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565 comments

SWEET, CHECK IT OUT: (-1, Offtopic)

GRAKKAR2 (890342) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754133)

Re:SWEET, CHECK IT OUT: (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754162)

I see you got stiffed with a crappy Squier Bullet. I guess you can always eBay it. Muhahaha!

Re:SWEET, CHECK IT OUT: (0, Troll)

GRAKKAR2 (890342) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754397)

please retype this with capslock on to get the full grakkar experience!!!! hey, that was actually an ok deal!!!! it was only $130 and the guitars ok since i just started!!!! it used to have issues and the neck sucked, but i got it adjusted!!!! and now its cool!!!! playing guitar is sweet!!!! except i dont have an amp yet!!! i plugged into my computer speakers, but i blew them!!!! at least everyone says they're blown, they sound fine to me!!!!! im pluggin in to my stereo now and its fine!!!! but fine stands for freaked out, neurotic, irrational, and emotional!!!!!! whatever!!!!! anyway, everybody go to my ebay auction and bid on it!!!! and add it to your watch list!!!!! im going to get an american fender soon!!!! its going to be sweet!!!!! hopefully i can get that dude to follow through on his offer to pay me a grand to fart the national anthem!!!!!

Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (5, Interesting)

rd4tech (711615) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754134)

The funny thing is... well, not so much funny as it is disturbing, signing an employment contract.

Remember that signature on that thick paper you've signed prior getting that high paid tech job? The one saying that everything you think of during working hours is theirs? The one that maybe is saying (in some cases) that everything you think on and off during working hours, while employed or 3 years after also belongs to them?

Well, it seems to me, and I might be way off here, that thinking up an email by an employee is in fact his company's property and hence, they have all the rights to read it, and it doesn't breaks anyone's right to privacy.

Can anyone with legal experience enlighten me on this one? Do the bastards have the right to do so, provided that one doesn't sign a document that explicitly states "you can read my email" but instead contains a fine version of "all your bases, off lunch hours, belongs to us?

Re:Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (5, Insightful)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754199)

Well, it seems to me, and I might be way off here, that thinking up an email by an employee is in fact his company's property and hence, they have all the rights to read it, and it doesn't breaks anyone's right to privacy.

Email is considered company property, but people have gotten a little miffed because work and home tend to mix some. (No worries. It's natural as long as you keep it under control and under wraps.)

The part that amazes me these days is that people bother to send personal email through their work address when perfectly good webmail clients exist (*cough*gmail*cough*). Yes, your employer can probably see that you're surfing Gmail/Hotmail/Yahoo/Home *nix Server. However, your email is not likely to be captured by their system, and remains private.

So, why do people still use work for private mail?

Re:Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (2, Interesting)

Adrilla (830520) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754347)

Probably because nowadays, more than ever, work life and home life tend to overlap, and so do your business and personal contacts. It's simply easier (maybe not smarter) to just maintain one main email account and since you have to use the work email for work contacts, it's simpler to use that account as your crossover account. Also, most people have nothing to hide from their employers, and others simply take the warning that their email will be read as an idle threat.

Re:Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (2, Insightful)

AlexMidn1ght (705563) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754391)

A lot of employers block access to gmail, hotmail, msn messenger etc. which leaves people with only one option, company mail.

Also, when you say email is company property, I understand the technical principle that the bits and bytes are on the company owned servers but it's still a form of communication and people should have the right to a little privacy. When I talk on the company phone (or even company paid cell for that matter), I do not expect someone to be listening to my every conversation. This is becoming ridiculous, my employer pays me to do a job and I do it. He shouldn't have the right to ear, see and read everything I do in the company office because he's afraid I may leak private information. Where will we have to draw the line between the company's right to corporate secrecy and its employees' right to privacy? Heck! who's watching me at night in case I may talk to a friend or a relative about some secret company ploy?

Finally, to answer your last question, I use company mail because it's the only thing I can use and I spend over 60 hours a week there :-P

Re:Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (1)

Smokey (14008) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754436)

Yes, your employer can probably see that you're surfing Gmail/Hotmail/Yahoo/Home *nix Server. Not my home webmail, https baby!

Re:Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (4, Funny)

sik0fewl (561285) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754202)

And what if I type my email without thinking? You know, like I do for slashdot my comments.

Re:Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754346)

Maybe I'm not getting the joke here, but didn't you have to think to write that last comment? It's not like you're just mashing the keyboard with your palm, you know. Give yourself more credit!

Ahhhh yeah. Knocking 'em out of the house tonight. My peeps be smokin'

Re:Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (1)

El Gordo Motoneta (821753) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754204)

Just use GPG for any source code you happen
to accidentally mail yourself.. let them
own your encrypted e-mail if they want it..

Re:Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (2, Insightful)

FosterKanig (645454) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754206)

You are using company resources. They can do whatever the hell the want.

Your base belong to them, but only if you say so (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754240)

IANAA, however I've been negotiating my own employment contracts for years. I carve out broad exceptions for any work I do offsite, without their equipment, and not under their direct orders. I also include a phrase exempting any pre-existing intellectual property. I also usually strike any anti-whistleblower clauses. So far, none of these changes have ever stopped my employment.

As I recall, the right to privacy applies only when and where one has a reasonable expectation of privacy. If you're in your employer's facility, on their equipment, using software licensed to them and interacting with servers owned by them; you've no more expectation of privacy than you do on a CB channel. Their ability to check your e-mail is roughly analogous to the rules that enable you to record phone calls in your own home if you inform the person who calls that they are being recorded (rule varies from State to State).

Re:Your base belong to them, but only if you say s (1)

rd4tech (711615) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754282)

hmm... your post is good

Can you give me more information on the "pre-existing intellectual property".

I'll be very interested to hear how you are handling that one.

Re:Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (2, Insightful)

rsborg (111459) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754253)

Can anyone with legal experience enlighten me on this one? Do the bastards have the right to do so, provided that one doesn't sign a document that explicitly states "you can read my email" but instead contains a fine version of "all your bases, off lunch hours, belongs to us?

IANA Lawyer... but I'm not sure you could afford one to solve this kind of issue for you. It seems to me that question here should not be "what is their legal rights" so much as "what are my technical capabilites". Assuming you have internet access at work, the best answer may not be to challenge their capabilites but to simply use encryption. If you have access to gmail, use it for your personal mail. If you're not into that, setup an SSH tunneling service so that you can pipe your mail out encrypted.

IMHO, I try my very best not to use my work mail for anything that is not directly related to work... that way when I see an alert in Tbird saying I have new mail, I know it;s important, if I have time to burn I browse to gmail (or my personal webmail server)... both of which are encrypted.

Re:Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754258)

First, courts have generally limited non-compete clauses to one year. Any thing over that and the company is assuming that you're ignorant. In states like California, non-compete clauses aren't legal.

Second, you're using the company's network and servers, so you don't really have a right to privacy. If you want to send mushy emails to your wife, do so with a non-company email address.

Third, I doubt any court would uphold anything stating that personal emails are considered to be intellectual property, implied or otherwise.

Ahhhhh yeah. Knocking 'em out of the house tonight. My peeps be smokin'

Re:Gentlemen don't read others gentlemen's mail... (2, Insightful)

kschawel (823163) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754266)

I think I may be playing Devil's advocate here, but I don't really have a problem with the companies reading their employee's email. Your work email address is for just that - work. These emails are written on company time and they are on the company network. I'm sure there is an AUP for the company network; they aren't hiding the fact that they can read your emails. In short, don't waste time with personal emails at work and don't send out company secrets through email. Isn't that unethical anyway? Keith

Next up... (2, Funny)

bburton (778244) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754135)

And it's all going to be done through a goverment agency call the Thought Police.

Next, Telescreens and microphones in every home!

Re:Next up... (0, Offtopic)

GRAKKAR2 (890342) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754153)

please retype this in notepad and put capslock on to get the full grakkar experience sweet, telescreens are cool!!!!!!!! rock on orwell and the thought police!!!!! i wish the thought police were watching me on a telescreen!!!!! that'd be sweet!!!! im an attention whore by the way!!!!

Re:Next up... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754170)

That is so old news
I have a tv camera in my bedroom since forever
Web camera, that is ...
Wanna link ?

Re:Next up... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754187)

Are you trying to be humorous? You know, I get really tired of these 1984 references all the time. You won't be laughing when you're working for the Ministry of Information changing newspapers for a living.

Does anyone realize that we are probably 3-5 years from a real, Orwellian existence?? Mark my words. Bookmark this post, and see that I told you so in 2008. Just do it before Slashdot gets censored off the face of this planet.

I'm moving to China. Sounds a hell of a lot better there right now.

Re:Next up... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754272)

We are at war with Eastasia. We have ALWAYS been at war with Eastasia. We will find you in China.

Re:Next up... (2, Insightful)

Nobody You Know (750014) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754306)

Does anyone realize that we are probably 3-5 years from a real, Orwellian existence??

And you base this on a company wanting to control a medium that it pays for and that it is, in today's litigious climate, liable for? Given that lawsuits today seem to include "every e-mail mentioning X" as a standard discovery item, why would any company want to open itself up to this kind of liability. To look at it in another light, if you're going to be held accountable (legally) for anything downloaded from your home internet connection, would you really want to keep that home wireless network wide open? This is ass-covering 101.

Sorry, but if you don't want your e-mail (or websurfing, or other internet habits) monitored, don't do them from a host that isn't under your complete control. How hard is that to understand?

Re:Next up... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754432)

What are you talking about? The parent post was about the Orwellian prophesy and here you blabbing about "litigious climates". I guess you want to go back to the days of chopping your finger off with a knife and not being able to sue the manufacturer for it?! What a great example you must be leading for your children. God forbid a corporation should take some responsibility in the shit they sell and do. Goddam clown.

The cost (1)

typical (886006) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754318)

So the point of offshoring all those jobs...was to free up resources so that we can pay people to do nothing but paw through my communications all day?

Why don't we lock a tape recorder onto a collar on every employee and have the security guard unlock it at the end of the day? That way we don't miss any verbal communications either!

AH! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754139)

All your freedoms are belong to us.

In other news (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754140)

Nobody gives a fuck.

Propz to GNAA

But..... (5, Funny)

ian rogers (760349) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754149)

Who do they hire to read the outgoing emails of the people they hired to read outgoing emails?

Re:But..... (2, Funny)

rd4tech (711615) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754165)

in fact, you can set up the whole system with two independent groups reading each other's emails ;)

Re:But..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754243)

Qui Custodes Custodiat? ;)

Re:But..... (1)

phantasma6 (799340) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754281)

and who do they hire to read the outgoing emails of the people they hired to read the outgoing emails of the people they hired to read outgoing emails?

oh no, infinite loop...

/brain implodes

They're called system administrators (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754369)

What's your username again?

>*clickety click*

Re:But..... (1)

illumin8 (148082) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754412)

And who do they hire to read the tcpdump captured Slashdot postings of the people they hired to read the outgoing emails?

Go Ahead (1)

dnoyeb (547705) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754151)

Go ahead, then explain to the shareholders how much of their money you wasted on nothing.

Seems like just another trick so management can fire people and bring in their own cabinet (brother/friend/etc.)

Re:Go Ahead (1)

TeraCo (410407) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754176)

Except they still don't get to fire you for no reason. This just gives them another avenue where they can find reasons for this. Just don't send out secrets via email and you won't be fired. (You still have no privacy but you didn't really seem to care about that aspect).

Re:Go Ahead (1)

Brushfireb (635997) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754415)

What world do you live in? I can fire you for ANY reason. I dont need to give you anything, all I need to say is get out? I suppose your mileage may vary, but I think the average US State use an "employment at will" guidline, which means I can fire you for anything I want, except some obvious (race, sex, age, etc). I could probably even fire you for those if I dont tell you.

Re:Go Ahead (4, Insightful)

rd4tech (711615) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754194)

Nope, you are getting it all wrong, imagine the following: "And by this, my dear shareholders, our development team will know that their email is read, thus, reducing the time they spend on writing non-work related emails to minimum... and..." :) Management 101 = "everything is magic"

What a great idea!!! (5, Funny)

tacocat (527354) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754161)

This is so far ahead of it's time I just don't know what to say...

I can't send more than maybe one or two MB of data through my email.

But I can easily shove a 1GB USB stick up my ass and walk out past the guards.

Re:What a great idea!!! (1)

rd4tech (711615) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754215)

Mod me troll, but, I've always wondered why all the brave men have that stiff walk ;)

Disclaimer: This is just a joke, no offence meant.

Re:What a great idea!!! (5, Funny)

3770 (560838) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754244)


Were you going to put any data on that USB stick before you do that or were you just planning on doing it for fun?

Re:What a great idea!!! (5, Funny)

Mr2001 (90979) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754284)

1GB? That's nothing. I bet Mr. Goatse could sneak a whole file server out of his office.

Change in original plan!!! (5, Funny)

bayankaran (446245) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754330)

A recent survey of 332 technology decision-makers at large u.s. companies reveals a growing concern over sensitive information leaving the enterprise through email and through USB memory sticks hidden in their employees ass.

In its 2005 study on outbound email security and content issues, email security vendor and ass searching expert Proofpoint found that more than 63% of corporations with 1,000 or more employees either employ or plan to hire workers to read outbound email and search their employees ass when they arrive and leave from work.

Re:What a great idea!!! (1)

shm (235766) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754334)

Why wouldn't you just carry your laptop out the door? Holds a lot more and easier to carry off.

Re:What a great idea!!! (1)

syukton (256348) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754431)

Maybe it's easy for you, but it's not easy for joe average.

Your ass is a stinky, dirty place. You DO NOT put things in there, if you're joe average. Things only come out of there. It doesn't occur to you that it's a place to "keep" anything.

E-mail, well shit, now THAT is easy, and you don't even need to wash your hands afterward. Click here, control-n, "hi, I just learned about project BlackZero, they're going to be doing a multi-tiered..." control-enter, close window... (although if you've read some of the articles out there on what's living on your keyboard, maybe you DO want to wash your hands afterward. heh.)

Hushmail ! (2, Interesting)

Ray Alloc (835739) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754163)

For that reason, site like Hushmail [hushmail.com] allow a SSL-secured web-based confidential mail.

Re:Hushmail ! no, GPG! (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754218)

Or you could use PGP. You know, with gnupg, through something like enigmail.

Re:Hushmail ! no, GPG! (1)

Matilda the Hun (861460) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754323)

Heh. Unless they decide to put their computers to task cracking your encryption. It might take awhile, but if you're the only one in a company of thousands with enough know-how to use PGP, they might think your stuff is worth reading.

Re:Hushmail ! no, GPG! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754427)

Yes, and with a keylogger they will know what you typed anyway... including your secret keys passphrase. Clever plan you got.

Hellooooo encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754164)

*nods head*

Our company already does...internal AND ext. (3, Insightful)

PenguinBoyDave (806137) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754168)

This isn't funny as it has resulted in more than one person being terminated because of what was called "inappropriate" material (meaning someone COULD have taken offense to it. Remember...Charlie is Watching!

Re:Our company already does...internal AND ext. (2, Funny)

El Gordo Motoneta (821753) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754294)

...more than one person being terminated because of what was called "inappropriate" material...


Well, I'm all for regulating the use of the internet connection at work,
but letting the cyborg kill them almost seems like a bit too much.

Oblig. Simpsons (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754174)

Eh, it'll be us who is doing the monitoring anyway.

I, for one, welcome our new IT-geek overlords.

Re:Oblig. Simpsons (1)

RodgerDodger (575834) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754355)

No it won't.

Think sensibly: this is going to be boring, mundane, unskilled labor work. It will be outsourced to India or China, of course.

I'm not sure if I'm joking, either...

Open Secret. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754179)

"... due to growing concern over sensitive information leaving the enterprise through email.""

Psst! Apple is going to switch to Intel processors. Pass it on.

My company scans all email for buzzwords (5, Interesting)

Average_Joe_Sixpack (534373) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754190)

For example if I include the name of one of my company's products plus "bug"/"flaw"/"crash" then I can expect a follow-up scolding from HR. (I found this out the hard way) Course that's cake compared to the other spying and practices that go on.

Great way to do corporate espionage: (1)

Brian Stretch (5304) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754191)

Get a job checking outbound email for espionage.

Seriously, there are so many ways to get info off computers your best bet is to focus on hiring decent people. Not infallible, just the least bad option.

I bet the same companies that are doing the email snooping have their employees send their username and password as cleartext while checking their email from countries with competent foreign intelligence services.

Yeah this is great (4, Insightful)

Azureflare (645778) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754193)

But how many plan on reading AIM conversations their employees are having?

My corp uses AIM for internal communications, and I am really disturbed by this. I'm amazed the local admins have allowed this to go on. Basically all our conversations are going through AOL's servers and the internet, in plain text. And there is ABSOLUTELY no reason for this, since we're all on the local LAN.

I'm planning on setting up a jabber server on the linux box there, but it may be a chore getting employees to switch from AIM to something like gaim or trillian (does trillian support jabber?)

Re:Yeah this is great (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754310)

I believe trillian pro supports jabber. I'm not sure about the free version though.

From an insider, re: eBay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754364)

From someone who used to work there: eBay does this, too. Not only customer service, but billing, investigations, and a host of other departments use AIM extensively. Of course, they, like everyone else, are a Windows house, so we shouldn't really be surprised that they're so trusting of product-ology.

eBay, are you listening: stop passing sensitive information over the AIM network!

Re:Yeah this is great (1)

ian rogers (760349) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754386)

Trillian Pro supports serverless IM, aka Bonjour (or Rendezvous pre-name change).

I got my friend to pick up a copy so we could use it during school. Just told the teacher we were both taking notes, and I just make a network on my iBook, he joined, and we chatted away.

Therefore, it would most likely work in your office, no internet connection needed.

Re:Yeah this is great (1)

bewmIES (251890) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754406)

So set up an internal IRC server and use the GAIM IRC transport. Works like a charm and there is little-to-no end-user rejection.

interception of email is illegal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754200)

Interception of someone else's mail or email is illegal in the US. An employer who is committing this type of crime is facing some serious charges. Seems like even a few large companies are in for some major class action lawsuits.

The "open" society or "panopticon here we come" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754213)

http://cartome.org/panopticon1.htm [cartome.org]

Mistrust is a self feeding phenomenon. If you feel the (irrational) need to spy on your employees you probably should seek psychological counseling. If your need to spy is JUSTIFIED, you should consider firing those employees!

Well (3, Insightful)

Rew190 (138940) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754214)

Well, the gut reaction is to say this a bad and terrible thing (also a bit silly, as it seems to me that anyone with any technical know-how would just use internet-based mail to get sneaky anyhow), but really, if you're on their payroll, isn't it well within their right to make sure you're not doing damage to them?

At the very least, it seems like a good way for the companies to weed out the idiots who would be stupid enough to send questional material through their servers.

Yeah, it sucks to be being watched and not trusted like that, but this shouldn't outrage anyone. They'll probably reverse their policies when the costs of something like this start racking up with nothing to show for it.

Makes more sense than Camera Cell Phone bans (1)

Beolach (518512) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754233)

My workplace is one of the many that has a "No camera phone" policy (thankfully not enforced). It really doesn't make any sense. There was a good Dilbert strip [typepad.com] that sums it up pretty well.

Good luck reading secure webmail (3, Insightful)

Timbotronic (717458) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754241)

As with most draconian Big Brother initiatives this one won't work. What's to stop employees from just logging into a private webmail account over HTTPS and sending information out that way? Unless employers block browser access, search people for USB keys, iPods, floppies etc there's a dozen ways information can be leaked out of a building.

Re:Good luck reading secure webmail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754332)

What's to stop employees from just logging into a private webmail account over HTTPS and sending information out that way?

The fact that they prohibit that too?

Re:Good luck reading secure webmail (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Cowdog (154277) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754371)

>What's to stop employees from just logging into a private webmail account over HTTPS and sending information out that way?

Keystroke logging.

So if you're an employee who values privacy and wants to send a bit of private personal email once in a while on your personal web mail account (say, gmail), the only way to retain that privacy is to either do all that mail through a cell phone, or install an OS that the IT people don't have a keystroke logger for. Where I work all our computers have the corporate spyware installed from day one. To have privacy, you have to find some obscure Unix distro (Red Hat isn't obscure enough; they have that covered too) and use it.

Good luck with your new job. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754435)

"As with most draconian Big Brother initiatives this one won't work. What's to stop employees from just logging into a private webmail account over HTTPS and sending information out that way?"

I got a better question. Are all you trying to slip corporate information out the door, and why? This really is much ado about nothing. Same with them listening in on your phone converstations. And NO, you have little to no expectation of privacy, constitution or not while at work.

give me the job. (2, Funny)

bobbyw (890344) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754245)

Having just read everyone's e-mail I know, I would be GREAT for the job. Where do I apply?

Corporate evolution at work (1)

lheal (86013) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754264)

Only time will tell whether reading employee email is good or bad for a company.

What's the effect on morale when everyone knows their email is being monitored? It will probably generate resentment, which leads to people selling out to the competition.

And what's to stop someone from saving some piece of information on a USB key, then sending that out by FedEx? Maybe email is the easiest thing to use, but there are lots of other ways to send data.

The more I think about it, the stupider it sounds. I think companies who bother reading outgoing mail will be worse for it.

Yes nasty, here's an email we intercepted (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754271)

From: steve@apple.com
To: paul@intel.com
Subject: Execute Order 66

Dear Paul,
let's do it,

signed

Steve

Re:Yes nasty, here's an email we intercepted (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754314)

From: paul@intel.com
To: steve@apple.com
Subject: Execute Order 66

I've told you 60 times, I am married!

Re:Yes nasty, here's an email we intercepted (1)

Peeps In Da House (890345) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754399)

Actually, the parent post was alluding to the scene in Revenge of the Sith where the Emperor orders the clone army commanders to 'execute order 66', i.e. kill all the Jedi. It was not a homosexual reference. Plus, I'm pretty sure that Steve Jobs isn't gay.

worth stealing? (1)

baomike (143457) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754275)

I guess they have to believe their stuff is worth stealing, doesn't leave you with much if it isn't.

Sort of like having to prove your human to post on /. . Gotta keep the riffraff out , even if they don't want in.

I like my job! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754279)

Really. This wouldn't affect me in any way, because I never use work time for personal business, and I like my boss! He's so clever and intelligent.

Brilliant, simply brilliant (1)

wyldeone (785673) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754290)

As if anybody shrewd enough to be stealing corporate secrets (and presumably selling them to the highest bidden?) isn't smart enough to encrypt it, or, god forbid, send it through another mail server.

Funny how... (0, Troll)

Donny Smith (567043) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754296)

It's funny how people object to having their email read by other people but not by machines (like Google's ad engine).

Google should add a mail gateway feature to their yellow search appliance box which would automatically tag suspicous emails.
They should also provide a Web-based GUI which would combine internal analysis with external Google searches (competitors' employees names, etc.) to create a very productive snooping environment.

Webmail? (1)

misleb (129952) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754298)

I can only assume they are looking for accidental information leaks. Obviously anyone interested in sending uncensored email would use Yahoo or Hotmail or something. Or a phone. Or whatever. Anything but corp email. Do they really think this will be useful? Is it really worth losing any good faith between management and employees? Forget about privacy. It seems like bad business.

-matthew

I have no problem with that. (1)

badfrog (45310) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754302)

Every single work e-mail I send is legitimate.
(as long as I can SSH home and use PINE to send all the personal e-mail I want)
Who really wants to use Outlook anyway?

ALL YOUR MAIL BELONG TO US (1)

shoma-san (739914) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754303)

I already read outgoing mail of all the people at my company I hate...what's a few more?

Easily circumvented. (5, Funny)

Waffle Iron (339739) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754321)

It's not hard to hide your email information leaks from snoops, like so:

2004 Request for temperature compensation aggregate mixtures: Aggregate mixtures are 3% above nominal for the first period, requiring a 8% reduction in admix composition between junction intervals. All temperature compensation is within target limits for the period ending 3/7. Urgent sell all your stock asap; the SouthEast deal has totally fallen through, we've lost all licensing rights and we're going to post a huge loss and massive layoffs next quarter, when this goes public on Thursday our price is going to fall off a cliff. Secondary filtering activity has increased by 27% this period, followed by tertiary filtering increases of 5%. Verification requested.

Personally speaking... (1)

gmajor (514414) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754331)

I travel most of the week for my employer, so I use my business laptop after work hours for personal e-mail. My employer has the right to read everything I do on my laptop (including this comment). I even balance my checkbook on my work laptop - theoretically, my employer could view every purchase I've made for the past several years. That's too freaky.

Where do most companies draw the line? There is serious potential for abuse.

trust.. (1)

slashkitty (21637) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754335)

If you don't trust your employees, you make them untrustworthy.

If you don't trust your employer, you make them untrustworthy.

Fwd: Nude pictures of the sysadmin's wife (1)

whoppers (307299) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754360)

Just use this topic for any personal emails. Me, I don't give a damn if they read email that I type on their computers, if it's that secret, I'll use my lunch hour or wait till I get home to tend to these matters.

How representative is the survey likely to be (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754376)

...considering that it was carried out by a company that has a product for scanning outgoing mail...

wrong on too many levels (4, Insightful)

yagu (721525) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754385)

This is oh-so-wrong on too many levels! One (that's too many.)! There are so many ways for employees to betray a financial or corporate trust. Likewise, there are many ways for an employer to betray a trust. This would, in my opinion, be one of the most onerous with many potential avenues for backfiring.

Consider the disgruntled or dishonest employee. Think they're intent to betray a company is stopped by this policy? Not a chance! This kind of "policy" would only bolster a disgruntled employee's rationalization/justification, etc. to follow through with betrayal. They only need choose some mechanism other than e-mail and there are many.

Now, consider the neutral employee... a policy like this could create a tipping point and generate resentment enough to give cause to consider doing something subversive to a company. After all, the company, by fiat, is essentially assuming an employee is "up to something".

Finally, consider the loyal employee (how many of those will there be after widespread policies like these?)... A quick glance around and loyal employees may begin to wonder what end from loyalty....

No, this is just plain bad policy.

what kind of an idiot... (1)

capoccia (312092) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754401)

what kind of an idiot leaks confidential information through their corporate email address? at least use a private email account from a non-work computer.

What about Why? (1)

MSTCrow5429 (642744) | more than 8 years ago | (#12754404)

...due to growing concern over sensitive information leaving the enterprise through email.

While there's some truth to this, one has to ask the question why employees would leak sensitive info. Could it be because the employees are maltreated, the company isn't doing a good job in selecting hires, or a combination of both? Besides, wouldn't it make more sense to copy sensitive info to a flash drive or CD-R, and just e-mail it from home in the first place?

This is old news. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#12754413)

One of my employees was telling his girlfriend about it in email, that's where I read it.

I also found out about the testicle he had removed for cancer treatments. Freaky.
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