Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Forget Phishing Just Buy Personal Info

samzenpus posted more than 9 years ago | from the who-are-you-today dept.

Security 163

Iago writes "If you need information about a person in Moscow, just go to the market and buy it. The Globe and Mail reports that along with the usual pirated software, cd's etc. you can find out information such as the bank records of your competitors, motor vehicle information and tax returns. The question is, how much of this information is being sold in other countries, perhaps in a more sophisticated manner?"

cancel ×

163 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

yeah ... I like fishing (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000784)

Nothing like fishing eh

Known about this for years (5, Interesting)

pcmanjon (735165) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000786)

They've been doing this for years in other countries. What most people don't realise is that most of these stories you hear about personal information/security breaches (Lexis Nexis, etc etc etc) usually goes to thugs like this.

These thugs sell this information to people in the black market. This isn't new stuff neither, the news just seems to hover on this and "identity theft" a lot recently. It's been happening since the 80's.

A better question (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000792)

A better question is, how much of this information is real?

Re:A better question (4, Interesting)

temcat (873475) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000850)

Most of it is real, believe me. Whay fake something as big as countrywide database when you can easily bribe the right person and get the real thing. Recently there was a scandal when a Central Bank (!) database was stolen. But this is for big boys; as to the general public, stolen mobile operators databases are very popular here, because we don't have official telephone directories with personal phone numbers.

Re:A better question (2, Interesting)

myukew (823565) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001096)

I don't think so, I haven't much black market experience, but I think it's much easier to fake databases than stealing them. And judging by the ratio of fake software and audio sold on such markets I would say that the chances are good to be ripped of buying such databases

Re:A better question (1)

temcat (873475) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001131)

Well, here it's easire to steal. It's RUSSIA!

A lot of people successfully use this stuff. I personally use the address/phone database from police and mobile phone operators, and I don't know anyone who doesn't. BTW, I haven't had a single failure with it ;-) But this is just because our stupid laws don't permit to create a real phone directory...

Re:A better question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001307)

In Russia, database steals YOU!

Re:A better question (2, Insightful)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001266)

Beyond fake, one would suspect a percentage of the information is of the honeypot variety, and will lead to a knock on the door at an unreasonably early hour by some nondescript fellows with a subpoena.

Re:A better question (2, Insightful)

ciroknight (601098) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001054)

The problem is, if *any* of it is real, then we have a problem.

Especially recently with all of the banks coming out with information of their customers being comprimised.

That old saying... (1)

KerberosKing (801657) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000794)

Why buy the cow when you can have the milk for free? Phishers/Pharmers will still steal things rather than pay for them. Besides, like it says in the article, the illicit databases are compiled from data stolen by hackers, so it's just another layer in the cake of computer crime.

Re:That old saying... (1)

teksno (838560) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000823)

well why not steal it, use it, and sell it...you get what you want and you make a bit on the side to the inept phishers that haxor your mghz to get your info... thats what i do...er....would do... isnt that right jason mitchell, 5425 34th st apt 12105 san francisco ca 94014...

btw where are the soviet russia jokes... i read 9 posts when i posted this, and none of them started "in soviet russia..." i know people typicall dislike them here, but can you really think of a more approite story...

Re:That old saying... (3, Funny)

jrockway (229604) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000871)

Sorry to hear about your shift key.

Also, I like how you can't put a period after "St." but can end every sentence with ... three periods. You only need one! ;)

Re:That old saying... (2, Funny)

Deliveranc3 (629997) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001128)

Don't put, commas in your sentences.

That, you could say, brings on the grammar Nazis :P

Re:That old saying... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001137)

Sorry to burst your bubble, but the comma in his sentence is grammatically correct.

Re:That old saying... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001174)

You sir, are a dumbass cum laude. Please masturbate in your eyes so you go blind. Before that, kill your parents so that may never ever procreate again to bring an abomination like you into the world ever again. Please die. Thanks.

Re:That old saying... (1)

John_Renne (176151) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000851)

It's not only the idea that phising / pharming is free, the data just might be more accurate. I know from my own habbits I'm not too happy to provide personal information on websites where it's easy to be harvested. On the other hand if a piece of malware is distributing the info while I'm not aware of it, it just might be more accurate

Re:That old saying... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001236)

wasn't Layer Cake (er, i mean L4yer Cake) meant to be a pretty good film?
as for the id stuff, well there're plenty of big companies whose sole purpose is collection and selling-on of personal data, such as credit history, full name, address, telephone number, spending habits and so on.
This is the main reason i'm dead against the UK's proposed id cards. I simply don't trust whichever crappy company they award the contract to not to sell all my details to a bunch of criminals. And by criminals i mean real criminals i.e. aside from jokes about banks and other credit card issuers

Disinformation? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000795)

A massive flood of fake information would dilute the value of stolen i.d. right?

Re:Disinformation? (1)

Jackie_Chan_Fan (730745) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000832)

very good point, and perhaps a tactic in full effect

Re:Disinformation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000922)

A massive flood of fake information...

Hopefully, phishers will not think of using a new technology called a program that tries every input, including the good and bad. If they discover this technology, then your solution will not work.

Re:Disinformation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000952)

I have an infinite supply of bad data. Go ahead and test all you want.

Re:Disinformation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000992)

Your ability to generate bad data is resource constrained, not the least by bandwidth and CPU power. Further, your ability to generate convincing random data is dubious. (If you think you can generate random user information in infinite quantities, then please provide a proof or reference algorithm. I can guarantee that an attacker can come up with a probabilistic check that performs better than .5 ROC.)

So, at best, the chaffe data approach merely affects the rate at which good data is exploited by the criminals. Since their cost is zero (they're using compromised computers to perform the processing, by the way), this is hardly an effective strategy.

In Soviet Russia... (0)

TheStonepedo (885845) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000798)

information sells you!

Re:In Soviet Russia... (2, Funny)

smokeslikeapoet (598750) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000912)

NO, NO, NO, it's

In Soviet Russia you buy your own information.

Equifax [equifax.com]
Transunion [transunion.com]
Experian [experian.com]

Unless you consider once a year access acceptable. Your credit report free [annualcreditreport.com] . But that's only once a year.

Who's information is it anyway?

You need info (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000802)

you need your social, call me 555-5555

Re:You need info (0, Troll)

Tonik, the (748167) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001203)

My home phone number is 555-7733, and yes it's real. Moscow, Russia.

Few, oh so few slashdotters can figure out the country and city code so I'm not afraid of posting it here.

Re:You need info (1)

Hogwash McFly (678207) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001309)

That sounds like a challenge. You heard him boys, let the Arnold soundboarding commence!

What, /.? You don't like it? (4, Funny)

chocolatetrumpet (73058) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000806)

But, I thought information wants to be free?

MOD PARENT UP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000818)

One of the definitions of a business is an organization that can choose who gets the limited resources. Businesses want to keep their stuff private/limited when they want to just like individuals do.

Re:What, /.? You don't like it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000881)

Yeah... that's why we're pissed that someone's charging money for it!

- Yogix

Re:What, /.? You don't like it? (3, Interesting)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000905)

Yes. If this information were Free, at least we would be more aware of what was happening. And criminals wouldn't be getting paid for it. This way, the criminals and the people with money benefit.

I personally don't think I care if my and everyone else's "personal" information becomes public. I don't think there is anything extremely interesting about it. People already find out my phone number, email address, street address, bank account number, sometimes even credit card number, user name, real name, etc. etc. etc. as it is.

All that said, I don't think it's necessary to make all everything publicly accessible. It does open the door to more fraud (although it can also help catch fraudsters more easily!), spam, etc. So let's say that public information wants to be free, and private information wants to stay private?

Re:What, /.? You don't like it? (1)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001065)

Why can't we just use decent modificators? I declare some of my information public and only me and my children (yeah, right) can access it. Or I restrict usage to everyone in the same package as me.
Then again, importing biz.booksellers.amazon.* might unnecessarily bloat my package... but it's still better than declaring all of my information as public.

Re:What, /.? You don't like it? (1)

Sique (173459) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000909)

Yes... keep that in mind. Every information wants to be free. And if you compile a lot of information in a database, this information is likely to leak further. It's like herding sheep. Some of the sheep are bound to get lost eventually.

Re:What, /.? You don't like it? (1)

mstefanus (705346) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001010)

Well RTFA, its not free; you have to buy it.

Isn't it scary? (2, Interesting)

Quentusrex (866560) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000807)

Doesn't it scare all of you that this has been happening for so long already? I'm not saying there is much we can do about it, but it's still scary.

Now think about the databases the FBI and the airport security are keeping about you. Not only that but also the ones K-Mart, Wal-Mart, Target, Giant(foods), and other stores. It shouldn't be too hard to be you. Just find out your address, and jump on Google maps. Find the nearest stores to you. With your name and address find out your shopping history. And expand from there.

And you thought with all the political speech out there that you might actually be safe in the USA. I'll be happy being Anonymous, until I choose to be known.

Re:Isn't it scary? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000842)

You'll be happy being Anonymous? Why you go to the University of Washington in Seattle. You are into Aristotle, and 3D rendering on your computer. You have Comcast broadband. You've recently been thinking about a LISP/MPI cluster of Linux AMD machines.

It's more than just databases being stolen. Even I'm not anonymous in some log right now. It's how hard you dig.

Because as a wise person once said... (5, Funny)

truckaxle (883149) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000809)

Sell a man a phish he can scam for a day, but teach him how to phish and he can scam for himself for a lifetime.

Re:Because as a wise person once said... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001197)

Sell a man a phish he can scam for a day, but teach him how to phish and he can scam for himself for a lifetime.

Not bad. But I always preferred:

Build a man a fire, and he will be warm for a night. Set a man on fire, and he will be warm for the rest of his life...

Buy from gangster, get burnt (4, Interesting)

Willeh (768540) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000820)

Yeah right, and what's to say this information is actually valuable? TFA says that at least some of it is, but just like bulk email lists there's bound to be a lot of chaff in all of it, due to natural entropy of data, etc etc.

And it's not like these lists ever get refreshed much, so what you end up with is increasingly less useful data in these lists, and the vendors don't even care about it. It's just the nature of the beast (and the overall state of former Russia, where anything goes).

Re:Buy from gangster, get burnt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000857)

AFAIK, it's still Russia.

Re:Buy from gangster, get burnt (3, Interesting)

Peeteriz (821290) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000923)

The things you can buy in Moscow market are the real thing - Russian IRS database, with the income information as accurate as the authorites have it, the living addresses are the ones that the police use, etc.

If it says 'Tax returns 2003', then it really is the tax returns, as they were for 2003, complete with the ability to easily search for, say, addresses and family relationships of persons in your neighbourhood with more than 100,000$ income last year.

Re:Buy from gangster, get burnt (1)

KaptNKrunchy (876661) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001082)

On the other side of it though, the next time that the Kremlin wants to make someone vanish, and erase them completely from the public records, there will still be millions of copies of the original records floating around.

Re:Buy from gangster, get burnt (3, Funny)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001019)

...and the overall state of former Russia...

Dude! When did the revolution happen? I'd better go and update my little database here [cia.gov] .

Are you sure about your sig? ;-)

Re:Buy from gangster, get burnt (1)

Willeh (768540) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001063)

I'm afraid i'm gonna have to fine you some karma credits for using facts before 1pm on a thursday, on SLASHDOT not less.

Re:Buy from gangster, get burnt (1)

FidelCatsro (861135) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001268)

These Gangsters will defiantly sell you the real thing . If they sell you a fake then they will earn a reputation and lose a lot of business , and if they sell that false information to someone of equal criminal intent then they run a very high risk of a punishment beating or a hit.
Simple as that , so you can pretty much guarantee that they are selling genuine information , they are mostly selling it to people with equally dubious morals .
they're no small fry scam artists job nor grifters , these are major organised criminal syndicates

Another example of security through obscurity. (4, Insightful)

Behrooz (302401) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000822)

The question is, how much of this information is being sold in other countries, perhaps in a more sophisticated manner?

All of it, of course. Sooner or later we're going to have to get used to the idea that the concept of preserving privacy as a society disproportionately benefits individuals and groups with the resources to acquire and disseminate information regardless of the obstacles in their way.

It's too late to save privacy as most people currently envision it. What we need to be doing as a society is focus on transparency and equality-- ensuring that all parties in the social contract stand on an equal footing with regard to what information is publicly available. Secrecy is most dangerous when the powers that be insist that it be one-sided...

It's just going to get worse (4, Insightful)

The Slaughter (887603) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000824)

I think this has always been around, but with the proliferation of the digital era, it becomes easier to make a thousand copies of something.
Look at medical records, it used to take a few minutes while they looked for your chart. At the medical clinic I currently go to they can locate you instantly. When you go into the doctor's office, he has your information on-screen. If something like a patient's chart goes missing, there's physical evidence that it's gone. But if a computer is poorly secured, you may not ever realized it was compromised.
What really bothers me is who is purchasing this information. My medical records would be pretty harmless to most people, but what if a coworker with a grudge were to find out about a deadly allergy I have? There's always that scary potential you don't necessarily think about. What if a terrorist uses your identity to get into the country and commit nefarious deeds? Could you be imprisoned while they go free?

Re:It's just going to get worse (4, Insightful)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000945)

``What if a terrorist uses your identity to get into the country and commit nefarious deeds? Could you be imprisoned while they go free?''

With the current paranoia, definitely. It's better to be safe than sorry, so let's send back that plane that has someone on board who might be a terrorist (and, after all, anybody could be a terrorist), and let's keep these people safely locked up without a trial, until maybe someday we have some evidence against them, or perhaps for them.

Seriously. The principle that you're innocent until proven guilty is a healthy one. There's also a reason this has to be proven in front of a judge. These people are trained to be impartial, and to spot weaknesses in the argumentation and evidence on both sides. People in general are easily swayed, especially with media influence.

Now, to return to your issue about computers, that's a very good point, and highlights an important problem. People think computers don't make mistakes, and information that is stored there and backed up is safe. Both of these are pretty much correct. However, that does not mean that what comes out of a computer is correct in any sense. People still make mistakes when entering information, and I think we here all know how sad a state computer security is in.

Especially falsification of information from inside is a very real threat. In most applications I have seen, this leaves no traces unless you want it to. Very different from handwritten information, where it's easy to see that something was written by a different person, and investigation may even reveal who that person is. If not by the handwriting, then by the fingerprints.

Many of these fallbacks are simply not available in computer systems, and with computers being the backbone of virtually everything organized, I think we ought to be really concerned. And, I might add, the fact that most of these are running known faulty software and operated by non-computer-savvy people does not make it any better. Nor does the fact that the workings of said faulty software are hidden.

People can be bought, too (2, Insightful)

The Slaughter (887603) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000982)

You're right. There's definately cause for concern - there are now so many weak spots in the system. A lot of people with access to these important databases are making less than $10/hr. If you find the right person, $15,000 would get you whatever information or passwords you need - or worse, making changes in records or deleting information.
It happens too with corporate espionage. Somebody at the help desk might be convinced to hand over the CEO's email account password to a competitor. If I've got $15,000 and find the right person, can I get your name on a terrorist watch list?

Re:People can be bought, too (1)

slashdot-me (40891) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001274)

$15,000? That's a year's salary for your hypothetical guy making $10/hr. $500 would do the trick, probably less.

Re:People can be bought, too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001303)

its 22k thank you and yes I do have your password

not only in Russia (4, Insightful)

Mrs. Grundy (680212) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000827)

What is going on in Russia IS a little scary, but is it really any different that buying the same information from one the businesses operating in the US like choicepoint? The government and industry buys information from HUGE databases legally here in the united states, but for some reason people make it seem scarier when it is a Russian kiosk instead of an american corporation even though both exercise about the same amount of restraint and ethics concerning to whom they will sell information.

Re:not only in Russia (1)

skreeech (221390) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000968)

the american companies usually don't sell your information to burly men named boris and ivan who are planning to kick in your door and put guns to your house as they rob you. I find publishers clearing house sweepstakes and other junk mail to be a much smaller annoyance.

Re:not only in Russia (2, Insightful)

Blastrogath (579992) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001057)

the american companies usually don't sell your information to burly men named boris and ivan who are planning to kick in your door and put guns to your house as they rob you. I find publishers clearing house sweepstakes and other junk mail to be a much smaller annoyance.

"burly men named boris and ivan" can buy your information in the US, all they have to do is hire a lawyer to buy it for them via a corporation the lawer made. Americans are safe from widespread home invasion robberies because they have an efective police force and a country with a history of relitive domestic peace and tranquility.

Re:not only in Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001015)

But.. but... Russians are communists! /. must fight them!

greeting from mother russia (2, Funny)

CloudDrakken (582681) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000828)

I am curious with the wonder of when someone is think the contents will from mother russia be on the wikipedias,

I am in need of some friendshipful cashmonies

I'm not surprised (4, Insightful)

Underholdning (758194) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000839)

The rule of thumb is: Do not worry about the means of transport, but the destination.
In other words - don't worry if the encryption used to send the data is 128 bit or 1024. No one will bother try to sniff'n'hack it anyways. Worry about whom you're giving your info to. Sure - they may have cheap DVD's, but in order to sell you cheap goods, they must save money in other areas. Security is (sadly) one of the first things to go.

Re:I'm not surprised (1)

Peeteriz (821290) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000935)

You cannot not give your financial information to government tax authorities - if their databases get sold, as it is happening in Russia, it's not like you can choose an 'alternate provider'

not just Moscow (5, Interesting)

Ingvar77 (845346) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000840)

In every major Russian city you can obtain almost for free a database with phone numbers(including cell), addresses, car registry and pasports for all citizens of this city.
Even more, it's hard to find a PC in my own city that doesn't have a "Megapolice" database, which contains all above information accessible throught a single easy-to-use interface.

In Solviet Russia.... (1)

martian67 (892569) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000967)

Database maintains YOU!

In Soviet Russia.. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000853)

Market Sells You!

Everything has its price. (3, Funny)

Shag (3737) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000856)

The question is, how much of this information is being sold in other countries, perhaps in a more sophisticated manner?
The answer to that question is available... for a price. ;)

In soviet Russia... (2, Interesting)

bloblu (891170) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000864)

...at least corruption was organized. I'm afraid nowadays Russia is just a big mess. You can't expect anything else.

Anyway, I guess that these days you better have nothing to hide.

Re:In soviet Russia... (1)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001008)

Which raises another scary issue. Stolen personal data is not that much of an issue. But what's happening to all those nukes that the soviet union built? I assume they are taking care of them as best they can, but how well is that? What about the ones in other countries, where the president may not be as powerful as Putin? Or what about more remote parts of russia, where people are secretly carrying out their own schemes behind Putin's back?

Re:In soviet Russia... (2, Funny)

jacen_sunstrider (797955) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001037)

I completely thought the title of the parent was leading up into a "In Soviet Russia, information phishes you!

Trolling 101 (1)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001073)

In corporate America, certain organizations are corrupt.
In soviet Russia, corruption certainly was organized.

See, wasn't that easy?

Old News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000872)

Walk into any telemarketing office and you'll find people's information that has been bought. In the shadier ones, you'll find lead sheets with SS numbers, bank account numbers, credit card numbers, etc. Sure some of the people are "suckers" (term used to describe people who've bought from telemarketers before), but a lot of them are stolen from the internet.

Grammar? (3, Funny)

noidentity (188756) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000873)

Forget grammar just stick words together see like this isn't that easy

India (3, Informative)

romit_icarus (613431) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000880)

It's being sold in India. I've met "vendors" who do the round of direct marketing agencies peddling CDs for information. The last I checked, about a year ago, a data CD came for 10c/record...

With all this Phishing in the news... (3, Funny)

Tink2000 (524407) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000882)

I've given a lot of thought to the subject lately, and really, I've decided I don't care much. In fact, I honestly believe that anyone who stole my identity would after a quick perusal of what they've stolen feel guilty and probably credit me a couple of hundred bucks or so.

Hey, you can't steal what isn't there, and my credit is already wrecked beyond belief. You'd have to be a pretty desperate scammer to steal my identity.

At what point do we as humans learn? (1)

Jackie_Chan_Fan (730745) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000891)

Just curious when we'll actually stop bleeding our personal info to foreign nations?

How about security?

Its pretty scary when you realize we were once at war with Russia. Nuclear stand offs... spys... tight security....

Just how tight was that security?

It seems to me that either there never was security, or we're just getting so lazy about protecting ourselves.

The hellish nightmare that one must go through when having their info stolen... is too much of a burden on the victom. It is not right that we continue to hand over info to unknowns.

Offtopic ! (1)

Peeteriz (821290) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001088)

The article and the databases there are about the personal information of Russian residents (well, including Americans who live there), not some outsourcing mishap.

in soviet russia, ... (0, Redundant)

imess (805488) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000933)

i can already see this joke coming...

Miene Final Solution (3, Funny)

HyoImowano (761382) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000942)

Live in the woods in a shack, no computer, no TV, no stereo, just you, the chickens, the cows, your banjo, and Deliverance. Que creepy hillbilly guitar riff.

Re:Miene Final Solution (3, Funny)

Frodo Crockett (861942) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000951)

You forgot the sheep. It gets lonely out in the woods.

"Private Eye" CD (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13000948)

A few years ago in Israel a CDROM started circulating with information about more-or-less the entire population. The database was probably leaked from the Ministry of Interior. It was originally used by a private investigations firm but a copy leaked and started circulating freely.

IMHO, once it's out there it's everyone's civil duty to get a copy, just to level the playing field.

Buying Personal Info, U.S. Style (4, Interesting)

divide overflow (599608) | more than 9 years ago | (#13000984)


The easiest way to buy personal information here in the U.S. is to set up a fake company, then request the desired information from one of the major credit bureaus: Experian, Equifax, TransUnion, or ChoicePoint. Back in February ChoicePoint admitted to releasing the information on at least 145,000 consumers to fake companies [msn.com] .

What is unusual about this? (4, Interesting)

dan dan the dna man (461768) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001005)

In the UK I've had the ... pleasure (?) ... of knowing some exceedingly dodgy people with very good technical skills. This information has been available to criminals with the requistite amount of cash as long as hackers (sorry crackers) decided they could make a fast buck doing companies rather than pootling around insecure university networks.

Nothing new here and it certianly isn't limited to dodgy stalls in Moscow markets or corrupt outsourced callcentre employees.

In Soviet Russia... (0, Redundant)

Rastan_B2 (615088) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001030)

fish phish you!

Re:In Soviet Russia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001118)

OMG THAT IS SO FUNNY

Check out that slahdot site on that World Wide Web thing, I bet they'd just love that one.

Wow! So original and witty! Wow!

forget punctuation just use run-on sentences (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001033)

nt.

Forget Punctuation Just Write Run-On Sentences (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001045)

That's what the cool kids are doing, anyway.

I hate to disappoint you (3, Funny)

plaxion (98397) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001051)

...but there aren't enough moderation points available in the /. system to stave off the flow of bad "In Soviet Russia..." _AND_ "PROFIT!" jokes that are going to flood in from this one.

If you think you have a good one, please save someone a mod point by keeping it to yourself, because if it isn't already redundant, it soon will be.

This message brought to you by the Moderator Points Association of America (MPAA) *ducks*

--
I'm commenting on this story to prevent myself from burning moderator points on useless comments like this one ;)

Re:I hate to disappoint you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001153)

I was about to mod you up, but then that would probably dispappoint you.... ;)

personal data (1)

chrisranjana.com (630682) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001090)

That's really bad news for the security !

OMFG! Terrorists strike in London?? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001116)

Jesus. There has been an explosion in London Underground and there are reported of people being in critical condition.

The Iraqi terrorists srike back on UK soil???

Ransom Want Ads (2, Interesting)

Valacosa (863657) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001133)

Though this is only alluded to in the article, one of the greatest dangers is using information like this as an ransom hit-list. If you could abduct the kids of the ten richest people in Moscow, odds are at least one of them would pay up...

Things like that are depressingly common in some parts of the world.

Go Ahead... I'll sell it to you (1)

panth0r (722550) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001143)

After student loans and other such fiscal treasures, I'd be happy to sell my identity to one of these places that sells it to other people... so, where do I sign up?

in Soviet Russia ... (1)

constantnormal (512494) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001159)

... rope will hang you!

The Capitalists will sell us the rope with which we will hang them.
-- Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Off-topic but (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001175)

Off topic but important - bombings in London - so far 3 bus bombs and bombings in the tube reported.

Re:Off-topic but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001196)

Just goes to show how dubya and his british clone are winning the war on terror...how many more countries will get invaded this time?

Preparing the public for the invasion of Iran (1)

slashb0t (441845) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001205)

That's it. I won't be surprised when the investigation points towards Iranian terrorists...

Re:Off-topic but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001225)

Our thoughts and prayers are with you in this tragic hour.

Re:Off-topic but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001242)

It's been also said not to take the Eurostar at the moment.

"Multiple blasts paralyse London" (OT) (0, Offtopic)

nmg196 (184961) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001297)

Looks like there have been explosions at five London tube stations and on at least one bus:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4659093.stm [bbc.co.uk]

Well, I hope (3, Funny)

SimianOverlord (727643) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001256)

that they haven't scammed detail from places like say, the NYTimes subsriber database. "Mr A Butthole, Kansas" and "Phil McCrackin, Washington" might find unwanted junk mail winging their way towards them.

Obligatory "In Soviet Russia..." joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13001262)

IN SOVIET RUSSIA, PERSONAL INFORMATION BUYS YOU!

(Don't complain. If I didn't say it, someone else would. Seriously, its like a government regulation or something.)

Re:Obligatory "In Soviet Russia..." joke (2, Funny)

xerxesdaphat (767728) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001293)

Information just wants to be free!!!

Re:Obligatory "In Soviet Russia..." joke (1)

Aardpig (622459) | more than 9 years ago | (#13001301)

Don't complain. If I didn't say it, someone else would.

Yes, but they would have made it funny. Or even mildly humourous.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>