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Inside the OpenSolaris Source Code

Zonk posted more than 9 years ago | from the looking-at-guts dept.

Programming 338

An anonymous reader writes "Ten million lines of code and not a single profanity? Is that really possible? Apparently, yes, says OpenSolaris community manager Jim Grisanzio. He said even before Sun filtered the code, it was relatively free of profanity. 'They went through the code for a great many things,' he said, 'and I'm sure they cleaned a word or two. Or three.' But a careful look through the code will reveal some programmers' frustration." From the article: "The most embarassing comment came from a developer of the GRUB project who went only by the name of 'Gord'. 'This function is truly horrid,' he wrote. 'We try opening the device, then severely abuse the GEOMETRY->flags field to pass a file descriptor to biosdisk. Thank God nobody's looking at this comment, or my reputation would be ruined.'"

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Odd Fascination (4, Interesting)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832677)

What's this fascination with dirty words in the code? I can't say that I've even considered writing such a thing in commercial code that I write. Unlike OSS code, other coworkers *will* be reading my comments and may not think they're that funny. (Although I love messing with test data. Batman, Picard, Superman, Professor X, Dylan Hunt, etc. are all game. Unfortunately, they all share a phone number with Jenny. Must be one of those antiquated shared lines. ;-))

Perhaps the most telling part of the article is that it's the Open Source code that has the foul language. Which isn't too surprising. If there are no repercussions for such behavior, why wouldn't developers engage in it? But in a straight-laced commerical environment? Unlikely. (Or at least uncommon.)

Re:Odd Fascination (3, Insightful)

dawnread (851254) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832696)

Agreed. In my work placements at University I was putting 'funny' comments and debug output in code. I got pulled aside by the manager and told it was definately not on. I thought he was being a bit boring at the time but now looking back I can see it was a geat piece of advice.

Re:Odd Fascination (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832813)

" Thank God nobody's looking at this comment, or my reputation would be ruined. " -- Gord

Sucks that your fifteen minutes of fame is gonna be for this, mate!

obscure enough for ya?!!! (2, Funny)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832959)

//
//
// SPACE PARANOIDS v 0.9.3
// Kevin J Flynn
// June 5, 1982
//
//Watch, I bet that weasel Ed Dillinger will like totally rip-off this program.
//
//

Re:obscure enough for ya?!!! (1)

agrounds (227704) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832994)

TRON!!

Now report to the game grid!

Re:Odd Fascination (1)

pegr (46683) | more than 9 years ago | (#12833043)

I dunno... Why don't you ask this guy? [slashdot.org]

Re:Odd Fascination (5, Funny)

BlogPope (886961) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832699)

What's this fascination with dirty words in the code?

The code might be compiled and run on some unsuspecting souls computer. Once the computer learns that kind of language, the next thing you know it will be downloading porn!

I should know, that how it got on my computer!

Re:Odd Fascination (1)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832718)

But in a straight-laced commerical environment?

I'd like to hear more from commercial developers. Personally, I'm a bit...loose...with my language in my code. If a comment I write helps me understand what I am trying to do and helps other's see what I was up to, I don't really care how it reads.

It's not like the customer will ever see the code, so it may be something that businesses don't really concern themselves with.

Re:Odd Fascination (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832763)

It's not like the customer will ever see the code, so it may be something that businesses don't really concern themselves with.

I wonder how many Solaris developers thought that.

Re:Odd Fascination (4, Interesting)

Chibi Merrow (226057) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832766)

It's not like the customer will ever see the code

Famous last words?

I'm suddenly reminded of !seineew era sreenigne epacsten!

Re:Odd Fascination (5, Interesting)

utuk99 (656026) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832802)

My favorite is I had to write about 50 different modules for a program. So I put a George Carlin quote at the begining of each module from brain droppings. No one except the small group of developers I work with would ever see it right. Unfortunately all of our code got subpoena. They obviously had no idea what the code was doing because out of 10 boxes of printed code, what do you think they had questions about? You guessed it the Carlin Quotes. There were a few sections with things like "Fear ye who enter here!" at the beginning of some really ugly subroutines. Ever since then I have had very innocuous comments in my code. Ok, I at least make them look innocuous to the casual observer.

Re:Odd Fascination (1)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832812)

I agree totally with the gp, I have my team regularly review each others code and profanity, derogatory comments etc are totally, and I mean totally unacceptable. Its not something then comes up often, as I think most commercial developers are conscious of the fact that its not actually their code to do with as they please and there will be reviews.

Professionalism aside though its something which can't be tollerated in a commercial environment as very often other depts see the code as well so putting stuff like 'this steaming heap of shite method is only here cos those fucktards in marketing spend more time wanking than thinking' is really only asking for trouble in a corporate environment.

Re:Odd Fascination (1)

Frymaster (171343) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832839)

'd like to hear more from commercial developers.

grep -rn "shit\|fuck" ./* | awk 'FS="\t" {print $NF}'

// we're in deep shit now... the least we can do is note it in the error details
// the array format returned from [function name] is fucked up. let's put it in a [variable name] like we want it
// it's fucking magic!

variable and function names removed to protect the innocent, guilty and neutral.

Re:Odd Fascination (3, Interesting)

deKernel (65640) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832857)

Well, I have been writing software for more years than I want to admit, but here is my take.

Other than using some terms that are really bad (c#@!, f$#% and such), there is nothing wrong with the developer putting his thoughts in the code. Somethings it will help the next person understand what the developer was thinking.
I will give you an example. Ugly hacks are bad but sometime necessary. Fact of life. If you have to support someone elses code, you might feel the need to say something bad about the person based upon what see in the code and how they got it to work. If you see comments like "... I realize that this really sucks and a major hack but I it does work..." you most likely will hold off your comments. Its called venting!!!!

This commercial developper see shit that makes him (1)

crovira (10242) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832879)

CRINGE. The comments in the code are:
obscene (Okay [name deleted] we'll do it your fuckin' way,)
reflect frustration (I have NO idea what this piece of code is supposed to do or what other events are being kicked inside this 'black box' All I know is that performance sucks.) and (I am deeply ashamed about the structure of this algorithm but the data is coming in this way.) OR
just plain wrong/outdated/unmaintained.

One commment left to me on a piece of unraveled recursive code by a guy I was replacing was: (If you get to debug this piece of shit, good luck. I'm gone now. Guess why?)

Documentation by osmosis is common in all in-house development efforts, as is profanity.

Re:This commercial developper see shit that makes (1)

Jim_Maryland (718224) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832983)

I had to debug some code from another developer who must have been watching the Scooby Doo movies at the time of development. Most of the comments/errors started as "Ruh Roh Shaggy" + an error statement. Not a profanity by any means, but still not something you'd want a potential customer to see during a demo.

Re:This commercial developper see shit that makes (1)

Pfhreakaz0id (82141) | more than 9 years ago | (#12833038)

yeah, to make something jump out I either use:

HERE BE DRAGONS: xxxx

or:

BITCHES: xxxx

Re:Odd Fascination (2, Interesting)

91degrees (207121) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832971)

I will be informal, but never obscene. You will occasionally see comments like "Sorry fellas, but [explanation as to why I was forced to do it the way I did]" or maybe make a reference to a well known joke occasionally ("the wonderful thing about standards is there are so many to choose from"), and nobody cares about these. I think it would be considered unprofessional and really a little childish to add expletives.

Re:Odd Fascination (1)

orderb13 (792382) | more than 9 years ago | (#12833015)

I've been known to leave some pretty nasty comments in the code about the state of things, such as "This function sucks and is extremely wasteful. [Insert Name here] can't code his way out a wet paper bag.", and the like but I've never left any actual instances of cursing in the comments since I got out of college. It isn't professional and depending on your company can get you fired nice and quick.

Comparison with Linux (2, Informative)

HyperBlazer (830880) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832773)

Linux Kernal Fuck Count [durak.org]

I'm not going to say whether Linux or Solaris is a better OS. But it seems like the Linux code might be a bit more entertaining to read.

Re:Comparison with Linux (1, Funny)

imr (106517) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832815)

What's a kernal fuck?

Re:Comparison with Linux (0)

HyperBlazer (830880) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832844)

Usually, a typo... Unless it's some really kinky act no one has told me about.

Re:Odd Fascination (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832831)

I don't know about the swearing bit, but....

There can be _vast_ differences in the level of quality of developers within a team. Sometimes these types of comments are necessary to point out bad behavior by another coder or to help, i.e. /* this is unusable */ /* completely un-necessary */ /* initialize your variables */ /* memory leak */ /* unsafe pointer ops */
Half of the time going to the project manager won't make a bit of difference; the developer will still continue on with the bad behavior. More often than not the person who found the problem then becomes responsible for fixing it rathar than the person who caused it in the first place. This can be VERY frustrating having to clean up for someone else constantly; hence some people will take their frustrations out using the comments.

Re:Odd Fascination (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832985)

What makes you think commecial code is exempt.

Funniest thing I ever saw was a diatribe that went on for several screens by a programmer (who no longer worked there) about how a particular manager (who no longer worked there) was an idiot.

The funny thing was that the comment had been there for years, and no one did anything about it. My theory is that it was protected by a somebody-else's-problem-field.

GSWAIIV

Prudism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832989)

The only reason anybody complains about foul language is to send a message to other ppl that "Well, /I/ would never say such a thing..."
It just doesn't go over well to constantly go around reminding everybody what a considerate wonderful person your are so ppl become creative. It's like the bitches that always loudly complain about being hit on, because nobody wants to listen to them bragging about how beautiful and desirable they are so they have to find another way.

Personally, I could give a fuck less how anal retentive ppl are or how much they like to suck up to non-coders standards.

GRUB project?? (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832679)

I believe that has nothing to do with the Solaris code.

Re:GRUB project?? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832770)

And I believe that you didn't RTFA. GRUB is included in OpenSolaris.

I wonder if it's this Gord [actsofgord.com] .

Re:GRUB project?? (2)

Fishstick (150821) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832821)

yeah, the article actually makes this distinction:

However, the real potty-mouths appeared to be open-source developers whose software made it into the OpenSolaris release in the form of the Perl and GRUB projects.

The summary does not go out of its way to make this clear.

Gord shouldn't feel so bad.. (-1, Troll)

jbuilder (81344) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832693)

If you saw some of the code in the software that keeps your lights on, you'd wonder why we all don't live in caves....

Grub is a bootloader (3, Insightful)

Dancin_Santa (265275) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832694)

Hardly part of the actual OS.

Sounds like Sun did a bang-up job with their software, reining in the developers under pretty solid coding guidlines. It's the Open Source people who have gone off and sullied the code with their silliness.

Humor in comments is sometimes good. Just not on Slashdot where it only risks your karma.

Re:Grub is a bootloader (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832729)

Grub is an official GNU project and thus, GPL. Gords comment was intended to be humourous. I'm not surprised the ZDNet hack missed it though. After all, understanding what GRUB is might require that they're are familiar with their subject, and that's just too much to ask these days..

MOD PARENT UP! (0, Offtopic)

alphakappa (687189) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832817)

I wish I had mod points right now, but parent has the truth about Grub.

Grub loads the OS, but... (1)

ChipMonk (711367) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832913)

How do you install it? Do you think they're going to use Linux or the Hurd to install GRUB on a pure Solaris system?

Re:Grub is a bootloader (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12833001)

"Sounds like Sun did a bang-up job with their software, reining in the developers under pretty solid coding guidlines. It's the Open Source people who have gone off and sullied the code with their silliness."

That's it! For all their cursing, all those OSS developers are FIRED!

Oh wait...

You know, if Sun really cared about that aspect, they're more than free to not use those nasty, vile, rude OSS components, that were lovingly developed for them for abso-fucking-lutely nothing.

When the developers are getting paid, then I can understand getting the code swear-free and presentable to clients. Otherwise, fuck 'em. Don't like my comments, don't use my code. It's that simple.

Re:Grub is a bootloader (4, Interesting)

arivanov (12034) | more than 9 years ago | (#12833017)

Silliness???

As far as the kernel is concerned the number of profanities is a clear reflection of the quality of the underlying hardware. One of the things I do before buying new hardware is look at the comments in the linux kernel code. If they are like the ones you meet in the sun** architecture bit (it is the most profane part of the linux kernel) it may be a good idea to stay away.

For example just read the sunhme.c under drives/net. It is an absolute ROFL. Or arch/sparc/mm/ptrace.c ...

Re:Grub is a bootloader (2, Informative)

stevey (64018) | more than 9 years ago | (#12833027)

And this coming from the people who gave the world the HME ("Happy Meal Ethernet") network devices?

I guess you're not being too serious.

I am vindicated! (2, Interesting)

ChibiLZ (697816) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832698)

I write very similar things into my code. My coworker and mentor yells at me about it. I think they're great little bits of levity when your code gets you down.

Re:I am vindicated! (1)

justsomebody (525308) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832801)

Sad story is that both of you are right, at least I can't help but agree with both of you.

I often make such comments in my source. But mostly they are without spaces or tabs at first character (not indented).

It is more like letting my frustration out and pointing out the badly written or hacked out parts which need redo on a first possible ocassion.

When you browse trough the code the next time you just can't help your self but to notice this.

haha score one to open source (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832700)

Code is so much better when your reputation is on the line amongst your peers.

I always think that peer esteem is one of the biggest contributing factors to the quality of open source code.

Re:haha score one to open source (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832885)

Did you RTFA? They're saying OSS is WORSE for profanity and unprofessionalism.

Nice humour (5, Insightful)

moz25 (262020) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832702)

I like the guy's humour. Either that or he is not smart for putting a reputation-ruining 'bomb' in the source code :-) But anyway... good programmers are supposed to be very critical of their code so even functionally correct code can be commented as though it were horrible.

http://cvs.opensolaris.org/source/search?q=fucking (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832706)

yep, no profanity at all

http://cvs.opensolaris.org/source/search?q=shit&am (1, Informative)

3.5 stripes (578410) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832867)

Good job guys...

http://cvs.opensolaris.org/source/search?q=redmond (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832976)

well, entertained me.

foo (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832709)

frosty piss!

oooo look what I found! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832712)

"Ten million lines of code and not a single profanity? Is that really possible?

Option Explicit

Private Declare Function SetForegroundWindow Lib "SHITHEAD" (ByVal hWnd As _
Long) As Long
Private Declare Function Shell_AssfaceIcon Lib "shell32.dll" Alias _
"Shell_AssfaceIconA" (ByVal dwMessage As Long, lpData As _
NOTIFYICONDATA) As Long

Who cares? (1)

phocutus (670853) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832720)

Comments are just that 'comments' who gives a crap if there's curse words or odd stuff? As long as it works and the developer wants to give in insight screw it! If the comments make sense and have some comical/curse words so be it. I rather see code with personality then someone who was straight chalk board.

Re:Who cares? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832784)

Us professional programmers care.

When you are doing a bid do having a conference after winnign one do you sit down and say,

Yeah, we can code that fucking system no problem. I mean shit man it may be hard as shit but we can meet that deadline. What we need to know is why the fuck did you want that in there. Can't we just get rid of this shit and move this over here. Fuck man, it makes more sense.

I don't think so. Being a professional means acting like a professional and only adding comments to code that help explain the program.

Having outsourced HUGE amounts of programming in my life, I can say that finding a comment like "Fuck this a hack." would not be a plus for the vendor in question.

FRIST PSOT (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832731)

HUBBAHUBBA

Could you have failed it any harder? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832946)

Not only did you not get first post, but you didn't even make it in the top ten. You were 13th, for fuck's sake. I am at a loss of words to even attempt to describe your monumental failure. You failed it so hard that the weight of your failure caused the fabric of space and time to collapse in on itself and create a portal to another dimension where you would undoubtedly fail it even worse.

Misquote... (0)

rel4x (783238) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832734)

name of 'Gord'. 'This function is truly horrid,' he wrote. 'We try opening the device, then severely abuse the GEOMETRY->flags field to pass a file descriptor to biosdisk. Thank God nobody's looking at this comment, or my reputation would be ruined.'"

I believe there is a misquote in there. I coulda sworn he said his reputation would be "gored"..

*ducks*

10kHz in 1996 (4, Insightful)

arete (170676) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832736)

ZDnet seems to want us to think "clock speeds" are at 3 Ghz regarding the following quote:

'Another tried his hand at predicting the future of system speeds. "As of this writing (1996) a clock rate of more than about 10 kHz seems utterly ridiculous, although this observation will no doubt seem quaintly amusing one day," he wrote.'

But in 1996 you had roughly 100Mhz 486s and Pentiums, so clearly it's not that clock, it's some other clock.

Re:10kHz in 1996 (1)

b1t r0t (216468) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832789)

Either they misquoted or, as you say, he was talking about some other clock. Perhaps the timeslicing clock?

Re:10kHz in 1996 (2, Funny)

Nutria (679911) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832816)

so clearly it's not that clock, it's some other clock.

The sad problem is that you are expecting Ziff-Davis writers to have a clue.

Re:10kHz in 1996 (4, Informative)

Chirs (87576) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832889)

Most likely this refers to the system tick. On linux this was 100Hz for most architectures in 2.4, although with 2.6 most architectures have moved to 1KHz.

Re:10kHz in 1996 (1)

molo (94384) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832907)

Actually I had a 200MHz Pentium Pro in 1996, the first of the i686 platform, which is still in production today as the Pentium 4.

-molo

Re:10kHz in 1996 (0)

charlieo88 (658362) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832951)

Woudn't a Pentium 4 be an i986?

Re:10kHz in 1996 (1)

farnz (625056) | more than 9 years ago | (#12833026)

Strictly, it's the Pentium-M which is still an i686, as the Pentium 4 is the NetBurst platform (a complete redesign for high clock speeds at the expense of all else). Pentium-M however, is an evolution of the P3, which is an evolution of the P2, which is a PPro with better 16-bit code support and MMX.

Re:10kHz in 1996 (1)

Billy the Impaler (886238) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832954)


Perhaps he just intended to say 10Ghz or something along those lines (a typo). Perhaps he said it as a joke (in that the number seemed like a low speed to him at the time).

More importantly, who cares?

Is Gord reading Slashdot? (1)

October_30th (531777) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832741)

So won't the real Gord please stand up, please stand up, please stand up...

Re:Is Gord reading Slashdot? (3, Informative)

Chmarr (18662) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832779)

I hear Gord [actsofgord.com] dropped out of the video game store market, and is teaching english in Korea.

Re:Is Gord reading Slashdot? (1)

Moredhel (1356) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832810)

Cue a crowd of "I'm Gordicus!" replies?

Re:Is Gord reading Slashdot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832903)

Its me, i confess

robert bison, 13493 Westchester Bldv, Akron, OH

Re:Is Gord reading Slashdot? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832944)

Its probably Gordon Matzigkeit, a canadian debian dev.

Has anyone found ... (5, Insightful)

ratta (760424) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832742)

something really interesting in the code, now that Solaris is open? People has been saying "Sun will never open Solaris" for month, now that it is open all that they do is to grep "fuck" or "shit", or look for frustrated comments?

Re:Has anyone found ... (5, Interesting)

mrm677 (456727) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832859)

Yes, the locking code in mutex.c is fascinating. They dynamically switch between spin-locks and adaptive backoff locks based on who is running and who is locking what. This is the stuff that makes Solaris scale to dozens of processors out-of-the-box.

everyone gets burned (4, Funny)

micromuncher (171881) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832747)

Hasn't everyone been burned by this? And why is it a big deal? It's not like professional developers never curse or get frustrated.

It is worse when questionable things get present to end users and/or clients. In a UI demonstration of an accounting project, I had a button called "Do Me". It didn't go over so well. But somehow it came out that one of the underlying combo boxes was called "ViagraComboBox" because it outperformed... that didn't go so well. So now all my code is antiseptic, just because its not good to show "unprofessionalism" infront of the client.

The worst thing I've ever heard was a friend gave a demo of a pipeline monitoring application to a client. During the course of a demo, a pumping station turned red to show an alarm, followed by a small mushroom cloud animation... suffices to say the client walked out of the meeting. (But hey, he now works at Microsoft.)

Re:everyone gets burned (1)

QuestorTapes (663783) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832996)

> So now all my code is antiseptic, just because its not good to show "unprofessionalism" infront of the client. ...
> During the course of a demo, a pumping station turned red to show an alarm, followed by a small
> mushroom cloud animation

That's the main reason I changed my commenting policies. I never used 'cute' comments (Start Trek characters, Tolkein references, game references), but I used to occasionally use 'indelicate' variable names, that occasionally showed up in error messages.

Comments don't need to be antiseptic; but if the comments have a lot of profanity, it often indicates a level of programmer frustration that may lead one to conclude that there are problems either in the code or the company that owns the code.

And often the decision is made to take some code or documentation that -used to be- for internal use only and make it public. That can be a bit embarassing, if the coders don't know ahead of time.

what's the problem? never got to do some crap just (1)

ranjix (892606) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832748)

because of some "insightful" managers? of course you'll appologize to the future generations for the hack... this is what I was tought at least, at JayLeno's Fruitcake Lady (I'm not sure which one is the first name)...

It is quite helpful really (2, Funny)

dominux (731134) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832750)

just search for "sucks" and you get a nice list of places to work to make things suck less.

f@#$ it (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832751)

F@#$ the G@# D#$% article. But at least the piece of S@#$ was informative! And enlightening to those of us who didn't f@#king know.

Will Linux benefit from this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832758)

How long until we start seeing features being ported over from OpenSolaris to Linux? Will it happen?

---

European zine about guns, hacking, paranoia [eurohacker.mine.nu]
#eurohacker@irc.freenode.org

Hopefully there's none of this (2, Funny)

sharpestmarble (875443) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832762)

Here we retrieve the configuration of the ConfigurationManager. In its configuration, it will find which ConfigurationAgent is defined along with the requiered parameters are requiered to initialize it. The Configurationmanager it self actualy retrieves its configuration by using directely the XMLConfigurationAgent.

my favorite comment (4, Funny)

k4_pacific (736911) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832777)

In a piece of C code where I work that has Unicode support, I saw this comment, by itself, within a routine that did some string manipulation: // I'm hot for TCHAR.

Comment should read: (2, Funny)

CultFigure (563155) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832787)

"...thank God this code isn't open sourced and linked to slashdot so that every geek can see what a horrible wretch of a coder I am!"

Deal (3, Funny)

dawnread (851254) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832795)

I'll stop using swearwords in my code when my manager stops using ridiculous buzzwords like 'bandwidth' and 'drill down'.

More checking needed (3, Informative)

Espectr0 (577637) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832814)

shit! [opensolaris.org]

embarrasing code.... (5, Funny)

MauMan (252382) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832818)

I remember once when I was was trying to track down a bug I wrote some debugging code which I then commneted out with: #ifdef _SEX_WITH_FARM_ANIMALS_ ...Debugging code... #endif Later, someone wanted to integrate with my code so I saved it off to the interim repository and a few minutes later I got a visit from my co-worker.

Boy he had some fun at my expense...

Re:embarrasing code.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832869)

So have you stopped having sex with farm animals yet?

Re:embarrasing code.... (1)

MauMan (252382) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832990)

Happily that code is yet to execute...

Oh noes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832871)

49 #undef P0_WA /* that shit not done here! */


http://cvs.opensolaris.org/source/xref/usr/src/cmd /volmgt/vold/dev_rmscsi.c#63 [opensolaris.org]

Re:Oh noes! (1)

ettlz (639203) | more than 9 years ago | (#12833030)

I didn't know Snoop Dogg was a coder! Maybe they ran the code through the Shizzolator.

Sad little article (-1, Troll)

andrewzx1 (832134) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832891)

This is a very sad little article. The very first article after Solaris open source is released and it's not about Solaris at all. It's about some silly GRUB comments. Talk about gross sensationalism. Whoever posted this article really could do much, much better.

A better comment... (2, Funny)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832893)

If I coded closed source software, I think I would probably deliberately load my code up with funnier comments. Something like:

/* I'm feeling lazy today, so I'll just kludge this for now and let the smart open source people figure out a better way to do it in a few years when it's released. Good luck, guys. */

or...

/* This is probably a HUGE security hole, but since the software is closed source, security doesn't matter much. */

or even something corny (a blatant ripoff of a ThinkGeek t-shirt [thinkgeek.com] I have):

/* Q. What's the difference between dead coders and me? A. 57,004 programmers. */

Any better suggestions? Reply, because I need something amusing to read this afternoon!

Re:A better comment... (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832998)

This reminds me of a heredoc in PHP.

$something = HOOLAPALOOZA_WAS_HERE
(html stuff)
HOOLAPALOOZA_WAS_HERE;

When my boss saw it, he demanded me to change it to the usually boring EOD. Bummer.

Ha, some crazy Perl developers! (1, Funny)

That's Unpossible! (722232) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832896)

One Perl developer cursed Microsoft... while another inexplicably chose to quote from JRR Tolkien's classic The Lord of the Rings .

That crazy Larry Wall, always inexplicably quoting Tolkien!

Wow (0, Redundant)

Fjornir (516960) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832901)

Synchronicity strikes again. Profanity in our source code is a huge problem at my company -- and a lot of it we do ship to customers. I've got my list of red flag words in place, but I've been having some pretty serious problems writing an effective filter.

It comes down to: inflected forms and naughty words in other words. For instance if I search for "ass" then I can either have it match too strictly and it will catch "class" and "passed" -- or too loosely and it will not catch "dumbass" and "jackass". Then think of all the -ed and -ing formations and it starts to become more and more of a tricky problem.

Has it been solved already? Googling for a comprehensive profanity dictionary at work is... tricky.

Re:Wow (1)

d99-sbr (568719) | more than 9 years ago | (#12833045)

For instance if I search for "ass" then I can either have it match too strictly and it will catch "class" and "passed" -- or too loosely and it will not catch "dumbass" and "jackass". Then think of all the -ed and -ing formations and it starts to become more and more of a tricky problem.

Assed I can see, but assing?

I guess you could say "This is quite an assing way to do this, but..."

What is this fascination with "obscenity?" (-1, Troll)

leereyno (32197) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832904)

Our society's continual fascination with "obscenity" is proof positive that 50% of the population is of below average intelligence. Some people have an almost superstitous attitude towards certain words. This isn't based upon the meaning of the words either since synonyms of these words are not treated with the same trepidation.

Whoever said human beings were rational, lied.

Lee

My favourite comment.. (2, Funny)

rasilon (18267) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832910)

From the Solaris 8 code, it may or may not still be there:
"Inserted for 2.6 testing - remove before shipping."

People (2, Insightful)

sn0wflake (592745) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832914)

Could Gord be http://slashdot.org/~Gord [slashdot.org] I wonder.

Gordon Matzigkeit? (1)

njchick (611256) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832949)

I believe it's Gordon Matzigkeit. He worked on GNU Hurd, and the only bootloader supporting GNU Hurd is GNU Grub.

Re:People (1)

sn0wflake (592745) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832950)

...or Gord Bowman? [slashdot.org]

My favorite solaris comment (1)

GGardner (97375) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832932)

From proc.h, of all places:
#define SRPC 0x40000000 /* Forgive me for this hack to overcome */
/* sunview window locking problems */

Comments are for cowards, anyway (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12832938)

"If it was hard to write, it should be hard to read."
My co-workers are lucky I even bother to use descriptive variable names. That's a huge improvement over my last reviewing quarter, when I started with variable a and worked to z, then started with aa, ab, ac, etc.

Occassionaly I'll put a comment like this in the header:
"If you're reading this, you have failed in some way to get the code I wrote to do what you wanted it to. Obviously, this is your failure, not mine, so close your editor and figure out what you did wrong."

SOLARIS acronym. (1)

jgacad (705298) | more than 9 years ago | (#12832995)

I was just reminded of the time not too long ago when we were upgrading our systems from (then) SUNOS to SOLARIS. A mildly frustrating experience! We came up with the acronym: Sh*t Out of Luck And Rational Intelligent Solutions.

I'm Gord... (1)

glMatrixMode (631669) | more than 9 years ago | (#12833004)

...you insensitive clod.

Another client horror story. (4, Funny)

CyricZ (887944) | more than 9 years ago | (#12833018)

I worked at a pretty laid back development firm developing various applications in VB. Well, one of the projects was a school library management system. One of my coworkers was, well, a bit of a freak. He had a strange obsession with penises and boners.

One of his jokes was to attach code to a button that would make an animation of a penis erecting and ejaculating appear, but only after every 7 or 8 clicks of that button. Normally he would only keep such code in for a day or so, until somebody in QA ran across it.

Anyway, at one point we were at a conference of school librarians demoing our product to them. Things were going well, until we clicked on a button, and up on the large screen came an animation of an erect penis ejaculating. Needless to say, we were quite embarrassed! I don't think he was with the company much after that.

is it reasonably complete now? (0)

cahiha (873942) | more than 9 years ago | (#12833035)

Rather than information about the frequency of profanities in the source code, I'd like to know whether the Solaris release is reasonably complete and open now. Has anybody actually succeeded in downloading, compiling, and running it? What's the FSF's take on the license?
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