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Longhorn to Require Monitor-Based DRM

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the it's-everywhere-it's-everywhere dept.

Microsoft 1266

Mr_Silver writes "Engadget has an interesting article regarding a new feature in Longhorn entitled PVP-OPM (Protected Video Path - Output Protection Management) which detects the capabilities of the display devices you are using and manages how (and if at all) content is sent to it. In short, this means that if Longhorn detects that your monitor is not "secure" enough, then your premium video content won't play on it until you buy one that is. Who gets to decide? The content providers of course." From the article: "So what will happen when you try to play premium content on your incompatible monitor? If you're "lucky", the content will go through a resolution constrictor. The purpose of this constrictor is to down-sample high-resolution content to below a certain number of pixels. The newly down-sampled content is then blown back up to match the resolution of your monitor. This is much like when you shrink a JPEG and then zoom into it. Much of the clarity is lost. The result is a picture far fuzzier than it need be."

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1266 comments

Outstanding (5, Insightful)

panxerox (575545) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073336)

As we live in a capitalistic society this of course means the end of Microsoft as an os providor as people generally don't want to buy crap (tm). I mean who would "want" to buy this?! I hope Linux is ready for the desktop (at least for Joe SP) when this rolls out because this is THE chance for linux to explode into the market.

Re:Outstanding (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073369)

people generally don't want to buy crap (tm). I mean who would "want" to buy this?!

Anyone who doesn't care, which is going to be a lot of people. They'll buy a new PC, which will merely happen to come with this kind of restrictive DRM. But it'll come with an appropriate monitor too, so they'll never notice.

Re:Outstanding (1)

musikit (716987) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073379)

i don't agree... although i don't know why anyone would want this functionality on their monitor/computer i don't think it will end up being the end all thing that kills MS and brings linux in everyones face.

Re:Outstanding (4, Insightful)

SocialEngineer (673690) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073386)

The problem is, people won't KNOW what it is. They may see "DRM security features" or something like that, and think it is something that actually benefits them.

I know people who think MS products are the bees knees, just because of tech buzzwords and jargon. They'll buy Longhorn and wonder why it sucks - just like Windows XP, ME, 98..

bees knees? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073481)

Grandma???

I'd expect something like that from my grandma, but not on Slashdot.

Re:Outstanding (2, Insightful)

bombadillo (706765) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073387)

" I hope Linux is ready for the desktop (at least for Joe SP) when this rolls out because this is THE chance for linux to explode into the market.

May I introduce you to OSX. It even runs on cheap intel hardware......

Re:Outstanding (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073421)

Yeah, it runs like a cheap piece of shit too.

Maybe you are in the wrong thread? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073475)

We aren't talking about your mom! Besides, lighten up a little. She's in her late 50s, how well do you expect her to perform night after night? Cut her some slack!

Re:Outstanding (4, Insightful)

stienman (51024) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073468)

May I introduce you to OSX. It even runs on cheap intel hardware.

I doubt that. It could run on cheap intel hardware, but Apple will restrict to expensive Apple hardware, which consists of cheap Intel hardware.

-Adam

Re:Outstanding (2, Funny)

Trigun (685027) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073450)

The same people who don't know that Macs still exist, that they have choice.

Just wait until the monitor companies start doing reverse checks to see if your computer is 'secure' enough, that your video card drivers are 'secure' enough, that your OS is 'secure' enough.

Then wait for the golden age of technology to crumble, us lower class citizens cast into the darkness of ignorance.

It's time to buy our own fucking island boys. Start printing passports, kiss your loved ones good-bye. Leave the sick and infirmed at home, let them deal with the mess. Just bring enough gear to hold lan parties, and enough guns to hold the corporations at bay.

Re:Outstanding (1)

IDontAgreeWithYou (829067) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073523)

Not only is this not THE chance for linux. It's not even a small opening. Most people don't care about DRM. Even people that do care about DRM probably don't care enough to switch their operating system.

Illegal to watch movies on Linux (5, Interesting)

Digital_Quartz (75366) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073530)

Do you honestly think it will be possible to purchase and watch content on a linux machine? Do you think the movie industry is going to give you something playable on your un-DRMed box? You might pirate it.

Of course, we all know that making bits not copyable is like making water not wet. But I think you underestimate the MPAA's lobbying capabilities. I fully expect it to be illegal to posses or discuss wet water any day now.

first post (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073339)

first post

WTF IS WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073342)

Mr Hands [threa.tv] has died today [nwsource.com] and all you can talk about is DRM? Get some priorities, people!

*sigh* (2, Insightful)

keesh (202812) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073347)

As ever, this won't stop anyone serious about circumventing DRM, and will only fuck over the innocent. Do they never learn?

Re:*sigh* (4, Insightful)

PepeGSay (847429) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073382)

Well... the lock on your front door isn't to keep determined criminals out. It is there to keep the average Joe from just walking in on a whim and stealing your stuff. This is the same philosophy as a lot of security mechanisms, and I don't think DRM is much different.

Re:*sigh* (3, Insightful)

Hungry Student (799493) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073495)

But the "average Joe" wouldn't walk in and steal your stuff.

Keeping an honest person honest is like keeping a tall person tall. The DRM may as well not be on there in the first place. The "honest" folk will do with their content what they would anyway, just as the DRM would allow them to (i.e. not distribute it on a large scale) , and the determined users will crack the DRM and do whatever they want with the content.

This stuff is so basic, why invest time and money in an inherently flawed system when they could *gasp* be pushing the frontiers of technology and inventing some truly useful stuff for us users.

Re:*sigh* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073454)

What makes you think your monitor will display high resolution images at all unless they are DRM encumbered? You won't be able to avoid it by using Linux because anything not DRM protected will be limited to 800x600 with intentional degredation.

Re:*sigh* (1)

RingDev (879105) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073526)

It's kinda like locking the doors on your car. It'll keep the kids from grabbing your smokes off the dash board, but it won't keep a theif from steeling your car. This is the same case, the "innocents" as you put it, arn't actually innocent, they just aren't car theives (or mass-reprodruction rings producing large quantities of copyright infringing materials).

The thing to watch out for is how "secure" is defined and how easy it is to become/remain secure.

I think DRMs are a great idea, as long as they work with the system I have, and I can still do everything I want with my purchased material. If I can download a song, burn it to a CD, copy it to my MP3 Player, and pipe it to my home entertainment system, I'm happy. If the DRM does not allow me to do that, then I am not happy and will not buy the content.

-Rick

ummmm (1)

TheScottishGuy (701141) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073350)

ok, now most security measures i can at least objectively see where they're coming from, but what is this supposed to gain for anyone?

Re:ummmm (2, Insightful)

DrSkwid (118965) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073431)

If you need a certified monitor then you can't play your premium content out to an monitor emulator for recording the video signal to rip content to strip the DRM.

Kind of like how now I can play my DRM'd music through my lineout and record it on line-in in any format I choose.

It will be like DeCSS all over again but this time instead of DVD players it will be monitors.

in related news (5, Funny)

Glog (303500) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073352)

Microsoft is considering the acquisition of an ASCII art company.

YESSSS (5, Funny)

KDan (90353) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073357)

This is just the feature I've been waiting for. I wouldn't dream of buying a monitor without this priceless capability.

Daniel

Nothing for you to see here, please move along.... (2, Funny)

reality-bytes (119275) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073360)


Its interesting to see that Microsoft and DRM technology providers are now taking a leaf out of Slashdot's book.

Re:Nothing for you to see here, please move along. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073456)

Nice ;-) thanks for that subtle chuckle!

Not for me. (1)

AltGrendel (175092) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073361)

I'll be sticking with Win2k, thank you very much.

Support or no support, I don't care.

Re:Not for me. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073423)

And I'll be sticking with Linux. I'd love to see this sort of atrocity happen with OSS.

Ours, all ours! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073362)

My Computer -> Computer

My Documents -> Documents

My Monitor -> Our Monitor!

Seriously, who didn't see this coming?

No Worries (1, Funny)

Rolan (20257) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073363)

By the time Longhorn is ready to ship, we won't be using monitors. The images will be beamed directly into our brains!

Re:No Worries (1)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073492)

By the time Longhorn is ready to ship, we won't be using monitors. The images will be beamed directly into our brains!

This just in from Microsoft. Apparently "your brain" will no longer be considered a DRM secure device. Be aware that any attempts to use "your brain" will be dealt with via a 3 second, 25KW shock to "your brain". Please prevent piracy and cease using "your brain" immediately!

extreme case of DRM (4, Interesting)

PureCreditor (300490) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073368)

isn't this a case of indirect industrial price-fixing? by forcing you to buy a DRM-enabled monitor, they can easily collude and charge a, say, 20% premium, over a standard LCD.

Another reason why Tiger and Leopard makes Longhorn look long-in-the-tooth ^^

Re:extreme case of DRM (1)

phoenix42 (263805) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073393)

Yeah, screw paying a premium for PC components. I might as well pay a premium for better made Apple components.

Re:extreme case of DRM (3, Insightful)

afd8856 (700296) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073502)

Are you talking about the same Apple for which playing full screen video is an extra feature that needs to be paid for?

Re:extreme case of DRM (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073457)

You are, of course, assuming that Apple has no similar plans.

Re:extreme case of DRM (1)

RickHunter (103108) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073498)

All DRM is a case of direct industrial price-fixing. It's primary purpose is to eliminate competition - both from unauthorized copying and from other hardware manufacturers.

Not an issue... (1)

symbolic (11752) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073371)


Let the industry keep tightening the rope that will eventually hang it. I'm will not even *consider* using a system, or purchasing anything that relies on DRM- especially from Microsoft and *AA. Ultimately, the most secure DRM in the world won't mean squat if nobody supports the products that use it. Boot that, Microsoft.

I'm cynical.. (1, Insightful)

helioquake (841463) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073372)

It doesn't matter. Dumb people would still buy Longhorn anyway.

Or maybe would it finally pursuade people to migrate onto Mac? (I don't dare to say "linux" yet).

Re:I'm cynical.. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073430)

you realize that apple runs even more proprietary hardware than wintel pc's?

The Solution without a Problem... (3, Insightful)

mythosaz (572040) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073376)

The problem is not things that *CAN* operate with a wide variety of DRM option. The abilty to support DRM isn't a problem at all.

The solution, as always, is simple. Vote with your wallet for either (a) DRM solutions that make sense, or (b) for solutions that don't take advantage of the richly enabled DRM fabic available to content producers.

If I produce content, I should be able to decide what's done with it (for a reasonable time, anyway). If I want it to be one-peek-per-customer, that's my right, it's my content.

You...just shouldn't be stupid as to buy it :)

Sorry, you've been outvoted by the sheeple. (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073490)

Vote with your wallet for either (a) DRM solutions that make sense, or (b) for solutions that don't take advantage of the richly enabled DRM fabic available to content producers.

Sorry, you've been outvoted by the apathetic masses who do what the TV tells them to do. DVD Video DRM doesn't make sense (region lockout; UOP segments that last longer than 30 seconds), and well over 90 percent of DVD Video titles use DVD Video DRM.

If I produce content, I should be able to decide what's done with it (for a reasonable time, anyway).

And why is 95 years (for a work made for hire) reasonable?

Oh yeah, I can't wait to pay for a fuzzy picture! (2, Funny)

rben (542324) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073383)

Another brilliant bit of marketing!

TV-out (2, Insightful)

Locarius (798304) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073385)

Say goodbye to sending a signal to your livingroom TV, LH users.

Re:TV-out (1)

Dr. Evil (3501) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073458)

I think the idea is to have your livingroom flatpanel HD TV support this so that it just doesn't matter.

AWESOME! (2, Funny)

Jerf (17166) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073389)

Wow, I wasn't thinking of buying LongHorn. I mean, all those features they tore out was really kind of a bummer.

But dayamn, I have to have that feature!

Nice to see Microsoft finally give me a positive reason to buy LongHorn. Now I can't wait for LongHorn!

Can Microsoft innovate or what?

What?! (1)

Shky (703024) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073390)

I, for one, am shocked that Microsoft would build in DRM. I mean, what kind of world are we living in where corporations control our media? Oh wait, Earth.

Choices (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073394)

Guys, I don't think you really understand the "choices" being offered.

Company's who wish to provide Hi-Def content to PCs won't want to do it if it gets stolen/copied easily. With a secure copy-protection mechanism, far more companies will be willing to offer content.

This will create a large marketplace with lots of competition because it won't be just the big companies that can swallow the piracy loss entering the market.

So your choice isn't really between viewing this hi-def content as you wish or viewing it on a secure setup. It's a choice between content or no content.

Wouldn't you rather have at least the option of content that you wouldn't normally have?

So please, stop crying that Microsoft is out to get you and that they're infringing on some rights you think you have. Since when did the consumer of a service have the right to dictate how the company in question provides the service? You either use the service, or you don't... if it sucks and nobody uses it, the company will change the service or go out of business. Simple as that.

Microsoft will be creating MORE opportunities for services and products that can't really exist without their technology.

Re:Choices (1)

The Warlock (701535) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073491)

Yeah, exactly. I mean, just look at how normal TV broadcasting just completely folded up when the VCR was produced. Oh, wait, it didn't, and they kept producing content even though they didn't get the DRM they wanted.

Feature? (1)

Lord Byron II (671689) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073395)

Two things: 1. This is not a feature. A feature is something that increases the functionality of software. 2. Features are not good things. I would much rather have feature-less software that was bug-free than buggy software with the latest bells and whistles.

In soviet russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073399)

monitor monitors YOU!

Saving Grace Period (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073404)

Does Longhorn do away with "Save", and especially "Save As..." features? That's the end-run, around our using our own computers to work with our own info, that I've been waiting for Microsoft to "innovate" for a decade. Since Windows 95, with Gates actually putting "My Computer" stamps on our computers, I've been expecting to have to call Redmond to get permission to keep anything for "myself".

Yet another reason (1)

elgee (308600) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073411)

To never upgrade to Longhorn. Put that Longhorn where the sun don't shine, Mr. Bill.

Simple solution (2, Insightful)

hrieke (126185) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073414)

Don't buy the content that requires this.
Create your own content and sell it to others that with no restrictions.

So Who here has a capture card for analog RGBHV? (1)

mikejz84 (771717) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073416)

Why do I have a feeling no one here was a capture card that could capture a monitors signal at a high resolution (and if you do I bet it costs thousands...)

Maybe if they'd have spent their time wisely.... (2, Insightful)

CygnusXII (324675) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073422)

This is just wonderfull. Just think instead of finishing most of the features, that were to be included in the newest Windows family member, they (MS) decided to integrate DRM, in lie of the file system, and all the other features that were pushed out, or for inclusion much later in the products dev cycle. Well, I know I am not going to partake of the latest offering from Redmond now. I wonder how much Macrovision is getting to cross license this sceme?

Times change (1)

Talsin (164230) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073424)

Nothing remains the same, evrything changes and so should the content providers. This will only effect the 99.99% of people that legally buy the "premium content", and dont understand why it looks like shit on their screen. As for the other .01% the hack or workaround will only be a google away, and they will happily watch their pirated version.

Jesus wept! These people make my head hurt.

Time for Upgrades (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073428)

What will probably happen is that lots of people will be required to buy new computers anyway. Imagine if games used this technology to prevent screen shots (not likely unless the computer is more than powerful enough). People will go into stores complaining that their Blue-Ray disc doesn't play. The sales person will tell them that they need a new computer/graphics card/monitor and that is what they will get. People expect that each new version of Microsoft's OS will require new hardware. Win2k on a Pentinum, XP on something less than a highend Pentium III? No, new computer. And guess what it comes with the operating system.

Will it stop a semi-serious pirate? (4, Interesting)

gunner800 (142959) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073434)

I doubt they have monitors or video cards that can detect, say, a simple splitter or repeater. It's the sort of thing a third-year EE student can build (fourth year for digital signals).

It will stop some casual piracy, you know, the kind companies and congressmen say they don't care about. Mostly it will get Microsoft a piece of the monitor market without the need to develop useful features or compete on price.

Why the monitor? (1)

3terrabyte (693824) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073436)

I guess I don't understand the point of having monitor output being regulated:

"Protected Video Path - Output Protection Management (PVP-OPM) makes sure that the PC's video outputs have the required protection or that they are turned off if such protection is not available."

This one, however, does make sense to me:

" Protected Video Path - User-Accessible Bus (PVP-UAB) provides encryption of premium content as it passes over the PCI Express (PCIe) bus to the graphics adapter. This is required when the content owner's policy regards the PCIe bus as a user-accessible bus."

I would think this one is a little more important in stopping piracy.

Re:Why the monitor? (1)

Engineering_bully (900092) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073532)

While encryption at this point makes some sense, doesn't that mean the video card will need to decrypt the data stream at some point?

What about when (not if) the encryption gets broken? Better get ready to flash your video card bios! Or worse, in addition to forced OS upgrades, now you'll have forced video card upgrades every 3-months (if I were a vido card manuf. that doesn't seem so bad now, does it?)

- Adam

WTF? (2, Insightful)

The Lynxpro (657990) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073437)

So, let me get this straight. If I so chose to upgrade to Longhorn, I'd have to buy a whole new videocard and monitor to actually view the OS and any other programs tailor written for it? I am not aware of any videocards that currently offer DVI ports that actually also have HDCP standard (although I could definitely be wrong). Does this mean we'll all have to upgrade to videocards with HDMI ports built in?

I think this is pure idiocy. And people thought Apple moving to Intel based processors because of built-in DRM was a step over the edge...

just perfect (1)

zeridon (846747) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073439)

What more to say ... Give the masess food and entertainment but to be sure they get it right you will have to spend a xxx gazillions of bucks for the really needed hardware so you can fully enjoy it.

god helps us with such ideas. I am not retard to burn my monitor on purpose but i want the chance to do it. //sidetrack: What will be MS excuse for that "Protection".

Microsoft making a spectacle of us. (3, Insightful)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073441)

Why don't they just cut to the chase and produce DRM-enabled eyeglasses for us to wear? They just turn opaque if we are viewing content we are not licensed to see. Package these with earplugs that keep out illegal MP3 sounds and the mouth-cork that prevents us from repeating privileged information. I, for one, welcome our "Tommy's Holiday Camp" overlords. It will give us time to hone our pinball skills.

"we're not gonna take it. da da da da da-da da. we're not gonna take it da da da da da-da da"

Capitalism at it's best (1)

NotFamous (827147) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073443)

Thanks to this maneuver, to see the Way Cool Show people will need to:

  • Buy a new monitor
  • Buy a new OS
  • Buy premium content (probably not a free show)
  • Because the new OS is such a hog, they get to buy a new computer!

WOW!

This is a joke... right? (1)

KD5YPT (714783) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073445)

If they seriously think they could get away with this... they're wrong.

Those anti-trust people are going to start coming out of the woodwork and resume bashing Microsoft's head in.

This is a reason to buy Longhorn!? (4, Insightful)

Maul (83993) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073464)

So, of the major features that were originally supposed to be the selling point in Longhorn...

WinFS pretty much seems indefinately stalled.

Avalon seems to be delayed until after release.

The new shell will not be available until the Server release.

But the crippling DRM feature that requires me to have an MPAA approved monitor to get "premium" video quality is right on schedule.

Hard to believe (2, Interesting)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073466)

The vast majority of the time, discussion of DRM on /. falls into the "nobody really cares except for the /. nerds". But this... I know everyone here hates Microsoft, but it's hard to believe they won't end up backing down on this. This is the sort of thing Joe Consumer will raise holy h*ll about, the first time it happens.

I know it's not "just Microsoft", but really - Microsoft can't afford to have the bad press this will generate.

Digging their own grave... (2, Informative)

Hexydes (705837) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073470)

The more Microsoft makes "solutions" that cater to the computer industry, at the expense of limiting end-users' choices and flexibility, the closer they are to losing the base that provides their income.

Bad news for Microsoft, good news for other operating systems [skyos.org].

Another PITA for legitimate people (1)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073473)

99.99% of people out there never rip content. As these measures usually do, they inconvenience them by requiring them to buy more costly monitors or risk degradation and not allowing legit use. But all it takes is ONE person with the requisite special equipment or a degree in EE to break the DRM once and the copy is out on net for ALL to download. They should give it up already.

wow (1)

illtron (722358) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073476)

This is the dumbest thing I will read all day. I'm sure everybody will really rush out to buy Longhorn now. Not that they were planning to before.

The next logical step... (2, Funny)

b06r011 (763282) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073478)

what a frustrating concept. so now content is "protected" all the way to the screen... what are they gonna do next... make you erase your memory of an event if you don't keep sending them royalty cheques?

"i'm sorry sir, you can't afford to remember that movie now... i know you paid to see it at the cinema, what right does that give you to remember it now? you only paid to see it once. after all you are still enjoying the memory of it - you must pay the actors and writers or else they will starve..."

DRMed to death (2, Insightful)

Digital_Quartz (75366) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073479)

IMHO, this is another example of the industry shooting itself in the foot, only moreso than they previously have.

It's one thing when joe-consumer downloads a song from the Microsoft music store, and can't copy it to his iPod. It's one thing when joe-consumer buys a DVD, and has a hard time making a VHS copy because his kids keep scratching the crap out her DVDs. Both of these things the average consumer accepts will not work, because consumers are used to different technologies not playing nicely together. They don't know about DRM, but they do know that they could never get those photos aunt Kathy sent to print on their printer, and figure this is more of the same.

If Morgan Freeman has his way, though, and movies are delivered to our homes by internet, consumers will be calling tech support in droves; "I can't watch my movie? What's wrong?" And those consumers will not be happy when they're told the 19" LCD monitor they bought two years ago needs to be replaced. Consumers DO expect to be able to watch a movie they download.

I think, ultimately, this is a nail in the coffin of the unborn movies-by-internet industry, which is a shame.

This is the reason (1)

fallen1 (230220) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073480)

that no one in their right minds would ever adopt Longhorn. All it will take is word of mouth from the technically inclined explaining to the general public that this is BAD. That this is only one example of how Microsoft and the "content providers" want to be able to CONTROL what you can and cannot do with the computer/monitor that YOU paid YOUR hard-earned money for. Microsoft damn sure didn't pay for your computer, **AA damn sure didn't pay for your computer, and no one else paid for it either! YOU paid for your computer system and YOU should be in control of what "content" you view on it, how you view it, and what you do with that content (except, of course, for selling copyrighted material for profit) INCLUDING the ability to time-shift, format-shift, and any other damn shift you wish. Under no cicrumstances should Microsoft be the arbiter of what a person can view, at what resolution, how they can view it, or any thing else. Until Microsoft buys a computer for me then _I_ decide the hows, whys, and wherefors of material on my computer.

As a group, Slashdot should rise up and vehemently oppose this in public. Start talking to local newspapers, friends, neighbors, and anyone else and explain in easily understood terms that this is an invasion of your person and private property and that it is BAD, BAD, BAAAAAAD. Do no support it.

We support longhorn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073483)

-- Hollywood Film makers and Companies selling information which can be copied with 0 cost, at very high prices to masses of millions of idiots.

Just A Little more (1)

KingBahamut (615285) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073484)

Big Brother control please. The more I hear these sorts of things, the more I fear we are getting closer and closer to "1984". Though Im sure that Orwell never intended for it to be this bad.
Perhaps we are much closer to the Thought Criminal Winston.......sigh

Dirty Business (1)

mfloy (899187) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073486)

This seems like a way people going to promote certain types of monitors by providing video. For example, a very popular video site might be payed by a monitor company so that only there type of monitor is deamed suitable enough, thereby making the millions of site users want to switch monitors.

retards! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073488)

what kind of fucking perverted retardedness is this?????

Sometimes ms sucks (1)

chrisnewbie (708349) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073494)

Doesnt this go against liberty of choice or somehting!
I mean whatever i want to load on my Windows is my choice and i should be able to run it at the resolution i want without some company telling me i cant run this a hign res because it may damage something.
If i want to destroy my computer it's my choice!

Audio DRM (3, Insightful)

jason718 (634659) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073496)

How long until we see something similar with audio? "Users without an appropriately DRM-equipped soundcard will hear down-sampled audio played back through the Windows PC Speaker driver"

Vote With Your Wallet! (2, Insightful)

jpsowin (325530) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073500)

The beauty of capitalism is that bad ideas usually die. The consumers dictate whether they will accept this by purchasing or not purchasing it.

Unfortunately, there is such a thing as marketers who create markets where there is none and desire where there should be none. If MS markets this correctly, people will want to give up their freedom.

M$ getting crazier (1)

onlyjoking (536550) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073506)

Each time M$ announces a new idea it seems to get crazier and crazier. Go ahead M$, make my day. This is sure to put the nail in the coffin of M$'s desktop monopoly. Now, let's just pray that Linux and Apple are smart enough to capitalise on Billy G.'s blunders.

What's the betting... (1)

daern (526012) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073508)

...that when Longhorn is released, this scary feature doesn't work anything like this article said and (gasp! shock! horror!) slashdot editors are yet again posting up articles which seek to stir up anti-Microsoft sentiment...not that that's a difficult thing on slashdot ;-)

Can you really see Microsoft telling the world - "hey, your DVI TFTs are all obsolete now" - when one of Microsoft's real strengths is the backwards compatibility of the Windows platform. From a purely commercial point of view, that's not likely, is it?

Daern

RTA: It's not just Microsoft (4, Informative)

Call Me Black Cloud (616282) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073509)


From the article:
To be fair - it's not just Microsoft. The next generation of digital content will, by and large, be protected to the display. Recently Toshiba released their HD-DVD specifications and have dictated HDMI/HDCP as a display requirement for playing back high-definition content. Most expect Blu-ray to have similar restrictions.
You don't think Apple is going to do this too? What will happen with Linux though? With Linux making inroads into set top boxes there will be some solution for Linux, though I don't think it will make its way to the desktop (legally).

Just another good reason... (1)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073514)

Just another good reason not to buy Longhorn. Microsoft just keeps adding to the list.

Of course, now with product activation on XP, MS can shut off sales of it at any time simply by refusing to activate new copies.

So how do we stop this freight train? Everyone stay with Win98SE?

Well.. (4, Interesting)

Solr_Flare (844465) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073516)

When DRM requires the purchase of new hardware just for things to work like they used to, then thats when it is going to turn off even the clueless consumer who normally wouldn't care. When it starts biting into people's wallets they always stand up and take notice.

In my case, if my monitor is not "secure" enough, finding a replacement might not be so easy. My monitor is an older CRT that presents a very high quality picture. I use this because I dislike the ghosting and viewing angle issues that, while much improved from how they used to be, are still present in LCD monitors.

The problem is that it is hard to find a decently priced, truly good CRT anymore because most of the industry is switching over to flat panel production. They literally don't make them like they used to anymore.

I'm guessing that this technology is just geared towards people using video outs to TVs and Tivo like devices, but I really don't like the idea of being potentially forced to buy a new monitor just for an operating system. That is pretty rediculous.

this just in... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13073522)

my next computer, while it may be capable of running Longhorn, will instead be running Mac OS X. Apple has not yet become the whiney bitch that microsoft is on issues like this, and therefore will get my support in the future.

Hm... third party bypasser... (2, Interesting)

KD5YPT (714783) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073524)

I could just imagine someone created a sort of blackbox that fools the PC into thinking that the monitor is opium (OPM) compatible. Connection would be something like this.

PC BlackBox Monitor

PC asks BlackBox - "Are you on opium?"
BlackBox reply - "Sure am, dude."
PC gives BlackBox on-restricted content.
BlackBox gives Monitor onrestricted content.

Hm...
1. Microsoft shell out Longhorn.
2. Foreign country (*cough*TaiwanChinaKorea*cough*) produces BlackBoxes(tm).
3. Opium bypassed.
4. ???? (maybe laugh in their face)
5. PROFIT (for foreign countries).

Question is.. (1)

SocialEngineer (673690) | more than 8 years ago | (#13073529)

How will this affect media center PCs? I know a number of people who are still too poor to afford anything other than VGA-to-TV adapters when playing with this sort of thing.. By then the tech should be cheaper, but still.
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