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Microsoft To Begin Checking For Piracy

CmdrTaco posted more than 8 years ago | from the only-a-matter-of-time dept.

Windows 810

Curious Yellow 82 writes "Microsoft will begin checking for pirated copies of its Windows software when users attempt to update. Security updates are supposed to be exempt from the check. Upon detection of pirated software the user will be given the oppportunity to purchase a legitimate copy of the software for a discounted price, upon providing proof of purchase etc."

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810 comments

Yawn (2, Interesting)

bigwavejas (678602) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165629)

Security updates are supposed to be exempt from the check.

Since when? I recall using an unauthorized version of Windows for a 2nd box of mine and when I attempted to update at windows.com it wouldn't allow me to download anything (including SP1 and SP2.) The only difference I see with this press release is now they will ask you if you want to squeal on your pirated source (Bambino's don't do this) or purchase a legitimate copy. Is this what it has come to for MS? A sub-standard online satellite program and now a ho-hum press release on Windows?

/sigh

What happened to the days of Balmer dancing to "Get on your feet"? now THAT was newsworthy.

Re:Yawn (4, Informative)

MoonFog (586818) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165655)

If you used the Security Center and set it to receive Automatic Updates automatically it would work, even with a counterfeit version of Windows.

Re:Yawn (1)

daveschroeder (516195) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165703)

If you used the Security Center and set it to receive Automatic Updates automatically it would work, even with a counterfeit version of Windows.

Reference or proof, please?

Re:Yawn (2, Informative)

MoonFog (586818) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165779)

Microsoft said the company has no plans at this time to require users running automatic updates to provide proof that their copies of Windows are genuine.

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2005-01-26-micro soft_x.htm [usatoday.com]

I did this myself until I got a proper version.

Re:Yawn (1)

daveschroeder (516195) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165813)

Thanks:

Microsoft said the company has no plans at this time to require users running automatic updates to provide proof that their copies of Windows are genuine.

But note the "at this time". If they're making the change for Windows Update, there's no reason they couldn't disallow it via Automatic Updates at some point in the future.

Re:Yawn (5, Funny)

BarryJacobsen (526926) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165863)

If you used the Security Center and set it to receive Automatic Updates automatically it would work, even with a counterfeit version of Windows.

Reference or proof, please?


I submit that Microsoft always tries their best to make things better, but overlooks some Monday detail that ends up shooting them in the foot. Yes, I'm aware that's just hearsay and conjecture, but those are kinds of evidence, your Majesty.

Pirated (4, Interesting)

GuitarNeophyte (636993) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165725)

Sadly, for those of us who constantly change the operating systems on our "hobby" computer, we'll probably get marked that we've pirated their operating systems, even though we're just using it on one system at a time, and bought it legitimately, and have a valid key and everything.

*sigh* as well

Luke
----
Tired of answering tons of basic computer questions for friends and family? Send them to ChristianNerds.com [christiannerds.com] instead!

Re:Pirated (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165782)

not how it works champ. They keep a central database of every key shipped. Windows Update just checks against the database. If your key is in there then you're fine. I'm sure if they see it installed on 250 different computers at the same time they might blacklist you, but that's probably about it.

Re:Yawn (5, Informative)

Solosoft (622322) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165840)

Not that I pirated my windows :/

Service Pack 2 is a breeze. I have the first copy of XP. All you have to do is Download this [solosoft.org] and copy it to the root of your C drive. Open up the "Command Prompt" and goto your root of the drive. Type in "cdkey xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx" as in x's are your SP2 compatable CD key. Once you press enter you should see nothing come up. (if somthing does then find a working key). Once your CD key is changed then Goto this site and click "Download and Deploy Service Pack 2 for multiple Computers" [microsoft.com] . Once you are done that install SP2 and your done.

Hopefully this is some help.

Uhh (5, Insightful)

daveschroeder (516195) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165630)

the user will be given the oppportunity to purchase a legitimate copy of the software for a discounted price, upon providing proof of purchase (!!)

That will be an interesting feat.

And, jokes aside, "proof of purchase" of what? If they mean a possible purchase of a machine with, or a standalone copy of, a counterfeit version of Windows, assuming the user purchased it legitimately in good faith, how in the hell is this the user's responsibility or fault? I'm not talking about someone who got Windows from a guy in an overcoat for $10 on a street corner (not to mention you probably wouldn't have a "proof of purchase" for that kind of sale); I'm talking about purchases reasonably believed to be legitimate. No, this doesn't mean that a software company has to honor pirated or illegal copies even if the user believed it to be legal for whatever reason, but it seems like this really sticks it to the user (not to mention the internet community as a whole by not providing OS updates, the fact they claim to be providing security updates aside[1]) as opposed to working to target the entities they believe to be illegally selling Windows...especially if the customer has a "proof of purchase" of an illegitimate copy of Windows in the first place, which presumably contains some element of contact information for the source if it can reasonably considered to constitute any semblance of "proof of purchase". They should be offering amnesty and/or discounts to people who are running straight-up pirated versions of Windows with no "proof of purchase" at all, if this is any attempt to reach out to people running unlicensed copies!

(Make no mistake: I'm not saying Microsoft is obligated to honor illegally purchased copies of Windows, whether they're pirated, or even ones purchased innocently and in good faith. But they'd be a hell of a lot better citizen of the internet community if they didn't withhold updates in either instance.)

[1] Windows Service Pack 2 would apparently not be included in this, for example, because it's not a "security update"; but it can be strongly argued that SP2 did more for general Windows XP security than any "security update" ever has. In other words, not updating the multitude of for-whatever-reason non-legal copies of Windows out there does everyone involved a major disservice, not the least of which is the rest of the world surrounding them.

Re:Uhh (0)

I8TheWorm (645702) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165717)

a counterfeit version of Windows, assuming the user purchased it legitimately in good faith, how in the hell is this the user's responsibility or fault?

Recieving stolen goods is also a crime. Caveat emptor, it's also the buyers responsibility to make sure the item they're purchasing is from a valid source.

You can rest assured you won't get a pirated copy from egghead, best buy, frye's, etc... But I wouldn't try that guy that's undercutting them on eBay.

Re:Uhh (0, Flamebait)

Entropius (188861) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165766)

Piracy is not theft. Bzzt.

Re:Uhh (1)

I8TheWorm (645702) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165798)

Google for it, I think you'll find it's being treated as such.

Re:Uhh (4, Insightful)

Ryosen (234440) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165851)

>>Recieving stolen goods is also a crime

You have to be proven to have known that the goods were stolen, otherwise there is no crime.

What the GP is talking about isn't someone buying the PC out of the back of a truck. It is someone who buys the computer from a retailer, in **good faith**, and the retailer, unknown to the purchaser, is using pirated copies of Windows. This is a common occurance with white box PCs and isn't limited to EBay sales.

The people affected by this aren't the ones buying and installing XP themselves. They are the ones that bought "no-name" PCs with XP pre-installed where the retailer is not a valid OEM licensee.

Re:Uhh (1)

Joffrey (242525) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165865)

"Receiving stolen goods" is a simplified label for the actual crime of "Receiving stolen goods knowing the same to be stolen," just FYI.

Re:Uhh (1)

differentiate_this (773934) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165731)

Hey....uh...yeah, I didn't know my copy was pirated illegal...*throws away CD-R copies*...So, how about that discount eh? This means that some huge corporation won't go crazy on you if you happen to have a illegitimate copy of their software? Couldn't you just feign ignorance and get a free discount?

Re:Uhh (1)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165856)

Couldn't you just feign ignorance and get a free discount?

No need. Those discounts are just their OEM prices. Microsoft has a special OEM program for home built systems, where you can get Windows with any hardware purchase. So next time you're upgrading a component, head over to MWave.com [mwave.com] and pick up both the component and discounted copy of Windows.

Re:Uhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165744)

Make no mistake

Can we PLEASE stop using that tired phrase?

Re:Uhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165772)

And I wish posters would refrain from using "tired phrase" in the future.

It's so cliche.

Re:Uhh (0, Troll)

rsd1s1g (519812) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165786)

...they'd be a hell of a lot better citizen of the internet community..

And just exactly when has MS had any concern about being a good citizen of the internet?

Re:Uhh (2, Interesting)

westlake (615356) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165817)

the user will be given the oppportunity to purchase a legitimate copy of the software for a discounted price, upon providing proof of purchase

"Customers who discover that their copy of Windows is pirated have two options.

They can get a free version of Windows if they fill out a counterfeit report identifying the source of the software, providing proof of purchase and returning the counterfeit CD.

If they are unable to provide all the information, filling out a report will entitle them to receive a copy of Windows XP Home Edition for the reduced price of £56 or Windows XP Professional Edition for £86." Microsoft steps up piracy fight [bbc.co.uk]

Re:Uhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165820)

i'm sorry. your initially bad argument against microsoft is just too much of a bait-and-switch. and the whole post is just very long for this time of day. ok, make that independent of timezone too.

so, i'm gonna have to call you numbnuts.

numbnuts!

Re:Uhh (5, Insightful)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165826)

If I bought a new DeWalt drill for really cheap of the Internet, it broke, and I went to get it repaired only to find out that I had purchased a knock-off product I wouldn't expect DeWalt to fix it. I'd go to the vendor who sold me it and take whatever action I could against them. Why is Microsoft any different?

w00t! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165634)

I want Ceren Ercen to have my babies!

mmm... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165637)

free softwa...d'oh!

How about a Parrot? (-1, Offtopic)

coulbc (149394) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165640)

Can I just get a parrot instead?

Darnit... (2)

daviq (888445) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165641)

I thought I'd get away with stealing from Microsoft. I don't feel that it is bad because they are such a ugly coding company.

or what? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165644)

or what?

Nice... (5, Funny)

op12 (830015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165648)

So if your copy of Windows is pirated, they'll prevent you from breaking it by not allowing you to install new service packs :)

Re:Nice... (1)

MoonFog (586818) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165695)

FTFA: While counterfeit copies of Windows will be prevented from downloading updates, Lazar said Microsoft is not including security updates in the lock-out. Even customers who do not check their copies of Windows for authenticity will be allowed to download security updates through Windows Update, Microsoft Update for Windows and the Download Center, he said.

"Those are available to all Windows users with or without validation," Lazar said. "We think of it like public health. We want to make sure no one gets infected by another system on the Internet because of our program."

Re:Nice... (1)

op12 (830015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165765)

I ReadTFA...they'll let someone with a pirated copy get security fixes, but not service packs or other updates. An example would be SP2.

Am I reading this wrong (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165653)

how's this?

Great news! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165657)

I hope the public at large realise quickly that WINDOWS IS NOT FREE, and they migrate to genuinely free alternatives.

Re:Great news! (2, Insightful)

dlefavor (725930) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165868)

...genuinely free alternatives.

Sorry to demonstrate a solid command of the obvious, but nothing is "genuinely free".

Wait a minute... (2, Insightful)

Sensible Clod (771142) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165659)

Security updates are supposed to be exempt from the check.

Didn't they say otherwise just a few months ago?

Got to find that link...

Re:Wait a minute... (2, Informative)

op12 (830015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165741)

"They" (the media) only hinted at that in January [usatoday.com] . But if you look they said that at least initially even those with pirated copies could get security fixes.

What? (2, Insightful)

JustAnotherReader (470464) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165662)

Upon detection of pirated software the user will be given the oppportunity to purchase a legitimate copy of the software for a discounted price, upon providing proof of purchase etc."

So if you're found to have a pirated copy, you need to show proof of purchase? If I have proof of purchase then it's not pirated, and therefore, I wouldn't need to buy it again at a discounted price.

Re:What? (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165720)

It is possible to purchase pirated software from many pirates.

Re:What? (1)

xlr8ed (726203) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165783)

How much Software would a Software Pirate pirate if a Software Pirate could pirate Software??

Re:What? (2, Informative)

NineNine (235196) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165734)

So if you're found to have a pirated copy, you need to show proof of purchase? If I have proof of purchase then it's not pirated, and therefore, I wouldn't need to buy it again at a discounted price.

Not true. You could've bought a pirated copy (see all those "bi S0ftw4ar3 4 cheep" emails?). And at least in the US, it's not legal to have stolen property, even if you didn't know that it was stolen. They're being very generous. Technically, they could sick the cops on each and every person using a pirated copy.

Re:What? (2, Informative)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165832)

Technically, they could sick the cops on each and every person using a pirated copy.

I call bullshit. The only way they could do that is if I bought a stolen copy off the back of a truck somewhere and said stolen copy had literally been stolen, i.e: shoplifted, taken from a warehouse, taken from my house.

In that scenario I would be in possession of stolen property. In the scenario of burning a copy for a friend and letting him use your key or downloading from the Internet you are in violation of the license (a civil matter) and maybe in violation of copyright laws (might or might not be a criminal matter -- more likely a civil penalty and/or fine).

In no case are you in possession of stolen property for merely violating the license agreement -- despite all BSA/Microsoft propaganda to the contrary.

Re:What? (1)

Chuck_McDevitt (665265) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165735)

Wrong... They guy you bought windows from might have pirated it, and you might be an innocent victim

Re:What? (1)

BaudKarma (868193) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165870)

Proof of purchase doesn't mean proof of legitimate copy of Windows. You might have bought a budget system from some strip mall store somewhere, and they could be putting the same copy of Windows on every system they sell. In that case, MS wants to see proof that they charged you for Windows without installing a licensed copy. That lets MS sic their lawyers on the store.

If you didn't need proof that you paid *someone* for your copy of Windows, then everyone who wanted to buy XP would install a pirated copy, fail the security check, and grab the discount.

Anyone know how much the discount is?

one question (3, Interesting)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165665)

How exactly do they check for it being a pirated copy? I mean other then checking their database of registered windows users and comparing it to the computer, how do they know the difference?

Re:one question (3, Insightful)

NineNine (235196) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165686)

How exactly do they check for it being a pirated copy? I mean other then checking their database of registered windows users and comparing it to the computer, how do they know the difference?

300 people using the same single user registration key/serial number is a pretty damn good indication.

Re:one question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165812)

What about corporate licensing?

Re:one question (1)

th0mas.sixbit.org (780570) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165697)

your title should read "one question, with answer included." ;)

Re:one question (2, Funny)

Winckle (870180) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165833)

I mean other then checking their database of registered windows users and comparing it to the computer
hmm I wonder how...

Hmmm (2, Interesting)

Omg Kthxbye (898058) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165666)

"Upon detection of pirated software the user will be given the oppportunity to purchase a legitimate copy of the software for a discounted price" Wait, so all I have to do to get Windows at a discount is download a pirated copy and fail the detection test? Sounds good to me!

Re:Hmmm (2, Insightful)

Crimsane (815761) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165774)

Yea sounds great to me too!
All you have to do is give microsoft your shipping address after admitting you've pirated their software.

Re:Hmmm (0)

seymansey (654465) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165854)

In other words... 1. Get hold of a dodgy copy of windows 2. Wait for M$ to detect its dodgyness 3. Claim discount and sell resultant copy on ebay 4. ???? 5. Profit!!

Some thoughts. (4, Insightful)

AnObfuscator (812343) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165671)

I wrote about this earlier today on bitsofnews.com [bitsofnews.com] . I'll save you the click and paste my thoughts here.

I am not sure how MS expects to keep pushing this down people's throats.
Most people don't want to be treated as thieves, and I can see some general backlash coming to MS from this.

I really don't see how this will, in the long run, benefit MS. Most people in the 1st world buy a computer from a major distributer, and use the (usually) legit copy of Windows from that. I'm guessing that that one-third number includes nations like India and China, where people can't afford the 1st world pricing scheme of Windows.

Oh, wait, silly me, why don't these poor people just use XP Starter Edition? Right. That's the ticket.

Do they seriously think this will decrease piracy in the 3rd world? All they've really done is cripple their product. They now have several issues to deal with.

This "Genuine Advantage" program is tantamount to legitimizing "pirated" XP. To many, I suspect it sends the message: "Ok, use pirated XP if you want, we'll just give special benefits to those who pay us." It's almost like a "shareware" model of distribution. Seeing how they are trying to push "XP Starter Edition", I seriously doubt this is their intent -- but it looks like they've emasculated that product entirely.

Simply, Pirated XP Home/Pro is still less crippled than XP SE. So for the 3rd world market, it's a choice between paying for a highly crippled OS, or getting a slightly crippled OS for free. I don't see many people paying for the privilege of less features.

This is also a potential gold mine for alternative OS's, such as the newer GNU/Linux systems pushing ease-of-install; Ubuntu [ubuntulinux.org] , Mepis [mepis.org] , Mandravia [mandriva.com] , Fedora [redhat.com] spring to mind immediately, and there are many others.

Given the choice of a super-crippled SE, a somewhat-crippled XP Home/Pro, or a fully-functional GNU/Linux, GNU/Linux becomes an increasingly "no-brainer" solution.

Re:Some thoughts. (2, Insightful)

NineNine (235196) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165787)

Given the choice of a super-crippled SE, a somewhat-crippled XP Home/Pro, or a fully-functional GNU/Linux, GNU/Linux becomes an increasingly "no-brainer" solution.

Considering that they'll give people the option of buying XP Pro for $150? Are you kidding? $150 isn't nearly enough to make people even consider switching platforms, and going through all the related headaches. If anything, they'll sell a hell of a lot more copies of XP. But, I think you're right. People who consider switching platforms over $150 are pretty brainless.

Re:Some thoughts. (1)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165831)

m not sure how MS expects to keep pushing this down people's throats. Most people don't want to be treated as thieves...

Because most people accept that, regardless of the fact that "Windows sucks", it's wrong (and possibly illegal) to use pirated software. They understand that in using pirated software, they can't expect to be treated the same as if they had purchased the software in a store. It all makes sense, really.

..., and I can see some general backlash coming to MS from this...

Really? When? This type of thing has been Microsoft policy for quite some time, and to date, there has been no discernable consumer backlash, probably because people realize that they give up certain rights when they use non-legit copies of Windows. It's quite simple, really.

MS can Kiss my... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165672)

MS can check all they want for my copy.

I'll figure a way around it and and they can kiss my #@!2kdd...[LOST CARRIER]

Evil worm (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165675)

I think it's about time for a Windows license-key and serial-no stealing worm. I'm sure someone will come up with one - possibly one of the smarter pirates. Think about it...

Re:Evil worm (2)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165804)

Evil? Shouldn't that worm be called "Robin Hood" or something?

Competition? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165676)

Ah, we knew this day would come. I wonder how long it'll be until they begin to also check for their competitors software and offer you discounts on their own competing software?

Somewhat interesting user behavior (4, Insightful)

ChrisF79 (829953) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165682)

Its kind of funny when you think about it--users steal the software and then go back to get the software maintenance. It's kind of like someone stealing a car from the lot of a dealership, then taking it back a few months later for it's customary 3,000 mile oil change.

Re:Somewhat interesting user behavior (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165770)

Except that a car uses consummables, but an operating system should come complete and not need fixes!

Is there a way to "check" individual workstations? (1)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165683)

Is there a way to "check" individual workstations?

On my workstations with auto-update, I'd prefer my first notification that something might be a problem in the field to not be an end user with a mystery dialog box on their screen.

Anyone know how this might work with SUS?

Blood is in the water and the sharks are near (0, Flamebait)

zioncity (862007) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165688)

Microsoft has a pretty good idea that their future is getting more and more dim. Time to cash in as much as they can before Vista comes out and is a total flop and security nightmare.

Re:Blood is in the water and the sharks are near (1)

op12 (830015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165800)

It even looks like the name might be a total flop [yahoo.com] for them :)

Re:Blood is in the water and the sharks are near (2, Interesting)

op12 (830015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165858)

I hate to reply to my own post, but I couldn't help but notice the following quote in that article:

"Wall says Vista will be analyzing traffic to its Web site to see what effect the "Windows Vista" name may have on visitors to the site. If the effect is significant--that is, if a surge of visitors comes to Vista.com looking for information about Windows Vista--the company may decide to take legal actions over the trademark."

Think Slashdot has the power to get the name of the next Windows changed? :)

I really hope that this is a pain in everyones ass (5, Interesting)

SeanTobin (138474) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165689)

I seriously hope that this causes no end of headaches for people across the world. I know of at least one system that I have at my office that is 100% legitimate and licensed, but will fail the authenticity check. It's a boxed Dell with the windows xp pro hologram sticker with the cd key on its side. At one point, the system was hosed to the point of needing reinstalling. I had just taken the job and there were no system images or proper cd's around. The sticker said WinXP sp1 and had its cd key. All the cd's at the office were either Compaq branded or WinXP sp2. So, I install with SP2 expecting my hologram'd sticker with the cd key to work. It didn't. Some fairy dust later and everything was installed and running.

So here I had a legitimate paid licensed Windows XP Professional computer which will not pass the windows licensing scheme. I'll have to dig out a SP1 cd sometime and reinstall with the actual key so it will pass.

I'm not saying its Microsoft's fault that the business didn't keep track of the original cd's. I'm just saying that I seriously hope this scenario is played out millions of times across the globe.

I'm off to ssh into my home computer and emerge sync && emerge world -uD right now.

Re:I really hope that this is a pain in everyones (5, Informative)

thesp (307649) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165834)

Also, an a Limited-User account, with all the activex security turned up (this is my current WinXP account for day-to-day tasks) the Genuine Advantage Tool fails to run, and requests a) Administrator rights and b) that I set my ActiveX security to Medium/Low. It then accuses me of having failed the test, and of having a counterfeit copy of Windows. So, I predict more security problems as people who have taken sensible security precautions are forced to abandon them for this tool.

Checked it this morning.... (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165701)

Corporate XP Pro still works FYI :-)

*scanning your copy of windows* (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165706)

Microsoft has detected an illegitimate copy of Windows....
The local FBI office is located 65 miles away...is this where you would like to go today?

Does not hurt... (1)

scrow (620374) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165710)

their profits.
... 35 percent of software worldwide is pirated. In North America alone, the piracy rate for software is 22 percent. "We consider that to be a staggering number," said MacNaughton.
What I find staggering is the ammount of money Micro$oft clears in a year. They seem to make so much money, I can't help wonder if the piracy is only helping business.

Re:Does not hurt... (1)

millennial (830897) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165795)

Of course it is. People with pirated copies of XP need MS Office, don't they?

Oh, wait... never mind.
/torrent

What does it apply to? (1)

millennial (830897) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165711)

The article didn't mention whether it applied to every version - professional, corporate, home, server, 64-bit, etc. Anyone have the inside info about this?

Trustworthy Computing? (5, Insightful)

Helmholtz (2715) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165718)

Perhaps I'm just being cynical, but doesn't this place the incentive on insecure code. Maximizing the number of "security patch releases" will also help (potentially) maximize revenue by quickly identifying "pirated" versions of Windows, causing said "offenders" to purchase legit versions.

If Windows were to become secure and relatively bug free, this would cause their "pirate detection" system to become very inefficient, as there wouldn't be a great need for using Windows Update.

I may be completely off base, but it does seem plausible. Perhaps we need Mythbusters ;)

Software Firewall (1)

xlr8ed (726203) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165723)

This is rather easy to get around, when your software firewall says "Windows Update is attepting to access the internet, what would you liked to do?"

[ ]Always allow this connection to the Internet
[ ]Manually configure this connection to the Internet
[*]Always block this connection to the Internet

Re:Software Firewall (1)

cr3ative (881393) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165848)

Then how, pray tell, does it download the necessary updates?

That's all fine and good... (2, Interesting)

emandres (857332) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165726)

That's all fine and good for MS, but what about the people who managed to obtain copies of corporate editions of the software? These copies will report tons of hits, undetected by MS.

Re:That's all fine and good... (1)

GweeDo (127172) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165871)

Why would a corporate license show as pirated? Do you really think that MS doesn't know which of their keys are corporate ones? That simply makes no sense.

More reason not to use Microsoft (1)

line.at.infinity (707997) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165733)

The main reason I stopped using MS Office was after it "detected" that I was using an illegitimate copy and refused to run when in fact it was a legitimate non-demo version and came with my Dell PC. I thought I wasn't going to put up with this crap anymore.

Guess the CD Key Generator Program will be popular (5, Interesting)

YukiKotetsu (765119) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165736)

I'll have to use it for every install now instead of just once, making sure I use a unique key every time.

Really, how are they going to enforce this? Just for the top 5 pirated cd keys or something? Why should JoeWhoever have to buy their software twice because they were ripped off? Dunno.

This really IS a good thing... (2, Insightful)

pickyouupatnine (901260) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165739)

.. for Open Source :D.

Next Fad: Windows Update .torrents (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165745)

...in other news, Microsoft joined with the MPAA in urging the immediate and unconditional ban of the BitTorrent network, blaming the file-sharing network for an annual revenue loss of $695 billion.

MS isn't doing anything wrong... (4, Insightful)

BTWR (540147) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165750)

I don't see this as anything wrong.

I mean, we have MS losing money on a pirated copy of windows. Fine. We can argue the merits of software piracy all night. But... when MS releases a patch, they are spending millions of dollars on R&D, advertising, lawyer fees, etc - this is supposed to be for legitimate users only. When you buy any software, you are understanding that this $50/$200/$whatever cost also includes free patches in the purchase price.

It'd be like someone stealing a car from GM - fine, they stole it. But imagine if they later came to GM with their stolen car and asked for the $1000 engine recall upgrade. Nope - that's for legitimate carowners only. The $25,000 GM prices the car takes into account the small chance that they may have to set a recall.

Plus, it's not like the RIAA. Nowhere does it say that MS will be prosecuting every illegal copy it finds. It simply says "hey, if you stole a copy, then that's one thing. But don't try and get free support from us too."

OK, but (1)

seymansey (654465) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165756)

I'm guessing that if the security updates are still going to come through, then that is all that is really required of windows update. The "non critical" items which appear in windows are generaly superfluous anyway. As an example: Windows Media Player or the .Net framework - is it possible to download those from other websites anyay, quite easily. If they do prevent security updates coming through, then as has been discussed on /. before it is liable to create more harm as boxes become out of date and unpatched. And lastly - theres always the possibility that there will be a way around this.

wont stop anything (5, Informative)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165758)

Several sites have the fulldownloads of the service packs and hotfixes etc...

hell there are torrents available that will give you everything that are updated weekly.

A buddy of mine recently offered me a CD of all XP updates including the lestes ones and his colleague at work was making a script to auto apply them all into a slipstream cd image.

it will only stop the clueless casual non licensed software user. everyone else will not be bothered one bit.

Nice (-1, Redundant)

Delifisek (190943) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165763)

People will more interested linux.
Also warez scene will find the way, in any condition...

Perhaps repacked or full packed windows xp relases

So,
If you know the way, noting stops you...

Their check didn't work when I tried (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165769)

I tried a pirated copy of Windows XP and when I checked it said it was genuine (which it isn't because I used a keygen program under wine to create a license key).

I suspect they have a list of pirated licenses and they just check for that. It has been posited in the past that they don't even know all the genuine keys that are out there and my experience supports that.

I actually do own a copy of Windows XP (came with my machine) but I wanted to see how this works hence installing with a generated key.

Haha, five years late! (-1, Flamebait)

mindmaster064 (690036) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165771)

Maybe next time they'll decide to put this purchase a real copy feature into the operating system when they release it, instead of five years later! They could also try another feature that has been proven to work. Make your product reasonably priced so that people will buy it, and stop selling crippleware lesser versions! Many people are bootlegging it not because they having bought the OS, but rather they needed something that was in WinXP that they didn't know they needed when they bought the computer.

On a truthful note most people running bootleg winxp and the like are using corporate keys that do not activate, if you decided to disable them I'm sure you would be pissing some companies off big time. Sure, go ahead, pave the way for OSX. I'd switch in a heartbeat.

-Mind

That will offer some nice oppertunities (1)

trendzetter (777091) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165781)

Keep your linux iso's and burner ready!

The Hassle Factor (2, Insightful)

RagingChipmunk (646664) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165789)

The Hassle Factor of using MS products has gone up tremendously in the last 3 years. I legitimately own XP etc, and yet, I'm hassled with crap like "Let MS check to see if you're legit before we fix our mistakes".

The lockdown mentality of MS has already made me choose that Longhorn/Vista will not be on my PCs. "Asta la vista baby!". Sure they have every right to 'enforce' their anti-piracy efforts, but, they've made it difficult to deal with them.

Re:The Hassle Factor (1)

mindmaster064 (690036) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165837)

I think this is especially true considering that there will be an OSX port to Intel available very soon. I cannot see why anyone would submit to the Microshaft torture test if they don't have to. People like doing their work and getting their games going. People do not like dorking with registrations, nags, "cannot reinstall", bloatware, and other such nonsense.

-Mind

They may have messed up BIG TIME here! (1)

goldspider (445116) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165792)

Let's face it; a lot of people are using pirated copies of Windows. Whether Microsoft likes it or not, that fact help solidify their grip on the desktop OS market.

Now this happens, and Microsoft is going to start telling these people to pay up, or else (whatever that "or else" might be.) So either the person is going to fork over the $100 for XP Home, or they're going to be chased to a free alternative.

Now all you neighborhood geeks need to spread the word on this, and let people know that there is a perfectly good FREE alternative out there. These peopld don't have to pay Microsoft in order to keep using their computer.

I think Microsoft inadvertently cracked the doorway to OSS a little here. Let's help throw it wide open!

Y'know... (0)

DwarfGoanna (447841) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165799)

..not to interject some shameless Mac advocacy, but stuff like this is exactly why I'm a shameless Mac advocate (though any non-MS OS would apply). When you have upward of 90% market share, most of which is locked into you for eternity, is stuff like this really that important? I would think the resources put into developing and maintaining schemes like this, coupled with the awful PR it generates, are probably worse for you at the end of the day, or at least a wash. Windows activation is one exception to the "only /.er's will bother to do it" rule. I know more than one computer illiterate person who has 'fixed' their ill gotten copy of Windows XP. Shmeh.

Re:Y'know... (1)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165843)

The actual source of the problem is vendor lockin. You know the sort where Apples have their very own boot layout, bios, etc and make it hard [re: mac mini] to install other OSes.

Sure apple doesn't do this... but that's not because they can't. Certainly their stranglehold on the Mac is strong enough.

A better solution would be open standards and a open OS/distro.

Tom

Want XP? ( Pirate it first for a discount ) (4, Insightful)

popo (107611) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165811)


Let me get this straight... if you're caught with a pirated version you're offered a discount? (or a free version altogether) Seems like a great way to shop!

Only suckers will pick up a boxed copy from the store from now on...



"they can still fill out a counterfeit report and receive a copy of Windows XP Home Edition for $99 or a copy of Windows XP Professional Edition for $149, Lazar said.

Windows XP Home normally sells for $199 and Windows XP Professional Edition usually costs $299."


lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165814)

There are also those out there who have a dell with a legitamate key. What they can do is get the updates and then slipstream them into a xp cd for their other pc that isnt so legit...

case and point: this stops nothing...

What about keygens? (1)

PeeAitchPee (712652) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165819)

How can they stop me if I'm using a valid XP ISO with a randomly generated (but valid) key from any number of available keygens?

No-Broadband Users Screwed? (4, Insightful)

Xesdeeni (308293) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165829)

So now, I can't download the update at work, where we have broadband, and transport it home (via CD or thumb drive) because I can't validate my home installation!? I have two machines at home. One is connected via dialup, and the other (an HTPC) is not connected to the internet at all.

Do you know how long 266 MB takes to download over dialup!? OVER 11 1/2 HOURS!!

Xesdeeni

No non-security updates? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165850)

What an implication...

Posit A:

Microsoft makes high quality software that has few to 0 bugs in it. Ergo there's no need to update and this is a worthless threat.

Posit B:

Microsoft makes buggy software so updating is a necessity and this threat is a backlash on their corporate image.

Posit C:

Microsoft moves to binary software distribution where you purchase/download a crippled version (or one which has one or two major annoying "feature" issues) where you HAVE to update to get full functionality. Making the threat "real" but hindering legitimate customers to begin with.

C is SOP.

Do I hear the $1.00 for a legit copy??? (1)

GecKo213 (890491) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165862)

I remember not too long ago Microsoft was offering countries like India the opportunity to then purchase a legitimate license to their software for only $1.00. Do you think those who have been "pirating" Microsoft's OS in the states or elsewhere will be shown the same leniency?

Note to Microsoft (4, Funny)

nizo (81281) | more than 8 years ago | (#13165864)

The more you tighten your grip, Bill, the more systems will slip through your fingers.

This will be grand when employers start having update problems because employess (or even ex-employees) took copies of software home and now the machines in the office can't update.

R.I.P (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13165869)

So EVERYONE will have to use Linux now?
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