Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×

234 comments

Nothing new...move along. (1, Insightful)

mcho (878145) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893386)

This was discussed in the 10th espisode of This Week in Tech [www.twit.tv] .

...and you should be able to hack anything you own -- it's yours.

Re:Nothing new...move along. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893547)

Are you sure you *own* it ? More-and-more stuff comes with all kinds of EULA's, of which one-or-the-other could contain that you own the paper the EULA is printed on, but everything else is (some sort of) *rented*, forbidding you to even put a sticker on the casing on a device, as you than violate the companies design ...

You think you *own* the thing (let alone the software), even enough to be permitted to do *anything* with it ? Are you *sure* ? I'm not ...

Re:Nothing new...move along. (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893588)

Until signing the contract - or at least reading the EULA - is a requirement of sale, it is not a contract at all. EULA's are nothing more than a wish list if they are not a condition of sale.

Re:Nothing new...move along. (4, Interesting)

Mattcelt (454751) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894174)

That's exactly right. Under US law (AFAIK, IANAL), agreements are solidified as soon as an exchange of goods takes place - in this case, software for money. So if an EULA is not presented prior to the Point of Sale, it cannot be enforced.

What's more, the last I heard there was a 9th Circuit Court Ruling [theregister.co.uk] applying the "First Sale " doctrine [answers.com] to software, regardless of what the EULA says... Which is why those people at computer shows can legally sell you the OEM copies that have "Not for Resale" stamped in big, bold, (useless) letters on the package.

Downloaded software is much more insidious, because many times the EULA is presented before the download... But with Firefox's "Edit Text Box" extension (or whatever it's called), you can change the EULA to whatever you want... or if it's like Sun's EULA, just rewrite the HTML to reflect terms that are favorable to you before you hit 'submit'.

So far I just write in the box that I reserve all rights and privileges and that's all there is to it... I wonder how far one could push it, legally?

Re:Nothing new...move along. (1)

aka_big_wurm (757512) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893572)

They were talking about the swap hack on TWIT. This one is even better. They should be able to make some cool apps for PSP now, firefox would be cool or a RSS reader.

Funny so many PSP hack posts but none about TWIT...

Re:Nothing new...move along. (1)

iamhassi (659463) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893590)

"This was discussed in the 10th espisode of This Week in Tech."

that epsiode is talking about the swap trick.

Re:Nothing new...move along. (1)

WwWonka (545303) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893603)

...and you should be able to hack anything you own -- it's yours.

Someone should have clued in Lorena Bobbit to that rule!

Re:Nothing new...move along. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893607)

I agree, but should one be allowed to share the hack?

Re:Nothing new...move along. (4, Interesting)

ThosLives (686517) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893637)

...and you should be able to hack anything you own -- it's yours.
Hrm. It just struck me that the problem with this statement is that most people agree, if you modify it to read (emphasis added):

...and you should be able to hack anything you own as long as it doesn't endanger anyone, deprive them of privacy, deprive them of something else, etc. -- it's yours.

This is part of the issue that the technically savvy face in the modern world. For instance, I could probably hack my car to get better fuel economy and more power, but turn it into something that emits a lot more NOx and CO2. I own the vehicle (it's actually paid for, a 2002 model). Should I have the right to do this? I cannot say that I have an answer to that.

The problem arises because it's hard to define what "endanger someone" or "deprive someone of something" means in most contexts. It's not like everything is simple like murder, theft of physical property, or other 'physical' issues. Take, for instance, the issue of DVD regions. The only reason this exists is political, and it's really unclear as to what damage would result from not having region-coded DVDs. Yes, I know about piracy and the "loss" of revenue, and I can understand the industry arguments, but I don't know that I agree with them. (If 10,000 people pay $10 each for a CD and give me $100,000, and 30,000 other people made copies, listen to the music, what did those 30,000 people "steal" from me anyway? It didn't cost me anything to produce those extra 30,000 CDs, so I didn't lose anything. The extra 30,000 copies didn't deprive anyone else of having a copy either. If, perhaps, I didn't think that $100,000 was enough to make more music I'll do something else, so that original bit of music is the only bit that will ever be out there. It does not make economic sense to continue to derive income from a non-scarce commodity for a lifetime; revenue should be proportional to services rendered or wealth created, not "I gave society this thing once, so keep giving me money forever". But I digress.)

Mostly the reasons for all the "do not hack your own stuff" laws comes from, especially in the United States, the desire to push all liability onto the manufacturers; this necessarily takes away some freedom. If, as a public, we want the freedom to hack our stuff, we have to take the responsibility for the possible consequences back upon ourselves.

Re:Nothing new...move along. (1)

BlogPope (886961) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893687)

I could probably hack my car to get better fuel economy and more power, but turn it into something that emits a lot more NOx and CO2. I own the vehicle (it's actually paid for, a 2002 model). Should I have the right to do this? I cannot say that I have an answer to that.

Yes, you have the right to do that. You do give up the privledge of driving that vehicle on the public roadways, however. This may be acceptable to you if your goal is to race the car in some way.

Re:Nothing new...move along. (0, Troll)

Ironsides (739422) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893731)

If, as a public, we want the freedom to hack our stuff, we have to take the responsibility for the possible consequences back upon ourselves.

sarcasm
Preaching personal responsibility? Why you sir must be a right wing religious nut! I'll have you know that no american can make up their mind and be expected to do the right thing without congress telling them what to do. That is, after all, why we have Social Security, medicare, medicaid and all these other programs as people can not be expected to make the right decisions for themselves. /sarcasm

That aside, you are fully right. It seems like every stupid lawsuit I hear about is because some idiot won't take personal responsibility for themselves and/or wasn't using common sense. For example, rear ending someone and sueing the person you rear ended for not having moved. Trimming a hedge with a lawn mower (while wearing sandals no less) sueing when you lose some toes. Couple more I have heard of, but all from people refusing to admit that they were an idiot.

Re:Nothing new...move along. (1)

mcho (878145) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893895)

But I digress.

Maybe just a little...

Originally, I was referring to electronics for the purpose of extending their usefulness. For example, assuming you're tech savvy, suppose your computer does not work as expected for some reason. So why would anyone prevent you from fixing -- essentially "hacking" in the loosest of terms -- your own property? Maybe the problem was just a bad power supply...

And, of course, as soon as you start ripping out the insides of your electronic gadget, the manufacturer's warranty does not apply -- they can only guarantee the quality of the product as it was delivered to you. But, overall, imagine where we would be now if way back when nobody could have expanded the usefulness of early Apple computers...

Re:Nothing new...move along. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893931)

I could probably hack my car to get better fuel economy and more power, but turn it into something that emits a lot more NOx and CO2. I own the vehicle (it's actually paid for, a 2002 model).

I thought only carbon monoxide (CO) was bad and a perfectly efficient engine emitted water(H2O) and carbon dioxide(C02).

Re:Nothing new...move along. (1)

everphilski (877346) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894110)

As long as you meet the federal emission requirements... why not?
If you don't meet federal requirements... you can't.
It's actually quite clear...
-everphilski-

Region code, short answer (1)

charlieo88 (658362) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894209)

Take, for instance, the issue of DVD regions. The only reason this exists is political, and it's really unclear as to what damage would result from not having region-coded DVDs. Yes, I know about piracy and the "loss" of revenue,

It's not political, it's economic. Region coding was made so that DVDs release in one market, aren't playable in a different region where the first run has yet to occur. Many movies aren't release simultaneously. Region coding is an attempt by the industry to maximize profit. Not to prevent piracy. Just to get the most money out of the consumer possible.

Re:Nothing new...move along. (1)

OldeTimeGeek (725417) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893833)

...and you should be able to hack anything you own -- it's yours.

I agree, but only with the following addition: Hacks place responsiblity completely on your shoulders - if you hack it and break it, too bad. The folks that built it don't have to fix it, take it back or even return your phone call. They do, however, get to point and laugh. Live with it.

Hehe... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893388)

"Homebrewed"... yeah, that's it. ;)

Re:Hehe... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893499)

Actually, homebrew is all it will play. Commercial games still won't play, unless you know how to crack the encrypted executables.

This is the best thing for the homebrew scene. You can't run pirated stuff, but you can develop and run your own app on the PSP! How cool is that? I'm playing Rick Dangerous on my PSP! Woohoo!

Re:Hehe... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893652)

"Homebrewed"... yeah, that's it.

No, that's how you spell "pirated" these days.

Just tried it (4, Informative)

pjameson (880321) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893389)

I just tried this yesterday, and finally I get to see what I was missing by having the 1.5 firmware. They really did a great job on this release, but it's going to suck when you have to update to play new commercial games

Time (1)

michrech (468134) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893397)

It was only a matter of time before it happened.

I don't think it'd be too long before other operating systems are running on the PSP.

--
telnet://sinep.gotdns.com [gotdns.com] -- TW2002 and LORD registered! :)

Re:Time (4, Insightful)

mesach (191869) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893624)

As much as people think that this is ONLY for pirating psp games, getting mame on the psp is the one thing that is keeping me from owning one. As soon as a good mame emulator for the psp is out, im all over it. In addition to using normal psp games.

Re:Time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893727)

So you want to use it to pirate non-PSP games as well?

ARRR!!! Abandonware off the port mizzencastle! (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893797)

Law of salvage. Any abandoned vessel belongs to whoever recovers it.

Re:ARRR!!! Abandonware off the port mizzencastle! (2, Interesting)

Total_Wimp (564548) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894143)

Things I've seen recently:

At Best Buy: PS2 classics game consisting of Dig Dug, Pole Position, Galaga and Pac Man.

At EBX games: Cartridge for Game Boy advanced with same games.

Under my Xmas tree six months ago: Similar games in a joystick that plugs into my TV.

At Target: A lot of other plug in joysticks with more classic games.

I agree with the abandonware argument, but a lot of these games are no longer abandonware. I'd agree with lowering copyright time periods, but the 20-25 years since most of these games were made doesn't even touch the surface of current copyright law.

Heck, I'd love a good argument to play these games free, but considering they cost less than 5 bucks apiece and are redily available, I can't help but think the ethical thing to do is to pay to play.

TW

Re:Time (1)

ChrisF79 (829953) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893758)

WHat games do you usually play on Mame? I had it for a while and the only game I could find that I remembered was "Tapper." What else is good for it? I'd like to give it a second chance.

Re:Time (1)

Digital Vomit (891734) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894038)

It sure must have been a long time since you've looked at MAME [mame.net] . It emulates over 3100 games now (5661 various rom sets, many of which are clones).

You can look through the list of all emulated games here:http://www.mame.net/gamelist.html [mame.net]

If you remember an old game, but don't remember the name, you can try finding it in the Killer List of Video Games [klov.com] . This is also a great resource for looking up information about various games.

When you know what you want, you can either look for the roms on eDonkey/eMule (if you know the rom set names), try to find a good roms site (there are some, but you have to wade through a lot of crap sites to find them), or you can find (and request) roms on Usenet at alt.binaries.emulators.mame (probably your best bet).

If you want some good old school games, try Ms. Pac-man, Frogger, Q*Bert (or the fun, but rare sequel Q*Bert's Qubes) for starters. Vector games like Asteroids work well, too. One of my favorites is Liquid Kids (I can't believe that game is 15 years old). Bank Panic - another old one -- is a fun *twitch* game. The original Rampage is great. Oh man, what is MAME not good for?!

Re:Time (1)

Wordsmith (183749) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893777)

So it's not just for pirating PSP games ... it's also for pirating old carts :)

Actually, there's only so much benefit to being able to pirate PSP games, at least for now. Memory cards large enough to store them are more expensive than the games in many cases. Sure, you could have just one card and constantly swap new games to it, but that's somewhat inconvenient.

Re:Time (1)

superpulpsicle (533373) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894157)

In what store can you buy a Genesis, SNES game in Rom format that plays on the PSP? None. Therefore it's NOT pirating. It does not translate to a loss in sale.

Methinks... (4, Interesting)

systemic chaos (892935) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893398)

It's about time to require a new firmware version for all new games

Re:Methinks... (1)

michrech (468134) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893427)

Won't matter. It'll get hacked just like the current firmware. It's all a matter of time.

--
telnet://sinep.gotdns.com [gotdns.com] -- TW2002 and LORD!

Re:Methinks... (1)

systemic chaos (892935) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893507)

True. Isn't this game of cat and mouse what keeps many of us interested?

Re:Methinks... (1)

michrech (468134) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893591)

I'd think the ability to concentrate on making interesting things that work would be much more fun than trying to hack the latest attempt at locking a user OUT of hardware (s)he OWNS.

--
telnet://sinep.gotdns.com [gotdns.com] -- TW2002 and LORD!

Of course (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893399)

Why didn't I think of that?.........

Exploit? (4, Insightful)

moz25 (262020) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893415)

I'm not so sure the term "exploit" is the appropriate one. It's more often associates with programs with malicious intent or gaining higher privileges on another person's system. Surely, making full use of the hardware you own is not "exploiting" it?

Re:Exploit? (2, Insightful)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893437)

Only to people that buy crippled hardware for some stupid reason, and then want to "hack" into their own stuff.

Re:Exploit? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893661)

What comparable uncrippled hardware exists? What PDA has an acceptable D-pad and buttons?

Re:Exploit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893699)

Re:Exploit? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893775)

The Tapwave NDA [tapwave.com] prohibits free software [gnu.org] or even freely redistributable software from being released for the platform. In addition, I could not find any Tapwave Zodiac hardware or software on the shelf at any retailer in Fort Wayne, Indiana, that I've visited, so it'll be tough to find partners for multiplayer games.

Uncrippled portable game device (2, Interesting)

ReverendLoki (663861) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893792)

What comparable uncrippled hardware exists? What PDA has an acceptable D-pad and buttons?

As I understand it, the GP32 [gp32eu.com] seems to fit the bill. I'm only passingly familiar with it, though.

Lack of a network effect (4, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893843)

As I understand it, the GP32 seems to fit the bill.

Unlike Game Boy Advance SP, Nintendo DS, and Sony PSP, How can I develop and share GP32 games if I can't find anybody else in town that has a GP32 to test on? Especially with multiplayer games, how can I test multiplayer gameplay if nobody else in Fort Wayne, Indiana, has a GP32?

OK, I'll modify my question. What portable game hardware:

  1. is not crippled,
  2. has decent controls for handheld gaming, and
  3. has a decent chance at an installed base in the United States of America?

Or is it a "good, fast, cheap, pick two, tough shit" situation?

GBA (1)

xtal (49134) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894181)

Game Boy Advance... not bad hadware, not broke, and last time I checked widely sold.

Re:Exploit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893954)

I think he means Sony is "exploit-ing" "their" customers.

Re:Exploit? (1)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893467)

http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=mozclient&ie =utf-8&oe=utf-8&q=define%3Aexploit [google.com]

# use or manipulate to one's advantage; "He exploit the new taxation system"; "She knows how to work the system"; "he works his parents for sympathy" # draw from; make good use of; "we must exploit the resources we are given wisely"


Still think it is used unwisely?

Re:Exploit? (1, Funny)

iamhassi (659463) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893532)

"Still think it is used unwisely?"

then I'm sure you don't mind if I exploit your wife ;)

Better terminology (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893511)

I prefer to call this and related techniques to remove unrequested locks from my systems "Digital Rights Management." :)

Re:Exploit? (4, Informative)

linguae (763922) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893561)

From dictionary.com:

  1. To employ to the greatest possible advantage: exploit one's talents.
  2. To make use of selfishly or unethically: a country that exploited peasant labor. See Synonyms at manipulate.
  3. To advertise; promote.

Well, installing this exploit does employ the PSP to the greatest possible advantage, IMO, so that definition of the word works fine. Of course, exploit has ta negative definition, but I see nothing negative about using your PSP to play homebrew games, Linux, and other "unsupported" stuff, so I guess the definition of exploit is relative to the speaker/listener.

Re:Exploit? (1)

Winterblink (575267) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893638)

Surely, making full use of the hardware you own is not "exploiting" it?

Is that not what you're doing when you elevate your privileges on another person's system? :)

Re:Exploit? (1)

wgaryhas (872268) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893719)

But those "exploiting" the PSP are the owners of the system. That is just a bit different from giving yourself full privileges on someone else's system.

Re:Exploit? (4, Funny)

David Gould (4938) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893793)


He said "own", not "0wn". It makes a big difference, you know.

Re:Exploit? (1)

Winterblink (575267) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893973)

Well at least someone got my pun. :)

How? (1)

mynickwastaken (690966) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893416)

With a Marker Pen?! Oh, not again!

Damn (1)

Foolomon (855512) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893423)

Damn, this must be so sensitive to Sony that my corporate firewall blocks access to the site describing the hack. :(

Re:Damn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893789)

Corporate firewalls block all the good stuff

and I believe you have my stapler

Old News for Nerds (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893431)

Anyone who cares enough about this would have already found out about this now. It's just a new version of the old "swaploit" that works with different folders one one memory stick instead of a folder on seperate sticks with the same name. Move along

Linux Inside? (1)

mislam (755292) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893433)

Can it run linux? I can then add all homebrewed software I like.

Re:Linux Inside? (3, Interesting)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893702)

Can it run linux? I can then add all homebrewed software I like.

including this one [psp-emulator.com] . I wonder if you can run the exploit on the emulator too...

...does this need comments? (-1, Flamebait)

swyterw (622994) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893440)

Okay, for all those with a PSP this is good news. For all those without a PSP, this topic can be ignored.

Instead, several hundred people will comment on this - providing their opinion on the PSP, and ROMs, and probably a few needless political comments.

I guess i'm just saying that just because you can comment on a story doesn't mean you have to. Of course, hundreds of comments will fill the page. And you'll have something to be angry about for 4 minutes.

Re:...does this need comments? (2, Funny)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893477)

I guess i'm just saying that just because you can comment on a story doesn't mean you have to.

But is it okay to comment on your comment?

Re:...does this need comments? (1)

Momoru (837801) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893478)

Thats just like you dirty liberals, always trying to tell us which portable is better....obviously the PSP sucks...why would i buy one when I have old NES ROMS?

nice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893444)

Let the avalanche of coolness...what now?

Heh (3, Interesting)

Auckerman (223266) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893448)

As was shown with the xbox, the secret to entering a new hardware/software market is to create a machine that allows piracy, but discourages it. While there are valid reasons to allowing homebrew software on the PSP, and hacks like this shouldn't be illegal, research like this will lead to hacked games (on to very expensive memory sticks).

Genious on Sony's part. Get an installed base at any price, while paying lip service to piracy. Even at $250, the PSP will be a hit.

Only if... (1)

spawnofbill (757153) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893575)

Re:Heh (1)

rob123 (889566) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893821)

On the contary, watson.. this is an example of microsoft just being a bit crappy at stopping piracy.

Microsoft make a loss on each Xbox sale and make the cash back from the games.. they don't want people to be able to pirate the games.. there's no cash in it for them then!

Re:Heh (1)

bluk (791364) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893965)

MSFT takes a loss on each sale and they expect it. MSFT isn't dumb. They weren't going to win the console wars with the first Xbox (and some at MSFT realistically say they won't win the next generation either). They came in expecting losses against Nintendo and Sony because these are giants. They want to grab more and more marketshare until they have enough and then they start their real antipiracy measures. The Xbox would not be as popular if it wasn't mod friendly.

Re:Heh (1)

tmbg37 (694325) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893835)

You don't understand, Sony has to prevent piracy at all costs, and that's because they make money off of software, not hardware. I'd be surprised if the "expensive" PSP costs as little as $250 to make, it wouldn't be surprising if it cost twice that. Rather, their revenue stream comes from game sales, as well as licensing the right to make games to developers. People buying PSPs soley to run free homebrew apps or pirated games destroys this model.

Yeah! (1)

cloudkj (685320) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893455)

Now I can play some Solitaire on my PSP.

this isn't the tech you're looking for (1)

paulsgre (890463) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893462)

games? i still have "swap" my pr0n to finish a single scene... This isn't the tech you're looking for. move along, move along

I didn't see that coming (1)

Mille Mots (865955) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893472)

I read that as 'Swapless P2P Exploit...'

Must be time to wipe eMule off the Windows box again.

It's all about platform control (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893508)

This shouldn't be a surprise; after all, Sony does want the "geek" section of the market, but it doesn't want to give up control of the platform completely. So, Sony makes it difficult but not impossible to run arbitrary code on the thing. More importantly it's probably technically illegal, which means that if Sony doesn't like what you're doing with their PSP, they can sue you easily into oblivion.

"Their PSP?" (1)

kdark1701 (791894) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893704)

If I buy a PSP, it becomes my property. If I choose to unlock the full potential of my hardware, I can.

Because the whole page is basically an ad... (4, Informative)

Tuxedo Jack (648130) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893530)

Here's the text and the link it links to.

- - - - -

Just when your fingers are getting sore and your friends keep asking 'Why do you have to switch memory sticks?' Killer-X and the PSP-Dev team have answered our prayers with KXploit, a way to run homebrew on 1.5's... Minus the memory stick swap!

The predecessor of Swaploit, users will now enjoy no more jammed fingers or broken nails with the introduction of "Direct Loader", and 1.5 users can now pretend they own a 1.0.

One of our users, Gavin King (Thanks), posted a comment on how to do this in its simplest form:

"If any of this confused you.... just do the same thing you did with swaploit, but put both folders on the same memory.

Let's use your NES folder as an example.

Your MS1 folder name "NES%" and your MS2 folder leave it the same, naming it "NES".

And that's all you need to do... a simple rename and move."

(I myself tested and verified this to work.)

You can get it in our PSP Download section here.

- - - - -

The file they're referring to is here:

http://files.psphacker.com/cgi-bin/cfiles.cgi?0,0, 0,0,38,469 [psphacker.com]

yay finally some new games! (1)

napa1m (154836) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893543)

Maybe if Sony actually released some new games for the PSP after launch people wouldn't be so eager to hack it up! Did they expect us to play the same 3 decent games for 5 months straight? Well, I guess all those GBA games I'll be able to run now will count as new games!

psphacker.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893563)

psphacker is a pretty crap site run by a bunch of kids.

your mom (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893753)

your mom is a promiscuous aids infested whore cumbucket

Technical Details (2, Insightful)

hansendc (95162) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893567)

Has anyone seen any details about how these hacks work, or what they exploit? I remember reading in gritty detail about the xbox font hacks, but I haven't seen any technical details on the PSP hacking.

DRM (1)

headkase (533448) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893571)

I wish companies would just drop DRM - it only hurts their legitimate customers. The warez pirates crack the protection within hours or days and then the pirates don't have to mess around with finding the CD when they want to play a game, etc. Sure DRM stops casual piracy but still there should be some limitations like what Id software does: CD protection at first but then remove it in some later patch to the game. This stops casual piracy for the immediate term while later on removing the annoyances for customers.

Re:DRM (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893713)

Companies will drop DRM like a hot potato the moment people stop buying things that have it built in.

Re:DRM or why I learned to love Copy II Plus (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893885)

I wish companies would just drop DRM - it only hurts their legitimate customers. The warez pirates crack the protection within hours or days and then the pirates don't have to mess around with finding the CD when they want to play a game, etc. Sure DRM stops casual piracy but still there should be some limitations like what Id software does: CD protection at first but then remove it in some later patch to the game. This stops casual piracy for the immediate term while later on removing the annoyances for customers.

Same thing happened with the whole copy-protection nightmare a lot of software manufacturers used to use back in the 80's - people just got so fed up that they stopped buying legit software - why bother, since it had all that copy protection cruft?

sale (2, Interesting)

stagl (569675) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893587)

This release has convinced me to purchase a PSP. I don't want to hack the commercial games...I could care less of those. I just want a portable movie/nes/snes/mame box! Come tomorrow I will be a PSP owner.

Cat and mouse (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893708)

Come tomorrow I will be a PSP owner.

And watch the PSP that you buy come with firmware 1.51 or 1.52, possibly rendering 1.5 hacks useless. Unlike Nintendo, Sony has shown itself willing to update the firmware several times in a row, even putting code in new UMD games that requires the user to flash a new version of the firmware before the game will play.

Re:sale (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893814)

Could you care less? Really? OK, I dare you. Please, care less. You said you could! I wanna see it. Go for it. Care less.

OH, I get it. You meant that you count NOT care less, as in your level of concern is the lowest possible value already.

Damn, I wish people would say what they mean and actually think about what they're saying. Is that so wrong?

Sony's really missing an opportunity here (4, Interesting)

Dark Paladin (116525) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893609)

Now, I know why they don't allow the homebrew software:

Less game sales
Loss of control (possibility of viruses, malware, etc)

But - I think they could really do something with the homebrew if done right. I had put out some of these in a column I wrote up a couple of weeks ago [advancedmn.com] , and still feel its true.

Sony could:

1. Offer a homebrew kit to developers for $100 - $200 dollars to be used for non-commercial use only.
2. Include big ass disclaimers "You break-a yo' PSP, not our fault".
3. If an application starts getting big, add it to an online PSP App Center and charge for it. 75% of the profits go to the devs, 25% to Sony. Everybody wins, as Sony could built up a library of applications and make some money off of it.

Is this as good as, say, just developing Palm Pilot applications and not getting a developers hard work appropriated by Sony? Naturally not - but half a loaf, as they say, is better than none. In this scenario, more apps for the PSP make it a more attractive device, which means more sales, which means more developers develop for it. At the moment, the Nintendo DS is looking like a better system (I've got two PSP games that look interesting to me, and about 15 DS games on my list for the future).

Of course, this is all just my opinion. I could be wrong. If nothing else, I'm enjoying having a Genesis emulator on my PSP - and the irony that I can play Game Boy Color games on my PSP but not on my DS ;).

Re:Sony's really missing an opportunity here (2, Informative)

Gotung (571984) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893769)

Do you really think Sony is making a profit on PSP's at $250? They have to combat homebrew because people that buy the PSP solely for homebrew/hacks generate zero (maybe even negative) dollars for Sony. These days game system manufacturers sell their systems for very little profit or even a loss to get the system into peoples hands. They then make the money back by selling games. If they sold a "hackable" version for $400 (so as to actually *GASP* make a profit) would you still buy it?

Re:Sony's really missing an opportunity here (1)

Medevo (526922) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894112)

I heard from a "friend" in the industry that PSP production costs at the very start were around $500 USD + ship. They have managed to pull them down to around $400 but there is still a pretty big loss leader on those $250 units.

I though the whole point of the value pack was to make the loss less to Sony. Also PSP games/movies the margins are pretty good for Sony and I think there PSP division isn't loosing too much money overall.

As for the "Hack-Able" unit idea, the unit would either include different firmware that would have the differences be reverse-engineered and integrated into the regular units. They could change the hardware (perhaps use a different BIOS) but different hardware almost always means compatibility issues, which "Console Style" game have to avoid to survive. For Sony those hack-able units are loose-loose, and go figure we don't see them.

Sony has avoided units hacks in almost all there products (Aibo no) because that's not who they are selling to. They want people to buy PSP's for the train ride or car trip, when somebody wants to charge the unit, turn it on and go. Sure $25 movies and $50 games are expensive, but they will work irregardless of when you bought the PSP, and the convenience/quality factor is what Sony is selling

Medevo

Re:Sony's really missing an opportunity here (1)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894118)

" Do you really think Sony is making a profit on PSP's at $250?"

If manufacturing and distribution cost is higher than that per unit, then they don't deserve to make a profit!

Re:Sony's really missing an opportunity here (1)

cybpunks3 (612218) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894383)

Nobody forced Sony to sell the PSP at a loss. There is no law that says if you buy a PSP you have to buy even a single game, only an expectation on their part that they will make the money back in software sales.

Re:Sony's really missing an opportunity here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12894295)

I didn't read your posting but the best way I have thought of to allow homebrew and independent projects (for any platform) would be to construct a stable, secure and efficient virtual machine that would run practically any program given to it. This idea was thought up specifically in the context of next generation consoles because you could obtain better than current generation performance on a next-gen platform running a java virtual machine; in the context of the PSP, I would suspect that you could still outperform the GBA and might be able to get similar performance to the Nintendo DS while running on top of a virutal machine.

MemoryStick Purchase Reciept (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893619)

Hope you kept your reciept.

copy-protection solution for PSP (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893809)

Add a copy-protecting function in the bios. It's up to the game vendor to call that function or not.

Ta-da, problem solved.

That wouldn't work... (1)

MS-06FZ (832329) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893942)

If it's up to the program to perform copy-protect checks, then people could modify the program code to remove the check. Besides which, Sony's top priority with regard to copy protection is to enforce it on commercial releases - they don't care about allowing it to be bypassed on homebrew stuff, because 1: they're selling it as a game console, a toy, and not a programmable computer (and the two are not the same thing these days) 2: any level of access people have to the machine weakens the copy-protection somewhat So the simplest solution is for them to run the copy-protect check unconditionally, any time a program is run.

in the history of portables... (2, Interesting)

sinner0423 (687266) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893815)

You would be hard pressed to find a manufacturer with a 'go ahead and play' policy on the hardware. I don't understand this at all, history has shown that software which has been open to developers has more staying power and versatility.

Why is this such a huge problem for Sony? They would still sell the fucking things for people to tinker with / modify them, why not bother to release a dev kit or SOMETHING for us geeks to play with?

A good parallel to this is the Xbox, do you know how many people I know bought one for the sole purpose of modifying them? Lots. I understand Microsoft still took a bite on the sale of the console, but not on the fact that these people still :

1) Bought games (secondhand or otherwise)
2) Bought accessories
3) Spent money they otherwise wouldn't have if they didnt own an Xbox.

Does Sony not realize that catering to the geek crowd could actually bolster sales and help with software development for the PSP? I guess not, and I hate to say it, but I have a feeling this portable is going to go the way of the Minidisc - another complete & total failure by Sony to actually let consumers use devices the way they see fit.

What loser hacks Paint Shop Pro? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12893827)

Why hack a graphics program? What mad skillz could you possibly acquire from this?

Technical Explanation (4, Informative)

Bri3D (584578) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893853)

This is really old news...anyway...here's the technical explanation of how this works.
The original Japanese PSPs would run unencrypted code straight off of memory sticks. Then Sony released firmware 1.50. Firmware 1.50 required ALL code it ran to be encrypted. But there was a flaw. Some people from a group called psp-dev discovered that the PSP firmware only checked for unencrypted code ONCE, when it read the archive with the name of the application, the icon, etc. They determined that by making an archive with NO code in it, the psp would give it the OK because there was NO code in it whatsoever. Then the memory sticks would be swapped, and the PSP code loader would run the code off the second stick. But that wasn't good enough for PSP-DEV. Using a flaw in the FAT driver on PSP they were able to make this work with ONE memory stick. Why? When two folders are placed on the memory stick, one with a percent sign after it containing the archive and one without a percent sign containing the code, the PSP would allow you to select the archive, then the PSP bootstrapper would read the directory without the %, because the PSP bootstrap and FAT driver do not understand % signs.

Mod Parent Up Informative! (1)

Abcd1234 (188840) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893887)

That was an excellent explanation, thank you. The question now, is, how long will Sony take to fix this flaw and release a firmware upgrade...

Re:Mod Parent Up Informative! (2, Informative)

trekstar25 (727712) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894127)

They already have. The only firmwares that can be exploited are 1.0 and 1.50. Since, they've released 1.51 and 1.52. They are planning on making upgrades compulsory with new PSP games coming out soon. I'm trying to decide which I want more - a portable NES SNES jukebox (and DOOM, too!), or a portable GTA game. Luckily, I have a while to decide.

Re:Mod Parent Up Informative! (1)

SigNick (670060) | more than 9 years ago | (#12894343)

This exploit has been already fixed in the 1.51 and 1.52 firmware releases. Thanks to grandparent for good explanation though!

The first site that reported this (1)

alias420 (873143) | more than 9 years ago | (#12893862)

PSP Hacks [psp-hacks.com] was the first site that had this news posted.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...