Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

19 million Amps

Hemos posted more than 8 years ago | from the coursing-thru-their-veins dept.

Science 457

deblau writes "On July 27, scientists at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Test Site said they generated a current equal to about four times all the electrical current on Earth. During the few millionths of a second that it operated, the 650-ton Atlas pulsed-power generator discharged about 19 million amps of current through an aluminum cylindrical shell about the size of a tuna can. Official news release is available from the DOE (PDF)."

cancel ×

457 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Elsewhere in the news: (4, Funny)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213647)


In operation, the 650-node Slashdot news-for-nerds generator successfully discharged nearly 19 million hits of HTTP requests through the NNSA Nevada Site Office News webpage, or PDF, on a server about the size and shape of a tuna can. The requests caused the server to implode at extreme speeds, with unrivaled symmetry, precision, and reproducibility.

Re:Elsewhere in the news: (2, Funny)

jurt1235 (834677) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213743)

LOL, tested and tried many times before, but you are the first one to decribe in details what really happens at such a moment.

Time for a noble price nomination I would say.

Wowf (1, Funny)

Stanistani (808333) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213648)

I wondered why my cat has been so tense lately...

Re:Wowf (0)

ceeam (39911) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213729)

I find your use of "cat" in "discharge" context highly disturbing.

Re:Wowf (0)

wpiman (739077) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213812)

Was it a can of chicken or tuna? It says Chicken of the Sea on the can. It makes it so confusing.

current == power? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213650)

"current equal to about four times all the electrical power on Earth" riiiight.

Re:current == power? (3, Informative)

stinerman (812158) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213699)

Sure.

I = V/R
If R->0, I->INF.

Its certainly possible.

Note to above (1)

stinerman (812158) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213757)

Obviously current and power aren't the same thing, but I was making the assumption that the submitter simply used them interchangeably, making a layman's error.

Re:current == power? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213765)

Great Scotts! With that amount of power, we could go Back to the Future!

Re:current == power? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213767)

ok, find me a 0 ohm conductor, smarty! :p
And no, 0 ohm resistors from Digikey do not count. I've put less than 10 amps through them and they go poof...

omgz (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213651)

fiirits poorts wankerrrrrs

Math (5, Funny)

dsginter (104154) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213652)

I did the math for everyone... it works out to One point twenty one jiga-watts, Marty!

Re:Math (1)

Ledneh (673693) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213772)

88 miles per hour? 88 miles per hour !!

Re:Math (0)

ari_j (90255) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213779)

Jigga, what?

19 Million amps!! (3, Funny)

Winckle (870180) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213657)

Now that was how Pink Floyd should have played.

Re:19 Million amps!! (1)

jurt1235 (834677) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213768)

Yep, stand in front off the speakers attached to that amplifier and you will not just have burst eardrums, but they will be blasted to the center of your head to just stick against each other at that spot.

Re:19 Million amps!! (0)

Winckle (870180) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213821)

Just like the band in Hitchikers guide then!

Each one turned up to 11 (2, Funny)

Silver Sloth (770927) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213844)

for when you want that extra edge

Waaaaaa! (1)

Chrispy1000000 the 2 (624021) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213660)

I want me one of those!

The other questions (2, Funny)

Samir Gupta (623651) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213666)

How much was the voltage? Would the power be more than 1.21 Gigawatts?

Was it part of a modified DeLorean travelling at 88 mph?

Re:The other questions (1)

ohyedoggies (859303) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213696)

to find out, just tell me the resistance/impedence

Re:The other questions (1)

jurt1235 (834677) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213849)

The impedance/resistance should be able to be calculated, the material is AL, the size is tuna can (about 2 to 3 inches across, length about 3 inches?). I can't find the bulk condictivity value though, but at least you have the approximate surface

Pure nonsense (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213671)

they generated a current equal to about four times all the electrical power on Earth.

Sounds like apples and oranges:
units of current = Amps
units of power = Watts

The statement is pure nonsense.

Re:Pure nonsense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213799)

amps = coulombs per second,

you can have high amps, and low voltage,
or high voltage and low amps (power lines)

high amperage is good for burning things...
consider it as kinetic energy related.
at this level, maybe they wany to do some
sort of nuclear reaction.

How many amps in a watt? (1)

JackDW (904211) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213823)

Sounds like apples and oranges If the scientists actually tried to compare current and power, their scientist licences should be revoked immediately.

Wouldn't that be... (3, Funny)

jav1231 (539129) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213674)

"about four times all the electrical power on Earth"
Wouldn't that be all of the OTHER power on Earth? After all, this test was conducted on Earth, making even this discharge a subset of the "all the electrical power on Earth," but I digress. It's really amazing, though, to think this was pulse through a tuna-can sized hunk of aluminum. You'd think it melt. Tuna...melt....I really should stop.

Re:Wouldn't that be... (0, Offtopic)

Filter (6719) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213750)

Your post time says 10:24AM, you need to get some sleep, I have seen these symptoms before. You'll be alright.

Re:Wouldn't that be... (1)

YankeeInExile (577704) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213787)

...all of the OTHER power on Earth?

No, I think they can stand by the all the power generated on earth. because their system does not actually generate any power. It just stores up power from The Grid for a longish while and then dumps it in a (quote) few microseconds. The power being dissipated in that chunk of plasma-ball-former-aluminium-puck is indeed excess to all the power being currently generated (Well, actually, converted from some existing source of potential or chemical energy, if we want to get superpedantic ... ) world-wide.

Re:Wouldn't that be... (1)

simon_clarkstone (750637) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213858)

You'd think it melt.

It probably did melt, but the important part was that it was also crushed by the immense magnetic field created. This is a bit like the effect created at http://205.243.100.155/frames/shrinkergallery.html [205.243.100.155] . Of course, the actual heating cannot be worked out as they do not specify the duration of the current.

Maybe Now... (1)

ballstothat (893605) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213675)

Perhaps with this technology, Con Edison can finally power all the air conditioners in the metro NYC area.

Nah, I doubt it.

Re:Maybe Now... (1)

NineNine (235196) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213698)

Are there problems with brownouts in NYC, too? Wow, if both LA and NYC don't have enough juice, then we may be seeing the first *real* practical limits of the massive human overpopulation. Awesome.

Re:Maybe Now... (1)

amliebsch (724858) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213785)

we may be seeing the first *real* practical limits

Nah, it would still be an artificial limit. Let people go without power long enough, and they'll have no problem with a couple of new nuke plants. Problem solved.

What? (5, Informative)

callipygian-showsyst (631222) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213679)

...Test Site said they generated a current equal to about four times all the electrical power on Earth.

...

During the few millionths of a second that it operated, the 650-ton Atlas pulsed-power generator discharged about 19 million amps

Um....unless things have changed in the 25+ years since I took a college physics class, we measure POWER in WATTS, and CURRENT in AMPS. So the number you quoted in AMPS that you claims is eqaual to four times the POWER in amps doesn't make any sense. Of course, that never stopped our /. Editors before!

Re:What? (0)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213777)

Don't blame the editors -- the press release contains the same irritatingly vague language.

Re:What? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213833)

The editors deserve all the blame. You know, its sorta their job to... edit? Revolutionary concept that is.

Re:What? (1)

timle (890873) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213824)

This has nothing to do with the editors its taken directly from the PDF, but I don't suppose you took time to read it. Yes, its a terrible sentence but later they say for the for "the few millonths of a second that it operates, Atlas generates electrical energy output roughly four times the Earth's entire energy production." Again an unforunate sentence as it doesn't say minus Atlas itself. However energy is power * time, so for a minute ammount of time this does seem to produce produce vast ammounts of power.

Re:What? (1)

WinterSolstice (223271) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213827)

Actually, it wouldn't matter. This was just a garbage press release.

"Hey, look! We can *still* do what we did before to simulate the "computer codes" we use to simulate the nuclear testing we can't do"

So, this is a re-test of a POC of a nuclear weapons testing system. It's hardly science, and it is definately not news, since this existed what, 3 years ago?

Sheesh.

-WS

Hmm... (5, Funny)

leshert (40509) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213681)

On July 27, scientists at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Test Site said they generated a current equal to about four times all the electrical power on Earth.

Where did they do this experiment--Mars?

Re:Hmm... (1)

DoorFrame (22108) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213788)

It only said "on" the Earth... I suppose they could have done it underground. Or in a balloon of some sort.

Re:Hmm... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213807)

Hats off to you sir, funniest comment I've seen in a long while.

I could use that... (2, Funny)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213683)

to power the beowulf cluster I just imagined.

Laugh kids... it's kinda funny.

Re:I could use that... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213811)

Laugh kids... it's kinda funny.

Sorry, but it isn't.

Fucking German wart-dick.

Re:I could use that... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213822)

No, it's not.

Two points (3, Informative)

TildeMan (472701) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213684)

1. Current != power. Power = I^2 R, or any equivalent formula.

2. They did this on Earth, so it was actually only 80% of the electrical power (or insert appropriate noun here, see point 1) on Earth. Assuming it was four times the normal power levels without this extra current.

11? (5, Funny)

ryanvm (247662) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213685)

I'll bet this amp goes to 11.

Re:11? (3, Funny)

adrianbaugh (696007) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213734)

Nah, they just made 10 louder ;-)

Re:11? (0)

Satorian (902590) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213746)

Oh, I see. And most amps go up to ten?

Re:11? (0)

JustOK (667959) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213793)

u needa spinal tap

Re:11? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213829)

yeah, man, but like this one, it goes to ELEVEN....

Re:11? (1)

Thalagyrt (851883) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213830)

Most guitar amps generally have 0-10 on their output knobs, I think that's what he was talking about.

Coherence ? (1)

Arthur B. (806360) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213686)

to about four times all the electrical power on Earth.
19 million amps
Urr... if it was all about generating amps I don't see the point. Can't you get near infinite amperage with finite power in a supraconducter ?

Re:Coherence ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213762)

Does this make sense? If power is the product of current and voltage is it possible to have an infinite current, a finite voltage > 0, and measure a finite amount of power? I would think that you could APPROACH an infinite current and still have a finite amount of power produced.

Re:Coherence ? (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213773)

supraconducter

You could also use a Honda or any other type of car for that matter.

Re:Coherence ? (1)

adrianbaugh (696007) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213784)

> if it was all about generating amps I don't see the point.

It wasn't, as you'd know if you'd RTFA. Passing a high current through a cylinder makes it implode (in our undergrad labs in Oxford there was a length of squished copper pipe that had provided a short circuit between (IIRC) an old linac and ground. They want to cause a powerful implosion to study nukes without having to detonate them for real.

Re:Coherence ? (1)

Interrupt18 (839674) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213800)

I googled supraconducter to make sure it wasn't some new type of material, but since it's apparent you mean superconductor, there is no power dissipated (R=0 so I^2R = 0, although you're right, it's finite) but there is still an upper limit on the amount of current a given superconductor can accomodate before it stops superconducting.

so that's what it was (1)

frovingslosh (582462) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213688)

I thought I felt a disturbance in the force.

And this benefits us how? (0)

thoolie (442789) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213691)

Being an EE, I am unsure how this, at this time, benefits us as a society or helps us move forward on the technilogical horizon. Yes, that is a HUGE amount of current, but unless you are designing HUGE lasers (such as what this is more than likey going to be used for - you know, the one that is mounted on the 747).

I am all for super cool tech, but I just wonder how usefull this is in comparison to the other cool stuff going on? Although, the headline "DOE Generates X Times of Current in Tuna Can" is pretty fascinating.

Re:And this benefits us how? (2, Informative)

vontrotsky (667853) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213797)

This is part of the nuclear stewardship program. The US has a few thousand nukes that need to be maintianed, but not tested due to treaty restrictions. Therefore, intricate computer simulations are used to run virtual weapons tests.

The "tuna can" in this experiments is being subjected to high stresses, and measuring its response lets the researchers validate their simulation's predictions. If the simulation predicts the behavior of the can, it's more likely to acurately describe a nuclear device.

Jeff

19 MA at (x) volts? (1)

YankeeInExile (577704) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213692)

Although, having read the press release, I do believe the four times the net energy production figure; without telling us what voltage this few-microsecond pulse is at, it is impossible to know what the instantaneous power is.

One would need to scrounge around in Wikipedia or something for the total worldwide electricity production, multiply by four, do the arithmetic, and know the peak voltage. But maybe they meant the energy dissipated in those microseconds, which case you'd need to know the discharge curve. That's what, 0.5*C*V**2, right? Quick, what's the resistance for a tuna-can-sized chunk of some random aluminium alloy?

Re:19 MA at (x) volts? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213813)

0.5*C*V**2 is the energy stored in a capacitor

"We never get tired of blowing stuff up" (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213694)

One of the researchers was quoted as saying.

 

Picturing preliminary testing... (3, Funny)

AndyChrist (161262) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213700)

A group of lab-coated engineers having a barbecue using a 48 million dollar grill.

Re:Picturing preliminary testing... (1)

Thalagyrt (851883) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213859)

Oh come on, this isn't flamebait, it's a joke. :P

I wonder if... (1)

Zweideutig (900045) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213702)

Could Intel be funding the construction of this generator as a drop-in replacement for our current source of electricity? With this, Intel should be able to get a system to POST with the new Pentium V. Disclaimer: I have a 3.8 GHz Precott on my Gentoo machine.

The big question is (0)

jurt1235 (834677) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213708)

Does it hurt when you hold the other end of the tuna can shaped wire?

Ok, last night Braniac rerun had an electric fence test, you have got to get your inspiration from somewhere :-(

can't anybody get it right? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213710)

Current, power and energy are not the same!

power = voltage times current

and

power = energy per unit time
(the rate of energy production or consumption)

But Current != Power (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213714)

nuff said

Tuna (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213716)

I think tuna can be cooked with far less power.
But then again, maybe they just wanted it seared.

Re:Tuna (2, Funny)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213798)

I think tuna can be cooked with far less power.

Tuna can be cooked with much less power, but unforunately by slow cooking it you lose a lot of the natural flavoring. That's why this, the preferred solution by most gourmet chefs, cooks the tuna in a few millionths of a second.

And? (-1, Troll)

mrbill1234 (715607) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213719)

And?

How much power? (1)

harks (534599) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213720)

How much is all the electrical power on Earth? It doesn't give numbers.

Re:How much power? (1)

JordanH (75307) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213778)

How much is all the electrical power on Earth? It doesn't give numbers.
~ 19/4 Million Amps

Re:How much power? (1)

Prophetic_Truth (822032) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213834)

Well, according to their claims, it would be 19,000,000 / 4 and some change. Which would be around 4,750,000 amps generated in the amount of time they generated thier power i guess.

purpose? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213721)

so they made some aluminum implode
whats the point?

are they planning on making a signularity to drop on Iran?

Partical Applications? (1)

nherc (530930) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213722)

Umm, okay that's interesting and all, but are there any practical uses besides using this thing to simulate nuclear weapons material tests? Or is this just another huge money sink for the good ol' US Gov't?

Do we really need to keep reasearching nuclear weapons anyway, with the Cold War long over and the ban on them and all?

Considering this is "News for Nerds" (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213724)

...is is too much to ask having editors who understand that an Ampere is not a unit of power?

19 mega-amps is "a current equal to about four times all the electrical power on Earth." Buh?

Also "all the electrical power on Earth" is a ridiculously stupid phrasing, and is meaningless. If this particular experiment took place on earth, than it cannot possibly exceed "all the electrical power on Earth" by definition.

Maybe this was an impressive hihg-power event. Maybe they refer to dissapating in a few microseconds power exceeding some meaningful measure like the electrical GENERATING CAPACITY currently in place on earth, or some such.

But TFA has essentially nothing useful, and obviously was written by someone who either doesn't know or doesn't care about basic physics.

I call bullshit. And I call incompetent editing on Slashdot for not doing so first.

What a waste of money... (1, Funny)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213730)

Any fool knows they could obtain just as much current by sticking a few boyscouts up on a pole... oops, bad taste...

19 Million? (2, Funny)

iamdrscience (541136) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213735)

19 Million Amps, eh? Now all they need is 19 million guitars and the whole planet can rock out.

Puh-leeze. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213736)

I generate that kind of electricity every time I walk across my living room carpet. Then I go give my wife a great big hug. It's great fun.

Black Mesa (3, Funny)

Chairboy (88841) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213756)

Of interest, the testing work here in Nevada has been farmed out to a private corporation. We now call it the Black Mesa Research Facility. Dr. Freeman and I have just started working together, and we have a number of exciting experiments underway. This last one in the story just happened, and it was very...

hold on, there's something moving out in the hallway, I've got to go check.

)#($)
NO CARRIER

Sadly (0)

Digital Warfare (746982) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213760)

The tuna didn't survive.

sooo... (1)

scaverdilly (902859) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213761)

If you divide that between the entire human race ... each person could make a piece of toast? Maybe over a 20 minute period of time?

But does it run Linux? (1)

martinultima (832468) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213791)

I see no reason to allow four times the amount of energy the Earth can produce unless the generator runs my favorite operating system. :-)

(Would nineteen million amps be enough to power the three million processor TRANSLTR [wikipedia.org] , do you think?)

Minor detail (1)

beavis88 (25983) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213792)

How the hell was it generated? A capacitor farm? 32 trillion hamsters on exercise wheels?

power != current (0, Redundant)

fizze (610734) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213796)

"...said they generated a current equal to about four times all the electrical power on Earth."

power = current * voltage

at least thats was teachers & prof bashed into my head for years.....

How was this measured? (1)

MirrororriM (801308) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213802)

I RTFA, but I see no mention of wattage or voltage. Amps would be just one part of the equation: V * A = W

Was it 1 volt? 1 watt? Call me shallow, but it could be much less impressive depending on the aforementioned questions.

Inquiring minds want to know...

Ya (1, Funny)

avkb03 (684477) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213804)

Keep Pedalin Lance, we're at 19 Million Amps!

That's great news... (0)

Anita Coney (648748) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213805)

Ted Nugent can finally go to 11!

Wait, that's BAD news. Sorry.

Isn't that... (1)

DigitalDwarf (902246) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213806)

Isn't that the same AMP that a 2 Year Old Child produce when on a Sugar Rush??

ugh? (1)

logik3x (872368) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213810)

This post is so useless... there is nothing back it up... that press realease is so generic I could make my little sister write one like that... and what are we supose to get from this? some random chunck of aluminium can implode when stuck by 19 million Amps... I could of predicted that and saved them a couple of millions...

Tuna cans... (1)

mikael (484) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213814)

During the few millionths of a second that it operated, the 650-ton Atlas pulsed-power generator discharged about 19 million amps of current through an aluminum cylindrical shell about the size of a tuna can.


That's one über wi-fi.

I can only imagine the wi-fi range they'd get with a Pringles can.

What A Waste... (0)

creimer (824291) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213816)

All that power and no Frankenstein monster in sight. You would think they could use the technology to create humanity instead of light shows.

Tuna can a poor choice (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213819)

Any mexican woman would have done better in her kitchen with a hot chili sauce can.

Yes, yes... current != power (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13213826)

Could you people maybe check and see that 9000 other people have not posted the same thing, or maybe realize it's just not that important to correct an offhand quip? That's why people make fun of nerds: you insist on technical accuracy in inappropriate or unnecessary situations. It's annoying.

Current != Power (1, Informative)

thoolie (442789) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213835)

"...they generated a current equal to about four times all the electrical power on Earth..."

Last I checked, Power = Volts * Current. So, unless I'm missing something, I'm not sure how that works out. According to the CIA World Fact book, the world uses 15.29 trillion kWh of power a year, so, if there are 86400 hours a year, then we use 1.769676e-4 Trillion kW a year. This computes to 5.61161e-12 TkW a second. So, if this thing ran for .02 seconds (I think they said for "milliseconds" then, they would need to generate (4x) 1.12232111e-13 TkW to make this thing work. So the voltage used would have to have been [4*1.12232111e-13e-13]/19000000 = 2.36278128e-12 Trillion Volts.

The odds that my math is correct: .02%
The odds that they misrepresented current at power: 98%

Just food for thought!

Pshaw (0)

Theatetus (521747) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213842)

Now when they can mount it on the back of a shark, I'll be impressed.

In other news... (0)

afstanton (822402) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213846)

nuclear fusion achieved with raw tuna!

Exploding apples with capacitors (4, Informative)

Cyclotron_Boy (708254) | more than 8 years ago | (#13213853)

This is a fun project. I was able to get about 18kA repeatably through a variety of objects [niell.org] from a small cap bank using low inductance leads and vacuum triggered spark gap. Lots of people do fun projects like this at home in their garages

For example
Bert Hickman's coin shrinking [205.243.100.155]
Thaltech's capacitor experiments [thaltech.com]
Sam Barros's Power Labs page [powerlabs.org]
Bill Beaty's webpage [amasci.com]
and many others...

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>