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China Forces Websites To Register

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the glad-we're-based-here dept.

Censorship 587

Rodrigo Strauss writes "The Inquirer has the story that individual owners of websites and blogs must register with the government or face a shut-down. Apparently they will begin monitoring of all sites, both commercial and personal, beginning this month. Site owners have until the end of the month to register. The BBC has the story as well." From the BBC article: "'The internet has profited many people but it also has brought many problems, such as sex, violence and feudal superstitions and other harmful information that has seriously poisoned people's spirits,' said a statement on the MII website, explaining why the new rules were necessary."

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In Soviet China (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748277)


Post Firsts You!

Re:In Soviet China (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748410)

Wow! Someone who does not fail it!

We have a winner, boys!

From inside the great firewall (5, Funny)

SeanTobin (138474) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748278)

everyone knows that this is really for the good of the PeopLE. the internet hAs poiSonEd our country as a wHolE and we must not alLow it to subvert our years of history, and tradition or Pollute our culture. i aM glad that our nation is taking a stand to assurE we stay united through this and any other time or crisis.

Re:From inside the great firewall (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748322)

Subtle... And in such great taste.

-ShadowRanger

Re:From inside the great firewall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748396)

"please help me"? (look at the caps-lock letters)

Re:From inside the great firewall (5, Funny)

databyss (586137) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748401)

what is really Striking here is hOw foRward thinking and pRogressive the government is there. whY, don't other countRies follow sUit behiNd the great and powerFul cOuntRy of chIna?
i am always amazed aT that.

Re:From inside the great firewall (0)

Ninwa (583633) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748477)

PLEASE HELP ME

Neat. :]

Re:From inside the great firewall (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748617)

Someone mod parent +5 obvious. Or is that -5 obvious? I'm not sure anymore.

Actually (0, Troll)

elucido (870205) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748609)

Thats a good point. Why would China want to immitate American culture? What is so good about our profit/consumption driven culture?

If China wants to have its own internet thats fine with me as long as I can access that internet.

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748288)

FP (not from China).

Re:fp (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748317)


You fail in unbeliveably.

The Chinese Internet (4, Interesting)

14erCleaner (745600) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748289)

I wonder how long it will be until China just disconnects itself from the global Internet?

Re:The Chinese Internet (1)

shm (235766) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748395)

I would guess less than 3 years.

Remember they have been actively pushing their own standards for DVD-like players, 3G networks, WiFi.

Re:The Chinese Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748557)

All of them more advanced than the MS-lobbied shit we get in the US, one has to admit.

Re:The Chinese Internet (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748445)

Werent they working on their own version of IPV6? One that wasnt compatible with the rest of us.

If they mandate that at all the ISPs, then they are effectively cut off.

But hey, internet isnt a 'human right'. So they can make any rules they like.

Re:The Chinese Internet (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748535)

It's China. They can make any rules they like.

Re:The Chinese Internet (-1, Flamebait)

KiltedKnight (171132) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748448)

If it did, we might actually see a somewhat noticable reduction in the amount of spam, malicious attacks trying to take over servers, etc.

I'm not holding my breath, though, because despite all that, China actually likes to sell all the bandwidth it can. They want money too.

Re:The Chinese Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748577)

" If it did, we might actually see a somewhat noticable reduction in the amount of spam, malicious attacks trying to take over servers, etc."

Yeah, if you're chinese.

Re:The Chinese Internet (1, Interesting)

brickballs (839527) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748491)


Yea, I could see this possibly going the way Australia did with guns:
First they forced everyone to register, then
about a year later they forced everyone to hand over their guns.
they already knew who had what because of the registration.

FYI, Australia now has insanely high crime rates.

to sum it all up: this is bad

Re:The Chinese Internet (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748516)

Don't worry. Soon the government will start putting some of you in camps, now that you can't fight back. Enjoy, mate!

Re:The Chinese Internet (1)

Gerv (15179) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748522)

They won't. Email and web access are too important for commerce.

Gerv

Re:The Chinese Internet (1)

PetriBORG (518266) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748590)

Considering how beneficial the internet has proven to be for cheep business operations, do you think that Chinese policy makers would actually do that? I find it pretty unlikely. It seems to me that if anything their filters will just become more intelligent about eliminating content they disagree with. Especially as meta-information becomes used in more places allowing their filters to more effectively filter.

Proving the Red Block still exists (4, Insightful)

izznop (884116) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748291)

Remember everyone, despite seeming very capitalist lately, China is communist. This wouldn't be even an article if it happened in Cuba.

Re:Proving the Red Block still exists (4, Insightful)

Jack Taylor (829836) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748370)

I think you'll find that true communism in the spirit of Marx doesn't have anything to do with censorship.

Re:Proving the Red Block still exists (4, Insightful)

GreyPoopon (411036) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748538)

I think you'll find that true communism in the spirit of Marx doesn't have anything to do with censorship.

You are correct. The censorship is an afterthought that was developed to keep "communism" going when it was discovered that almost nobody would willingly stay committed to it. It goes hand-in-hand with the small elite class continuing to run the government (which is also not part of true communism).

And I think you'll find... (0)

Chordonblue (585047) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748566)

...that 'true' communism doesn't exist. ANYWHERE. Never will.

Re:And I think you'll find... (3, Insightful)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748613)

yes it does, in small voluntary communes, that is the only way it will work is in a setting small enough that eery contribution is felt by all.

Re:Proving the Red Block still exists (1)

ShamusYoung (528944) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748574)

I think you'll find that true communism in the spirit of Marx...

Would one of you commie appologists please tell the rest of us which communist country DOES follow the "spirit of Marx". Because every single time one of these communist nations turns into an oppressive hellhole we're told they aren't really doing it right, not really communist... etc.

The truth of it is that this is the end result of any nation that treads the path of communisim. Once you give the government that much power, once it can decide what you may or may not own, once it can decide that someone or something else is more deserving of something YOU own, then tyranny is inevitable. I don't care if the original goal of the government was Economic Justice or Aryan Supremacy, in the end they will all end up the same.

Re:Proving the Red Block still exists (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748622)

" I think you'll find that true communism in the spirit of Marx doesn't have anything to do with censorship."

No, not communism, but Marx's socialism does. And as he says that communism is only possible once all countries change to socialism, this one is a very Marxist move.

Disclamer: Note that I said Marx's socialism, not genral socialism. There are plenty of interpretation of the words "communism" and "socialism". I'm using the ones created by Marx.

Re:Proving the Red Block still exists (1)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748381)

I would say that given their recent industrialization efforts combined with their centralized authority, China is heading towards a facist state. Should make for some interesting world wars for my grandkids to fight.

Re:Proving the Red Block still exists (1)

salzbrot (314893) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748576)

This seems to be one of the general confusions, especially in the U.S.: everything that is unfree is seen as communism and everything that is free is seen as capitalism. It gets really dangerous, if you draw the reverse conclusion: everything that is capitalist is free. China is proof that this is not the case.
Unfortunately this belief is so widespread that the foreign policy of western countries seems to be focused much more on the "capitalist" part than on the "free" part. So remember: democracy is possible without capitalism (at least theoretically) and capitalism is possible without democracy (see china).

Re:Proving the Red Block still exists (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748408)

In other news, George Bush applauded China's crackdown on intellectual property thieves. Journalists overheard him saying "If they can control the interweb, why can't we?"

Re:Proving the Red Block still exists (1, Insightful)

arose (644256) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748414)

China is capitalist from one end of the Great Wall to the other and back again. Only an ignorant or a member of the Party would argue and only the ignorant would believe it.

Re:Proving the Red Block still exists (2, Informative)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748495)

Yet another example of someone not understanding the difference between communism (an economic system) and totalitarianism (a political system). They may sometimes go hand in hand, but you can easily have totalitarianism (of which this is an example) without communism. Why, I've even seen it growing in market-based economies.

It can happen here. (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748556)

With a Communist mafia government, you don't have to choose between "Communism" and "Capitalism". Nor do you with a Capitalist mafia government. It's all just BS to get people to go along with robbing and killing them for the mafia's benefit.

Sex? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748297)

And since when this is a problem? How did they reach 1.3 billion?

FF (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748304)

FIRS FRORT!

Re:FF (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748369)

FIRST FAILURE!

SUCK IT.

Meanwhile, in America... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748309)

...the Bush administration is taking notes.

Re:Meanwhile, in America... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748332)

And your mother drinks human blood.

See how fun random baseless accusations can be? Whee!

Re:Meanwhile, in America... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748507)

The American military is engaged in an agressive campaign to collect vital information about critical Eastern technologies. The website-registering technology being showcased at this conference in China would help the Americans in their plans to build a fully democratic [whitehouse.gov] nation ruled under an iron fist.

This technology must be banned or restricted from export.

is it just me? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748312)

or has troll posting certainly been very less rampant?

If sex is a problem... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748314)

why don't they neuter every chinese when they are born?

Re:If sex is a problem... (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748451)

Actually, I'm heard that the CCP wanted ever child to have the tubes cut. If you wanted to have children in the future, you had to pay the fee to get the tubes reconnected so you may father children.

It's forced birth control

Re:If sex is a problem... (-1, Troll)

suitepotato (863945) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748549)

Tacking up photoshopped nudes of Margaret Thatcher on every wall in place of Mao would kill the sexual reproduction rate quicker.

Does this include China-based spammer sites? (4, Informative)

Animats (122034) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748327)

Will this include major China-based spammer services like Black Box Hosting [blackboxhosting.com]? "Our offshore bullet proof web hosting plans allow bulk email hosting, spam friendly web hosting and bulletproof host."

Re:Does this include China-based spammer sites? (1)

gmletzkojr (768460) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748417)

I like how on the main site for Black Box Hosting you can turn off the check boxes for '100% Money Back Guarantee', '24/7 Phone Support', etc. etc. Maybe your price goes down if you uncheck the things you don't want.

China has tightened up in the past few weeks (4, Informative)

winkydink (650484) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748337)

My colleagues and I have found it much more difficult to download email from the US while in the PRC in the past month.

...whatever. (1)

Ninwa (583633) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748339)

Is all I have to say, I'm rather disgusted by this. And what do they do after you register? Can your site be shut down if they don't "agree" with your site (ideas)? And they should know they cannot regulate this outside of sites served from China, so what's the point? This just annoys me.

Re:...whatever. (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748390)

Welcome to the Wonderful World of Communism, my friend.

Re:...whatever. (1)

pthor1231 (885423) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748526)

Actually, they can regulate it, because anyone who wishes to use the internet has to register with a government agency, last time I checked. You have to agree not to look at certain materials, among that list being things that are "harmful to the country" Nice and vague for open interpretation

Re:...whatever. (1)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748562)

And what do they do after you register? Can your site be shut down if they don't "agree" with your site (ideas)?

To put it bluntly: yes. And if your ideas are controversial and you refuse, the sanctions will probably be severe. Don't forget that you're talking about China, where human rights is still an almost mythological term, and when dissidents are shot the invoice for the bullet goes to their family.

WTF (1)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748342)

"Poison people's spirit" in other worlds "It will stop making them naive little hate mongers we can control". Not to insult the Chinese or anything but when you live in a world of ignorance you become a happy little smurf and just do what you're told. Statements like the above just prove that the "happiness" is forced upon them by the government and not happiness at all.

Re:WTF (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748528)

And just how would you know?. "live in a world of ignorance" - Try the U.S.A. I think it fits the bill just as well

Harmful Information (1)

syntap (242090) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748350)

other harmful information that has seriously poisoned people's spirits

In the US we just call these Web sites that suck.

How about the Chinese government assign a site rating at the time of registration? Maybe it would clean some of the rabble out.

sort of like New York Times (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748353)

requires registration, along with most other websites in the 'free' world.

is it really that different when a handful of interlocking gigantic corporations make you register, vs when the government does it?

this will fail... (1)

bad_outlook (868902) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748364)

after all, information wants to be free. just as they can't govern ppls thoughts, they won't be able to govern this. They'll ALWAYS be some way around it. What's to stop hosting in neighboring countries, with wifi transmitting connections over the border? Hosting outside, and surf from outside like some big giant proxy to avoid detection.

they should use the internet to connect their ppl, rather than try to cut them off.

bo

Re:this will fail... (1)

pthor1231 (885423) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748595)

No, it wont fail. For a time, the Chinese, along with many other countries, have been registering users and censoring content they can view. This is just another way of censoring.

chinese government is fascist (1)

Tuxinatorium (463682) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748371)

It's time for bush to wake up and smell the coffee that China's government is just as opressive as North Korea's. If we try and do anything about it though, here comes world war 3.

Re:chinese government is fascist (3, Insightful)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748596)

And yes, when the USA government does something similar (and it will be coming soon), it is patriotic.

superstitious (2, Insightful)

null etc. (524767) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748378)

The internet has profited many people but it also has brought many problems, such as sex, violence and feudal superstitions

I like how feudal superstitions rank amongst the top threats to a Communist government.

"In order for our government to work, you're not allowed to think like that, nor be presented with such ideas."

Such a government seems like it would have to rely upon barriers that prevent intercommunication of popular ideas amongst its citizens, especially with such a large population. Wouldn't it be interesting if 1984 became true in China?

I chide the story submitter for not ending his submission with a question. Allow me to suggest on:

"Could the Internet be the end of China as we know it?"

Re:superstitious (1)

eviloverlordx (99809) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748421)

The internet has profited many people but it also has brought many problems, such as sex, violence and feudal superstitions

I like how feudal superstitions rank amongst the top threats to a Communist government.


They're one of the top threats to democratic government, too.

Re:superstitious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748442)

"Wouldn't it be interesting if 1984 became true in China?"



ummm, that happened in 1947 or 48 in china, IIRC



Re:superstitious (1)

null etc. (524767) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748544)

ummm, that happened in 1947 or 48 in china, IIRC

If I recall correctly? How old are you?

Anyways, the full context of 1984 can only be realized in a populous society in which the only barriers are government-induced. In the 1940's, there were plenty of other barriers that have since disappeared (like the lack of cheap and plentiful transportation.)

Re:superstitious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748483)

Who cares! Bush just raised chocolate rations 2 grams today in the States!

Must be said... (0, Offtopic)

mikeee (137160) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748418)

In Communist China, YOU register WEBSITES!

Re:Must be said... (1)

David Horn (772985) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748471)

No, in Communist China, WEBSITES register YOU.

Sadly, that's probably a little too close to the truth to be funny.

Re:Must be said... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748503)

Umm, shouldn't that be "In Communist China, websites register YOU!"?

Whois, and responsible in the eyes of the law (1)

3770 (560838) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748436)

Isn't this information already available for the most part from the Whois archives?

I realise that Whois isn't very reliable, but in principle it should be correct for most domains.

So this means that China isn't interested in sort of kind of knowing who is responsible for a web site. They want someone that will be responsible in the eyes of the law.

This is likely a very clever way to force self censorship. If your name is registered, you'll make sure that there's no contra band on your web site.

They'll prosecute a few, but many more web sites will comply out of fear.

Re:Whois, and responsible in the eyes of the law (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748571)

It's not just registering the domain, it's registering the real information of bloggers as well, so they can point to a specific outspoken individual instead of "XX_H8CH1N4G0VT_XX : blogger extraordinaire".

All other media outlets are registered (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748438)

Even in US all other media outlets are registerd e.g. News Papers, magazines, Radio, TV etc. Website owners are registerd, How do you think HLS banner is desplayed on impounded sites. blogs are media outlet sometime small sometime big. How should it be different. Have'n you heard about political weblogs!!

As an overseas Chinese... (0)

Dante Shamest (813622) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748441)

My honest opinion? This is completely nuts. I really think the mainland government is getting increasingly out of touch with the rest of the world.

This has nothing to dowith "sex, violence or superstition" at all, but is clearly a blatant attempt to keep track of sites that promote views other than the ones officially recognised by the CCP. The only thing that needs to be kept in check is the CCP itself.

I think what they say is true, with great power comes great corruption.

Economic issues... (1)

guyfromindia (812078) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748453)

How can they expect to solve many problems, such as sex, violence and feudal superstitions just by cutting off their internal websites??? Can't the Chinese surf to external sites, where such problems are rampant???

Patriot Act? (2, Informative)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748457)

I wonder how soon before congress will require US citizens to do the same via the use of patriot act or some other bill wrapped in the flag?

Re:Patriot Act? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748486)

Then I will vore with my feet and get the hell out of the US. There are plenty of places where one can enjoy and even higher standard of living than in the US.

sex! (0)

lovebyte (81275) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748460)

it also has brought many problems, such as sex
I think they are taking this one child policy a bit too far!

Meanwhile, in America... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748468)

...the Bush administration is writing up a How-to on this very topic.

Nothing new... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748481)

National interests replace freedom everywhere, not just in China.

End of story.

(Oh.. at least the chinese don't care about innovation-killing-patents like my European-Whore-Union next month.)

Well... (0)

Blue-Footed Boobie (799209) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748498)

Step 1: Submit Registration 'on behalf' of China Based Competitor.

Step 2: Insert Anti-China, Anti-Communism and Goatse into registration.

Step 3: ???

Step 4: PROFIT!

20 years later ... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748500)

USA will be doing the same thing and we will have people give long lectures on how this is justified.

"Show me your papers, Yuri!"

About that "other harmful information" part... (1)

Mulletproof (513805) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748537)

"The internet has profited many people but it also has brought many problems, such as sex, violence and feudal superstitions and other harmful information..." ...like religious freedom, political freedom, free speech, the unregulated sharing of knoledge and ideas, etc, etc. I mean honestly, is anybody really fooled by this? I'm almost ashamed that my country is actually doing business with these jokers.

Well, well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748543)

And all the multinational corporations - with the eager support of their governments - are busy to help this government become one of the most influential economy and military power.

In Communist China... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748559)

The Internet Registers You!

resources (1)

pintomp3 (882811) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748563)

what kind of resources are they allocating for this? monitoring all websites? reminds me of an earthlink commercial where the guy finds the end of the internet.

Not unlike the rest of the world..? (2, Interesting)

xiando (770382) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748564)

Most of the worlds people who want to run a website are required to host it somewhere, and the hosting provider usually requires a billing address.. So the rest of the world are also not free to publish what they want anonymously, at least not truly anonymously, unless they are using Freenet or some other clever way to hide their identity. Registering with a provider is obviously better than registering with a government, but it is still registering... This being said, I do not quite understand what the China government thinks they are accomplishing here. It is the Internet, what prevents a citizen of China to host a anti-China website anywhere else in the world? I am sure at least some of the non-China hosting providers in the world are unwilling to provide any foreign government with customer information when asked...

whats goin gon (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748569)

i wonder myself, why china is going into a different way like all others. i hope they will learn from their experiences.

http://www.immobile-brandenburg.de/ [immobile-brandenburg.de]

Keep it Up (1)

ThisIsFred (705426) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748570)

Every time they enact and attempt to enforce some sweeping control like this, it costs money. Before you know it, there will be a collapse of the government (okay, so maybe in 50 years). Say what you will about buying Chinese-made products, but there aren't enough deep-pocketed Americans to support all the grand schemes of Communist China.

Who's doing the watching? (1)

HermanAB (661181) | more than 8 years ago | (#12748587)

In China, is half the population employed by the state to watch the other half, like East Germany was doing? A nation of voyeurs...

Welcome (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748589)

I, for one, welcome our new paranoid, communist, website registering overlords.

Stupid Gooks (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12748612)

Maybe the Government should have an initiative to teach them how to Drive.
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