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Full Debian ARM for Under $200

timothy posted about 9 years ago | from the neato-keen dept.

Hardware Hacking 233

An anonymous reader writes "With minor elbow grease, you can now set yourself up with a complete Debian ARM Linux box for under $200. This is thanks to Peter Korsgaard, who figured out a cool byteswapped kernel hack for the little $99 Linksys NSLU2. Add a $99 USB harddrive, and the tiny, cute, quiet 'Slug' can run any of about 16,000 Debian ARM packages, 24x7, for pennies per month worth of electricity, since ARM is still orders of magnitude more power-efficient than anything x86. Serve files, music, web pages, printers, backups, kernel images, webcams/motion detection, firewalls/routers, wireless access point... or whatever. Oh, did I mention you can overclock the Slug?"

cancel ×

233 comments

But (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13118756)

Does it play ogg?

Re:But (1)

Joey Patterson (547891) | about 9 years ago | (#13118903)

Does it play ogg?

NO!

Stereo component (3, Insightful)

Doc Ruby (173196) | about 9 years ago | (#13118777)

Where's the $100 ARM device for Debian that includes ethernet and stereo audio out (headphones/speakers)? Even used PocketPCs cost $100, plus $50-100 for PCMCIA ethernet/sleeve.

Re:Stereo component (2, Informative)

anthonyclark (17109) | about 9 years ago | (#13118795)

usb audio for $30-$50?

Re:Stereo component (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | about 9 years ago | (#13118876)

Are you suggesting a USB soundcard, on an i386 desktop? The desktop has a cost, of course. And it sucks power, and can't fail over to battery. But worst of all is the fan noise, and it's kinda big & ugly next to the rest of the stereo.

I want a dinky little device that sucks little juice, set to play a single stream from a Shoutcast server across my ethernet. The server I can put in the closet, and set with playlists, or a cheap old wireless PalmPilot I've got, hitting the server's playlists webpage with a VNC client.

Re:Stereo component (4, Informative)

dartboard (23261) | about 9 years ago | (#13118904)

http://www.slimdevices.com/ [slimdevices.com]

get of their older devices for cheap on ebay, they rock. i've got 5 of them scattered throughout my house (3 different models, all running off the same server software on my debian box).

Re:Stereo component (2, Informative)

geekylinuxkid (831805) | about 9 years ago | (#13118918)

but this device doesn't support the 10/100 ethernet card yet... The device has 32MB of SDRAM, 8MB of NOR Flash, built-in 10/100 (not yet supported in litte-endian mode), and dual USB 2.0 ports. so... i guess add another $30 for a USB 10/100 Adapter.

Re:Stereo component (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13119098)

It's called an apple airport express. Bloody marvelous device. It's 802.11g, connects to your wireless LAN, plugs into hifi via optical or phono plugs, and you tell itunes to play to it.

I'm not an apple fan, and I personally think OS X is grossly overrated, and very irritating in how dumbed down the gui is, but this one function is something I've been after for a number of years.

Arm? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13118781)

I want a Fedora Leg!!!!

So... the question on everyone's mind is... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13118784)

Does it run Li...Oh, right... ^_^

It may have... (2, Funny)

zegebbers (751020) | about 9 years ago | (#13118786)

ARM but does it have a HURD?

(sorry)

Re:It may have... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13118984)

If you posted it anonymously, you wouldn't need to feel sorry

Already hacked (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13118809)

The Linksys NSLU2 has already been hacked [tomsnetworking.com] so you can run your own applications on it. :-)

Re:Already hacked (3, Informative)

jaylee7877 (665673) | about 9 years ago | (#13118887)

Yes but having it run Debian opens up a huge number of precompiled applicatons to the NSLU2.

Re:Already hacked (1)

damiangerous (218679) | about 9 years ago | (#13118950)

Sure, and that was a great hack then. But this is much better. Now you can have a completely standard Debian ARM distro with all the packages available to it.

Re:Already hacked (1)

pyrrhonist (701154) | about 9 years ago | (#13119373)

But this is much better. Now you can have a completely standard Debian ARM distro with all the packages available to it.

The Debian installation requires a serial port modification, though.
Unslung does not, so people that aren't hardware inclined can easily install it.

Re:Already hacked - Linux Appliance (1, Interesting)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | about 9 years ago | (#13119028)

The Linksys NSLU2 has already been hacked so you can run your own applications on it.

So why doesn't Linksys admit the obvious and start selling a Linux Appliance sans WiFi hardware? They could increase volume, lower costs, and expand into a new area.

Re:Already hacked - Linux Appliance (2, Informative)

CaptainStormfield (444795) | about 9 years ago | (#13119148)

RTFA. The NSLU has nothing to do with WIFI. Its a NAS device.

Linux Sucks! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13118818)

Oh, did I mention, Linux sucks ass?

I mean, come on, there's no excuse with BSD and OSX around. Even with Windows being as stable and secure as it is now.

Linux is the second most breached OS in the world.

http://www.mi2g.com/cgi/mi2g/press/021104.php [mi2g.com]

Re:Linux Sucks! (3, Insightful)

kaldek (901414) | about 9 years ago | (#13118901)

Let's just do a search and replace on your post here...

Oh, did I mention, VHS sucks ass? I mean, come on, there's no excuse with Beta around.

Guess who lost that one! Just because it's the best techology, doesn't mean it's going to get used.

Re:Linux Sucks! (2, Informative)

superpulpsicle (533373) | about 9 years ago | (#13118907)

It's not our fault you prefer the never-changing BSD and the 1-button MAC mouse. With the second highest install base in the world, you're bound to get breached.

Linux Sucks!-Backdoor OS. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13119060)

"With the second highest install base in the world, you're bound to get breached."

Goatse/OS

MAC (1)

green pizza (159161) | about 9 years ago | (#13119187)

It's not our fault you prefer the never-changing BSD and the 1-button MAC mouse.

Weird, my MAC [wikipedia.org] didn't even come with a mouse.

Oh, you mean my Macintosh? I don't use the bundled mouse, nor do I use the mouse that came with my Dell at work. Instead I use a pair of Logitech MX-1000 mice [logitech.com] .

Re:Linux Sucks! (1)

corvair2k1 (658439) | about 9 years ago | (#13119206)

Mac and Linux have approximately the same desktop share... The trend is generally around 3%, with Linux slightly ahead.

w3school stats, highly unscientific [w3schools.com]

And, as a recent OSX switcher, you really don't miss the second mouse button... AppleKey + Click works, and it doesn't inconvenience me.

*has just spent three wonderful weeks discovering his new powerbook*

Re:Linux Sucks! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13119325)

hehe, indeed.
OSX on Powerbook is absolutely beautiful.

Re:Linux Sucks! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13119153)

from: http://books.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=05/07/20/ 0511247&tid=160 [slashdot.org]
"Hacking sounds crass. It manifests images of short cuts, jobs poorly done and people most interested in just finishing, no matter what."

Lol!
Is it just me, or does that perfectly describe Linux?

Re:Linux Sucks! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13119204)

from: http://books.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=05/07/20/ [slashdot.org] 0511247&tid=160
"Hacking sounds crass. It manifests images of short cuts, jobs poorly done and people most interested in just finishing, no matter what."

Lol!
Is it just me, or does that perfectly describe Linux?


It's just you. Linux devs love what they do. You'll have to look to commercial OSes if you want to see clock punchers pushing out s*** to meet an unreaslistic schedule.

ps: wrong article.

Practically useless (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13118821)

ARM is the hardware equivelent of a turing tarpit. Only a RiscOS fan would be insipid enough to think this was a good idea.

Next!

Re:Practically useless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13118890)

how's the parent flamebait? he's 100% right. this opinion is widely held, especially by hardcore embedded developers. the arm backlash is coming hard and fast, trust me. are slashdot mods completely ignorant of the state and current trends in the embedded market?

Re:Practically useless (3, Funny)

mikefe (98074) | about 9 years ago | (#13118995)

In a word...

Yes!

And so am I. Please enlighten us as to why people hate ARM now.

Re:Practically useless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13119275)

It's not that people hate ARM, it's that these ARM devices are as powerful and expensive as desktop PCs were in 98 and it's dawning on many of the engineers who are tasked with creating them that this "platform" is not the panacea it was supposed to be. People used to play quake 3 arena on systems with lower specs than these toys, yet they barely able to perform such seemingly trivial functions as packet switching and voip.

Re:Practically useless (1)

mabinogi (74033) | about 9 years ago | (#13119269)

It's flamebait because of the way he said it, not what he said.

It's possible to disagree with a point of view without being insulting.

Fans of this should check out openwrt.org (5, Informative)

kaldek (901414) | about 9 years ago | (#13118828)

OpenWRT is a similar thing for the Linksys WRT54G and GS wireless routers. Same goes for the Asus WL500 series. Linux forever! heh

Re:Fans of this should check out openwrt.org (3, Informative)

raz0 (899158) | about 9 years ago | (#13118878)

You can't, however, attach a HDD to the WRT54G(S). I've just ordered myself an Asus WL-500g Deluxe with two USB 2.0 ports. Should be nice for a little web server with OpenWRT, though the performance should be poor. 1.3Mbytes/s I've heard. I guess this Linksys device has better USB performance, it being meant for file sharing, though it's not a guarantee. The WL-HDD (connects a regular IDE HDD) can only transfer 2Mbytes/s.

Re:Fans of this should check out openwrt.org (1)

raz0 (899158) | about 9 years ago | (#13119018)

It seems, after investigating further [tomsnetworking.com] that the NSLU2 can trasfer data at around 4-6 Mbytes/s on average. Faster than the WL-HDD, though still rather slow if you want to use it extensively, maybe even having an NFS mount on it.

Re:Fans of this should check out openwrt.org (2, Informative)

commanderfoxtrot (115784) | about 9 years ago | (#13119178)

I have one of the older Asus WL500G wireless routers. At various times I've had photo printers and USB disks plugged in to it- it's a fantasic piece of kit. You can make it boot off USB and have SSH as well.

Not blazingly fast, but enough for most of us.

My Compaq laptop can only do about 1.5MB/sec using SSH anyway. FTP is obviously faster.

Re:Fans of this should check out openwrt.org (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13118979)

Too bad there's no decent UI to OpenWRT.
Just like desktop Linux!

I've been waiting for this! (1, Interesting)

fimbulvetr (598306) | about 9 years ago | (#13118842)

Cheaper, more efficient, faster (Disk I/O wise), more stable, more flexible (apt-get) than the Mac Mini. Not to mention the ability to hack it when I want (The warranty is already void!). Moreover, I don't have to give the litigious bastards (Apple, of course) any of my dough!

My new media server!
I can't wait to set this up in a cabinet/closet somewhere and stream video/audio from it.

Re:I've been waiting for this! (2, Interesting)

FLAGGR (800770) | about 9 years ago | (#13118941)

You do realize that you can install linux on the mac mini, and I'm sure PPC has better support than ARM, or you can just use fink (like bsd ports) to install *nix apps under OSX? Not to mention the mac mini is much more powerfull....

Re:I've been waiting for this! (1)

spiritraveller (641174) | about 9 years ago | (#13118972)

You do realize that you can install linux on the mac mini, and I'm sure PPC has better support than ARM, or you can just use fink (like bsd ports) to install *nix apps under OSX? Not to mention the mac mini is much more powerfull....

You do realize that all he wants to do is stream files don't you? And that this is about 1/5th the price of a mac mini?

Re:I've been waiting for this! (1)

tmk (712144) | about 9 years ago | (#13119021)

The Germany magazine c't has published in the recent issue an howto on running the Mac mini as an media server. The only problem is that the mac mini does only have one Ethernet-Port, so it can't be used as an router.

Re:I've been waiting for this! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13119312)

I think that the emphasis was more on the cheap, and the not giving the litigous bastards money, than on the apt-get.

Re:I've been waiting for this! (2, Insightful)

qyiet (851101) | about 9 years ago | (#13119053)

Moreover, I don't have to give the litigious bastards (Apple, of course) any of my dough!
I thought that was SCO's [caldera.com] trademark.

Re:I've been waiting for this! (1)

fimbulvetr (598306) | about 9 years ago | (#13119108)

It is, and I've been one of the (helpful?) google bombers for a long time; This, however, doesn't mean that Apple doesn't deserve the same description. When linksys sues me, one of their customers, I might add add them to the list too.

Re:I've been waiting for this! (2, Insightful)

jizmonkey (594430) | about 9 years ago | (#13119116)

Cheaper, more efficient, faster (Disk I/O wise), more stable, more flexible (apt-get) than the Mac Mini.

Come again? I'll give you cheaper and more energy efficient but let's not get carried away. I bet you lose the energy efficiency once you plug in an external USB hard drive too.

Re:I've been waiting for this! (1)

fimbulvetr (598306) | about 9 years ago | (#13119177)

Come again? I'll give you cheaper and more energy efficient but let's not get carried away. I bet you lose the energy efficiency once you plug in an external USB hard drive too.

I guess that depends - I don't know the facts for power usage on either, but I'd venture to guess that the baseline draw (Both units equipped with 5400rpm 2.5 inch laptop drives) is much more for the Mini than it is for this. Assuming as much, I'd inevitably upgrade the drive to something like a 400G - and (assuming) the Linksys box draws less in the beginning - it's going to draw less in the end.

Re:I've been waiting for this! (1)

fimbulvetr (598306) | about 9 years ago | (#13119219)

This is a bit ambigious - my apologies - it meant to read that I suspect the power draw for a (Mac Mini + 400GB USB drive) is more than it would be for a (Debian ARM box + 400GB USB drive).

Re:I've been waiting for this! (3, Informative)

chrysrobyn (106763) | about 9 years ago | (#13119259)

Cheaper, more efficient, faster (Disk I/O wise), more stable, more flexible (apt-get) than the Mac Mini.

Cheaper? Granted, by at least 5x. More efficient? Less power, certainly, can't attest to what efficiency you're shooting for -- if its CPU cycles per cubic inch, not likely. Faster? If I put an identical IDE drive on a firewire bridge, the MacMini will be faster than some USB implementation.

Not to mention the ability to hack it when I want (The warranty is already void!).

Who cares about the warranty when you're doing something like this? With a Mac Mini, you're not voiding the warranty by loading an alternative OS anyway.

My Linux box is a PowerMac 7600 with a 500MHz G3 upgrade card, running PowerPC Debian. PowerPC doesn't have all the support of the x86 world in Linux (and ARM is even worse), but Debian provides a great platform to provide support for us non-x86 platform users.

Apples to Oranges... (4, Insightful)

jevvim (826181) | about 9 years ago | (#13119270)

faster (Disk I/O wise)

Since both the NSLU2 and the Mac Mini support USB2, I don't really understand how one would have faster disk I/O than the other. Now, certainly, there can be questions about file system efficiency, but you could also say that the Mac Mini (for, granted, 5x the price) could have much faster I/O, since you have 256MB of RAM instead of 32MB for things like read-caching.

more stable

I'm very interested as to why the NSLU2 would be more stable than a Mac Mini. Personally, I think the short, square design of the Mini is more stable than the tall, tower design of the NSLU2. From a software standpoint, I'd say the two are rather comparable in stability for comparable activities (i.e., no complaining about 3D games crashing on the Mini when the NSLU2 doesn't even have a graphics chip).

more flexible

While the Mini's certainly not a flexibility powerhouse, I don't see the NSLU2 beating it out here, either. Software flexibility? Mac OS X has a lot of software available, both commerical and software libre (GPL/BSD). You can also run GNU/Linux on the Mini, including the Debian distribution with apt-get.

Not to mention the ability to hack it when I want (The warranty is already void!).

Open your Mini and replace the hard drive. Voila, both can be hacked at will because the warranty is void! ^__^

Decent file server... (5, Funny)

MindNumbingOblivion (668443) | about 9 years ago | (#13118848)

...that doesn't cost an ARM and a leg.

Thank you, thank you.

Ugh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13119266)

Will you be here all week?

If you're gonna go there... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13119295)

Hacking it will require strongarm tactics.

Buying largue quantities means you're exercising your right to bear ARMs.

People running to get them are conducting an ARMs race.

A beowulf cluster of these will be called an ARMy

Stallman's creating an OS specifically for this called GNU/HARM

They're marketing it and calling it a Linux-Installed Micro Box System (LIMBS) with a monitor called a Linux-Embedded Graphics Station (LEGS)

LEND THE PARENT AN "ARM" (1)

MindNumbingOblivion (668443) | about 9 years ago | (#13119323)

Oh God. Someone mod this boy up.

Yeah, but I have a $50 MIPS box (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13118853)

Let's not forget the WRT54G

More Secure? (1)

pardasaniman (585320) | about 9 years ago | (#13118856)

We have all heard software monoculture is bad from a security standpoint... Would running one of these things be more secure than running debian on x86 since the hardware is different?

Re:More Secure? (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | about 9 years ago | (#13119020)

More secure against script kiddies, and pre-made attacks that send binaries for execution. If an attack can run an arbitrary shell script, then you are still in trouble.

yes.. (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13118859)

but does it run windows?

Getting there, but not yet perfect (3, Informative)

glowworm (880177) | about 9 years ago | (#13118860)

This is a cool project and Kudos to Linksys for using Linux as a basis for their NAS and Routers.

But TFA says "built-in 10/100 (not yet supported in litte-endian mode)". If I read this correctly the device works, but the network port doesn't. Hopefully someone can correct me and confirm that the ethernet port does work.

This would be a perfect low-cost always-on media centre server for Slim Devices [slimdevices.com] Squeezebox Server [slimdevices.com]

Re:Getting there, but not yet perfect (3, Informative)

MindNumbingOblivion (668443) | about 9 years ago | (#13118999)

The key there is the "not yet supported in little-endian mode" (emphasis mine). Endianness [wikipedia.org] refers to which end of the data the processor starts chewing on first. Big endian means it reads the most significant bit first, little means it starts from the least sig bit.

ARM processes things in what is known as a byte-sexual method, ie, either big or little endian. What tfa is saying is that eth0 port should work just fine under Debian ARM in big-endian mode (otherwise having this thing set up as a network storage device is pretty useless unless you're planning on exclusively USB hubbing it).

Re:Getting there, but not yet perfect (3, Informative)

damiangerous (218679) | about 9 years ago | (#13119081)

What tfa is saying is that eth0 port should work just fine under Debian ARM in big-endian mode

What it also says is that Debian ARM only supports little endian mode. I closed the page and now I can't get back to it, so I don't recall if he overcame this problem with the ethernet port.

Re:Getting there, but not yet perfect (1)

MindNumbingOblivion (668443) | about 9 years ago | (#13119186)

Damn, you're right. It says that in order to get Debian ARM running on the NSLU, they had to byte swap it (ie, turn the kernel around so the processor would read it as if it were in big-endian). And the tag next to the mention of the 10/100 interface, is, as the gp said, not supported in little endian mode.

My hat is off to you, good sir, and I shall await the return of my reading comprehension skills before I make another attempt at an informative post.

Re:Getting there, but not yet perfect (1)

pyrrhonist (701154) | about 9 years ago | (#13119195)

If I read this correctly the device works, but the network port doesn't. Hopefully someone can correct me and confirm that the ethernet port does work.

Read this [slashdot.org] for an alternative that does work with the built-in Ethernet.

Re:Getting there, but not yet perfect (1)

pedantic bore (740196) | about 9 years ago | (#13119396)

Reverse kudos from me...

He took a working kernel that supported the network and replaced it with another kernel so that he could get the debian package manager to work. This is backwards. If he wants kudos, he'll fix the endianess problem.

In the meanwhile, the NetBSD people could probably port their system to this hardware in an afternoon. There's more to life than Linux.

Overclock the slug? (1)

flibble-san (700028) | about 9 years ago | (#13118873)

Will it overheat? Oh well, no 'ARM in trying

Re:Overclock the slug? (4, Informative)

jaylee7877 (665673) | about 9 years ago | (#13118988)

This is not an overclock. For reasons unknown, Linksys chose to clock the unit at 133mhz. The chip is spec'ed by intel to run at 266mhz w/o cooling. So your not overclocking your un-underclocking :-)

Cheap Network Device ? (1)

adisakp (705706) | about 9 years ago | (#13118875)

But an XBOX cheap when people throw theirs away for XBOX 360 and chip it :-) You can run Linux legally on it and put in any HD you want much cheaper (internal) than a USB drive.

Re:Cheap Network Device ? (1)

Gherald (682277) | about 9 years ago | (#13118915)

> But an XBOX cheap when people throw theirs away for XBOX 360 and chip it :-) You can run Linux legally on it and put in any HD you want much cheaper (internal) than a USB drive.

Ah, but then you would still be running x86 -- and that's just not 1337 enough for /.!

Re:Cheap Network Device ? (1)

adisakp (705706) | about 9 years ago | (#13119146)

Not L337 as ARM but you get ethernet, video output, 2X RAM (64 MB), internal "case" for HD. You can mod the firmware without a chip too if you don't mind soldering a few lines on the MB and following various xbox hacking guides on the net.

Re:Cheap Network Device ? (1)

drspliff (652992) | about 9 years ago | (#13119170)

Cheaper than a USB hard drive.. eh?

The last time I checked, I could buy a 250gb seagate barracuda for ~£80 and a seperate USB 2.0 compatible housing case for ~£15...

The difference between buying the same sized hard disk (from a less reliable manufacturer, i've never had any problems with seagate before) works out to about ~£7-10 depending on where you buy from.

This started out as an innovative product, with Linksys using Linux yet again to open new avenues in the consumer computing market.. If only they would release the code for the rest of their products (they already released the build scripts for their wireless range of routers after they were hacked into running custom applications and even custom kernels)..

I've got a standard wired Linksys router just sitting here just begging for me to install Linux on it, although wouldn't NetBSD be a much better choice considering it's being used in much more constrained production environments/products every day!

Think again, homies: (2, Interesting)

zerocool^ (112121) | about 9 years ago | (#13118926)


From TFA:

The device has 32MB of SDRAM, 8MB of NOR Flash, built-in 10/100 (not yet supported in litte-endian mode), and dual USB 2.0 ports.

How are you planning on accessing those files? Hopes and dreams? Network Attached Storage with no Network Attached is just a hard drive.

~Will

Re:Think again, homies: (1)

jaylee7877 (665673) | about 9 years ago | (#13118958)

That's what the USB ethernet adapter is for.

Re:Think again, homies: (1)

timeOday (582209) | about 9 years ago | (#13119246)

...if it works. You can't assume hardware support for something like this. USB ethernet sounds like the kind of thing likely to cause problems under linux even on X86, for that matter. Frankly I'm relieved when *anything* USB works. For instance, just loading ehci_hcd disables the USB ports on my IBM T40 docking station. USB scanners generally don't work - even the Epson Perfection 1200 I bought specifically because it was supported doesn't work right. The Lego USB Tower can be made to work IF you're willing to run the "right" version of the kernel, and patch it. My Rio mp3 player works pretty well - after my own edits to riotuil.

Re:Think again, homies: (4, Informative)

pyrrhonist (701154) | about 9 years ago | (#13119165)

How are you planning on accessing those files? Hopes and dreams? Network Attached Storage with no Network Attached is just a hard drive.

If you don't need a distro as large as Debian, you can run Unslung [nslu2-linux.org] , which does support the built-in Ethernet.

Unslung uses ipkg for package management and has a simple installation using the native firmware. It is very stable, since it has been available almost since the Linksys product was announced. It is actively being developed and you can talk to the developers via IRC at #nslu2-linux on Freenode.

There is also a Yahoo group [yahoo.com] for running Linux on the NSLU2.

Dupe (1, Redundant)

SoloFlyer2 (872483) | about 9 years ago | (#13118943)

Re:Dupe (1, Redundant)

SoloFlyer2 (872483) | about 9 years ago | (#13118998)

on closer examination...
NOT A DUPE
previous was just hacking into the NSLU2 and adding services... this is actually installing a whole new OS

What about... (2, Funny)

JeiFuRi (888436) | about 9 years ago | (#13118977)

the debian LEG?

Performance? (1)

tmk (712144) | about 9 years ago | (#13118987)

I have a media server and p2p machine on an old Compaq Prolinea Desktop with an 133 Mhz Pentium and 96 MB RAM which runs Debian Sarge. The I/O-Performance is not very good but I can run mldonkey 24/7 without much noise.

Could this ARM device compete with this? And what is the use of 16000 Debian packages when I can only run very few of them in 32 MB RAM?

Re:Performance? (1)

orkysoft (93727) | about 9 years ago | (#13119173)

For one, it'll pay for itself quickly if you look at the power usage.

Re:Performance? (1)

i.r.id10t (595143) | about 9 years ago | (#13119327)

And what is the use of 16000 Debian packages when I can only run very few of them in 32 MB RAM?

Don't say that to the P-75 with 24mb ram at one of the offices I support. It doesn't know that it has too little ram to run exim, apache, samba, hylafax, courier imap-d, squirrelmail, and a few shell scripts to turn it into a fax server.

I can't believe it but (1)

axonal (732578) | about 9 years ago | (#13118992)

we slashdotted Linksys!

Re:I can't believe it but (1)

Mordanthanus (300840) | about 9 years ago | (#13119111)

For some morbid reason, I find this to be extremely hilarious...

Dumbassed questions... (1)

absurdist (758409) | about 9 years ago | (#13118993)

1: Can you attach a USB hub to it and daisy-chain devices?

2: If so, can you attach a printer and use it as a print server as well as a file?

Yes and yes (1)

77Punker (673758) | about 9 years ago | (#13119044)

I'm pretty sure the daisy-chain thing works for any USB 2.0 port up to 256 devices.

Also, any Linux compatible USB printer should work since it runs Linux and has a USB port.

Serve This! (3, Funny)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | about 9 years ago | (#13119005)

Serve files, music...

And be served with an RIAA lawsuit!

Project page slashdotted, but I have questions... (3, Interesting)

PsychoKiller (20824) | about 9 years ago | (#13119048)

Can it use other USB 2.0 peripherals?

How much power does it consume? Better than a WRT54G?

Can it be further underclocked?

Re:Project page slashdotted, but I have questions. (1)

jaylee7877 (665673) | about 9 years ago | (#13119264)

1) Yes, see http://www.nslu2-linux.org/ [nslu2-linux.org] for more info. User's have succeded in adding USB based webcams, bluetooth, ethernet, flashdisks, etc. It's true USB 2.0 so anything that has a Linux driver that will compile under ARM should work fine.

Re:Project page slashdotted, but I have questions. (1)

jaylee7877 (665673) | about 9 years ago | (#13119287)

2) Probably about the same, but of course, a external hard drive is going to suck a lot more power... 3) No. The Intel arm chipped is locked at 266mhz. Linksys used a trick to underclock it. The hack simply restores it to the chips normal speed.

laptop replacement? (1)

planckscale (579258) | about 9 years ago | (#13119056)

Okay so would this be an improvement over my laptop at home (PIII800 + 380MB PC100 & 10GB HD + wireless)? I leave it on at home all the time mostly in order to occasionally pop in and start a bittorrent download or FTP. Also, what hardware would I need to get this on a wireless network?

Re:laptop replacement? (1)

Procyon101 (61366) | about 9 years ago | (#13119248)

Not even close. Figure a Dhrystone of 1.3K per Mhz for this ARM proc, and 2K per Mhz for the PIII.

The default Dhrystone for this box: 173K
Overclocked to 266: 346K

Your PIII 800: 1600K

The summary forgot to mention (1)

bersl2 (689221) | about 9 years ago | (#13119075)

that you'll be needing to add your own serial port.

Re:The summary forgot to mention (1)

jaylee7877 (665673) | about 9 years ago | (#13119306)

I know, and it had me all excited too :-( I'm playing around with Debian's auto-install text file (sort of like unattend.txt on Windows or kickstart on RHEL) and see if I can skip the serial port...

iPaq Linux - ARM powered (0)

blakespot (213991) | about 9 years ago | (#13119082)

Don't underestimate the power of the ARM processors. The iPaq Pocket PC has long been a ripe ARM unix platform:

http://www.ipaqlinux.com/ [ipaqlinux.com]



blakespot

Re: me loves my Sharp Zaurus (1)

void aint () (880781) | about 9 years ago | (#13119375)

let the flame wars begin! *ggg*

PS: does anyone know wether sd-cards work under openbsd now?

Yes, but can I run NetBSD on it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13119084)

Well can I?

Ethernet not supported (2, Informative)

alan_dershowitz (586542) | about 9 years ago | (#13119104)

NOTE: First page says that the built-in ethernet isn't working under the Debian install yet. Not thinking this will be useful for most people. I'll be getting one when that's worked out, I need a low-power box to run an HTTP proxy on.

arm != efficency (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13119272)

the arm cpu in this thing sucks ass. thats why it uses "less" power. you get what you pay for. arm != good.

Read Slashdot post, Read TFA, Order NSLU2. 5 Mins. (1)

flowerp (512865) | about 9 years ago | (#13119343)


Honestly, it took me 5 minutes from reading the slashdot post until ordering the NSLU2 from amazon. Lol.

This is so cool. Does anyone know about a USB 2.0 ISDN hardware that is supported by Debian ARM? I want to make this a PBX using Asterisk.

Christian

If you don't want to mod... (5, Informative)

pyrrhonist (701154) | about 9 years ago | (#13119349)

To install Debian on the NSLU2, you'll need to do a serial port modification. If you aren't comfortable with modifying your NSLU2, than I suggest running Unslung [nslu2-linux.org] .

Unslung can be installed without using a serial port modification, because it simply uses the built-in Linksys web administration to upgrade the firmware to the Unslung distribution.

Once Unslung is installed, it only takes a matter of minutes to have your NSLU2 running Samba, OpenSSH, Apache, Slimserver, and even Asterisk!

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