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'Haute Cuisine' on Mars

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the don't-forget-alien-tartare dept.

Space 295

Roland Piquepaille writes "If you're lucky enough to be a crew member of one of the next European Space Agency (ESA) long-term missions, you will have the choice between eleven new delicious recipes, such as 'martian bread and green tomato jam' or 'potato and tomato mille-feuilles' when it's time for dinner. In 'Ready for dinner on Mars?,' ESA says that these recipes will use fresh ingredients grown in greenhouses built on Mars colonies or other planets. The future astronauts -- should I write 'farmonauts'? -- will grow potatoes, onions, rice, soya or lettuce. And it's interesting to note that the new menus were elaborated with the help of Alain Ducasse, the French chef who has almost as many stars in the 'Guide Michelin' as there are planets in our Solar system. This overview contains more details and references about eating in space."

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Oh well... (2, Funny)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825837)


I used to want to go into space...but if I have to eat that damned Frenchy food while I'm up there, forget it.

(Note: This post may seem like flamebait, but I really do hate the French, so I feel I'm justified.)

^_^

Re:Oh well... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12825864)

No biggie, they hate us, too.... and unlike us, they have justification.

Re:Oh well... (2, Interesting)

AnusesBaskets (891817) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825872)

French cusine is actually some of the best food. Just becuase you don't like modern French politics or social habits doesn't mean you have to throw away their entire rich cultural history.

Jingoism of the future. (1)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825893)

"French cusine is actually some of the best food. Just becuase you don't like modern French politics.... "

Didn't you hear? "Mars is the new France".

Re:Jingoism of the future. (1)

Jherek Carnelian (831679) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825938)

Didn't you hear? "Mars is the new France".

Well, we can fix that!
I'm on hold right now for the Rush Limbaugh show, I am going to have him rename Mars to "The Freedom Planet!"

Re:Oh well... (1)

tgd (2822) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825953)

Just becuase you don't like modern French politics or social habits doesn't mean you have to throw away their entire rich cultural history.

No, thats because you don't like historical French politics or social habits.

Re:Oh well... (1)

AnusesBaskets (891817) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826047)

And how does that justify not eating French food?

You eat American food? Does that imply you like every unjust thing Americans might have done, minor or major, in the past or present?

These anti French arguments are getting silly. The food has nothing to do with the politics.

Re:Oh well... (1)

ErikTheRed (162431) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826010)

French cusine is actually some of the best food.
The best food for what? If you mean for building business for the medical and pharmaceutical industries, I can go along with that. "Yes, I'll have my butter drenched in more butter, on top of my cheese, thank you."

But as food? Far too heavy for my taste (although I do like brie occasionally). I'm generally into the left-coast sushi, grilled everything, and twigs-and-berries diet.

Re:Oh well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12826124)

It cant be that unhealthy; the french life expectancy is far higher than that of the average american, wine-drinking nontheless.

Re:Oh well... (4, Insightful)

falcon5768 (629591) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826180)

That because most of the french dont eat what "The French" consider to be french food.

French food IS extreamly unhealthy, but most food there is common peasant food which is a lot more healthy and light.

Re:Oh well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12825960)

You, sir, are a complete and utter fucking moron.

Re:Oh well... (-1, Flamebait)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826035)


Actually, sir or madam, it is you that are the moron, along with all the other responses to my original post bleating about how I shouldn't dislike the French.

Go back and reread my original post carefully, genius. See the smiley face at the end? I put that in there specifically so brain-dead idiots like yourself could connect the dots and see that I intended the post as a joke.

Now this post...this is flamebait. Notice how there's no smiley at the end of this one? That's because I'm serious when I express my fervent hope that a freak microwave accident sterilizes you so we don't have to put up with any more of your deficient genes in the gene pool.

Re:Oh well... (1)

xutopia (469129) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826079)

I read it and realized that you were joking. Still the joke was of very bad taste and I was offended.

People say all kinds of nasty things in the name of humor. Your humor was racist.

Re:Oh well... (1)

falcon5768 (629591) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826141)

like polish screen door jokes arnt.

Gee last I looked people still make them and people dont bitch about those being racist to Poles.

Re:Oh well... (2, Funny)

UnixRawks (705739) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826023)

But the French are good at defendi..oh nevermind, I surrender.

Re:Oh well... (2, Funny)

Rei (128717) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826095)

I can just picture it now... the US plans to settle Mars. Huge announcements are made as to how the mission will be a cakewalk. "Martian" defectors tell us that the atmosphere already has enough oxygen to breathe and enough plants to eat. The French try and tell us otherwise and advise us to bring space suits, but to no avail. However, shortly after arriving on newly renamed "Libertas Planum", the trouble starts...

Next plan: Colonize the sun. To avoid a firey meltdown, we'll go at night.

Re:Oh well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12826031)

Then stay where you are and eat your own food. We don't want you to go into space anymore either.

(Note: This post may seem like flamebait, but I speak for the rest of the rational-thinking world when I say we really do hate you, so I feel I'm justified.)

I wonder if (-1, Troll)

thundercatslair (809424) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825840)

They will grow hot sex, BTW this is not a troll or offtopic, it is serious and I want to know

Just add water (4, Funny)

hydroxy (863799) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825848)

Unfortunetly, all plants grown on Mars will still be freeze-dried before eaten.

Re:Just add water (4, Interesting)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825955)

Unfortunetly, all plants grown on Mars will still be freeze-dried before eaten.

*chuckle* No, they really are thinking about growing the food. :-)

The article was interesting (despite the fact that the ESA seems to be already picking out foods for a mission they don't yet have [wikipedia.org] ), but I would have liked to know more about how they planned to grow food on Mars. For example, the soil samples seem to tell us all kinds of different things about the actual composition of Martian soil. Have we found a concensus on what materials we'll need to bring to grow plants. Last I heard, nitrogen was going to be the biggest issue.

The other thing I'd like to see is someone actually developing a Martian greenhouse design. However you make it, you'll want the greenhouse to be light, portable, and easy to setup. My current thoughts are that a transparent, inflatable tarp would do the trick. We'd first need to know what the minimum pressure is that the plants require before we design the tarp. Hopefully, they can survive in pressures similar to Mars's surface. That knowledge could then be used to develop a greenhouse that works like this:

1. The tarp would be planted into the ground. Depending on the pressure required, it could either be nailed in with stakes (how primitive, but effective) or a stiff ring could be buried into the ground, thus creating an airtight seal.

2. CO2 could then be pumped from the surrounding atomosphere into the greenhouse. Depending on the plant, a certain amount of oxygen may need to be initially pumped in.

3. The pump system should move air in and out of the tarp area. Oxygen would be separated out, and replacement CO2 would be pumped from outside.

So far, so good. But then what about solar energy? Does enough energy reach Mars' surface to support these plants? Does artifical lighting need to be added? (I guess that's why they went with potatos. Little to no light necessary.)

Re:Just add water (1)

hydroxy (863799) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826046)

Dont forget about the sand storms, freezing to boiling temps and such that the green house would have to withstand

Re:Just add water (2, Interesting)

FleaPlus (6935) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826142)

The other thing I'd like to see is someone actually developing a Martian greenhouse design.

I've commented about this in the past, but here's a quote from the Wikipedia article on Elon Musk [wikipedia.org] :

In 2001, Musk had plans for a "Mars Oasis" project [spaceref.com] , which would land a miniature experimental greenhouse on Mars, containing food crops growing on Martian regolith. He put this project on hold when he discovered that launch costs would dwarf the mission development and construction costs for the project, and decided to work on lowering launch costs by founding SpaceX.

If I recall correctly, he actually hired a team of engineers and scientists to do a feasibility study, and I'm betting they put together at least some preliminary designs. Hopefully we'll see him return to this project once he gets launch costs lowered some.

Re:Just add water (3, Interesting)

Rei (128717) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826148)

Mars's pressure is little higher than a vacuum. NASA has been doing experiments to get plants to grow in the sparsest atmosphere possible [nasa.gov] . Currently, if the pressure gets too low, plants think that there's a drought even if they're given plenty of water and kept at 100% humidity.

As for light, Mars gets half the sunlight we do on Earth; plenty of plants on Earth grow in partial shade.

"Midichlorian stew again?" (3, Funny)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825852)

"I HATE midichlorian stew!"

"Shut up and eat, kid. You want to grow up to be big and strong like your father, don't you?"

Re:"Midichlorian stew again?" (2, Funny)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826017)

You know the real Sith would just use some anti-biodics on the Jedi to take away their powers.

Re:"Midichlorian stew again?" (1)

vbrtrmn (62760) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826107)

They tried, the antibiotics were over perscribed for minor matters like viruses, so they didn't work.

Re:"Midichlorian stew again?" (1)

Enigma_Man (756516) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826109)

antibiotics

avacados (0, Redundant)

udderly (890305) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825856)

What? No avacados? What's the point of good to space if you can't have an avacado while you're there.

Another nifty side effect of farming (1)

dannyitc (892023) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825857)

would be the oxygen created from the plant's metabolic process. Maybe on a larger scale it could be used as a renewable supply of oxygen for settlements or return travel to earth.

Re:Another nifty side effect of farming (1)

Kainaw (676073) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826008)

Another nifty side effect of farming would be the oxygen created from the plant's metabolic process.

My rudimentary understanding is that the green in plants comes from chlorophyl. Chlorophyl reacts with the photons from the sun and creates Oxygen as a by-product. That is just one reaction. In the rest of the plant, the biochemistry is your basic oxygen-sucking carbon-based lifeform. Plants do create more oxygen than the suck up, but the point most people miss is that they do consume oxygen.

The point here is that the chlorophyl requires the sun's light or artificial sunlight to create oxygen. Artificial sunlight will require fuel of somekind. So, that's a waste of time to pursue. Real sunlight on Mars is less powerful than on Earth. So, a plant on Mars will create less oxygen than it will here on Earth.

Finally, explaining my possible misunderstanding of biology, I think my question can be understood: Even if we cover Mars with plants, will they produce enough oxygen to make a difference?

Re:Another nifty side effect of farming (1)

dannyitc (892023) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826128)

Well, the issue is that farming is an energy intensive process, so using artificial sunlight isn't necessarily a waste of time since farming is a natural resource sink as-is. Utilizing the oxygen would just be a nice way to make the process more resource efficient. And I hate to quarrel, but plants don't suck up oxygen. Their metabolism works by utilizing CO2 and, through the photosynthetic pathway, releasing oxygen at the end. As to your oxygen question, although if I'm not mistaken algae produces the greatest proportion of atmospheric oxygen, terrestrial plants do produce quite a bit. It is estimated that the rainforests alone contribute 20%. Keep in mind this is total atmospheric oxygen, and that our total oxygen supply on earth is much much more than we could ever hope to utilize in a storage capacity.

spirulina ? (2, Funny)

ilikeitraw (706793) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825861)

omg... they mentioned spirulina ! smart astronauts !!

my girlfriend takes a heaping spoonful of it and mixes it with warm rice milk. she loooves it, and i think it smells like raw chicken.

i'm sure Monsanto will find a way to get in on this, to ensure the first seeds planted on Mars are genetically modified and prevent strange new martian diseases that only Monsanto knows about.

Re:spirulina ? (2, Insightful)

Rei (128717) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825954)

Of course they'll be genetically modified. It's either that, or extremely heavily bred. There's no way we could take full-pressure domes covered in thick radiation shielding. We're going to need plants with a number of traits: high radiation resistance, the ability to take very thin atmospheres with higher-than-usual CO2 percentages, proper growth in low gravity, hydroponic or martial-soil adapted, low light, easy to grow and resistant to any diseases that may be carried (crop failure on Mars? ack!), etc, while still being nutritious.

NASA life scientists will probably do the engineering, though, at least at first.

Re:spirulina ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12826155)

You have a gf and you read/post on slashdot !! Whats wrong with you ?

Re:spirulina ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12826173)

OMFG, your GF is a freak.

I feed that stuff to my fish as food pellets/disks.

Soy milk = yuck, spirulina = Double yuck.

I suggest getting a non nutty GF.

Looking at the article (1)

dr_dank (472072) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825866)

how are those chefs going to keep their hats from floating away in space?

Luckily in space, no one can hear Gaston say "Sacre blu!".

Re:Looking at the article (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826044)

Velcro.

Or tie a rope around their chin

Or because they are cheifs in space their heads will get bigger and the friction will be enough to keep them on their heads.

Yum. Martian food. (5, Funny)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825870)

Once you pick the antennas off, and drain all the green ichor, the stuff's pretty good! Looking forward to the first Martian fast food restaurant to open "Barsoom King", with its slogan "Take me to your eater!"

Re:Yum. Martian food. (2)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825979)

How is that different then lobster? Lobster is pritty good and I like it. But when you put it like that it seem discusting.

next ? (1)

Ragnagnor (682349) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825871)

"If you're lucky enough to be a crew member of one of the next European Space Agency (ESA) long-term missions..." Next ? ESA hasn't even had a first manned mission as far as I know...

Re:next ? (2, Informative)

bluGill (862) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825995)

You don't count all the space lab trips in the shuttle? Or the other ESA manned missions in various other ships?

The ESA hasn't launched a mission all on the own, but they have been an important part of many missions.

What! No Burger (2, Funny)

views (818215) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825879)

Count me out. I'll wait for McDonald to open first

Re:What! No Burger (1)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825987)

I'm not going until there are at least three Starbucks over there. Oh, excuse me, my shuttle is boarding!

Re:What! No Burger (1)

mbbac (568880) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826074)

Burgers aren't exactly haute cuisine.

should I write 'farmonauts'? (5, Funny)

hugerobot (634548) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825880)

-- should I write 'farmonauts'? -- No... you should not. Some things can not be un-read.

Re:should I write 'farmonauts'? (1)

caldroun (52920) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825998)

I agree, if you question what you are about to write...let it go.

BTW wasn't Luke Skywalker the first Farmonaut?

Re:should I write 'farmonauts'? (1)

ImaLamer (260199) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826197)

farmonauts? I like fartonauts instead!

Terminology (-1, Redundant)

jfengel (409917) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825881)

should I write 'farmonauts'?

No, you should not.

ROLAND PIQUEPAILLE ALERT! (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12825882)

Don't read the overview. Just more ad revenues for him. (Info on Roland Piquepaille) [thedarkcitadel.com]

Re:ROLAND PIQUEPAILLE ALERT! (3, Insightful)

RobertB-DC (622190) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825915)

Don't read the overview. Just more ad revenues for him. (Info on Roland Piquepaille [thedarkcitadel.com] )

Perhaps he's saving up for a trip to Mars, to enjoy the tres, tres haute cuisine.

I say we all pitch in, send him up, then cut off his web connection. Or his oxygen, whichever is easier to grab.

The TRUTH about Roland (2, Informative)

Asshat Canada (804093) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826145)

Roland Piquepaille and Slashdot: Is there a connection?


I think most of you are aware of the controversy surrounding regular Slashdot article submitter Roland Piquepaille. For those of you who don't know, please allow me to bring forth all the facts. Roland Piquepaille has an online journal (I refuse to use the word "blog") located at http://www.primidi.com/ [primidi.com] . It is titled "Roland Piquepaille's Technology Trends". It consists almost entirely of content, both text and pictures, taken from reputable news websites and online technical journals. He does give credit to the other websites, but it wasn't always so. Only after many complaints were raised by the Slashdot readership did he start giving credit where credit was due. However, this is not what the controversy is about.


Roland Piquepaille's Technology Trends serves online advertisements through a service called Blogads, located at www.blogads.com. Blogads is not your traditional online advertiser; rather than base payments on click-throughs, Blogads pays a flat fee based on the level of traffic your online journal generates. This way Blogads can guarantee that an advertisement on a particular online journal will reach a particular number of users. So advertisements on high traffic online journals are appropriately more expensive to buy, but the advertisement is guaranteed to be seen by a large amount of people. This, in turn, encourages people like Roland Piquepaille to try their best to increase traffic to their journals in order to increase the going rates for advertisements on their web pages. But advertisers do have some flexibility. Blogads serves two classes of advertisements. The premium ad space that is seen at the top of the web page by all viewers is reserved for "Special Advertisers"; it holds only one advertisement. The secondary ad space is located near the bottom half of the page, so that the user must scroll down the window to see it. This space can contain up to four advertisements and is reserved for regular advertisers, or just "Advertisers".


Before we talk about money, let's talk about the service that Roland Piquepaille provides in his journal. He goes out and looks for interesting articles about new and emerging technologies. He provides a very brief overview of the articles, then copies a few choice paragraphs and the occasional picture from each article and puts them up on his web page. Finally, he adds a minimal amount of original content between the copied-and-pasted text in an effort to make the journal entry coherent and appear to add value to the original articles. Nothing more, nothing less.


Now let's talk about money. Visit BlogAds to check the following facts for yourself. As of today, December XX 2004, the going rate for the premium advertisement space on Roland Piquepaille's Technology Trends is $375 for one month. One of the four standard advertisements costs $150 for one month. So, the maximum advertising space brings in $375 x 1 + $150 x 4 = $975 for one month. Obviously not all $975 will go directly to Roland Piquepaille, as Blogads gets a portion of that as a service fee, but he will receive the majority of it. According to the FAQ, Blogads takes 20%. So Roland Piquepaille gets 80% of $975, a maximum of $780 each month. www.primidi.com is hosted by clara.net (look it up at Network Solutions ). Browsing clara.net's hosting solutions, the most expensive hosting service is their Clarahost Advanced ( link ) priced at £69.99 GBP. This is roughly, at the time of this writing, $130 USD. Assuming Roland Piquepaille pays for the Clarahost Advanced hosting service, he is out $130 leaving him with a maximum net profit of $650 each month. Keeping your website registered with Network Solutions cost $34.99 per year, or about $3 per month. This leaves Roland Piquepaille with $647 each month. He may pay for additional services related to his online journal, but I was unable to find any evidence of this.


All of the above are cold, hard, verifiable facts, except where stated otherwise. Now I will give you my personal opinion.


It appears that every single article submitted to Slashdot by Roland Piquepaille is accepted, and he submits multiple articles each month. As of today, it is clear that ten articles were accepted in October, six in November, and four in December (so far). See his page for yourself. Some generate lots of discussion; others very little. What is clear is that, on a whole, this generates a lot of traffic for Roland Piquepaille. Just over 150000 hits each month according to Blogads. And the higher the traffic, the higher the advertisement rates Roland Piquepaille can charge. So, why do the Slashdot editors accept every single story from Roland Piquepaille? Is the content of his journal interesting and insightful? Of course it is, but not by Roland Piquepaille's doing. The actual content of his journal is ripped from the real articles, but at least he gives them credit now. Does the content of his journal bring about energitic discussion from the Slashdot readership? Yes, because the original articles from which he got his content are well written and researched and full of details.


So you may be asking, "What is so controversial about this?" Well, in almost every single article submitted by Roland Piquepaille, Slashdot readers complain that Roland Piquepaille is simply plaigarizing the original articles and that rather than linking to Roland Piquepaille's Technology Trends on the front page of Slashdot (guaranteeing a large amount of traffic for him), Slashdot should instead link to the original articles. In essence, avoid going through the middle man (and making money for him!). The Slashdot readership that can see through Roland Piquepaille's farce objects on the basis that he stands to make a generous amount of money by doing very little work and instead piggy-backing on the hard work of other professional writers. Others argue that he is providing us with a service and should not be ashamed to want to get paid for it. But exactly what service is he providing us with? He copies-and-pastes the meat of his journal entries from professional and academic journals and news magazines and submits about seven or eight of these "articles" to Slashdot each month. Is this "service" worth up to $647 a month? Or, does each "article" represent up to $80 of work?


The real question is, why does Slashdot continue to accept every single one of his submissions when many of the readers see through the scam and whole-heartedly object to what he is doing? Maybe the Slashdot editors don't have much journalistic integrity. Haha, just kidding. We all know they wouldn't know integrity if it bitch-slapped a disobediant user talking about Slashcode internals or shut down www.censorware.org [google.com] in a temper tantrum. Anyway, what incentive would Slashdot editors have to link to lame rehashes of original and insightful technology articles? What incentive would Roland Piquepaille have to constantly seek these tech articles and rehash them into lame journal entires and submit them to Slashdot? I submit to you, the Slashdot reader, that the incentive for each is one and the same. Now that you have been informed of the facts of the situation, you can make your own decision.


It has to be said. (1)

citizenklaw (767566) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825885)

In Soviet Russia, crops farm you!

Iron Chef Martian... (3, Interesting)

idontgno (624372) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825890)

And today's ingredient is...

Chlorella! [wikipedia.org]

Farmonauts (-1, Redundant)

nxtr (813179) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825899)

...should I write 'farmonauts'?
No, you shouldn't. You might start up some stupid cliché.

Other planets? (1)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825901)

in greenhouses built on Mars colonies or other planets.

Er, what other planets? Other than Earth I'm not aware of any other planet which has the potential for allowing greenhouses to be built. At least none that are close enough to allow resupply of food without a multi-year trip.

Was this a slipup or are the folks at the ESA not telling us something (tinfoil hat goes on).

P.S. To see some of the stories you've been missing, check out my journal.

Re:Other planets? (1)

Aerog (324274) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826063)

In other news, EU officially redefined to mean "European Universe".

Re:Other planets? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12826129)

I think you are confused, greenhouses can be built anywhere, supply extra light,heat and air as required.

No You Shouldn't (0, Redundant)

Jherek Carnelian (831679) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825906)

. The future astronauts -- should I write 'farmonauts'?
No. No you should not. It is really stupid.

Meat, Its what is for Dinner (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825907)

Cut to a scene of a bunch of green aliens running around, making strange sounds.

Say that again? (1)

kniLnamiJ-neB (754894) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825911)

If you're lucky enough to be a crew member of one of the next European Space Agency (ESA) long-term missions

ESA says that these recipes will use fresh ingredients grown in greenhouses built on Mars colonies or other planets. So one of their next missions will feature food grown on Mars? Talk about jumping the gun! Oh wait, this is Roland. Dang it, I took the bait.

Linux (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12825914)

Well, the Linux zealots are at it again. When can we go one day without a stupid story about this non-OS? Get a real operating system you maggots.

Emerald anyone? (1)

part_of_you (859291) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825916)

Let's just hope that nothing goes, "BAM!"

Let Me Be One of the First to Say It (2, Funny)

Compulawyer (318018) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825923)

I have not noticed any posts from Roland in a long while. It was nice while it lasted.

Re:Let Me Be One of the First to Say It (1)

aardvarkjoe (156801) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825963)

It would have been nice if they have to post something of his, if it had at least been a marginally newsworthy story. Of all the crap he comes up with, was this really the most interesting?

Re:Let Me Be One of the First to Say It (1)

Compulawyer (318018) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826131)

Of all the crap he comes up with, was this really the most interesting?

Probably. And sadly. Very sadly.

Not a "Freedom Fry" thing, but... (4, Funny)

pla (258480) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825926)

And it's interesting to note that the new menus were elaborated with the help of Alain Ducasse, the French chef

No specific offense to the French intended, but as a vegetarian, I can think of much better choices to have designed the menu (not to mention, not everyone likes real French-style food).

Indian food, for example, has a truly huge variation of veggie-only dishes, as does Spanish (though on that, I'll admit, my experience with it involves mostly South-American-Spanish, not Southern-Europe-Spanish food). Greek has a decent selection as well, and you replace the lamb with falafel for most of the rest.

But French? The French have a reputation for taking perfectly good, otherwise healthy and veggie safe foods, and drenching them in lard. Wrapping them in thinly sliced meat. Stuffing them with unnameable mollusks and cephalopods.

Not the best choice, IMO.

Re:Not a "Freedom Fry" thing, but... (1)

AndersOSU (873247) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825948)

mmmmmmm mollusks and cephalopods

Re:Not a "Freedom Fry" thing, but... (1)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825956)


Indian food, for example, has a truly huge variation of veggie-only dishes...

That may be true, but perhaps curry isn't the best choice of food for groups of people in a sealed environment...

^_^

Re:Not a "Freedom Fry" thing, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12825967)

Not familiar with Provence style cuisine are you.

Cephalapoids? (1)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825991)

"Stuffing them with unnameable mollusks and cephalopoids."

I once ran down a cephalapoid on foot. But then he blinked the wrong eyelids and jumped off the Guggenheim Museum.

Re:Not a "Freedom Fry" thing, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12826004)

not everyone likes real French-style food...taking perfectly good, otherwise healthy and veggie safe foods, and drenching them in lard. Wrapping them in thinly sliced meat. Stuffing them with unnameable mollusks and cephalopods

Totally agree. I actually like France and the French generally (despite that Je suis un ros beef), but their cooking is typically gross. While I'm on a roll, I'll also note that French wine is grossly over-rated too.

Re:Not a "Freedom Fry" thing, but... (1)

be-fan (61476) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826052)

I don't know too much about Spanish food, but I'd point out that Indian food achieves most of its flavor buy using a wide variety of spices and ingredients. That presents quite a logistical issue when your're growing your own food on Mars...

Re:Not a "Freedom Fry" thing, but... (1)

pla (258480) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826117)

That presents quite a logistical issue when your're growing your own food on Mars...

They can grow potatoes but not fennel?

Okay, some spices (saffron, for example) they would most likely need to import. But even then, a single kilogram of most spices would last a few dozen people for years. And for most commonly used spices, they literally grow as weeds in the wild. Deliberately growing them requires no more effort than stuffing the right seeds in some healthy dirt.

Re:Not a "Freedom Fry" thing, but... (1)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826066)

I think the rugged conditions and nutritional requirements of the Martian environment will truly put the vegetarian diet to the test as a legitimate and viable diet for human survival.

Re:Not a "Freedom Fry" thing, but... (1)

Adelbert (873575) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826125)

The French have a reputation for taking perfectly good, otherwise healthy and veggie safe foods, and drenching them in lard.

Yes, but they also make a hell of a foie gras. You could go for that instead.

Re:Not a "Freedom Fry" thing, but... (2, Insightful)

mbbac (568880) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826182)

You may be forgetting that this is coming from the ESA. Secondly, this isn't traditional French food, but is instead haute cuisine -- they are very different.

Re:Not a "Freedom Fry" thing, but... (2, Funny)

daeley (126313) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826191)

Stuffing them with unnameable mollusks and cephalopods.

So would that be the Gaul of Cthulhu?

Nice idea, but... (4, Interesting)

nystagman (603173) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825930)

....it's the variety of the diet, at least as much as the quality that keeps you (well, me at least) from going nuts, or potentially worse, losing interest in eating.

I hope that these fancy new meals do not end up displacing "comfort foods" such as may have previously been on the menu.

As Martha would say, "It's a good thing."

Re:Nice idea, but... (1)

bluGill (862) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826037)

Since they are targeted at 40%, I would have to say that this adds to variety, not displaces it. Particularly considering the quality of most freeze dried foods.

I for one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12825932)

I for one welcome our new ant overlords, who now happily carry martian food crumbs to their space nests.

Oh nos!!!1! (3, Funny)

aftk2 (556992) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825934)

'martian bread and green tomato jam'

But the book isn't named How to Cook For Humans on Mars, it's named How to Cook Humans on Mars!!

Oops.... (1)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825944)

"If you're lucky enough to be a crew member of one of the next European Space Agency (ESA) long-term missions, you will have the choice between eleven new delicious recipes, such as 'martian bread and green tomato jam' or 'potato and tomato mille-feuilles' when it's time for dinner. In 'Ready for dinner on Mars?,' ESA says that these recipes will use fresh ingredients grown in greenhouses built on Mars colonies or other planets."

The same minds that destroyed a spacecraft because they forgot the Metric system existed will likely be involved. On the first mission, the astronauts will be told that there is no food on the spaceship. However, they have 1.25 years to fill out order forms for Martian delicacies which will be served to them by Martian robot chefs once they land. Future film adaptations of the shocking results bear such titles as "Donner Party... in SPACE!" and "Houston, could you send up some burgers?"

(Cue scene of emaciated John Malkovich being pulled from the lander saying. "The kzinti boarding party did this!")

Does this mean... (3, Insightful)

suman28 (558822) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825952)

What about plumbing and the rest of the infrastructure needed for maintaining this 'farm'?

Martian Menu samples (2, Funny)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12825964)

"The Helium Special". Four-armed green martian basted in its own ichor. Favorite of John Carter.

"The War of the Worlds". This blobby Martian is served to you live, at which point you sneeze on it, and your Earth germs instantly render it dead...and tasty.

Low GEE (1)

Leroy_Brown242 (683141) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826002)

I'm interested in seeing how veggies grow in lower gravity.

Farmonauts? (1)

norminator (784674) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826022)

should I write 'farmonauts'?

Maybe try "agronauts"?

Soil (1)

irritus (789886) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826026)

How much do we really know about Martian soil at this point? All things considered, for a greenhouse to be a serious plan, we'd have to know we wouldn't need to ship fertilizer, nutrients, and minerals to support them. All of those things add a lot of weight, so if we can't use the soil on Mars as it is, the idea of thriving communities based around greenhouses is a work of science fiction.

French Food For Thought from Roland! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12826029)

Amazing, a story people hate more than Frenchman Roland Pickmyscabs: a story about French food!

Oh ye gods (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12826034)

Not another Piquepaille "story"...

Does this mean... (1)

suman28 (558822) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826038)

We will soon have the Crushinator 3000 and Lulabell working the martian farm or is it the moon :)

Re:Does this mean... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12826193)

that was the moon.... but at least on mars they can eat buggalo.

I'd want one of these! (1)

Man in Spandex (775950) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826054)

May I have some of them Illudium PU-36 Explosive Space Beans?

What's to drink? (1)

donnyspi (701349) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826081)

Fermented Tang?

Mars dining? (1)

Tengoo (446300) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826094)

That's haute.

Recent Book Covers Topic (1)

gmletzkojr (768460) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826101)

I read a book recently called "The Shortcut To Mars". It is a horribly written book (I have it at home, if anyone is morbidly curious for more details), but the author goes into details of how a Mars mission would be handled, including the growing of food. In the author's fictious example, the astronauts had difficulty growing food. Which brings up general questions about growing food on other worlds....

  • What sort of tools do you bring with you to work unknown types of soil?
  • How do you know that earth plants will grow in the unknown soil?
  • Do you bring fertilizer? (The astronauts in the book used their own poop.)
  • What sort of shelter do you put up to protect your new earth/mars plants?
  • Once you grow the plants (hopefully more than you can eat), how do you store them? Mars freezer? Canning?

I made fermented tang once (2, Funny)

Thanatopsis (29786) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826111)

I was in fifth grade. I then used the "Tang" as wine in a school play, getting the kids pretty well buzzed. It was incredibly funny at the time. The nuns did appreciate that I was able to change "Tang" to Wine.

Other planets (2, Interesting)

a1cypher (619776) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826164)

ESA says that these recipes will use fresh ingredients grown in greenhouses built on Mars colonies or other planets.

On other planets... like Earth?

'farmonauts'? (1)

tod_miller (792541) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826165)

No farmonauts would be a voyager into a farm.

I think you mean astrofarmers or cosmofarmers.

Still, I just ate a pizza hut pizza, so stick that in your shuttle and eat it! :-)

I wish dominos/hut would do mars delivery one day, but I think subaqueous hotels will exists first, and the first subaqua society. That'd be cool.

Cart before horse (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12826168)

This is either silly or a P.R. stunt. (Actually, it's both.)

The early missions to Mars will be supplied w/ food shipped from Earth. We may use crates of MREs, or even more every-day food, but the food won't be grown on Mars.

There are a couple of reasons for this:

First, MREs and other prepackaged foods can be prepositioned one launch-window ahead of time, and will survive with long shelf lives as stockpiles. Sufficient food for mission success (and even comfort) will be delivered prior to humans leaving Earth, and the crew will bring another complete set of rations, in case something goes wrong.

Second (and the reason the first is feasible) is that the necessary mass of food per person per year is not a huge fraction of the mass that needs to be sent. It is a lot of mass, and eventually you will want to begin production on the other side. But, there are other things that need to be transported fron Earth which account for a much larger fraction of the cargo shipments from Earth. Propellant will probably be made automatically on Mars even before humans arrive, and major concern of the early crews will be to ensure that the propellant production pipeline is prepared for the demand of later missions. Water supply is also a much, much higher priority than food production, since the hydrogen is so useful for propellant, since humans need it directly, since it is of intense scientific interest, and since many of our manufacturing processes rely on water. Greenhouses and cooking will start up along the way, experimentally and then eventually for a significant fraction of nutrition. However, there will be higher priorities to in the early stages than producing food on Mars.

Marvin fillets with Tabasco may be tasty, though.

11 Recipes? (1)

Anonymous Monkey (795756) | more than 9 years ago | (#12826183)

Ok, even if they are VERY good I would be board stiff in like, a month and a half. Not to mention with a hand full of ingredients and some creativity you can think of 11 different meals very quickly. I think instead of hiring a world renowned French chef they should hire a mom who has 3+ kids and normally has a very limited budget to feed them with. That way you can get several million recipes in a month.
Potatoes: baked, fried, mashed, soup
Tomatoes: Salad, soup, baked dishes
Wow, we are up to eight, and I haven't even spent a minute on this!
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