×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

540 comments

They should check Karl Rove's computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13216930)


who knows what you could find there

Supports the Hacker Creed (2, Insightful)

WebHostingGuy (825421) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216931)

That information wants to be set free.

Re:Supports the Hacker Creed (5, Insightful)

Swamii (594522) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217017)

No it doesn't, and please stop anthropomorphizing it.

Open-source software advocates want information to be free, as do civil liberty groups and other political organizations that fall near the Slashdot line of thinking.

But to say information wants to be free is like saying my computer monitor wants to be plugged into a high-end video card: it may be better for all parties, but in the end, the monitor is just a monitor. Likewise, information is just information.

Re:Supports the Hacker Creed (1)

BlowChunx (168122) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217051)

Is every one in your family that literal? It must be difficult to use metaphors, metonome, etc.

Information wants to be free because sunshine is the best antiseptic.

Re:Supports the Hacker Creed (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217082)

No it doesn't, and please stop anthropomorphizing it.

Yeah, it hates it when you do that.

Re:Supports the Hacker Creed (5, Insightful)

nickptar (885669) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217091)

Information "wants" to be free in the same sense that things "want" to fall to the ground; it's the path of least resistance. What the statement means to me is that information usually becomes free in the absence of measures taken to prevent it from doing so. I think we can agree that that's true.

Re:Supports the Hacker Creed (1)

Andorion (526481) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217112)

You obviously misunderstood the use of the word "wants" in that statement, it has nothing to do with anthropomorphism. The phrase "Information wants to be free" doesn't apply to this situation, but what it really means is that information has a natural tendancy to slip out, to disseminate - to be free. It takes special effort to contain information, by its very nature it wants to be free, just like a river wants to flow, a raindrop wants to fall, etc.

If so (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217020)

then push for Sibel Edmunds [justacitizen.org] to be able to talk with being buried in a Texas prison.

Re:Supports the Hacker Creed (3, Interesting)

deathcloset (626704) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217048)

well, yes.

But that information doesn't want to be used as fodder for extortion.

if the hacker had just made the find publicly available that would have been one thing. but, rather, the hacker choose to use his find to threaten the researchers.

Re:Supports the Hacker Creed (3, Funny)

EccentricAnomaly (451326) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217057)

more from here: http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/29/science/29cnd-pl [nytimes.com] anet.html

Dr. Brown had still hoped to hold back announcements of 2003 UB313 and another large Kuiper Belt object, 2005 FY9, until October, but his hand was tipped by Brian Marsden, director of the Minor Planet Center, who said that he was worried about hanky panky.

Dr. Marsden said that it was possible by looking on the Internet at the logs of one of the telescopes Dr. Brown's team had been using to find out where they had been pointed. He had evidence, he said, that someone had done that and computed crude orbits of the two unannounced planetoids, "presumably" in preparation for their own observations.


perhaps we should call the planet P4w-N3d :)

Re:Supports the Hacker Creed (1)

Adrilla (830520) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217067)

or maybe they believe in the motto of 'Serenity', "Can't Stop the Signal".

Re:Supports the Hacker Creed (0, Redundant)

MrWhitefolkz (751859) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217092)

Actually, no information wants anything. If I'm wrong, can I have your credit card numbers please? I'm sure that wants to be free :)

Re:Supports the Hacker Creed (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217116)

> That information wants to be set free.

Absolutely! Hey, what's your credit card number?

Hey CmdrTaco (-1, Offtopic)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216939)

Nothing for you to see here. Please move along.

Why don't you fix your fucking code already? This is one of 102938912371293792137971 glaring, on-going, Im gonna come to your house and eat your family, bugs.

Re:Hey CmdrTaco (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217062)

Why don't you fucking fix the code already? It's open source, quit your complaining.

Re:Hey CmdrTaco (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217093)

Bullshit, everybody knows that to get patches accepted you have to give Taco a blowjob.

Re:Hey CmdrTaco (-1, Offtopic)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217104)

Since when did open source become "I am too fucking lazy to code properly... even though I make revenue from said code base"?

And when did you geeks get so afraid to post non-anonymously? You got something to say? Then SAY IT to ME.

you, sir, suck at life (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217095)

Nice site you got there, mindchild.net

Oh, wait, it doesn't exist anymore.

How about you go update your 'fucking' website or your 'fucking' prefs and stop trolling Taco.

Re:Hey CmdrTaco (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217097)

Nice thing about open source:
Get the code and fix it yourself if you don't like it.
That or start your own site with a decent codebase.
But bitchin won't do you any good. This is Taco's college project and he still treats it like such.

wtf (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13216940)

The new planet's name is Xena [google.com] .

Re:wtf (1)

hattig (47930) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217047)

It'll have a moon called Hercules.

Meanwhile, on the other side of the Solar System, the KBOs 'Buffy', 'Angel', 'Willow' and 'Spike' are soon going to clash.

I quite like Xena as a name though. Better than Xanthros or Xerces or Xybots.

go figure. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13216943)

shocking.

A bad thing? (5, Insightful)

ect5150 (700619) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216948)


while they waited for full analysis

So, waiting for a full analysis is a bad thing now?

Re:A bad thing? (1)

hackwrench (573697) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216993)

Before telling anybody else about it, yes. Also, how come no one is asking the question why it took 2 years before such analysis was done.

Re:A bad thing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217079)

I don't know. Maybe they wanted to make astrologers look silly?

Re:A bad thing? (2, Insightful)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216997)

In America, sure. Think if we had waited for a full analysis of Iraq's WMD's, or if they had anything at all to do with 9/11. Then we never would have had an excuse to go to war.

Re:A bad thing? (1)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217006)

In some cases it can be!

Consider the following:

If geeks fully analylized their winnings from random bar, almost all would never get laid (And have lack of good "Oh MY GOD WHAT DID I DO!!?!?! stories)

Re:A bad thing? (1)

Valiss (463641) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217016)

So, waiting for a full analysis is a bad thing now?

Of course. How can you expect us to mob the scientist with questions you know they can't answer so we can cut their funding if they have done all the needed analyst?

Millions of schoolkids were being lied to. (0)

team99parody (880782) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217080)

So, waiting for a full analysis is a bad thing now?

And in the mean time, millions - hundreds of millions - of schoolkids were being lied to everwhere.

This _is_ a bad thing.

The result of these lies is that the kids are taught "if you know something, and a bunch of people around you are telling lies, it's OK to play along with the lie and hide the truth from people".

In other news... (1)

djfray (803421) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216950)

crazy alien theorists were disproved about the government hiding information about alien life forms, through them hiding information about the tenth planet

Article quality (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13216953)

I question the reliability of that publication. I mean, they even have a - bad - Uranus joke in the end. I really don't think there's anything to it. Move along.

Re:Article quality (1)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217111)

The Inquirer article is actually just rehashing what the South African Sunday Independant reported. That publication seems to have more credibility (or at least didn't make any Uranus jokes... was that a joke?)

UFO deniers (1)

truckaxle (883149) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216958)

So all of you smarty pants UFO deniers what do you think of that!!! Just wait until I hack into the USAF computers and force them reveal the truth likewise.

I've always wanted to see... (1)

jwigum (813234) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217133)

A missile target by IP address, why don't you go and mess with the air force...

Security through Obscurity (2, Funny)

Natchswing (588534) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216960)

When will corporations ever learn? Obscuring the knowledge of the 10th planet will not keep us safe from their eventual attempt to take over Earth.

Secure (1)

alop (67204) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216967)

I guess their "secure website" wasn't up to snuff... BTW, what the heck is a boffin?

Re:Secure (1)

SparafucileMan (544171) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217049)

boffin: a cock who is also a cockblocker, who upon getting laid tells the entire world that said lady is easy.

aka, "But for many young people in Britain, it is indeed derogatory, but for a different reason. When it came into fashion among them some 20 years ago, it took on much the same sense that my generation gave to swot, as a disparaging description of someone good at school work--a person acknowledged to be brainy, but inoffensive and definitely not respected."

http://www.worldwidewords.org/topicalwords/tw-bof1 .htm [worldwidewords.org]

Re:Secure (1)

geniusj (140174) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217083)

I asked a friend..

me: wtf IS a boffin?
him: you don't know what a boffin is dawg?
me: nope
him: you kinda suck :(
him: it's what dumb people call clever people to make up for their own dumbness
him: pretty much a lame insult to clever people

What jerks (1)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216969)

Seriously, they were sitting on the data for a reason. And as this data doesn't affect anybody on a day to day basis, I can see why they'd want to hold off on the announcement until they could give real numbers.

This is of course assuming the story isn't bullshit. I seem to remember one scientist saying he had a bet with another that he'd discover a 10th planet by the end of last year.

Re:What jerks (1)

snuf23 (182335) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217094)

"This is of course assuming the story isn't bullshit. I seem to remember one scientist saying he had a bet with another that he'd discover a 10th planet by the end of last year."

This was found by the same guy. He lost the bet by 10 days. You can read more at Xena Planet X or Big Lump of Rock [theregister.co.uk] .

The Scientists Had No Right... (0, Troll)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216970)

The scientists had no right to keep this information secret if they used publically funded (one of the telescopes on Mount Palomar) equipment to make this discovery, or their salaries are paid from tax money. Taxpayers deserved to hear about it when it was discovered.

The people involved in this should be banned from using public equipment due to their clear lack of ethics!

Re:The Scientists Had No Right... (5, Insightful)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217031)

The people involved in this should be banned from using public equipment due to their clear lack of ethics!

No, they should be commended for not rushing out their findings until they had been properly analyzed and validated. The public doesn't track or care about retracted or falsified scientific studies, so to come out with unchecked data would end up confusing most people if the conclusion made based on that data was proven to be incorrect. And it's not like this was some big discovery that was actually going to change the average person's life... they aren't sitting on the cure for cancer or something.

Re:The Scientists Had No Right... (1)

MustardMan (52102) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217070)

And if the scientists made the announcement before properly analyzing the data, and it turned out to be a false positive, the backlash from the bad press could very well cause them to lose their funding.

There's a big difference between "withholding information" and "scientific rigor"

Re:The Scientists Had No Right... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217100)

You lack a basic understanding of how the scientific process works. Confirmation of an observation, analysis of the resulting data, peer reviewing of those data, and replication of the original observation ALL ensure the accuracy of the scientific find.

Ban them!?! The scientists were clearly planning on releasing their discovery but were forced to do it prematurely. They were abiding by scientific principles.

asa da (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13216971)

asa da

RE: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13216973)

What harm would come if the data was released? None that I can think of.

"Nothing to see here. Please move along." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13216978)

I guess there is no 10th planet after all. Or is there even a 9th? I smell a conspiracy!

Oh noes! Hackers! (4, Interesting)

Dirtside (91468) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216980)

I traced through the friendly articles, and I'm not sure where the Sunday Independent got the info that a hacker "forced" them to announce their findings. Brown isn't quoted as saying anything about a hacker, and they didn't source that info.

Of course, what's even stupider is how both the Independent and, to an even stupider degree, the Inquirer make it sound all ominous and elitist that the scientists didn't release the info as soon as they found it. Like, maybe they didn't want to risk the media flaming them for prematurely announcing a tenth planet if they had to recant part of their data?

Re:Oh noes! Hackers! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217118)

>> Of course, what's even stupider is how ....

I think you probably mean "more stupid".

'stupider' ain't proper usage.

Damn the Hackers!! (1)

Tibor the Hun (143056) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216981)

Damn those Hackers. Who are they and how can they be stopped?

This past year they were not responsible for things such as millions of private records being given out by various credit card companies, banking institutions and what not. They were also not responsible for vast majority of copyright infringment, ie theft, ie grand larceny, ie murder in the first.
I am sick and tired of Hackers.

ooh... Hersch just wrote to tell me about the new Cialis prices... gotta go...

As any good scientist should do! (1)

hattig (47930) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216984)

Instead they had to announce the discovery of a planet they don't even know the diameter of.

Right now it is looking to be bigger than Pluto.

And for my contribution to the inevitable 'Asteroid', 'Minor Planet', 'Planet' argument, I'm tending to the viewpoint that any body in space that is spherical under its own gravity is a planet. Even if it has been flung from its parent solar system into deep space.

Yes, that means the Moon is a Planet.

Planets include Gas Giants, Ice Bodies, Rocky Planets, and so on.

No big deal (1)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216989)

There are 'planetoids' that are bigger than pluto that are considered simple KBO even though some consider them to be planets.

I think Pluto is only considered a planet because it was grandfathered into the current (confusing and not entirely adhered to) rules on what is and isn't a planet.

Odds are, this will just be classified as another KBO.

Name One (3, Insightful)

SteveM (11242) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217119)

There are 'planetoids' that are bigger than pluto that are considered simple KBO even though some consider them to be planets.

Really, name one.

You cannot, as this is the first KBO discovered that is larger than Pluto.

SteveM

I found a planet (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13216992)

in my pants. i had chinese last night

Witholding information (1)

Zordak (123132) | more than 8 years ago | (#13216994)

Evidently the discoverers have been withholding this information from the public since 2003 while they waited for full analysis.
You mean they held on to their data until they could do a proper analysis and really determine what they had, rather than jump all over a premature and sensationalistic announcement? Those charlatans! Pons and Fleischman would be ashamed of them.

Source? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13216999)

Short article, short on evidence or sources.
Next?

Uranus... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217000)

The end of the article:

The find should further stuff up modern astrologers - they still have not got the hang of Uranus.

Haha

first post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217002)

but not the first 10th planet found

According to who!? (1)

djSpinMonkey (816614) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217005)

That's nothing! According to the Weekly World News, Batboy [batboy.co.uk] has been secretly in communication with the denizens of Planet X since early 2000!

first post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217007)

first post

ObJoke (1)

RedLaggedTeut (216304) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217008)

Quote from the end of the referred article:

The find should further stuff up modern astrologers - they still have not got the hang of Uranus.

Well, I hadn't noticed their probes yet, I didn't think someone would go the distance to get to know me inside out ..

A Mad Affair. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217009)

""According to The Inquirer, hackers gained access to the secure server where the data about the new planet was being held and threatened to reveal it."

*Mad Magazine Cover*

Buy this magazine or else the dog gets it.

Meanwhile... (1)

daviq (888445) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217022)

Hackers got into a secure server where the request to keep back the information was being processed and took over the world.

Full disclosure? (0, Troll)

Sv-Manowar (772313) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217029)

This method of using intrusions to force 'full disclosure' by scientists is interesting, and begs why this information can be kept out of the public eye, where it would benefit the scientific community at large, and is instead held back to bolster the reputations of those who make the initial discovery. Should they really have the right to keep the information secret until they've had the opportunity to make time-critical observations and gain all the information they require to make impressive enough announcements. Who knows what else could be kept back from the scientific community until its observer deems it 'impressive' enough to release..

Re:Full disclosure? (1)

geoffspear (692508) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217124)

I think they should send every bit of data they collect each day to all of the world's major newspapers, myself. And shame on the publishers if they don't publish it all without knowing what, if anything, it all might mean.

so.. (1)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217037)

That hacker who went in look for UFOs doesn't seem so crazy now does he? If they're hiding whole planets surely a few space ships/bases/fleets would be simple.

Can you really blame them? (1)

jesuscyborg (903402) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217038)

Can you blame them for holding back on announcing the discovery? After all, it would be very embarassing to the astronomer community to retract such an important discovery, like the chemists did with Ununoctium [webelements.com] .

Serves 'em right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217040)

So says I.

Blackmail (1)

FlatCatInASlatVat (828700) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217042)

If it's true, said Hacker should have his/her computer taken away. It's not like the planet was going to go away. Were astrologers or other "common people" suffering for lack of the data? The astronomer was right to confirm and tighten up the data before going public. He'd be embarassed and ridiculed if he released too soon and got it wrong.

Info was not withheld since 2003 (3, Informative)

YoDave (184176) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217071)

From a BBC article [bbc.co.uk] : The object was first observed on 21 October 2003, but the team did not see it move in the sky until looking at the same area 15 months later on 8 January 2005.

Thank you Astronomers/Researchers for good science (5, Insightful)

Listen Up (107011) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217074)

Congratulations and Thank You to the Astronomers/Researchers involved with this discovery. Thank You for discovering something and then waiting for a full peer review and analysis before presenting your data to the public. WAAAAY too much today that process does not occur, because of bad scientists, and gives a bad name to good science and scientists.

Fuck you to the hackers who feel that something like this needed to be public without review. If it was 'revealed' and then found to be false, nobody would have remembered some script kiddie illegally, immorally, and unethically published the data before it was reviewed. Everyone would have jumped on the Astronomers/Researchers and science in general like a bunch of ignorant cattle (like they always do) and the true facts would have been buried in the mess.

So Maybe The Other Hacker Was Right (0, Troll)

Master of Transhuman (597628) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217086)


Maybe that guy who busted into computers looking for evidence of a UFO coverup was right.

He just didn't bust into the RIGHT computers and he was sloppy about it.

Anybody ever try to hack the computers at Area 51? That might be fun.

Don't do this from home. "That's universally stupid, dude!"

Well thank you too much (0, Troll)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217108)

Stupid crackers.

How about cracking imdb and putting the endings to movies on line.

Get a life, fer Bobsake.

That's awesome! (1)

daVinci1980 (73174) | more than 8 years ago | (#13217131)

This way, when the researchers get a chance to get more data and then decide that it's actually a comet, asteroid, or an object in the Kuiper belt and make an announcement to such an effect, the public will condemn them for releasing their initial findings too soon!

Yay!
 
...
 
Oh wait, that sucks.

Ah The Inquirer... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13217135)

now there is a reliable news site. NOT.

I have been involved in events which The Inquirer covered and they not only got the facts wrong, they mangled the facts into out-and-out-lie to push their own warped idea of how things are or should be.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...