bit of memorization to become natural.

Between the two, I rather have an on-screen touch-keyboard, or Graffiti. :P

All get to display on the screen what it thinks you put in so you get the same feedback.

It just seems morse loses only because it's not intuitive, otherwise it sure is faster to key-in.

Nokia app lets you key SMSes in Morse Code (4, Informative)

mocm (141920) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711910)

Someone [typepad.com] already wrote an application for Nokia phones that lets you write your SMS by using Morse code.

Nokia Morse Code App (1)

zeromemory (742402) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711912)

For those with Nokia Series 60 phones, here's an app that will let you type in SMS using morse code: http://laivakoira.typepad.com/blog/2005/05/morse_t exter.html [typepad.com]

Re:Nokia Morse Code App (1)

lordsilence (682367) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712104)

I doubt this plugin will be useful. Considering that many Nokia phones use "bouncy" rubber-feelish buttons. Simply dont get the same feeling as if you used real tools.

No surprise? No News... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711916)

Isn't the idea of news that it should be *new*? Or does this article enlighten us in ways the May 6th one [slashdot.org] didn't?

Flogging a dead horse (1)

terminateprocess (812697) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711917)

It's ironic that this comes right at the same time that the search is down and /. is relying on google for everything...
Original news here [slashdot.org] .

We tried using morse code (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711918)

An employee suggested to me that we use this encoding scheme for a few offices here as an evaluation. I was skeptical at first but he explained the benefits of using morse code instead of a more complicated RF protocol. So I decided to let him train 5 offices to see how the employees got on. Besides, our IT manager had been using it in his wireless and it seemed to work fine, why not try it on the client superhets?

Once he'd got the radios up and running with CW we let the users try it out. It all seemed fine to start with: Morse was a pretty good replacement for SMS and the users could still do their work as normal.

Alas it did not stay that way. After a few days, I had lost count of the number of complaints received. Users could not find things they were used to (like the encoding for SOS) or tasks they could not perform that they previously could with SMS. The constant harrasment by the FCC became more of a day job than my own. The final straw came when one employee lost several hours work when his wrist suddenly broke and corrupted his message.

Needless to say, Samual Morse offered no support whatsoever. I made the employee remove the Morse Code from the radios and lets just say he's not with us anymore.

W Reason: You can type more than that for your sub (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711943)

TF?

Re:We tried using morse code (1)

Kinky Bass Junk (880011) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711974)

Would be a nice little story if it had a little more variation from the others that this AC posted.

Re:We tried using morse code (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711988)

How did you come to make your mind so small as to allow you to run forever in such a little loop?

morse code over skype (1)

drfrog (145882) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711920)

just say dot for dot

and dash for dash

Writing such an app would be simple (1)

lokedhs (672255) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711921)

You can do it today, there is an SMS API supported by some phones. Just write a J2ME app to do it.

Maybe I will... Some day... When I learn morse code... Or maybe I'll just have another beer instead. :-)

Re:Writing such an app would be simple (1)

GQuon (643387) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712034)

Well, there allready is a program for it, as other commenters have pointed out.

You don't really need to learn morse code to write such an application. You just need to have the conversion table handy when you make the application.

Your real challenges would be
1: Setting up the development environment and learningn the API. Should not be difficult, but takes some time.

2: Working out the timing for interpreting key presses as dots and dashes and seperating words. This is the real challenge.

Re:Writing such an app would be simple (1)

lokedhs (672255) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712118)

Well, there allready is a program for it, as other commenters have pointed out.
When I replied, no such comments had appeared.
You don't really need to learn morse code to write such an application. You just need to have the conversion table handy when you make the application
No, but I would have to know it to be able to use it. :-) At work I write code that I don't really use myself, so if you're willing to pay me, I'll do it. :-)
Your real challenges would be 1: Setting up the development environment and learningn the API. Should not be difficult, but takes some time.
I know this already, that would be your challenge, not mine. :-)
2: Working out the timing for interpreting key presses as dots and dashes and seperating words. This is the real challenge.
This would not be very difficult either. The trick is to not have any hard-coded timings at all but use determine the difference in timing based on the actual data. Some simple statistical analysis should do the trick.

Dupe (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711922)

Done before [slashdot.org] . You know this was reported on numerous other tech sites and blogs days before it was reported here. Here's a question: Why should I keep coming back to /. if the news is repeated, slow and bias? Seriously. It isn't meant as a troll but a serious question. This site needs improving. Perhaps we need an ask slashdot article up where we try to throw up some ideas in the air to improve this site because its going down the drain.

Re:Dupe (1)

pflodo (640623) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711951)

I agree. I just tried to find the delete button in my account preferences but it wasn't there....

Re:Dupe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711972)

Why should I keep coming back to /. if the news is repeated, slow and bias?"

The thing about online communities/blogs/forums etc. is the bigger and more popular it is the more idiots it will attract. The more idiots it attracts the more the blogs/communities will lower themselves to serve the idiots standards.

If you want a perfect community on the net go too one that either:

a. doesn't allow commentator interaction because it is the dimwitted hordes that ruin it for the few or;

b. find a forum that is small and has its own specialized niche. You will find excellent conversation and reporting there.

Re:Dupe (1)

masklinn (823351) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712119)

The thing about online communities/blogs/forums etc. is the bigger and more popular it is the more idiots it will attract. The more idiots it attracts the more the blogs/communities will lower themselves to serve the idiots standards.
But the reason /. is supposed to have editors is to remove those fucking dupes/POS stories from the waiting line and only allow... you know... news... for nerds...

Nowadays it's more like Slashvertisements for nerds, dupes that matters, though

Re:Dupe (4, Insightful)

Schemat1c (464768) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711982)

Why should I keep coming back to /. if the news is repeated, slow and bias?

I come to slashdot not for late breaking, fresh news, but for the discussion that follows. Who really cares if a submission is a dupe? You are not forced to read it, just skip it and go on to the next one. People that feel the need to point out dupes are just as useless as the grammar/spelling nazis. If you really have nothing to add to the discussion and are just going to whine, why post at all?

Re:Dupe (0, Troll)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712011)

If you really have nothing to add to the discussion and are just going to whine, why post at all?,

Take your own advice.

Re:Dupe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712019)

You are not forced to read it, just skip it and go on to the next one.

By the way, that's a run-on sentence. You should have used a hyphen instead. For example:

"You are not forced to read it -- just skip it and go on to the next one."

Or you could break this up into two separate sentences:

"You are not forced to read it. Just skip it and go on to the next one."

People that feel the need to point out dupes are just as useless as the grammar/spelling nazis.

Oh, uh... never mind the above!

--
"Bobby, come on up... you're late for dinner. What are you doing in your bedroom?"
"I'm coming!", Bobby ejaculated.

Re:Dupe (0, Troll)

Breakfast Pants (323698) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712055)

Who really cares if a [post] is a [complaint about a]dupe? You are not forced to read it, just skip it and go on to the next one. People that feel the need to point out [the idea that complaints about] dupes [add nothing to the discussion] are just as useless as the grammar/spelling nazis. If you really have nothing to add to the discussion and are just going to whine, why post at all?

It cuts both ways.

Re:Dupe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712144)

Welcome to Slashdot.

News for Nerds. All whiners welcome.

Re:Dupe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712001)

"Why should I keep coming back to /. if the news is repeated, slow and bias?"

You shouldn't. bye

Re:Dupe (0, Offtopic)

CHESTER COPPERPOT (864371) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712128)

Nerd 1: Well, you've come to the right place then. If there's one thing we know, it is science.

Nerd 2: And math.

Nerd 3: And the words to every Monty Python routine.

Nerds: [in unison] We are the Knights Who Say...Ni! Ni! [laughter]

Well, yeah. (5, Interesting)

msmercenary (837876) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711923)

Morse code was created for the purpose of sending text over REALLY low bandwidth. Cell phones were created to talk to people [slashdot.org] . The idea of entering text with a numeric keypad was a wart they hung on the side of the phone when they realized that a full keyboard wouldn't work.

Personally, I just don't understand the appeal of text messaging. Maybe that marks me as an old fogey (27), but I just don't need my tendonitis to get any worse, TYVM.

Re:Well, yeah. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711977)

The only use for text messaging is to send the message "pick up". As you as you buy a car, text messaging becomes completely useless.

Re:Well, yeah. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711980)

Nah, your not old. I'm in the age range to use SMS but just like you, I don't see why i would use it unless they give me a full sized keyboard and a 17 inch LCD screen that magically folds out of my phone.

Re:Well, yeah. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712009)

Some phones, e.g. the Nokia 6820 do have a full keyboard.

Texting does have its uses - e.g. for messages like "Are you ready yet?", which don't require an immediate reply (and you wouldn't want to get them out of the shower to answer the phone if they weren't).

Alternatively, think of it as premium-rate IRC :)

Re:Well, yeah. (1)

wallitron (308146) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712039)

Personally, I just don't understand the appeal of text messaging.

So obviously you don't own a telco that charges significant amounts of money to send 162 characters of text.

Re:Well, yeah. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712043)

Personally, I just don't understand the appeal of text messaging.

You don't go to anywhere that has loud music playing, do you?

Re:Well, yeah. (2, Interesting)

JanneM (7445) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712065)

I'm an older fogey (36), and I usually only use messaging. The reason? I'm often using the phone in noisy, bustling environments (city streets, office landscape, robotics lab), and I'm an old fogey - which means my hearing is not what it used to be. Talking on a phone is frankly often fairly difficult, and you disturb other people no matter how low-key you try to be.

With text messaging I can get or send info no matter how noisy the environment is (try understanding spoken directions while standing on a street corner in Osaka) and whatever info I receive I can refer to over and over again (my memory has never been too hot either).

I still want the ability to call or receive calls, but my preferred channel clearly is text.

D-d-d-dupe! (1)

Ronald Dumsfeld (723277) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711926)

Yes, those cunning editors have done it again.

Here's [slashdot.org] the original submission.

As to the Skype idea, I have no clue how the blogger came up with the idea that Morse with Skype would be any use whatsoever. The point of Skype is to provide a VoIP application that anyone can use.

No, this is NOT a dupe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711966)

The original story was similar, but it's a different event. The first time, it was one morse coder versus one girl, and Jay Leno had nothing to do with it.

This may prove that Jay Leno uses a lot of old recycled ideas, but it's not really a dupe.

Re:D-d-d-dupe! (1)

NuShrike (561140) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712016)

It's not quite a dupe because it looks more like Jay Leno read the original story, and decided to duplicate the test for the American late-night tv audience.

Same idea, different event.

Re:D-d-d-dupe! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712074)

> Yes, those cunning editors have done it again.

Somehow, I read that as cunting. Didn't make a lot of sense, but I still got a good laugh out of it. Good eye, Daffy Rumsfeld!

own3d! (1)

GrendelT (252901) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711928)

Avatar from the clip: pwn3d! [img98.echo.cx]

...and yeah, this is old news. HamSexy.com [hamsexy.com] linked it the day of.

Dupe! (1)

countchoc12 (789688) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711933)

I smell a dupe!

Wow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711936)

Both a dupe and really old news.

Awesome! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711941)

or.. .- .-- . ... --- -- .

whatever.

Lameness filter

A chording keypad is the thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711949)

As a braille user I can tell you that using a 6-dot braille keyboard is a mightty economical way to type.
Does anyone know of a cell phone that has such a feature?

Here's a torrent of the video (1)

Osmosis_Garett (712648) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711950)


8.4 MB WMV [yi.org]

oh my god this is old (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711953)

jesus christ slashdot, you suck.

Dupe (1)

NanoGator (522640) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711961)

To quote the immortal Rocky the Flying Squirrel:

"Again?"

Re:Dupe (1)

Anonvmous Coward (589068) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711970)

To quote the immortal Rocky the Flying Squirrel:

"Again?"


Funny. Now go back to stuffing nuts in your mouth.

Nice, but... (2, Funny)

rokzy (687636) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711968)

..once you start adding punctuation, formatting and emoticons, how do they fare?

Ridiculous (1)

nate nice (672391) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711973)

This is stupid and shouldn't even be on the front. How is this interesting, important or relevant in any way? I guess it's late anyways.

Re:Ridiculous (1)

filthy-raj (581774) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712085)

Hey dude. I don't know morse code myself (it has always been on my brain's TODO) but I think it is nevertheless an important skill. I don't think it is still a requirement for military recruits but I reckon it would be vital in life and death situations. For example, downed pilots behind enemy lines, sailors lost at sea or underground resistance groups coordinating liberation efforts against an invasion force (e.g. the French resistance during WWII). The wartime potential benefits are extraordinary.

It is for reasons such as these that I find it an essential skill that ought to be more widely known. In fact, I might start learning now!

Take heed of the Scouts' motto: Be prepared.

Your friend,

Raj

Do your jobs... (0, Flamebait)

humberthumbert (104950) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711986)

...lazy ass editors.

Translation time... (1)

IronMagnus (777535) | more than 9 years ago | (#12711992)

Disregarding send time, consider the read time. If a person on the receiving end had never seen sms shorthand or m.code before, which do you think would be faster to read? Which would be comprehended faster, again, by a novice to either option.

Re:Translation time... (1)

JanneM (7445) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712069)

You would of course use Morse only as the input method. whatever you tap out would be transcribed to ordinary text and sent like any other message. Only the sender needs to know Morse to utilize it.

While Morse is faster to write than typing on a mobile keypad, reading ordinary text is faster than listening to Morse.

heres something jay leno can do (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12711999)

shine up his chin with baby oil
flash a laser off of it
divert planes from restricted airspace

New Nokia Feature (1)

davidfree (886279) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712000)

Yeah, great, new feature for Nokia phones, instead of SMS, they now offer morse code to send messages, I can really see everyone jumping at the chance of getting one of those. This is a real, lets compare apples with potatoes kind of thing, and just goes to show what the media will come up with when they've cant think of anything else to put on!

Pfft... Morse Code.... (1)

colonslashslash (762464) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712003)

-- --- .-. ... .<br>
-.-. --- -.. . <br>
... ..- -.-. -.- ... <br>
This theory is backed up by the fact that when I went to submit the above Morse code to this thread, slashdot gave me the following ouput:

Lameness filter encountered. Post aborted!
Reason: Please use fewer 'junk' characters.

Re:Pfft... Morse Code.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712070)

Mike Oscar Romeo Sierra Echo
Charlie Oscar Delta Echo
Sierra Uniform Charlie Kilo Sierra

Super-secret message!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712013)

dotdot dotdotdashdot / dashdotdashdash dashdashdash dotdotdash / dashdotdashdot dotdash dashdot / dotdashdot dot dotdash dashdotdot / dash dotdotdotdot dotdot dotdotdot / dashdotdashdash dashdashdash dotdotdash / dashdot dot dot dashdotdot / dash dashdashdash / dashdashdot dot dash / dotdashdotdot dotdash dotdot dashdotdot

Re:Super-secret message!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712047)

"If you can read this you need to get laid"

Re:Super-secret message!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712072)

dotdashdashdash dashdashdash dotdot dashdot / dash dotdotdotdot dot / dotdashdashdash dotdot dotdotdotdot dotdash dashdotdot / dotdash dashdot dash dotdot / dotdotdot dotdashdotdot dotdash dotdotdot dotdotdotdot / dashdotdot dashdashdash dash / dashdashdash dotdashdot dashdashdot

Your comment violated the "postercomment" compression filter. Try less whitespace and/or less repetition.

incorporated functionality (1)

panic_smooth (679365) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712029)

how many people have noticed that the default tone for text messages beep-beep, beep-beep-beep, beep-beep is actually the Morse for SMS?

Re:incorporated functionality (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712114)

SMS is actually dih-dih-di,dah-dah,dit-dit-di

Re:incorporated functionality (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712143)

beep-beep, beep-beep-beep, beep-beep

wouldn't that be MSM ?

YUO FAIL IT? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712030)

the time to meet the most. OLook at

Must be a slow news day (1)

Doomwizard (882209) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712035)

Someone check this news for an expiration date.

Not a true test. (3, Interesting)

Domini (103836) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712038)

Firstly, the morse code they used was the final optimised product. It basically uses huffman-like compression for english only. Thus texting other languages using morse would not be so efficient.

Secondly they used TAP method which is outdated and inefficient. Predictive text input is much faster. Also, the US is not the big SMS country. It hardly has GSM! More people still use outdated devices like pagers.

Thirdly they also tested the transport medium. An SMS may be relayed faster via different networks (sometimes immediate) and can be re-read if something was missed (unless ticker-tape is used). This is not fair, as for very long distance morse messages one can have intermediaries as well which would lengthen the process considerably.

Fourthly, most people cannot send morsecode while receiving it, thus also making asynchronous conversation slower. (And you cannot receive morse from multiple sources sil

I've recently been to Japan and had the rare privelege seeing a teenage school-girl on a Train sitting and texting on two phones at the same time! Beat that!

Re:Not a true test. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712059)

I've recently been to Japan and had the rare privelege seeing a teenage school-girl on a Train sitting and texting on two phones at the same time! Beat that!

I was screwing her at a love hotel. I win!

Re:Not a true test. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712125)

I was the doctor texting her the results of her tests on her second phone. She has AIDS, Syphilis, Gonorrhea, Chlamydia and Hepatitis B & D.

Re:Not a true test. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712129)

That's right. I still win!

Re:Not a true test. (2, Informative)

RzUpAnmsCwrds (262647) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712153)

"It hardly has GSM!"

I'd hardly call 60 million GSM users "hardly having GSM". Not to mention that CDMA2000 also has SMS support.

Ironically enough... (1)

Arthur B. (806360) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712071)

The standard Nokia bell for SMS actually spells SMS in morse. Yeah I know there will be two category of people, those who already figured that who will say it's obvious etc, and those who haven't but will be ashamed not to have and will act just like the former.

Java Morse Code Translator (2, Informative)

plaxion (98397) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712090)

You can encode, decode and listen to morse here [scphillips.com]

Oh, and try setting the speed at 40 wpm before you start thinking it's easy!

phones are not fast enough (1)

necromcr (836137) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712107)

..to comprehend the speeds of CW morse coders. With all these new features (camera, mp3 player, allmighty software) some phones take up to 30 seconds to start responding from bootup. So far, siemens M55 is the worst case I've seen. Sometimes if freezes for one minute at the "Speed is.. Siemens" animation :P

Though it would be fun to see message option "Send over morse" :P

Morse code spam (2, Funny)

paylett (553168) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712108)

Spread your message world wide! Minimal transmission fee! No pesky filters to worry about!

(why do these things always sound less funny once you press preview?)

Old news (1)

AnuradhaRatnaweera (757812) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712113)

Posted here [slashdot.org] long ago; but the link in this article is more comprehensive.

Perhaps a Morse code Skype device. (4, Funny)

xpeeblix (701114) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712127)

OMFG, Slashdot's "Lameness filter" just prevented me from posting a comment on this story in morse code. I cry censorship, someone call the ACLU!

Try it, if you don't believe me.

Morse Texter for Series 60 phones (1)

MenssanA (90843) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712134)

Engadget is reporting [engadget.com] that there's a Morse Text utility for Series 60 phones. the original story [russellbeattie.com] , Preview, download it here [typepad.com]

One Word (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12712136)

SPANKED

What a worthless test (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 9 years ago | (#12712138)

So here we have two people with extensive training and practise on their chosen method versus those without. Gee, big supprise they won.

You have to understand that those who still do morse code with any regularity are serious enthusiasts and/or ex professionals who did it for a living back when it was popular. Now you take people with this kind of training and put them against a couple of teen amatures, gee, I wonder why they'd be faster.

What does that have to do with anything?

One also has to consider the relitive dificulty of the two systems. Morse code is something that takes a good deal of time and practise to learn. It's not intuitive, you have to memorize the signal patterns, and then practise to improve speed. Some never get good at it and have a perpetually sloppy fist. Text messaging was designed to be accessable to anyone, with no prior training. Consideration was given to ease, not to speed.

I mean I bet I could develop a numeric keypad to text system that would easily beat Morse Code when someone was trained. I'd do it by dividing keys into letters as is done now, but doing a dual press system. You press once to indicate group, again to indicate specific letter. So on teh system on the phone to do a k you'd press 5 then 2, fifth key, 2nd character. Of course it'd be remapped to make it more efficient.

You could map the entire alaphabet to just 2 rows (6 keys) and have all letters transmitted with 2 presses. A trained perons could learn to do something like this very quickly, simply use two fingers, probably the thumbs, with minimal movement to signal a message.

Also as others have pointed out this test has an additonal problem: The Morse isgnal is being sent in realtime. An operator signals, the other recieves. That's not the way an SMS message works. You key it in and submit it to the network. It then takes time to route to its destination. 5 seconds or so is a pretty good routing time. IT can be far more, it's not designed to be realtime transmission.

However in this video, it's quite clear you ahve two professionals against two amatures. The code operator is transmitting very fast, with a very regular fist. The SMS kid is pecking away very slowly. You could easily find someone using the current SMS entry system that could go far faster than him. It is amusing televisoin, but no real test of any kind.
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