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South Korean Scientists Clone Dog

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the this-is-one-clone-with-a-seoul dept.

Biotech 404

Ebon Praetor writes "According to the BBC and Reuters, South Korean scientists have created the world's first cloned dog, an Afghan hound. The research purpose of the research is ostensibly to produce research animals and not for commercial purposes. Dogs are especially difficult to clone, but the scientists were able to extract DNA from a skin cell, inject it into an egg, and implant the egg into a surrogate mother."

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sex with ducks (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234031)

GNAA mutherfuckers FP beotches

Boring... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234032)

Dammit where is the half dog half alligator? This whole cloning regular animals thing is getting boring.

Re:Boring... (2, Funny)

crownrai (713377) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234205)

Question is would you really want that animal to come when you call it?

Re:Boring... (4, Funny)

lucabrasi999 (585141) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234312)

where is the half dog half alligator?

More importantly, where is the "Mog"? A mog is his own best friend.

They forgot to mention Walmart (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234033)

NOWADAYS, mighty Wal-Mart's headquarters in Bentonville, Ark., must feel less like a hotbed of retailing than like a war room. The company faces a groundswell of criticism, largely focused on its treatment of workers. From low wages to limited health care coverage, Wal-Mart has some issues to tackle, and it has mostly responded with feel-good television advertisements and denial. But to chalk up Wal-Mart's success simply to the exploitation of its work force, as many of the company's most ferocious critics do, is simply wrong, for two reasons.

First, Wal-Mart hasn't just sliced up the economic pie in a way that favors one group over another. Rather, it has made the total pie bigger. Consider, for example, the conclusions of the McKinsey Global Institute's study of United States labor productivity growth from 1995 to 2000. Robert Solow, a Nobel laureate in economics and an adviser on the study, noted that the most important factor in the growth of productivity was Wal-Mart. And because the study measured productivity per man hour rather than per payroll dollar, low hourly wages cannot explain the increase.

Second, most of the value created by the company is actually pocketed by its customers in the form of lower prices. According to one recent academic study, when Wal-Mart enters a market, prices decrease by 8 percent in rural areas and 5 percent in urban areas. With two-thirds of Wal-Mart stores in rural areas, this means that Wal-Mart saves its consumers something like $16 billion a year. And because Wal-Mart's presence forces the store's competitors to charge lower prices as well, this $16 billion figure understates the company's real impact by at least half.

These kinds of savings to customers far exceed the costs that Wal-Mart supposedly imposes on society by securing subsidies, destroying jobs in competing stores, driving employees toward public welfare systems and creating urban sprawl. Even if these offenses could all be ascribed to Wal-Mart, their costs wouldn't add up to anything like $16 billion.

Similarly, the savings to customers also exceed the total surplus the company generates for its shareholders- a surplus that would be wiped out if Wal-Mart's million-plus employees were to receive a $2-per-hour pay increase, modest though that sounds. Such a possibility would be unacceptable to Wal-Mart's shareholders, who include not only Sam Walton's heirs but also the millions of Americans who invest in mutual funds and pension plans. Instead, the more than 100 million Americans who shop at Wal-Mart would most likely just end up paying higher prices.

This last point suggests that the debate around Wal-Mart isn't really about a Marxist conflict between capital and labor. Instead, it is a conflict pitting consumers and efficiency-oriented intermediaries like Wal-Mart against a combination of labor unions, traditional retailers and community groups. Particularly in retailing, American policies favor consumers and offer fewer protections to other interests than is typical elsewhere in the world. Is such pro-consumerism a good thing?

The answer depends on who these consumers are, and Wal-Mart's customers tend to be the Americans who need the most help. Our research shows that Wal-Mart operates two-and-a-half times as much selling space per inhabitant in the poorest third of states as in the richest third. And within that poorest third of states, 80 percent of Wal-Mart's square footage is in the 25 percent of ZIP codes with the greatest number of poor households. Without the much-maligned Wal-Mart, the rural poor, in particular, would pay several percentage points more for the food and other merchandise that after housing is their largest household expense.

So in thinking about Wal-Mart, let's keep in mind who's reaping the benefits of those "everyday low prices" - and, by extension, where the real conflict lies.

Re:They forgot to mention Walmart (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234106)

Thank you, Mr. Walton, for those insights.

In korea (1, Funny)

mingot (665080) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234035)

In Korea only old people clone dogs.

It's karma burn wednesdaty!

South Korean Scientists Clone Dog (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234238)

Then eat it

Motivation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234038)

And, as a result, the Korean food supply becomes more plentiful!

Oblig... (-1)

ALeavitt (636946) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234041)

I, for one, welcome our cloned, Korean, canine overlords.

Off-color joke: (3, Funny)

BigZaphod (12942) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234044)

What, are they running out of their favorite food over there? *ba-dum-bump*

Re:Off-color joke: (1, Interesting)

CodeArtisan (795142) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234393)

Hang on a minute - I posted this joke first and was modded down as a Troll. Bloody PETA moderators.

Dog days of summer (1, Funny)

TrippTDF (513419) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234045)

...at least they picked the appropriate month to release this...

OMG (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234046)

That's as bad as Scottish scientists cloning sheep. Leave the animals alone people.

Re:OMG (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234199)

Not quite.
The scottish did it for sex. The Koreans are doing it for food.

Dear Mods... (-1, Offtopic)

suitepotato (863945) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234057)

...please mod down any posts making jokes regarding Asian foods and dog meat. Please. They're old. Although if anyone comes up with a way to plausibly reference a Beowulf cluster with this, that would be okay. Once. Second attempts should be met with terminal force. Just a humble request.

Beowolf cluster (0, Offtopic)

krell (896769) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234140)

' plausibly reference a Beowulf cluster with this'

You mean a Beowolf cluster of cloned canids?

Hey Timothy, (0, Offtopic)

SCHATTIE (760808) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234061)

You stated I threatened you, and
the judge laughed at you.
Nice of you to mention that the only reason you got that order is because
every single one of you lied to the cops and the judge, Ted. Like the lie I
screamed at you and at everyone in court.
Why do you lie, Ted?
That's hateful, asshole.

And, in sports news, (4, Funny)

conJunk (779958) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234065)

The organizers of the Iditerod prepare for scandal worse than major league baseball and and olympic running, combined!

er (3, Funny)

AnonymousNinja (828785) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234066)

He can be his own best friend

mmmmmmmmm (-1, Troll)

dthrall (894750) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234070)

and dinner has now been served...

End of food shortage (-1, Troll)

ClogHammer (904919) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234074)

Title says it all. Bon Appétit.

South Korean's Clone Dog... (-1, Troll)

CodeArtisan (795142) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234075)

... and create renewable food supply

Makes sense (0, Troll)

B-a-Z.nl (765901) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234076)

They need the food

Re:Makes sense (0, Troll)

B-a-Z.nl (765901) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234165)

Owk, slashdot ripped of my [asshole] ... [/asshole] parts of this message, makes me look reaaaally bad now :-(

Sorry 'bout that.

What did they call it? (1)

daniil (775990) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234077)

A Baskerville?

Re:What did they call it? (1)

frisket (149522) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234401)

A Baskerville?

Cloning a font?

Mmmmm.... (-1, Redundant)

jimmyCarter (56088) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234086)

Dinner's served!

(I know, poor taste, but funny..)

Re:Mmmmm.... (1)

coflow (519578) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234099)

Very original

Re:Mmmmm.... (1)

dzarn (760066) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234229)

(I know, poor taste, but funny..)

Actually, the taste ain't too bad...

Re:Mmmmm.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234275)

So I've heard.

Apparently it tastes like horse.

In Communist North Korea, (2, Funny)

chrisfez (305204) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234092)

dogs clone you!

Re:In Communist North Korea, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234215)

Shouldn't that be: "In Communist North Korea clones dog you" ?

Sounds like humans the next step... (1)

gg3po (724025) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234096)

...according to the article:

we'll learn about whether it is effective in our pets and we'll also learn whether it's safe and effective for our loved ones.

If I'm understanding TFA, breaking this "dog" barrier is an important step down the road to cloning you and I. Things keep getting more interesting.

Re:Sounds like humans the next step... (4, Interesting)

alvinrod (889928) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234274)

I honestly doubt it will be tried for a long while. First of all there are a lot of moral and religious objections to cloning a human. Second of all, cloning is still a fairly clumsy science. If you read in the article it says that they had 1000 embryos to start with. Of those 1000 implanted, 3 turned into pregnancies. Of those 3 pregnancies, 2 births occured (1 miscarried). Of those 2 births, 1 died less than a month after birth. Success rate, 1 in 1000.

Whether or not people have objections about cloning based on moral or religious reasons, I doubt that anyone would be willing to accept a 1 in 1000 success rate for attempting to clone a person. Whether or not the clones have souls, are real people, or any of the other arguments that apply, I don't think people would want 999 failures out of 1000 tries.

So until people become more accepting of cloning and the science is able to produce reliable results, I don't think we'll see it done with humans anytime soon.

Difficult to clone (3, Interesting)

truckaxle (883149) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234102)

Why are cloning dogs "notoriously difficult"? Is it because of the wide range of variability within the species?

Re:Difficult to clone (1)

lupinstel (792700) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234184)

It is hard to perfect the taste.

RTFA alternative Re:Difficult to clone (4, Informative)

StefanJ (88986) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234197)

From the NYTimes story:

* Can't stimulate estrus with hormones, as you can with other animals. (Doggy estrus is weird. I read about it while reading up on dogs prior to adopting one. Very complex process, and messy. Glad my pup is spayed.)

* Difficult to detect ovulation.

* Eggs are not ripe when they leave the ovary. They have to be nabbed as they travel through the fallopian tube, modified, and reinserted within a few hours.

Re:Difficult to clone (1)

papa248 (85646) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234256)

From TFA - "It has taken scientists longer to clone a dog than other animals because of the difficulty in producing mature, unfertilized canine eggs in the laboratory."

Re:Difficult to clone (5, Funny)

dr_dank (472072) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234288)

Why are cloning dogs "notoriously difficult"?

Ever try to get a poodle to stand still on a Xerox machine?

Concerned (1)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234104)

I wasn't worried until I saw that the press release was put out by the Umbrella Corporation from someplace called Raccoon City.

Slight differences in the copy (5, Funny)

StefanJ (88986) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234111)

"a frisky, healthy, normal, rambunctious puppy."

If you ignore the glowing red eyes, caustic drool, and an unearthly howl that makes babies cry and causes normal dogs who hear it to lose bowel control, chew through their leads, and leap in front of FedEx trucks.

Wulf (0)

HermanAB (661181) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234112)

I'd rather clone a beowulf cluster...

With my lysdexia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234117)

I thought they said that Koreans had cloned God.

Re:With my lysdexia... (1)

HermanAB (661181) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234262)

God was independently invented by many cultures around the Mediteranean sea. Unfortunately business method patents were not allowed yet, so whoever thought of it first, quickly lost his monopoly on religion...

In Korea (0, Redundant)

Phidoux (705500) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234118)

It's now possible to clone your own food.

Master Plan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234119)

Korea plans to produce radioactive cloned dogs of war! We're doomed!

Dinnertime! (0, Redundant)

old_skul (566766) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234126)

Suuuuure it's for research.

Soylent Green is DOGGGGGGGGGG (0, Troll)

MajorDick (735308) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234129)

I , being a Dick, have to say this , South Korea clonign dogs is like the US cloning chickens.

Lets be frank they eat Dogs there, and they LIKE them, we have a fellow here where I work that says the White or lighter ones tasted better than Darker ones, black being the least tasty, and you have to kill them right (cats also) otherwise the blood taints the meat.

I will have to forward this to him, anyone that can carry on an honest and frank discussion in the US about eating Dog deverves my respect.

Re:Soylent Green is DOGGGGGGGGGG (1)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234263)

"Lets be frank they eat Dogs there, and they LIKE them, we have a fellow here where I work that says the White or lighter ones tasted better than Darker ones, black being the least tasty, and you have to kill them right (cats also) otherwise the blood taints the meat."

From what I've read on the parallel thread on Fark, the eating of dogs is a dying tradition that young people are avoiding. /notice how I cleverly worded my post to avoid saying "In South Korea, only old people..." :)

Only about 10% eat dog (1)

winkydink (650484) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234395)

So it would be probably more akin to cloning deer or somesuch in the US.

I don't know about Korea, but I can tell you that in the parts of China I have visited, the black dog's meat is the most highly regarded.

Re:Soylent Green is DOGGGGGGGGGG (4, Interesting)

alvinrod (889928) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234405)

I think most of the objection that comes from our culture about anyone eating dogs is because we keep them as pets here. It's a little bit harder to eat something commonly regarded as "man's best friend" here.

Read Charlotte's Web, watch Babe, and keep a pig as a pet for a while. See if you don't feel like eating pork any more. I'd bet you would feel a slight bit edgy, but that's only because our culture doesn't make eating pork shameful or socially discourage the practice. If we had the same snide jokes about people eating pigs as we did about people eating dogs, you'd certainly find less people having bacon with their eggs.

If you're not squimish about eating beef, pork, chicken, or any other kind of meat, dog really shouldn't bother you. Yet because our culture identifies dogs and cats as pets and friendly, domesticated creatures we're prone to frown on eating them. To me, it seems as though it's almost viewed in the same light as canabalism.

To be blatantly honest, we Westerns are the ones being hypocritical and irrational for the most part. I don't know whether or not dog tastes good, and I might be willing to try it just for the sake of trying it, but I've been culturally conditioned to not want to eat dog.

Before you know it (1)

ch-chuck (9622) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234130)

N. Korea's Kim Jong-il will have an army of clone warriors.

Re:Before you know it (1)

Dystopian Rebel (714995) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234371)

In fact, it is inewitabo.

Inewitabo! Inewitabo! Inewitabo!

Imagine... (2, Funny)

Black Perl (12686) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234133)

...a Wolf cluster of these!

Obvious (1)

NetDanzr (619387) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234139)

I ran a poll in the office, for coworkers to guess which country has cloned the dog. Given that I work at a venture capital firm with the "Find a need, fill the need" mentality, everybody answered correctly.

Now I'm just waiting what the genetically modified food opponents would do...

Not Impressive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234146)

I'll be impressed when they clone the zombie dogs.

Whoof! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234147)

Whoof!

A dog?! What's next?! (1)

mynickwastaken (690966) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234153)

Snuppy joins a host of other cloned animals including Dolly the sheep, CC the cat and Ralph the rat
Let me guess: Batman the bat?!
Oh, just a sec. "For non-comercial purposes"? This would not work...

In Korea... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234155)

only Old people are cloned.

OMG IT'S RE-PET! (0)

xchino (591175) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234159)

But seriously, I think using this technology to clone our beloved pets would be a great idea. Now granted a cloned pet is not going to be exactly the same, but it will have the ssame genetics, and given the same environment to mature in, the end result should be a very similar pet. I've had a lot of dogs in my life, but Buster the Mutt was by far my favorite. He was super kind and loving and ridiculously smart. I know I will never find another dog like Buster, and given the oppurtunity I'd clone him in a second.

Re:OMG IT'S RE-PET! (2, Interesting)

Gunnery Sgt. Hartman (221748) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234294)

What made Buster be Buster was not his DNA. They way he was raised and environment and what not affected his personality way more than DNA ever could. In a few hundred years you might be able to put him in a copy machine and spit out an identical one, but until then he'll be alike in DNA only. Even spots aren't hereditary.

Re:OMG IT'S RE-PET! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234321)

Have you ever made love to a egg-mcmuffin? It makes shoot my spermies all over my self.

I like to pick my ass

5 easy steps... (1)

jackelfish (831732) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234177)

1) Get egg 2) Inject DNA 3) Implant 4) Incubate for awhile 5) Start morality debate... again and again.

Imagine a Bow-Bow Cluster of those (n/t) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234179)

Imagine a Bow-Bow Cluster of those (n/t)

No.... This is cloning (1)

durbnpoisn (813086) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234183)

No... This is how you clone things! [durbnpoisn.com]

In related news: I'm not going to be impressed with this "cloning" technology until they invent a machine where, you put an animal inside, and 2 come out.

Re:No.... This is cloning (1)

Orrin Bloquy (898571) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234308)

I'm not going to be impressed until they invent a machine where you put an animal inside and Rebecca Romijn comes out.

Allow me to have a Bob Barker moment here... (5, Insightful)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234190)

I hold nothing but extreme vitriol towards people that breed dogs when there are so many cats and dogs that are out on the streets and in shelters needing good homes. Same goes towards any pet store that sells cats and dogs.

People, please spay or neuter your pets and don't allow your ego to perpetuate the suffering of homeless cats and dogs.

Re:Allow me to have a Bob Barker moment here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234310)

You know, for a lot of people, does not satisfy what they intend to achieve by having a pet.

Many people gravitate towards a specific breed because of its tendencies. Things like: tends to do well with children, tends to be intelligent and trainable, tends to like water.

It's pretty callous to think most people just want any old pet, and picking one out at the pound will fulfill their needs.

Re:Allow me to have a Bob Barker moment here... (1)

Just Some Guy (3352) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234372)

I hold nothing but extreme vitriol towards people that breed dogs

I hold nothing but comtempt for people that don't realize that some of us aren't don't want to experiment to find a housepet that won't freak out and mame our children. Yeah, that cur has pretty eyes, but do you know that he wasn't thrown out for biting kids?

I'm not much for "think of the children!", but given that pets are completely optional, it makes sense to pick one that is statistically most likely to fit in with your lifestyle. AKC breeds are pretty well known; if you buy a Boston Terrier from a reputably breeder, it will probably be a loving, tolerant pet. Random mutts from the shelter may also be loving, wonderful companions, but there's little reason to expect that of them.

Excellent! (0, Redundant)

Quixadhal (45024) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234193)

Finally, an unlimited food source for the populous East!

Why bother cloning them? (1)

Iriel (810009) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234196)

http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=05/06/2 7/1923259&tid=191&tid=14 [slashdot.org]

We can bring them back to life!

We're going to have a canine overpopulation with zombie dogs and more being cloned...(hiding behind nearest available corner)

Re:Why bother cloning them? (1)

arosas (904929) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234363)

oh yes... pet cemetary for real this time.

Department of Redundancy Department (3, Funny)

Lord Crc (151920) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234198)

The research purpose of the research is...

Wait, research has research purpose? When did this happen?

Is that really necessary? (1)

mmell (832646) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234200)

Won't they reproduce on their own, or are they an endangered species there on the Asian continent?

Re:Is that really necessary? (0, Troll)

Arimus (198136) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234342)

Depends on whether the local McKorean has a special on dog bugers and fries...

North Korea already did it (5, Funny)

Just Some Guy (3352) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234217)

Kim Jong-Il memorized the dog genome and used a gene sequencer he personally invented - shrewdly using the alias "Dovichi" to avoid deflecting the glory from his Workers' Paradise to himself.

His stated goal was to create a new golf club to allow every blissful, well-fed citizen to achieve holes-in-one, even on tricky dog legs.

Up next: Kim writes The Iliad and Beowulf in one afternoon, after using his psyonic powers to defeat Canada (in preparation for a crippling attack of their southern neighbor).

word salad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234218)

"The research purpose of the research is ostensibly to produce research animals and not for commercial purposes."

Am I the only one thinking this sentence is incredibly funny?

Let the jokes begin (0, Troll)

Bruha (412869) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234220)

*crickets*

Okay I was sure to see at least one they eat dogs over there joke.

Hell for that matter never saw pigeons and cats also.

Mr Lee's beefsticks were good though!

Nothing like Itaewon at 2am!

Ok, I'm confused on this... (5, Funny)

Jargon Scott (258797) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234226)

"You can't teach an old dog new tricks" was easy to remember, and often true.

So, what is it now? You can now teach your new old dog new tricks? Or, you can only re-teach your new dog's tricks to the old dog? Do the old tricks come pre-installed, and how many new tricks can you stack on top?

Wait, you can't teach your old dog new tricks, but the new dog....

Forget it...

Big deal! (1)

Phidoux (705500) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234255)

In Japan they have cloned a whale!

Cloned dogs for medical purposes? (1)

th3mp!r (901692) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234268)

I personally am against cloning. Aren't there enough dogs roaming around without owners that testing could be done on instead of using tons of money to make the same thing that can be done for free? When my mom had cancer you could hear the dogs that tests were being done on barking and running around upstairs in the Cancer Research Center, but I think cloning them is an unnecessary step.

Re:Cloned dogs for medical purposes? (2, Insightful)

wk633 (442820) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234354)

If you accept animals being used for research, then cloning is a very neccessary step. Sure, it would be cheaper to just let them go at it, but then you don't get genetically identical test subjects.

With clones, you can inuduce cancer in multiple animals, and give half a drug. The non-treated animals are now a perfect control group.

Re:Cloned dogs for medical purposes? (1)

dotdan (902253) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234362)

I think cloning dogs is a stepping stone to cloning humans, and my main guess for human cloning is to increase the availability of spare organs.
However, how do you clone a human and grow organs suitable for a forty-year-old male? On top of that, how can it be done quickly?
Cloning a human, growing them for twenty years, then knocking them out and stealing their organs to cure someone who had a disease twenty five years ago is completely useless.
(Unless the person was a good-looking female.)

Re:Cloned dogs for medical purposes? (3, Interesting)

geekoid (135745) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234386)

For testing to have worth a damn, you need to know the genetic history of the animal. Also, you can create animals with a specific genetic disorders to test meds against.

Magine being able to test a drug were all the test animal were identical.

Snuppy Doggy Dog (1)

mynickwastaken (690966) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234269)

Was a "doggy style" clonning?! I think, using "Missionary" style would be more productive...

LUNCH !!! yummy yummy make mo eat mo ! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234277)

Doggie poo platter maky mo dog eat mo !

Cloning, breeding, who cares (4, Insightful)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234316)

Quoth the article: "Canine cloning runs contrary to the Kennel Club's objective 'To promote in every way the general improvement of dogs'," Phil Buckley, spokesman for the Kennel Club told the BBC News website.

But the KC does things like register particular breeds of dogs which, due to their popularity, have been improperly bred so that they develop a wide variety of health problems. Some breeds are even prone to genetic disorders even if they aren't inbred. So doesn't promoting the breeding of these susceptible dog breeds detract from the lives of those dogs?

And besides that, there are so many dogs out there that are euthanized because nobody can find homes for them. Doesn't intentionally breeding more dogs in such an environment make life worse (as in, dead) for the dogs that get euthanized?

Yes, I think that cloning animals to be pets is a bad idea, but aside from the multitude of failed clones, I don't get how that's any worse than breeding them. And at least the cloning scientists have a goal of improving the state of medicine for humans.

RE: (1)

JesperJ (900341) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234329)

It looks pretty cute'n normal imo. :D

Typical First Born Advantage (1)

Hobbes828 (880721) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234338)

The second cloned dog, named NT-2, died of pneumonia. Does this come as a surpirse to anyone?

Everyone at the lab: "Ooooh Snuppy is soooo cuute!"

Random Scientist 1: "Anybody else notice NT-2 is coughing a lot?"

Everyone else: "What did you sa- Ooooh look at Snuppy play with his ball."

New McDonalds food source... (1)

Cheerio Boy (82178) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234339)

"I'd like one McShitzu please?"

Well... slahsdot editors.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234388)

... have been cloning articles since like... forever!!

Do clones have a soul? (1)

xmorg (718633) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234399)

Assuming there is a God, and assuming it is possible to clone humans, will the cloned human have a soul or just the original?

Will the original and clone have to share 1 sould or will there be separate souls? If the original does bad will the have to go to hell?

As a christian, I have no problems with cloning, as long as the clone will live.(and not be used as spare parts)

Re:Do clones have a soul? (1)

TheSneak (904279) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234413)

I thought Christians believed dogs had no soul to begin with.

uh oh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13234402)

Begun, the clone wars have.

Cryrogenics (1)

daviq (888445) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234404)

When do we clone frozen people like Walt Disney?

w00f! (1)

ettlz (639203) | more than 9 years ago | (#13234407)

Great, backup copies. I've always wanted a redundant array of independent dogs.
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